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Edarbi


Pronunciation: AY-zil-SAR-tan
Generic Name: Azilsartan
Brand Name: Edarbi

Edarbi may cause injury or death to the fetus if taken while you are pregnant. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor right away.


Edarbi is used for:

Treating high blood pressure alone or with other medicines. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Edarbi is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). It works by relaxing blood vessels. This helps to lower blood pressure.

Do NOT use Edarbi if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Edarbi you are in your second or third trimester of pregnancy

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Edarbi:

Some medical conditions may interact with Edarbi. Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you are able to become pregnant if you have a history of angioedema (swelling of the hands, face, lips, eyes, throat, or tongue; difficulty swallowing or breathing; or hoarseness), including angioedema caused by treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (eg, lisinopril) if you have a history of heart problems (eg, heart failure), blood vessel problems, blood flow problems, liver problems, or kidney problems (eg, renal artery stenosis) if you have a history of a stroke or a recent heart attack if you are dehydrated or have low blood volume if you have electrolyte problems (eg, high blood potassium levels, low blood sodium levels), vomiting or diarrhea, or are on a low-salt (sodium) diet if you have diabetes, especially if you are also taking aliskiren if you are scheduled to have major surgery if you take other medicines for high blood pressure or heart problems

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Edarbi. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because the risk of low blood pressure may be increased Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril) because the risk of kidney problems and high blood potassium levels may be increased Aliskiren, potassium-sparing diuretics (eg, spironolactone, triamterene), or potassium supplements because the risk of high blood potassium levels may be increased Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen, indomethacin, celecoxib) because they may decrease Edarbi's effectiveness Lithium because the risk of its side effects may be increased by Edarbi

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Edarbi may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Edarbi:

Use Edarbi as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Edarbi. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Take Edarbi by mouth with or without food. Taking Edarbi at the same time each day will help you remember to take it. Take Edarbi on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Continue to take Edarbi even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of Edarbi, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Edarbi.

Important safety information: Edarbi may cause dizziness. This effect may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Edarbi with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Edarbi may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting; alcohol, hot weather, exercise, or fever may increase these effects. To prevent them, sit up or stand slowly, especially in the morning. Sit or lie down at the first sign of any of these effects. Dehydration, excessive sweating, vomiting, or diarrhea may increase the risk of low blood pressure. Contact your health care provider at once if any of these occur. Check with your doctor before you use a salt substitute or a product that has potassium in it. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Edarbi before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Patients who take medicine for high blood pressure often feel tired or run down for a few weeks after starting treatment. Be sure to take your medicine even if you may not feel "normal." Tell your doctor if you develop any new symptoms. If you have high blood pressure, do not use nonprescription products that contain stimulants. These products may include diet pills or cold medicines. Contact your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Lab tests, including blood pressure, blood electrolyte levels, and heart or kidney function, may be performed while you use Edarbi. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Edarbi with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Edarbi should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Edarbi may cause birth defects or fetal death if you take it while you are pregnant. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor right away. It is not known if Edarbi is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Edarbi. Possible side effects of Edarbi:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; dizziness.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing or swallowing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, throat, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain; fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat; muscle pain or cramps; symptoms of low blood pressure (eg, fainting, severe dizziness, lightheadedness).

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Edarbi side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Edarbi:

Store Edarbi at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store Edarbi in its original container. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Edarbi out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Edarbi, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Edarbi is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Edarbi. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Edarbi resources Edarbi Side Effects (in more detail) Edarbi Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Edarbi Drug Interactions Edarbi Support Group 0 Reviews for Edarbi - Add your own review/rating Edarbi Prescribing Information (FDA) Edarbi Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Edarbi Consumer Overview Compare Edarbi with other medications High Blood Pressure
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Infasurf


Generic Name: calfactant (kal FAK tant)
Brand Names: Infasurf

What is Infasurf (calfactant)?

Calfactant is a lung surface acting agent, or "surfactant." It helps the lungs function normally. Calfactant is similar to the natural fluid in the lungs that helps maintain effective breathing.

Calfactant is used to treat or prevent respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in a premature baby whose lungs have not fully developed.

Calfactant may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Infasurf (calfactant)?

Your baby will receive this medication in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or similar hospital setting.

Calfactant is given directly into the baby's lungs through a breathing tube that is also connected to a ventilator (a machine that moves air in and out of the lungs to help your baby breathe easier and get enough oxygen).

Calfactant is similar to the natural fluid in the lungs that helps maintain effective breathing.

Your baby will remain under constant supervision during treatment with calfactant. What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving Infasurf (calfactant)? To best participate in the care of your baby while he or she is in the NICU, carefully follow all instructions provided by your baby's caregivers. How is calfactant given?

Calfactant is given directly into the baby's lungs through a breathing tube. Your baby will receive this medication in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or similar hospital setting.

The breathing tube is connected to a ventilator (a machine that moves air in and out of the lungs to help your baby breathe easier and get enough oxygen).

Calfactant is given as soon as possible after the baby's birth, usually within 30 minutes.

Calfactant is usually given every 12 hours for up to 3 doses.

Your baby's breathing, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs will be watched closely during treatment with calfactant. What happens if a dose is missed?

Since calfactant is given as needed by a healthcare professional, it is not likely that your baby will miss a dose.

What happens if an overdose is given?

Since calfactant is given in a controlled medical setting by a healthcare professional, an overdose is not likely to occur. However, an overdose of calfactant is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.

What should be avoided after receiving Infasurf (calfactant)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions in feeding, medications, or activity after your baby has been treated with calfactant.

Infasurf (calfactant) side effects Calfactant causes few side effects. There is a possibility that the baby will have breathing difficulties during the calfactant treatment, and these problems may require further treatment by health care professionals. Your baby will remain under constant supervision during treatment with calfactant.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Infasurf (calfactant)?

Your baby's caregivers will manage and monitor all medications given to your baby during treatment in the NICU. A drug interaction between calfactant and other medications is not expected to occur.

Do not give any medications to your baby that have not been prescribed by the baby's doctor. This includes vitamins, minerals, or herbal products. More Infasurf resources Infasurf Side Effects (in more detail) Infasurf Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Infasurf Support Group 0 Reviews for Infasurf - Add your own review/rating Infasurf Prescribing Information (FDA) Calfactant Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Calfactant Compare Infasurf with other medications Respiratory Distress Syndrome Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about calfactant.

See also: Infasurf side effects (in more detail)


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calfactant


Generic Name: calfactant (kal FAK tant)
Brand Names: Infasurf

What is calfactant?

Calfactant is a lung surface acting agent, or "surfactant." It helps the lungs function normally. Calfactant is similar to the natural fluid in the lungs that helps maintain effective breathing.

Calfactant is used to treat or prevent respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in a premature baby whose lungs have not fully developed.

Calfactant may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about calfactant?

Your baby will receive this medication in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or similar hospital setting.

Calfactant is given directly into the baby's lungs through a breathing tube that is also connected to a ventilator (a machine that moves air in and out of the lungs to help your baby breathe easier and get enough oxygen).

Calfactant is similar to the natural fluid in the lungs that helps maintain effective breathing.

Your baby will remain under constant supervision during treatment with calfactant. What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving calfactant? To best participate in the care of your baby while he or she is in the NICU, carefully follow all instructions provided by your baby's caregivers. How is calfactant given?

Calfactant is given directly into the baby's lungs through a breathing tube. Your baby will receive this medication in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or similar hospital setting.

The breathing tube is connected to a ventilator (a machine that moves air in and out of the lungs to help your baby breathe easier and get enough oxygen).

Calfactant is given as soon as possible after the baby's birth, usually within 30 minutes.

Calfactant is usually given every 12 hours for up to 3 doses.

Your baby's breathing, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs will be watched closely during treatment with calfactant. What happens if a dose is missed?

Since calfactant is given as needed by a healthcare professional, it is not likely that your baby will miss a dose.

What happens if an overdose is given?

Since calfactant is given in a controlled medical setting by a healthcare professional, an overdose is not likely to occur. However, an overdose of calfactant is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.

What should be avoided after receiving calfactant?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions in feeding, medications, or activity after your baby has been treated with calfactant.

Calfactant side effects Calfactant causes few side effects. There is a possibility that the baby will have breathing difficulties during the calfactant treatment, and these problems may require further treatment by health care professionals. Your baby will remain under constant supervision during treatment with calfactant.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Calfactant Dosing Information

Usual Pediatric Dose for Respiratory Distress Syndrome:

>72 hours of life: Safety and efficacy have not been established.

What other drugs will affect calfactant?

Your baby's caregivers will manage and monitor all medications given to your baby during treatment in the NICU. A drug interaction between calfactant and other medications is not expected to occur.

Do not give any medications to your baby that have not been prescribed by the baby's doctor. This includes vitamins, minerals, or herbal products. More calfactant resources Calfactant Side Effects (in more detail) Calfactant Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Calfactant Support Group 0 Reviews for Calfactant - Add your own review/rating Calfactant Calfactant Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Infasurf Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare calfactant with other medications Respiratory Distress Syndrome Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about calfactant.

See also: calfactant side effects (in more detail)


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Synthetic ovulation stimulants


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Synthetic ovulation stimulants are drugs that stimulate ovulation or release of ovum from the ovaries.

The drug in this category has a similar structure to estrogen. It binds to the estrogen receptors so the brain thinks there is a low level of estrogen in the body. Therefore estrogen cannot provide accurate negative feedback to the hypothalamus and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is released. GnRH activates the pituitary gland to release follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). FSH and LH secretion stimulates growth of ovarian follicles and subsequent release of the egg.

Synthetic ovulation stimulants are used in treating infertility in anovulatory women.

See also

Medical conditions associated with synthetic ovulation stimulants:

Female Infertility Lactation Suppression Oligospermia Ovulation Induction Drug List: Clomid Serophene
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Exterol 5% w / w Ear Drops, Solution


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

EXTEROL™ 5% w/w EAR DROPS, SOLUTION

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Urea Hydrogen Peroxide 5.0% w/w.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Ear drops, solution.

Clear, straw-coloured, viscous ear drops.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

As an aid in the removal of hardened ear wax.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

For adults, children and the elderly: Instil up to 5 drops into the ear. Retain drops in ear for several minutes by keeping the head tilted and then wipe away any surplus. Repeat once or twice daily for at least 3 to 4 days, or as required.

4.3 Contraindications

Do not use if the eardrum is known or suspected to be damaged, in cases of dizziness, or if there is any other ear disorder (such as pain, discharge, inflammation, infection or tinnitus). Do not use after ill-advised attempts to dislodge wax using fingernails, cotton buds or similar implements, as such mechanical efforts can cause the ear's delicate inner lining to become damaged, inflamed or infected, whereupon the use of ear drops can be painful. For similar reasons, it is inadvisable to use Exterol within 2 to 3 days of syringing. Do not use where there is a history of ear problems, unless under close medical supervision. Do not use if sensitive to any of the ingredients.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Keep Exterol away from the eyes. For external use only. Replace cap after use, and return bottle to carton.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Exterol should not be used at the same time as anything else in the ear.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

No known side-effects.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

None known.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Due to the release of oxygen, patients may experience a mild, temporary effervescence in the ear. Stop usage if irritation or pain occurs. Instillation of ear drops can aggravate the painful symptoms of excessive ear wax, including some loss of hearing, dizziness and tinnitus. Very rarely, unpleasant taste has been reported. If patients encounter any of these problems, or if their symptoms persist or worsen, they should discontinue treatment and consult a doctor.

4.9 Overdose

No adverse effects.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

After insertion of the drops into the ear, the urea hydrogen peroxide complex liberates oxygen which acts to break up the hardened wax. The hydrogen peroxide component is also an antiseptic, especially in sites with relative anaerobiosis. The glycerol assists in softening the wax, so that it may more easily be removed from the ear, either with or without syringing. The urea acts as a mild keratolytic, helping to reduce the keratin-load in the wax debris, thereby assisting penetration of the other components.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Exterol is intended only for the treatment of impacted wax in the external auditory canal. The ingredients of the formulation are therefore readily available for intimate contact with the affected area, as the drops are instilled into the ear and retained therein for several minutes by tilting the head.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

No special information.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

8-Hydroxyquinoline; Glycerol.

6.2 Incompatibilities

None known.

6.3 Shelf Life

24 months. Discard 4 weeks after first opening.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Store upright. Do not store above 25°C. Replace cap after use.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

8 ml easy squeeze plastic dropper bottle with screw cap. This is supplied as an original pack (OP).

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

Not applicable.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Dermal Laboratories

Tatmore Place, Gosmore

Hitchin, Herts SG4 7QR, UK.

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

00173/0037.

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

28 January 2007.

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

July 2010.


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Centrine



Dosage Form: FOR ANIMAL USE ONLY
Centrine®
AMINOPENTAMIDE
HYDROGEN SULFATE
Veterinary Injection and Tablets
Centrine Description

Centrine (aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate) is a potent antispasmodic agent. As a cholinergic blocking agent for smooth muscle, its action is similar to atropine.

ACTION

Centrine effectively reduces the tone and amplitude of colonic contractions to a greater degree and for a more extended period than does atropine.

Centrine effects a reduction in gastric secretion, a decrease in gastric acidity and a marked decrease in gastric motility.

The mydriatic and salivary effects of Centrine are less than those produced by atropine at similar dosage, permitting the control of vomiting and diarrhea with less distress to the animal due to dryness of the mouth and blurred vision.

INDICATIONS

Centrine is indicated in the treatment of acute abdominal visceral spasm, pylorospasm or hypertrophic gastritis and associated nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea.

Contraindications

Centrine should not be used in animals with glaucoma because of the occurrence of mydriasis.

Warning

FOR USE IN DOGS AND CATS ONLY.

Precautions

Dryness of the mouth is the most commonly reported side effect. Blurring of vision may occur and dryness of the eyes may occur if larger (greater than therapeutic) doses are used. Centrine should be used cautiously, if at all, in pyloric obstruction because of its action in delaying gastric emptying. These effects frequently decrease with continued administration of the drug. Disturbances in urination are relatively infrequent. They vary from slightly hesitancy in initiating urination to complete inability to urinate; the latter is an indication for discontinuing the drug. After a day or two, it may be resumed at a lower dosage level.

DOSAGE

Centrine (aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate) may be administered by subcutaneous or intramuscular injection or by oral tablets according to the following schedule. If the desired effect is not obtained, the dosage may be gradually increased up to a maximum of 5 times the doses listed. When the condition has been brought under control by parenteral medication, treatment can be continued, if desired, with 0.2 mg scored tablets according to the dosage schedule.

Weight of Animal Amount to be Administered Every 8 to 12 hours Dosage Injectable Volume Oral Tablets 10 lbs or less 0.1 mg 0.2 mL 1/2 Tab 11 lbs to 20 lbs 0.2 mg 0.4 mL 1 Tab 21 lbs to 50 lbs 0.3 mg 0.6 mL 1 1/2 Tabs 51 lbs to 100 lbs 0.4 mg 0.8 mL 2 Tabs Over 100 lbs 0.5 mg 1.0 mL 2 1/2 Tabs CAUTION

Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian.

How is Centrine Supplied

0.5 mg/mL Centrine (aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate) VETERINARY INJECTION, 10 mL vials.

0.2 mg Centrine (aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate) VETERINARY TABLETS, bottles of 100.

NDC 0856-2401-10 – 0.5 mg/mL – 10 mL vials.
NDC 0856-2400-60 – 0.2 mg – bottles of 100.

Store at controlled room temperature 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F).

Fort Dodge Animal Health
Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501 USA

92686
Rev. September 1996
4260F

NADA 43-079, Approved by FDA
NADA 43-078, Approved by FDA

PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL - 10 mL Vial Label

NDC 0856-2401-10

Centrine®
AMINOPENTAMIDE
HYDROGEN SULFATE
Veterinary Injection

FORT DODGE®

contains 0.5 mg/mL
aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate

10 mL

CAUTION: Federal law restricts this
drug to use by or on the order of a
licensed veterinarian.

NADA 43-079, Approved by FDA


Centrine 
aminopentamide sulfate  injection, solution Product Information Product Type PRESCRIPTION ANIMAL DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 0856-2401 Route of Administration SUBCUTANEOUS, INTRAMUSCULAR DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength aminopentamide sulfate (aminopentamide) aminopentamide sulfate 0.5 mg  in 1 mL Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength No Inactive Ingredients Found Product Characteristics Color      Score      Shape Size Flavor Imprint Code Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 0856-2401-10 10 mL In 1 BOTTLE None
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date NADA NADA043079 09/05/1970
Labeler - FDAH, Division of Wyeth (149957656) Revised: 07/2010FDAH, Division of Wyeth

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vitamin A


Generic Name: vitamin A (VYE ta min A)
Brand Names: A-25, A/Fish Oil, Aquasol A

What is vitamin A?

Vitamin A is found in foods such as liver, milk, cheese, eggs, carrots, squash, dark green and yellow vegetables, and fruits such as cantaloupe or apricots. Vitamin A is important for the eyes and skin, and for normal growth.

Vitamin A is used to treat vitamin A deficiency.

Vitamin A may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about vitamin A? Never take more than the recommended dose of vitamin A. Avoid taking more than one vitamin product at the same time unless your doctor tells you to. Taking similar vitamin products together can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects. An overdose of vitamin A can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Do not take vitamin A without medical advice if you are pregnant. Vitamin A can cause birth defects if taken in large doses.

Before taking vitamin A, tell your doctor about all other medicines you use.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking vitamin A?

Before using vitamin A, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use vitamin A if you have certain medical conditions.

Do not take vitamin A without medical advice if you are pregnant. Although some vitamin A is needed for the normal development of a baby, vitamin A can cause birth defects if taken in large doses. You may need to use a prenatal vitamin specially formulated for pregnant women. Ask your doctor about taking vitamin A if you are breast-feeding a baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are nursing. How should I take vitamin A?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Swallow the tablet or capsule whole.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Never take more than the recommended dose of vitamin A. Avoid taking more than one vitamin product at the same time unless your doctor tells you to. Taking similar vitamin products together can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Your healthcare provider may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from vitamin A. The recommended dietary allowance of vitamin A increases with age. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions. You may also consult the National Academy of Sciences "Dietary Reference Intake" or the U.S. Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Reference Intake" (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances" or RDA) listings for more information.

Store at room temperature away from light, moisture, and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of vitamin A can cause serious or life-threatening side effects.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, vision changes, hair loss, peeling skin, cracked skin around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, dizziness, drowsiness, tired feeling, bone or joint pain, severe headache, pain behind your eyes, severe stomach pain, dark urine, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

What should I avoid while taking vitamin A? Avoid taking orlistat (alli, Xenical) or mineral oil while you are taking vitamin A. Vitamin A side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, and you may have none at all.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect vitamin A? Do not take vitamin A without your doctor's advice if you are also taking:

birth control pills;

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

bexarotene (Targretin);

cholestyramine (Questran, Prevalite);

acitretin (Soriatane);

tretinoin (Vesanoid); or

isotretinoin (Accutane, Sotret, Claravis, Amnesteem).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with vitamin A. Tell your healthcare provider about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More vitamin A resources Vitamin A Drug Interactions Vitamin A Support Group 0 Reviews for Vitamin A - Add your own review/rating Aquasol A Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitamin A Monograph (AHFS DI) vitamin a Oral, Intramuscular Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare vitamin A with other medications Vitamin A Deficiency Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about vitamin A.
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Granisol


Generic Name: granisetron (oral) (gra NIS e tron)
Brand Names: Granisol, Kytril

What is granisetron?

Granisetron blocks the actions of chemicals in the body that can trigger nausea and vomiting.

Granisetron is used to prevent nausea and vomiting that may be caused by medicine to treat cancer (chemotherapy or radiation).

Granisetron may be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about granisetron? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to granisetron or to similar medicines such as dolasetron (Anzemet), ondansetron (Zofran), or palonosetron (Aloxi).

Before taking granisetron, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, a heart rhythm disorder, an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood), or a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome.

Granisetron is usually started up to 1 hour before chemotherapy. Tell your doctor if you forget to take the medication within the specified amount of time before your procedure.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking granisetron? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to granisetron, to similar medicines such as dolasetron (Anzemet), ondansetron (Zofran), or palonosetron (Aloxi).

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take granisetron:

liver disease;

a heart rhythm disorder;

an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood); or

a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether granisetron passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take granisetron?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Granisetron is usually started up to 1 hour before chemotherapy. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Measure the liquid form of granisetron with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Store granisetron at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Tell your doctor if you forget to take your dose within 1 hour before chemotherapy. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have received too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include headache.

What should I avoid while taking granisetron?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Granisetron side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fast or pounding heartbeats;

fever, body aches, flu symptoms; or

easy bruising or bleeding; unusual weakness.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache;

stomach pain or upset, loss of appetite;

diarrhea or constipation;

dizziness; or

sleep problems (insomnia);

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect granisetron?

There may be other drugs that can interact with granisetron. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Granisol resources Granisol Side Effects (in more detail) Granisol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Granisol Drug Interactions Granisol Support Group 0 Reviews for Granisol - Add your own review/rating Granisol Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Granisol Prescribing Information (FDA) Granisetron MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Granisetron Prescribing Information (FDA) Granisetron Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Kytril Prescribing Information (FDA) Kytril Consumer Overview Sancuso Prescribing Information (FDA) Sancuso Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Sancuso Consumer Overview Sancuso MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Granisol with other medications Nausea/Vomiting, Chemotherapy Induced Nausea/Vomiting, Postoperative Nausea/Vomiting, Radiation Induced Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about granisetron.

See also: Granisol side effects (in more detail)


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palonosetron


Generic Name: palonosetron (PAL oh NOE se tron)
Brand Names: Aloxi

What is palonosetron?

Palonosetron blocks the actions of chemicals in the body that can trigger nausea and vomiting.

Palonosetron is used to prevent nausea and vomiting that may be caused by medicine to treat cancer (chemotherapy).

Palonosetron may be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about palonosetron? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to palonosetron or to similar medicines such as dolasetron (Anzemet), granisetron (Kytril), or ondansetron (Zofran).

Tell your doctor if you forget to take your dose within 1 hour before chemotherapy. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking palonosetron? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to palonosetron or to similar medicines such as dolasetron (Anzemet), granisetron (Kytril), or ondansetron (Zofran). FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether palonosetron passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take palonosetron?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Palonosetron is usually taken 1 hour before chemotherapy. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Store palonosetron at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Palonosetron dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Tell your doctor if you forget to take your dose within 1 hour before chemotherapy. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have received too much of this medicine.

An overdose of palonosetron is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while taking palonosetron?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Palonosetron side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache;

constipation; or

tired feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Palonosetron Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Nausea/Vomiting -- Chemotherapy Induced:

Parenteral: 0.25 mg IV as a single dose 30 minutes before the start of chemotherapy.
Oral: 0.5 mg orally administered approximately 1 hour prior to the start of chemotherapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Nausea/Vomiting -- Postoperative:

0.075 mg IV as a single dose immediately before induction of anesthesia.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Nausea/Vomiting -- Chemotherapy Induced:

The dosing information for children and adolescents for prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting is based on clinical trials:
Kadota (2007): A randomized trial of 60 pediatric patients greater than 2 years of age [12 patients (1 month to 2 years) treated in an open-label fashion] showed 3 mcg/kg (maximum dose: 0.25 mg) and 10 mcg/kg (maximum dose: 0.75 mg) were well-tolerated and effective (no emesis, no rescue first 0 to 24 hours).
Sepulveda-Vildosola (2008): A randomized comparison of palonosetron (0.25 mg single dose 30 minutes before chemotherapy) and ondansetron (8 mg/m2 every 8 hours beginning 30 minutes before chemotherapy) in children 2 to 15 years, evaluated 100 chemotherapy courses in each arm and showed a statistically significant reduction in emetic events on days 2 to 3 in the palonosetron group and clinically significant reduction in emetic events on days 4 to 7 (up to 6 emetic events in the ondansetron group versus none with palonosetron).

What other drugs will affect palonosetron?

There may be other drugs that can interact with palonosetron. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More palonosetron resources Palonosetron Side Effects (in more detail)Palonosetron DosagePalonosetron Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingPalonosetron Drug InteractionsPalonosetron Support Group0 Reviews for Palonosetron - Add your own review/rating palonosetron Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Palonosetron MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Aloxi Monograph (AHFS DI) Aloxi Prescribing Information (FDA) Aloxi Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Aloxi Consumer Overview Compare palonosetron with other medications Nausea/Vomiting, Chemotherapy InducedNausea/Vomiting, Postoperative Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about palonosetron.

See also: palonosetron side effects (in more detail)


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Nabilone 1mg Capsules


Nabilone 1 mg Capsules

(nabilone)

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If you experience any side effect and this becomes serious, tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Nabilone is and what it is used for 2. Before you take Nabilone Capsules 3. How to take Nabilone Capsules 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Nabilone Capsules 6. Further information What Nabilone Is And What It Is Used For

Nabilone is a medicine that helps to reduce nausea and vomiting caused by many anticancer medicines.

Nabilone is often used when other medicines have not helped your nausea or vomiting.

Nabilone is a man-made chemical known as a cannabinoid. It is not made from the Cannabis plant but it is similar to some marijuana extracts and can cause similar effects.

Before You Take Nabilone Capsules Do not take Nabilone If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to any of the other ingredients of Nabilone Capsules (these are listed in section 6, "Further Information"). If your nausea / vomiting is not due to anticancer treatment. If you are under 18 years. Nabilone is not meant for children. Take special care with Nabilone

It is best if you take Nabilone Capsules in hospital, as you may experience side effects.

Tell your doctor before you start treatment if you have any of the following problems or if you develop any of these during treatment:

Any liver problems. High blood pressure or any other heart problem. Any mental illness, for example depression or schizophrenia. Taking other medicines

Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription.

In particular, tell your doctor if you are taking any sleeping pills, pain killers or tranquillisers.

Taking Nabilone with alcohol

Do not drink alcohol while you are taking Nabilone.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Tell your doctor before you start treatment

If you are pregnant, if you think that you are pregnant, or if you intend to become pregnant. If you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed.

Your doctor will then decide if you can take this medicine.

Driving and using machines

Nabilone Capsules may cause side effects such as sleepiness, confusion, hallucinations, a feeling of dizziness or spinning, poor muscle co-ordination, problems with your sight and problems with concentration. These side effects may occur up to 3 days after taking Nabilone. This may affect your ability to drive and operate machinery. Do not drive or operate machinery if you experience any of these side effects.

How To Take Nabilone Capsules

Always take Nabilone exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure how to take it. Your doctor will usually start you on the lowest possible dose.

It is best if you take Nabilone Capsules in hospital, especially the first time that you take Nabilone. This is because you may experience side effects.

The hospital doctor or nurse may give you your first dose the night before you start chemotherapy and the second dose one to three hours before it begins.

Swallow the capsules with water.

Dose The usual dose is 1 or 2 capsules twice a day. You should never take more than 2 capsules three times a day. You can take Nabilone while you are having chemotherapy treatment and for up to 2 days after your last dose of chemotherapy.

The dosing recommendations for elderly patients are the same as for other adults.

If you take more Nabilone than you should

If you ever take too many capsules, tell your doctor or get someone to take you to the nearest hospital casualty department immediately together with your medicine to show to the doctor.

If you forget to take Nabilone

If you miss a dose, wait until it is time for the next dose, and then continue as before.

Do not take a double dose to make up for a forgotten dose.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, Nabilone can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Side effects that you may experience are: Feeling sleepy, relaxed, or "high". A few patients have had hallucinations, felt confused, depressed, anxious or had other changes in their mood or mental state. A feeling of dizziness or spinning, especially when you stand up. Poor muscle co-ordination. Dry mouth, problems with your sight or concentration, difficulty sleeping, or headaches. Shaking, a faster heart beat than normal, low blood pressure, losing your appetite and stomach pains.

Any changes in your mood, such as feeling depressed, relaxed or "high", may last for 2 or 3 days after you stop taking Nabilone. You may find that you get used to these feelings.

If you have any of these side effects, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How To Store Nabilone Capsules Keep Nabilone Capsules out of the reach and sight of children. Do not use Nabilone after the expiry date which is stated on the bottle and carton after "EXP". The expiry date refers to the last day of that month. Keep the container tightly closed. Store your capsules at room temperature (15-25°C) in a dry place. If your doctor tells you to stop taking the capsules, please take them back to the pharmacist. Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Only keep the capsules if your doctor tells you to. Further Information What Nabilone contains

Active substance: Nabilone. Each capsule contains 1 mg of nabilone.
Other ingredients: Povidone, starch, gelatin and the colourants E132, E172 and E171.

What Nabilone looks like and contents of the pack Nabilone capsules are blue and white and have CL 3101 printed on them. Each bottle or blister pack of Nabilone contains 20 capsules. Marketing Authorisation Holder Meda Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Skyway House Parsonage Road Takeley Bishop's Stortford CM22 6PU UK Manufacturer Dales Pharmaceuticals Limited Snaygill Industrial Estate Keighley Road Skipton North Yorkshire BD23 2RW UK

For any information about this medicine, please contact the Marketing Authorisation Holder.

This leaflet was last approved in July 2009.

F687


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Liposic


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Liposic®, eye gel

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Each 1g of gel contains 2mg of carbomer

For excipients see 6.1

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Eye gel; white, turbid, highly viscous, dripable

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Symptomatic treatment of dry eye syndrome

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Therapy of dry eye conditions requires an individual dosage regimen.

According to the severity and intensity of the symptoms, instill one drop into the conjunctival sac 3

Generally, an ophthalmologist should be consulted when treating keratoconjunctivitis sicca, which normally turns out to be long-term or permanent therapy.

An appropriate drop size is obtained when the tube is held in a vertical position above the eye during instillation.

4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to any component of this product

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Contact lenses should be removed prior to administration, and may be inserted again 30 minutes after Liposic has been instilled. Concomitant ocular medication should be administered 15 minutes prior to instillation of Liposic (see 4.5).

No specific studies with Liposic have been performed in children.

If the symptoms of the dry eye continue or worsen, treatment should be stopped and an ophthalmologist should be consulted.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

None known

Please note:

Liposic may prolong the contact-time of topically applied drugs in ophthalmology. Concomitant ocular medication should be administered 15 minutes prior to instillation of Liposic.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

Clinical data regarding the safety of Liposic in human pregnancy or lactation are not available. Preclinical data predict that the risk of Liposic use in human pregnancy or lactation is very low. But due to the lack of clinical data the use of Liposic during pregnancy or lactation can not be recommended.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Even when used as indicated, this medicinal product may impair visual acuity for about five minutes due to the formation of streaks after gel application, and patients should exercise caution when driving vehicles or operating machinery.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Ocular irritation may occur in rare cases due to the preservative contained. Intolerance reactions to one of the ingredients may be seen in isolated cases. Observed undesirable effects include burning, reddening of the eyes, sticky eyelids, palpebral giant papillary conjunctivitis, corneal stipples, episcleritis, blurred vision, itching, discomfort

4.9 Overdose

Any ocular overdosage or oral intake which might occur is of no clinical relevance. However, care should be taken to administer small drops to the eye to avoid sticky eyelids.

5. Pharmacological Properties

ATC code S01XA20

5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Liposic eye gel is based on a high molecular weight hydrophilic polymer. Its pH and osmolality are similar to those of the normal tear film. Due to its physical properties, the eye gel binds water and forms a translucent lubricating and wetting film on the surface of the eye. The gel structure is destroyed by the salts contained in the lacrimal fluid and releases moisture. A study in 54 patients with keratoconjunctivitis sicca found that Liposic therapy prolonged tear break-up time from a mean of 5.3 seconds to 11.2 seconds after 6 weeks. Schirmer I-test values were increased from a mean of 4.8 mm to 10.7 mm after 6 weeks.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

No controlled animal nor human pharmacokinetic studies with this product are available. However, absorption or accumulation in eye tissues can presumably be excluded due to the high molecular weight of carbomer. Clinical studies performed with an essentially similar product have shown that ocular residence time can be assumed to be approximately up to 90 minutes.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Preclinical data reveal no special hazard for humans based on studies of repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenic potential, reproductive toxicity and pharmacological safety.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Cetrimide, sorbitol, medium-chain triglycerides, sodium hydroxide (for pH adjustment), purified water

6.2 Incompatibilities

None known so far.

6.3 Shelf Life

3 years

28 days after opening of the container

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Do not store above 25?C

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Tubes of 5 g eye gel. Packs with one or three tubes of 5 g eye gel.

Tubes of 10 g eye gel. Packs with one or three tubes of 10 g eye gel.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

No special requirements

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Dr. Gerhard Mann

Chem.-Pharm. Fabrik GmbH

Brunsbuetteler Damm 165-173

13581 Berlin (Germany)

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 13757/0001

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

21 March 2000

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

26 October 2001

11. Legal Category

P


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Flumadine


Generic Name: rimantadine (ri MAN ta deen)
Brand Names: Flumadine

What is Flumadine (rimantadine)?

Rimantadine is an antiviral medication. It blocks the actions of viruses in your body.

Rimantadine is used to treat and prevent influenza A (a viral infection) in adults. It is also used to prevent influenza A in children.

There may be some flu seasons during which rimantadine is not recommended because certain flu strains may be resistant to this drug.

Rimantadine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Flumadine (rimantadine)? Do not use this medicine if you are allergic to rimantadine or a similar medicine called amantadine (Symmetrel).

Before taking rimantadine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have a seizure disorder, kidney disease, or liver disease.

Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Do not use FluMist nasal influenza "live vaccine" while you are being treated with rimantadine and for at least 48 hours after you stop taking rimantadine. The nasal vaccine may not be as effective if you receive it while you are taking rimantadine. Before taking rimantadine, tell your doctor if you have received a nasal flu vaccine within the past 14 days.

Avoid coming into close contact with someone who has a weak immune system, such as a person who is taking steroids, being treated for cancer, or has a bone marrow disorder or an illness such as HIV or AIDS. If you have a type of influenza that is resistant to rimantadine, your body may actually shed that virus and a person with a weak immune system could easily become ill from being near you.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Flumadine (rimantadine)? Do not use this medicine if you are allergic to rimantadine or a similar medicine called amantadine (Symmetrel).

Before taking rimantadine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

kidney disease; or liver disease.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether rimantadine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Flumadine (rimantadine)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

If you are taking rimantadine to treat influenza A, take it within 48 hours of when you notice your first flu symptoms.

Take this medication with a full glass of water.

Measure the liquid form of rimantadine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Store rimantadine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include agitation, confusion, hallucinations, or uneven heart rate.

What should I avoid while taking Flumadine (rimantadine)? Do not use FluMist nasal influenza "live vaccine" while you are being treated with rimantadine and for at least 48 hours after you stop taking rimantadine. The nasal vaccine may not be as effective if you receive it while you are taking rimantadine. Before taking rimantadine, tell your doctor if you have received a nasal flu vaccine within the past 14 days.

Avoid coming into close contact with someone who has a weak immune system, such as a person who is taking steroids, being treated for cancer, or has a bone marrow disorder or an illness such as HIV or AIDS. If you have a type of influenza that is resistant to rimantadine, your body may actually shed that virus and a person with a weak immune system could easily become ill from being near you.

Flumadine (rimantadine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using rimantadine and call your doctor at once if you have a seizure (black-out or convulsions).

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, stomach pain;

dry mouth;

sleep problems (insomnia);

dizziness;

headache; or

anxiety, trouble concentrating.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Flumadine (rimantadine)?

Before taking rimantadine, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

cimetidine (Tagamet);

aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol); or

nasal flu vaccine (FluMist).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with rimantadine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Flumadine resources Flumadine Side Effects (in more detail) Flumadine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Flumadine Drug Interactions Flumadine Support Group 0 Reviews for Flumadine - Add your own review/rating Flumadine Prescribing Information (FDA) Flumadine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Flumadine Monograph (AHFS DI) Flumadine Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Rimantadine Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Flumadine with other medications Influenza A Influenza Prophylaxis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about rimantadine.

See also: Flumadine side effects (in more detail)


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Totect


Generic Name: dexrazoxane (dex ray ZOX ane)
Brand Names: Totect, Zinecard

What is dexrazoxane?

Dexrazoxane is used to protect the heart and other tissues from harmful side effects caused by certain cancer medications.

The Zinecard brand of dexrazoxane is used in women who are receiving doxorubicin for metastatic breast cancer.

The Totect brand of dexrazoxane is used in men or women to treat a condition called extravasation (es-TRA-va-ZAY-shun). Extravasation happens when an injected medicine escapes from the blood vessels and circulates into tissues in the body. Serious tissue damage can occur when extravasation happens during injection of certain cancer medications.

Dexrazoxane may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about dexrazoxane? You should not receive Totect if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. If possible before you receive Totect, tell your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether Zinecard will harm an unborn baby. You should not receive this medication if your chemotherapy does not include doxorubicin or a similar medication such as daunorubicin (Cerubidine), epirubicin (Ellence), idarubicin (Idamycin), or mitoxantrone (Novantrone).

Before you receive dexrazoxane, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease, or if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Tell your doctor at once if you have serious side effects such as fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, easy bruising or bleeding, or sores your mouth or throat.

In an emergency situation it may not be possible before you are treated to tell your caregivers about your health conditions or if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for you afterward knows that you have received Totect.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving dexrazoxane? You should not receive Zinecard if your chemotherapy does not include doxorubicin or a similar medication such as:

daunorubicin (Cerubidine);

epirubicin (Ellence);

idarubicin (Idamycin); or

mitoxantrone (Novantrone);

If possible before you receive dexrazoxane, tell your doctor if you have:

liver disease;

kidney disease; or

if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Zinecard is rated as FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Zinecard will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Totect is rated as FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use Totect if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. If possible before you receive Zinecard, tell your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether dexrazoxane passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using dexrazoxane. In an emergency situation, it may not be possible before you are treated with Totect to tell your caregivers if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for your pregnancy or your baby knows you have received this medication. How is dexrazoxane given?

Dexrazoxane is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

Totect is usually started within 6 hours after extravasation, and continued once daily for 3 days.

Zinecard is usually started 30 minutes before you receive your doxorubicin injection.

Dexrazoxane can add to the bone marrow lowering effects of chemotherapy. This can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get sick from being around others who are ill.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood cells and kidney function will need to be tested often. Do not miss any follow up visits to your doctor for blood or urine tests. What happens if I miss a dose?

Since dexrazoxane is given by a healthcare professional as part of your chemotherapy treatment, you are not likely to miss a dose.

Call your doctor if you miss a chemotherapy appointment.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid after receiving dexrazoxane?

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Tell your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection.

Dexrazoxane side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores in your mouth and throat;

easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin; or

bruising, swelling, warmth, redness, oozing, or bleeding of any surgical incision.

Less serious side effects may include:

swelling in your hands or feet;

hair loss;

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite;

sore throat, trouble swallowing;

dizziness, tired feeling; or

pain, swelling, or redness where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect dexrazoxane?

Some cancer medications may be less effective if they are used with dexrazoxane. Tell your doctor if your chemotherapy medications include:

fluorouracil (5-FU, Adrucil);

cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with dexrazoxane. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Totect resources Totect Side Effects (in more detail)Totect Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingTotect Support Group0 Reviews for Totect - Add your own review/rating Totect Consumer Overview Totect Prescribing Information (FDA) Totect Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Dexrazoxane Prescribing Information (FDA) Dexrazoxane Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Dexrazoxane MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Zinecard Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Totect with other medications Extravasation Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about dexrazoxane.

See also: Totect side effects (in more detail)


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Zinecard


Generic Name: dexrazoxane (dex ray ZOX ane)
Brand Names: Totect, Zinecard

What is Zinecard (dexrazoxane)?

Dexrazoxane is used to protect the heart and other tissues from harmful side effects caused by certain cancer medications.

The Zinecard brand of dexrazoxane is used in women who are receiving doxorubicin for metastatic breast cancer.

The Totect brand of dexrazoxane is used in men or women to treat a condition called extravasation (es-TRA-va-ZAY-shun). Extravasation happens when an injected medicine escapes from the blood vessels and circulates into tissues in the body. Serious tissue damage can occur when extravasation happens during injection of certain cancer medications.

Dexrazoxane may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Zinecard (dexrazoxane)? You should not receive Totect if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. If possible before you receive Totect, tell your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether Zinecard will harm an unborn baby. You should not receive this medication if your chemotherapy does not include doxorubicin or a similar medication such as daunorubicin (Cerubidine), epirubicin (Ellence), idarubicin (Idamycin), or mitoxantrone (Novantrone).

Before you receive dexrazoxane, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease, or if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Tell your doctor at once if you have serious side effects such as fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, easy bruising or bleeding, or sores your mouth or throat.

In an emergency situation it may not be possible before you are treated to tell your caregivers about your health conditions or if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for you afterward knows that you have received Totect.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving Zinecard (dexrazoxane)? You should not receive Zinecard if your chemotherapy does not include doxorubicin or a similar medication such as:

daunorubicin (Cerubidine);

epirubicin (Ellence);

idarubicin (Idamycin); or

mitoxantrone (Novantrone);

If possible before you receive dexrazoxane, tell your doctor if you have:

liver disease;

kidney disease; or

if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Zinecard is rated as FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Zinecard will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Totect is rated as FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use Totect if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. If possible before you receive Zinecard, tell your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether dexrazoxane passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using dexrazoxane. In an emergency situation, it may not be possible before you are treated with Totect to tell your caregivers if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for your pregnancy or your baby knows you have received this medication. How is dexrazoxane given?

Dexrazoxane is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

Totect is usually started within 6 hours after extravasation, and continued once daily for 3 days.

Zinecard is usually started 30 minutes before you receive your doxorubicin injection.

Dexrazoxane can add to the bone marrow lowering effects of chemotherapy. This can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get sick from being around others who are ill.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood cells and kidney function will need to be tested often. Do not miss any follow up visits to your doctor for blood or urine tests. What happens if I miss a dose?

Since dexrazoxane is given by a healthcare professional as part of your chemotherapy treatment, you are not likely to miss a dose.

Call your doctor if you miss a chemotherapy appointment.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid after receiving Zinecard (dexrazoxane)?

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Tell your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection.

Zinecard (dexrazoxane) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores in your mouth and throat;

easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin; or

bruising, swelling, warmth, redness, oozing, or bleeding of any surgical incision.

Less serious side effects may include:

swelling in your hands or feet;

hair loss;

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite;

sore throat, trouble swallowing;

dizziness, tired feeling; or

pain, swelling, or redness where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Zinecard (dexrazoxane)?

Some cancer medications may be less effective if they are used with dexrazoxane. Tell your doctor if your chemotherapy medications include:

fluorouracil (5-FU, Adrucil);

cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with dexrazoxane. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Zinecard resources Zinecard Side Effects (in more detail) Zinecard Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Zinecard Support Group 0 Reviews for Zinecard - Add your own review/rating Zinecard Prescribing Information (FDA) Zinecard Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Zinecard Monograph (AHFS DI) Zinecard MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Dexrazoxane Prescribing Information (FDA) Dexrazoxane Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Totect Prescribing Information (FDA) Totect Consumer Overview Compare Zinecard with other medications Cardiomyopathy Prophylaxis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about dexrazoxane.

See also: Zinecard side effects (in more detail)


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antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent Injection


an-tee-VEN-in (kroe-TAL-i-dee) pol-ee-VAY-lent

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Antivenin Polyvalent

Available Dosage Forms:

Kit

Therapeutic Class: Antivenom

Uses For antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent

Pit viper antivenin belongs to a group of medicines known as immunizing agents. It is used to treat the bites of certain poisonous snakes called pit vipers (crotalids), which are native to Central, North, and South America. Pit vipers include rattlesnakes, such as the Eastern and the Western diamond rattlesnakes; copperheads and cottonmouth moccasins, including those of Korea and Japan; the fer-de-lance and similar species; the tropical rattler (Cascabel) and similar species; the Cantil; and the bushmaster of Central and South America.

Pit viper antivenin is to be used only by or under the supervision of a doctor.

Before Using antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Studies show that children tolerate pit viper antivenin better than do adults. However, children usually have more severe reactions to snakebite poisoning because of the greater amount of poison per body weight. Therefore, children may need larger doses of pit viper antivenin than do adults.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is no specific information comparing use of pit viper antivenin in the elderly with use in other age groups, antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than it does in younger adults.

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Proper Use of antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent Dosing

The dose of antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

Make certain your health care professional knows if you are on any special diet, such as a low-sodium or low-sugar diet.

antivenin (crotalidae) polyvalent Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Difficulty in breathing or swallowing hives itching, especially of feet or hands reddening of skin, especially around ears swelling of eyes, face, or inside of nose unusual tiredness or weakness (sudden and severe)

For up to 24 days after you have received pit viper antivenin, you may develop symptoms of a side effect called serum sickness. The severity of the symptoms and the length of the sickness depend on the amount of pit viper antivenin you were given and how long the treatment lasted. During the 24 days after treatment with pit viper antivenin, check with your doctor if you notice any of the following side effects:

Fever joint pain rash and itching swollen lymph glands

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.


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anidulafungin


Generic Name: anidulafungin (a nid yoo luh FUN jin)
Brand Names: Eraxis

What is anidulafungin?

Anidulafungin is an antifungal antibiotic that fights infections caused by fungus.

Anidulafungin treats candida (yeast) infections in the blood, or in the stomach or esophagus.

Anidulafungin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about anidulafungin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to anidulafungin, caspofungin (Cancidas), micafungin (Mycamine), or similar antifungal medicines.

Before using anidulafungin, tell your doctor if you have liver disease.

There may be other drugs that can interact with anidulafungin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Use this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Anidulafungin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before using anidulafungin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to anidulafungin, caspofungin (Cancidas), micafungin (Mycamine), or similar antifungal medicines.

To make sure you can safely use anidulafungin, tell your doctor if you have liver disease.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether anidulafungin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether anidulafungin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is anidulafungin given?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Anidulafungin is injected into a vein through an IV. You may be shown how to use an IV at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles, IV tubing, and other items used to inject the medicine.

Anidulafungin is a powder medicine that must be mixed with a liquid (diluent) before using it. If you are using the injections at home, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medicine.

Use a disposable needle only once. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

Use this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Anidulafungin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Store unmixed medicine in the refrigerator, do not freeze. After mixing anidulafungin with a diluent, store in the refrigerator and use it within 1 hour. Do not freeze. What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while using anidulafungin?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Anidulafungin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using anidulafungin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

bronchospasm (wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing);

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores in your mouth and throat;

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling).

Less serious side effects may include:

hot flashes;

diarrhea or constipation;

nausea, vomiting; or

pain, swelling, or irritation where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Anidulafungin Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis:

Initial dose: 100 mg IV on Day 1
Maintenance dose: 50 mg IV once a day thereafter
Duration: Treatment should be given for a minimum of 14 days and for at least 7 days following resolution of symptoms. Treatment duration should be based on the patient's clinical response. If the patient is infected with HIV, suppressive antifungal therapy may be considered after a course of treatment to minimize the risk of relapse.

Usual Adult Dose for Candidemia:

Candidemia and other Candida infections (intraabdominal abscess and peritonitis):
Initial dose: 200 mg IV on Day 1
Maintenance dose: 100 mg IV once a day thereafter
Duration: Duration of treatment should be based on the patient's clinical response. In general, antifungal therapy should continue for at least 14 days after the last positive culture.

What other drugs will affect anidulafungin?

There may be other drugs that can interact with anidulafungin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More anidulafungin resources Anidulafungin Side Effects (in more detail) Anidulafungin Dosage Anidulafungin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Anidulafungin Drug Interactions Anidulafungin Support Group 0 Reviews for Anidulafungin - Add your own review/rating anidulafungin Intravenous Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Anidulafungin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Anidulafungin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Anidulafungin Monograph (AHFS DI) Eraxis Prescribing Information (FDA) Eraxis Consumer Overview Compare anidulafungin with other medications Candida Infections, Systemic Esophageal Candidiasis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about anidulafungin.

See also: anidulafungin side effects (in more detail)


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Cardura


Generic Name: doxazosin (dox AY zo sin)
Brand Names: Cardura, Cardura XL

What is doxazosin?

Doxazosin is in a group of drugs called alpha-adrenergic (AL-fa ad-ren-ER-jik) blockers. Doxazosin relaxes your veins and arteries so that blood can more easily pass through them. It also relaxes the muscles in the prostate and bladder neck, making it easier to urinate.

Doxazosin is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), or to improve urination in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate).

Doxazosin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about doxazosin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to doxazosin or similar medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), prazosin (Minipress), silodosin (Rapaflo), tamsulosin (Flomax), or terazosin (Hytrin). Doxazosin may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it or when you start taking it again. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated during exercise and in hot weather. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. If you stop taking doxazosin for any reason, call your doctor before you start taking it again. You may need a dose adjustment.

Doxazosin can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using doxazosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially other blood pressure medications including diuretics (water pills).

What should I discuss with my doctor before taking doxazosin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to doxazosin or similar medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), prazosin (Minipress), silodosin (Rapaflo), tamsulosin (Flomax), or terazosin (Hytrin).

If you have liver disease or a history of prostate cancer, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take doxazosin.

Doxazosin can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using doxazosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether doxazosin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether doxazosin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take doxazosin?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Doxazosin lowers blood pressure and may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it, or when you start taking it again. Call your doctor if you have severe dizziness or feel like you might pass out.

You may feel very dizzy when you first wake up. Be careful when standing or sitting up from a lying position.

If you stop taking doxazosin for any reason, call your doctor before you start taking it again. You may need a dose adjustment.

Your blood pressure or prostate will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Some things can cause your blood pressure to get too low. This includes vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, heart disease, dialysis, a low-salt diet, or taking diuretics (water pills). Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

If you miss your doses for several days in a row, contact your doctor before restarting the medication. You may need a lower dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme dizziness or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking doxazosin? Doxazosin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

To prevent dizziness, avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated during exercise and in hot weather.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of doxazosin. Doxazosin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

feeling like you might pass out;

fast or pounding heartbeats, fluttering in your chest;

trouble breathing;

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or

penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild dizziness;

tired feeling, drowsiness;

headache;

nausea; or

runny nose.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect doxazosin?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

sildenafil (Viagra, Revatio)

tadalafil (Cialis);

vardenafil (Levitra); or

other blood pressure medications, including diuretics (water pills).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with doxazosin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Cardura resources Cardura Side Effects (in more detail) Cardura Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Cardura Drug Interactions Cardura Support Group 3 Reviews for Cardura - Add your own review/rating Cardura Monograph (AHFS DI) Cardura Prescribing Information (FDA) Cardura Consumer Overview Cardura Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Cardura MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Doxazosin Prescribing Information (FDA) Cardura XL Prescribing Information (FDA) Cardura XL Extended-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Cardura with other medications Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia High Blood Pressure Raynaud's Syndrome Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about doxazosin.

See also: Cardura side effects (in more detail)


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Minims Lidocaine & Fluorescein


Minims*

Lidocaine and Fluorescein

4% w/v Lidocaine hydrochloride and 0.25% w/v Fluorescein Sodium

About your eye drops

The name of this medicine is Minims Lidocaine & Fluorescein. Each Minims unit contains a solution of 4% w/v Lidocaine hydrochloride with 0.25% w/v fluorescein sodium.

One of the active ingredients in this medicine is lidocaine hydrochloride. This is the new name for lignocaine hydrochloride. The ingredient itself has not changed.

It also contains purified water, povidone and hydrochloric acid. Each Minims unit is a sterile, single-use container which holds approximately 0.5ml of solution. Each carton holds 20 Minims units. Lidocaine is a local anaesthetic which temporarily numbs the surface of the eye. Fluorescein temporarily colours your eyes orange or green and helps your doctor or eye specialist to examine them.

Who makes your eye drops?

Minims Lidocaine and Fluorescein are manufactured by

Laboratoire Chauvin S.A. ZI Ripotier 07200/Aubenas France

The Marketing Authorisations for Minims Lidocaine and Fluorescein (PL 0033/0073 & PA 118/24/1) are held by

Chauvin Pharmaceuticals Ltd. 106 London Road Kingston-Upon-Thames KT2 6TN England What are your eye drops for?

Your eye drops are used to numb and stain the surface of the eye, for a short time only, to allow the doctor or eye specialist to examine your eye.

Most often, your eye drops are used to allow the pressure inside your eyes to be measured.

Before using your eye drops

You should not use this product if you are allergic to fluorescein or Lidocaine and other similar types of local anaesthetic.

This product should be used with care in eyes that are inflamed (red and painful).

Your eye drops are not intended for long term use. Frequent use of local anaesthetic in the eye over long periods of time may affect your eyesight.

Using your eye drops

The doctor or eye specialist will put the drops in for you. You may be asked to press on the inner corners of your eyes for a minute to stop the solution draining into your nose and throat through the tear ducts.

It is important to protect your eye from dust during the time your eye is numb. Your doctor or eye specialist will make sure that your eye is properly protected.

The Minims unit should be thrown away after a single use, even if some solution remains.

It is unlikely that you will suffer an overdose from Minims Lidocaine & Fluorescein, but if you do suddenly feel unwell after receiving the drops, tell your doctor or eye specialist.

Following administration of Minims Lidocaine & Fluorescein you may experience very rare side effects which includes redness and irriatation of the eye, swelling around the eye, rarely difficulty in breathing and symptoms of shock and itchy skin rash with raised red blotches.

After using your eye drops

Tell your doctor or eye specialist if you suffer from any unwanted effects after using Minims Lidocaine & Fluorescein, that are not mentioned in this leaflet.

Storing your eye drops

The expiry date is printed on each Minims unit overwrap and printed on the carton label. Do not use it after this date.

Your eye drops should be stored below 25°C and in original container to protect from light. Do not allow to freeze.

This leaflet applies only to Minims Lidocaine & Fluorescein, but does not contain all the

If you have any questions or are not sure about anything, ask a doctor, eye specialist or pharmacist.

Date of (Partial) Revision of Text:

August 2005.

* Trade Mark

Chauvin Pharmaceuticals Ltd. 106 London Road Kingston-Upon-Thames KT2 6TN England Tel:020 8781 2900 Fax:020 8781 2901

Art. 76441 0504128/4


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phenylephrine and promethazine


Generic Name: phenylephrine and promethazine (fen ill EFF rin and pro MEH thah zeen)
Brand names: Phenergan VC, Promethazine VC Plain, Promethazine VC

What is phenylephrine and promethazine?

Phenylephrine is a decongestant. It works by constricting (shrinking) blood vessels (veins and arteries) in the sinuses and nose to decrease congestion.

Promethazine is an antihistamine. It blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Phenylephrine and promethazine is used to treat symptoms such as itching, runny nose; sneezing; and congestion due to allergies or the common cold.

Phenylephrine and promethazine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about phenylephrine and promethazine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylephrine and promethazine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking phenylephrine and promethazine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking phenylephrine and promethazine?

Do not take phenylephrine and promethazine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), or selegiline (Eldepryl) in the last 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking phenylephrine and promethazine, tell your doctor if you have

epilepsy or a seizure disorder;

been diagnosed with sleep apnea (periods of not breathing during sleep);

thyroid problems;

diabetes;

glaucoma;

an ulcer or an obstruction in the stomach;

bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an enlarged prostate;

high blood pressure, irregular heartbeats, or heart disease;

kidney problems; or liver problems.

You may not be able to take phenylephrine and promethazine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Phenylephrine and promethazine is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether phenylephrine and promethazine will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take phenylephrine and promethazine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether phenylephrine and promethazine passes into breast milk. Do not take phenylephrine and promethazine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from phenylephrine and promethazine. Your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of this medication. How should I take phenylephrine and promethazine?

Take phenylephrine and promethazine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand the directions on your prescription bottle, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain the instructions to you.

Phenylephrine and promethazine can be taken with or without food.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid form of phenylephrine and promethazine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Store phenylephrine and promethazine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Phenylephrine and promethazine dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a phenylephrine and promethazine overdose include severe drowsiness, dizziness, headache, seizures, dry mouth, large pupils, flushing, nausea, vomiting, difficulty breathing, and unconsciousness.

What should I avoid while taking phenylephrine and promethazine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylephrine and promethazine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking phenylephrine and promethazine. Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight. Phenylephrine and promethazine may increase the sensitivity of the skin to sunlight. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when exposure to the sun is unavoidable.

Do not take other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, diet, pain, fever, or sleep medicines while taking phenylephrine and promethazine without first talking to your doctor or pharmacist. Other medications may also contain phenylephrine, promethazine or other similar drugs, and you may accidentally take too much, which could be harmful.

Phenylephrine and promethazine side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking phenylephrine and promethazine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or

uncontrollable movements of the eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take phenylephrine and promethazine and talk to your doctor if you experience

dizziness, drowsiness, sleepiness, or confusion;

restlessness or irritability;

blurred vision or a dry mouth;

nausea or vomiting; or

increased skin sensitivity to sunlight.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Phenylephrine and promethazine Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Allergic Rhinitis:

5 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Maximum dose: 30 mL/day.

Usual Adult Dose for Cold Symptoms:

5 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Maximum dose: 30 mL/day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Allergic Rhinitis:

2 to 6 years: 1.25 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Maximum dose: 7.5 mL/day.
6 to 12 years: 2.5 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Maximum dose: 15 mL/day.
> 12 years: 5 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Maximum dose: 30 mL/day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cold Symptoms:

2 to 6 years: 1.25 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Maximum dose: 7.5 mL/day.
6 to 12 years: 2.5 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Maximum dose: 15 mL/day.
> 12 years: 5 mL orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Maximum dose: 30 mL/day.

What other drugs will affect phenylephrine and promethazine?

Do not take phenylephrine and promethazine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), or selegiline (Eldepryl) in the last 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Phenylephrine and promethazine may increase the effects of other drugs that cause drowsiness, including antidepressants, alcohol, sedatives (used to treat insomnia), pain relievers, anxiety medicines, and muscle relaxants. Tell your doctor about all medicines that you are taking, and do not take any medicine unless your doctor approves.

Do not take other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, diet, pain, fever, or sleep medicines while taking phenylephrine and promethazine without first talking to your doctor or pharmacist. Other medications may also contain phenylephrine, promethazine or other similar drugs, and you may accidentally take too much, which could be harmful.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with phenylephrine and promethazine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More phenylephrine and promethazine resources Phenylephrine and promethazine Side Effects (in more detail) Phenylephrine and promethazine Dosage Phenylephrine and promethazine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Phenylephrine and promethazine Drug Interactions Phenylephrine and promethazine Support Group 0 Reviews for Phenylephrine and promethazine - Add your own review/rating Compare phenylephrine and promethazine with other medications Cold Symptoms Hay Fever Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has more information about phenylephrine and promethazine written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: phenylephrine and promethazine side effects (in more detail)


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Trelstar LA Mixject


Generic Name: triptorelin (TRIP toe REL in)
Brand Names: Trelstar Depot, Trelstar Depot Mixject, Trelstar LA, Trelstar LA Mixject

What is Trelstar LA Mixject (triptorelin)?

Triptorelin is a man-made form of a hormone that regulates many processes in the body. Triptorelin overstimulates the body's own production of certain hormones, which causes that production to shut down temporarily.

Triptorelin is used to treat the symptoms of prostate cancer. Triptorelin treats only the symptoms of prostate cancer and does not treat the cancer itself. Use any other medications your doctor has prescribed to best treat your condition.

Triptorelin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Trelstar LA Mixject (triptorelin)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to triptorelin or similar drugs such as leuprolide (Lupron, Viadur, Eligard) or goserelin (Zoladex).

Before using triptorelin, tell your doctor if you have any type of cancer that has spread to your spine, a bladder obstruction or problems with urination, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, a history of stroke or heart attack, or if you smoke.

After your injection, your prostate cancer symptoms may get worse for a short time because triptorelin raises your testosterone levels. These side effects should get better within 3 or 4 weeks. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse while using triptorelin. Some of the side effects of triptorelin are symptoms of prostate cancer that may occur because the medicine raises your testosterone levels. Call your doctor at once if you have pain or burning when you urinate, blood in your urine, bone pain, numbness, tingling, muscle weakness, or loss of movement in any part of your body. Although triptorelin is not for use by women, this medication can cause birth defects and should not be used by a woman who is pregnant or who may become pregnant. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Trelstar LA Mixject (triptorelin)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to triptorelin or similar drugs such as leuprolide (Lupron, Viadur, Eligard) or goserelin (Zoladex).

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a triptorelin dose adjustment or special tests:

any type of cancer that has spread to your spine;

a bladder obstruction or problems with urination;

diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, recent weight gain, high cholesterol (especially in men);

heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol;

a history of heart attack or stroke; or

if you smoke.

FDA pregnancy category X. Although triptorelin is not for use by women, this medication can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. Triptorelin should not be used by a woman who is pregnant or who may become pregnant. It is not known whether triptorelin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Although triptorelin is not for use by women, this medication should not be used while breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Trelstar LA Mixject (triptorelin)?

Triptorelin is injected into a muscle. You may be shown how to use injections at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

This medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

This medication comes with a vial (bottle) of powder medicine and a prefilled syringe of sterile water. The powder must be mixed with the sterile water before using the medicine. If you are using the injections at home, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medication. Prepare your dose in a syringe only when you are ready to give yourself an injection. Do not save the mixture for later use. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Triptorelin is usually given once every 4, 12, or 24 weeks. Your dose schedule will depend on the strength of triptorelin you are using. Follow your doctor's dosing instructions very carefully.

After your injection, your prostate cancer symptoms may get worse for a short time because triptorelin raises your testosterone levels. These side effects should get better within 3 or 4 weeks. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse while using triptorelin.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Each single use vial (bottle) of this medicine is for one use only. Throw away after one use, even if there is still some medicine left in it after injecting your dose.

Store vials and prefilled syringes at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Do not freeze. What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of triptorelin.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while using Trelstar LA Mixject (triptorelin)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Trelstar LA Mixject (triptorelin) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect. Some of these side effects are symptoms of prostate cancer that may occur because the medicine raises your testosterone levels:

painful or difficult urination, burning when you urinate, blood in the urine;

bone pain;

numbness, tingling, or muscle weakness (especially in your legs and feet);

loss of movement in any part of your body;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

sudden numbness or weakness, sudden severe headache, confusion, problems with vision or speech; or

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

hot flashes;

back pain, pain or swelling in your legs;

headache, dizziness, tired feeling;

decreased interest in sex, impotence, trouble having an orgasm;

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, upset stomach;

sleep problems (insomnia);

breast pain or swelling; or

pain where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Trelstar LA Mixject (triptorelin)?

There may be other drugs that can interact with triptorelin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Trelstar LA Mixject resources Trelstar LA Mixject Side Effects (in more detail) Trelstar LA Mixject Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Trelstar LA Mixject Drug Interactions Trelstar LA Mixject Support Group 1 Review for Trelstar LA Mixject - Add your own review/rating Trelstar Depot Prescribing Information (FDA) Trelstar Depot MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Trelstar Depot Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Trelstar LA Prescribing Information (FDA) Triptorelin Pamoate Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Trelstar LA Mixject with other medications Prostate Cancer Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about triptorelin.

See also: Trelstar LA Mixject side effects (in more detail)


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