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Myasthenia Gravis Medications


Definition of Myasthenia Gravis: Myasthenia gravis is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by variable weakness of voluntary muscles, which often improves with rest and worsens with activity. The condition is caused by an abnormal immune response.

Drugs associated with Myasthenia Gravis

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Myasthenia Gravis. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Myasthenia Gravis

Micromedex Care Notes:

Myasthenia Gravis

Medical Encyclopedia:

Myasthenia gravis

Harvard Health Guide:

Symptoms and treatment for Myasthenia Gravis
Drug List: Mestinon Mestinon-Timespan Mytelase Mytelase-Chloride Prostigmin Prostigmin-Bromide Regonol Soliris
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antimyasthenic Oral, Parenteral


Class Name: antimyasthenic (Oral route, Parenteral route)

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Aricept Cognex Exelon Mestinon Mestinon Timespan Mytelase Chloride Prostigmin Bromide Razadyne Razadyne ER Razadyne IR

In Canada

Reminyl

Available Dosage Forms:

Tablet Syrup Tablet, Extended Release Capsule, Extended Release Solution Tablet, Disintegrating Capsule Uses For This Medicine

Antimyasthenics are given by mouth or by injection to treat myasthenia gravis. Neostigmine may also be given by injection as a test for myasthenia gravis. Sometimes neostigmine is given by injection to prevent or treat certain urinary tract or intestinal disorders. In addition, neostigmine or pyridostigmine may be given by injection as an antidote to certain types of muscle relaxants used in surgery.

These medicines are available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using This Medicine Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to medicines in this group or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Although there is no specific information comparing use of antimyasthenics in children with use in other age groups, these medicines are not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than they do in adults.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is not much information comparing use of antimyasthenics in the elderly with use in other age groups, these medicines are not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than they do in younger adults.

Pregnancy

Antimyasthenics have not been reported to cause birth defects; however, muscle weakness has occurred temporarily in some newborn babies whose mothers took antimyasthenics during pregnancy.

Breast Feeding

Antimyasthenics have not been reported to cause problems in nursing babies.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking any of these medicines, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with a medication in this class or change some of the other medicines you take.

Atropine Metoclopramide

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Succinylcholine Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of medicines in this class. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Intestinal blockage or Urinary tract blockage or Urinary tract infection—These medicines may make the condition worse. Proper Use of This Medicine

Your doctor may want you to take this medicine with food or milk to help lessen the chance of side effects. If you have any questions about how you should be taking this medicine, check with your doctor.

Take this medicine only as directed. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of side effects.

If you are taking this medicine for myasthenia gravis:

When you first begin taking this medicine, your doctor may want you to keep a daily record of: the time you take each dose. how long you feel better after taking each dose. how long you feel worse. any side effects that occur.

This is to help your doctor decide whether the dose of this medicine should be increased or decreased and how often the medicine should be taken in order for it to be most effective in your condition.

Dosing

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For ambenonium For oral dosage form (tablets): For myasthenia gravis: Adults and teenagers—At first, the dose is 5 milligrams (mg) three or four times per day. Then, if needed, the dose will be adjusted by your doctor. Children—The dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The total daily dose is usually 300 micrograms (mcg) per kilogram (kg) (136 mcg per pound) of body weight or 10 mg per square meter of body surface area. This dose may be divided into three or four smaller doses. If needed, the total daily dose will be increased to 1.5 mg per kg (0.68 mg per pound) of body weight or 50 mg per square meter of body surface area. This dose may be divided into three or four smaller doses. For neostigmine For oral dosage form (tablets): For myasthenia gravis: Adults and teenagers—At first, the dose is 15 milligrams (mg) every three or four hours. Then, the dose is 150 mg taken over a twenty-four-hour period. Children—The dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The total daily dose is usually 2 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.91 mg per pound) of body weight or 60 mg per square meter of body surface area. This dose may be divided into six to eight smaller doses. For injection dosage form: For myasthenia gravis: Adults and teenagers—The usual dose is 500 micrograms (mcg) injected into a muscle or under the skin. Children—The dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. It is usually 10 to 40 mcg per kg (4.5 to 18.2 mcg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle or under the skin, every two or three hours. For urinary tract or intestinal disorders: Adults and teenagers—The usual dose is 250 to 500 mcg, injected into a muscle or under the skin, as needed. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For pyridostigmine For oral dosage forms (syrup and tablets): For myasthenia gravis: Adults and teenagers—At first, the dose is 30 to 60 milligrams (mg) every three or four hours. Then, the dose is 60 mg to 1.5 grams (usually 600 mg) per day. Children—The dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The total daily dose is usually 7 mg per kilogram (kg) (3.2 mg per pound) of body weight or 200 mg per square meter of body surface area. This dose may be divided into five or six smaller doses. For long-acting oral dosage form (extended-release tablets): For myasthenia gravis: Adults and teenagers—The usual dose is 180 to 540 mg one or two times per day. Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor. For injection dosage form: For myasthenia gravis: Adults and teenagers—The usual dose is 2 mg, injected into a muscle or vein, every two or three hours. Children—The dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. It is usually 50 to 150 micrograms (mcg) per kg (22.7 to 68.1 mcg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every four to six hours. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Keep the syrup form of pyridostigmine from freezing.

Side Effects of This Medicine

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Symptoms of overdose Blurred vision clumsiness or unsteadiness confusion convulsions (seizures) diarrhea (severe) increase in bronchial secretions or watering of mouth (excessive) increasing muscle weakness (especially in the arms, neck, shoulders, and tongue) muscle cramps or twitching nausea or vomiting (severe) shortness of breath, troubled breathing, wheezing, or tightness in chest slow heartbeat slurred speech stomach cramps or pain (severe) unusual irritability, nervousness, restlessness, or fear unusual tiredness or weakness

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Redness, swelling, or pain at place of injection (for pyridostigmine injection only) skin rash (does not apply to ambenonium)

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Diarrhea increased sweating increased watering of mouth nausea or vomiting stomach cramps or pain Less common Frequent urge to urinate increase in bronchial secretions unusually small pupils unusual watering of eyes

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Healthcare (Micromedex) products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

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Norflex


Generic Name: orphenadrine (or FEN a drin)
Brand Names: Norflex

What is Norflex (orphenadrine)?

Orphenadrine is a muscle relaxant. It works by blocking nerve impulses (or pain sensations) that are sent to your brain.

Orphenadrine is used together with rest and physical therapy to treat skeletal muscle conditions such as pain or injury.

Orphenadrine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Norflex (orphenadrine)? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to orphenadrine, or if you have problems with urination, an enlarged prostate, glaucoma, a blockage in your stomach or intestines, trouble swallowing, or myasthenia gravis. Do not crush, chew, or break the extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking or crushing the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Orphenadrine may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Orphenadrine should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Orphenadrine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol, which can increase some of the side effects of orphenadrine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Norflex (orphenadrine)? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to orphenadrine, or if you have:

problems with urination;

enlarged prostate;

glaucoma;

a blockage in your stomach or intestines;

trouble swallowing; or

myasthenia gravis.

Before taking orphenadrine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

heart disease;

a heart rhythm disorder; or

coronary artery disease.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take orphenadrine.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether orphenadrine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Norflex (orphenadrine)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water. Do not crush, chew, or break the extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking or crushing the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Orphenadrine is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include rest, physical therapy, or other pain relief measures. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Orphenadrine may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Orphenadrine should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Store orphenadrine at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of orphenadrine can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include blurred vision, fast heart rate, confusion, weak or shallow breathing, cold or clammy skin, feeling like you might pass out, or seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking Norflex (orphenadrine)? Orphenadrine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol, which can increase some of the side effects of orphenadrine. Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by orphenadrine. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other muscle relaxer. Norflex (orphenadrine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using orphenadrine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeats;

confusion, anxiety, agitation, tremors, hallucinations;

seizure (convulsions); or

urinating less than usual or not at all.

Less serious side effects may include:

dry mouth or throat;

blurred vision, dilated pupils;

headache;

drowsiness, dizziness;

nausea, vomiting, constipation; or

weakness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Norflex (orphenadrine)?

Before taking orphenadrine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop);

bronchodilators such as ipratroprium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);

glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

mepenzolate (Cantil);

bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare); or

irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with orphenadrine. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Norflex resources Norflex Side Effects (in more detail) Norflex Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Norflex Drug Interactions Norflex Support Group 5 Reviews for Norflex - Add your own review/rating Norflex Prescribing Information (FDA) Norflex Monograph (AHFS DI) Norflex Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Norflex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Antiflex Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Norflex with other medications Migraine Muscle Spasm Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about orphenadrine.

See also: Norflex side effects (in more detail)


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Prostigmin


Pronunciation: nee-oh-STIG-meen
Generic Name: Neostigmine
Brand Name: Prostigmin
Prostigmin is used for:

Treating myasthenia gravis. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Prostigmin is a cholinesterase inhibitor. It works by improving the transmission of nerve impulses in muscles so that the muscles are better able to work.

Do NOT use Prostigmin if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Prostigmin you are taking procainamide, a quinine derivative (eg, quinidine), or succinylcholine

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Prostigmin:

Some medical conditions may interact with Prostigmin. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a heart blockage, a slow heartbeat, a blockage of the intestines, or a urinary tract obstruction or infection

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Prostigmin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

General anesthetics (eg, cyclopropane), procainamide, or quinine derivatives (eg, quinidine) because they may decrease the effectiveness of Prostigmin Beta-blockers (eg, propanolol) or succinylcholine because side effects may be increased by Prostigmin

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Prostigmin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Prostigmin:

Use Prostigmin as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Prostigmin may be taken with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. If you miss a dose of Prostigmin, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Prostigmin.

Important safety information: Prostigmin may cause drowsiness, dizziness, blurred vision, or fainting. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how you react to Prostigmin. Using Prostigmin alone, with certain other medicines, or with alcohol may lessen your ability to drive or perform other potentially dangerous tasks. Before you have any medical or dental treatments, emergency care, or surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are using Prostigmin. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Prostigmin during pregnancy. It is unknown if Prostigmin is excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Prostigmin, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Prostigmin:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Abdominal cramps; diarrhea; difficulty speaking; dilation of pupils; dizziness; drowsiness; excess saliva; frequent urination; gas; headache; increased sweating; joint pain; muscle twitching; weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; itching; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); fainting; increased muscle weakness; interrupted breathing; irregular heartbeat; seizures; vision changes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Prostigmin side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include blurred vision; cold sweating; difficulty swallowing; panic; severe anxiety; stomach cramps; vomiting.

Proper storage of Prostigmin:

Store Prostigmin at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C), in a tightly closed container. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Prostigmin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Prostigmin, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Prostigmin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Prostigmin. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Prostigmin resources Prostigmin Side Effects (in more detail) Prostigmin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Prostigmin Drug Interactions Prostigmin Support Group 0 Reviews for Prostigmin - Add your own review/rating Neostigmine Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) neostigmine Injection Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information neostigmine Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Neostigmine Bromide Monograph (AHFS DI) neostigmine Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Prostigmin with other medications Myasthenia Gravis
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Mytelase Chloride


Generic Name: ambenonium (am ben OH nee um)
Brand Names: Mytelase Chloride

What is Mytelase Chloride (ambenonium)?

Ambenonium affects chemicals in the body that are involved in the communication between nerve impulses and muscle movement.

Ambenonium is used to treat the symptoms of myasthenia gravis.

Ambenonium may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Mytelase Chloride (ambenonium)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ambenonium, or if you are using certain medications.

Be sure your doctor knows if you use: mecamylamine, (Inversine), atropine (Atreza, Donnatal, Sal-Tropine, Lomotil, Lomocot, and others), blood pressure medications, or a diuretic (water pill).

Before using ambenonium, tell your doctor if you have asthma, Parkinson's disease, or a bladder or bowel obstruction.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. You may be asked to keep a daily record of when you took each dose and how long the effects lasted. This will help your doctor determine if your dose needs to be adjusted.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking Mytelase Chloride (ambenonium)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ambenonium, or if you are using certain medications. Be sure your doctor knows if you use:

mecamylamine, (Inversine);

atropine (Atreza, Donnatal, Sal-Tropine, Lomotil, Lomocot, and others);

blood pressure medications; or

a diuretic (water pill).

To make sure you can safely take ambenonium, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

asthma;

Parkinson's disease; or

a bladder or bowel obstruction.

It is not known whether ambenonium will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether ambenonium passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using ambenonium. How should I take Mytelase Chloride (ambenonium)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Ambenonium is usually taken every 3 to 4 hours during the day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. You may be asked to keep a daily record of when you took each dose and how long the effects lasted. This will help your doctor determine if your dose needs to be adjusted.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include severe diarrhea, muscle twitching, anxiety, sweating, and cough or breathing problems.

What should I avoid while taking Mytelase Chloride (ambenonium)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Mytelase Chloride (ambenonium) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe diarrhea;

muscle twitching; or

cough with sputum (mucus).

Less serious side effects may include:

sweating or urinating more than usual;

drooling, watery eyes;

warmth or tingly feeling;

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

blurred vision;

anxiety;

dizziness, spinning feeling; or

muscle cramps.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Mytelase Chloride (ambenonium)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

atropine (Atreza, Sal-Tropine), belladonna (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm Scop);

bronchodilators such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);

bladder or urinary medicines such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare);

irritable bowel medicines such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Hyomax), or propantheline (Pro Banthine); or

ulcer medications such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul) or mepenzolate (Cantil).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with ambenonium. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Mytelase Chloride resources Mytelase Chloride Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Mytelase Chloride Drug Interactions Mytelase Chloride Support Group 0 Reviews for Mytelase Chloride - Add your own review/rating Ambenonium MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Mytelase Chloride with other medications Myasthenia Gravis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about ambenonium.
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Pyridostigmine Tablets


Pronunciation: peer-id-oh-STIG-meen
Generic Name: Pyridostigmine
Brand Name: Mestinon
Pyridostigmine is used for:

Treating myasthenia gravis. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Pyridostigmine is a cholinesterase inhibitor. It works by improving nerve impulses in muscles so that the muscles are better able to work.

Do NOT use Pyridostigmine if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Pyridostigmine you are taking quinine or quinidine you have a stomach, intestinal, or urinary blockage

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Pyridostigmine:

Some medical conditions may interact with Pyridostigmine. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have heart problems (eg, heart block, slow heartbeat), a urinary tract infection, asthma, or kidney problems

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Pyridostigmine. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Quinine or quinidine because effectiveness of Pyridostigmine may be decreased Succinylcholine because actions and side effects may be increased by Pyridostigmine

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Pyridostigmine may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Pyridostigmine:

Use Pyridostigmine as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Pyridostigmine may be taken with or without food. Take with food if it upsets your stomach. If you miss a dose of Pyridostigmine, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Pyridostigmine.

Important safety information: Before you have any medical or dental treatments, emergency care, or surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are using Pyridostigmine. Use Pyridostigmine with extreme caution in CHILDREN. Safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant while taking Pyridostigmine, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Pyridostigmine during pregnancy. Pyridostigmine is excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Pyridostigmine, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Pyridostigmine:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. When used in small doses, no COMMON side effects have been reported with this product. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); diarrhea; fainting; increased production of saliva; increased sweating; muscle weakness; nausea; small pupils; stomach cramps; trouble breathing; vision changes; vomiting; weakness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Pyridostigmine side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include diarrhea; fainting; increased production of saliva; increased sweating; muscle weakness; nausea; small pupils; stomach cramps; trouble breathing; vision changes; vomiting; weakness.

Proper storage of Pyridostigmine:

Store Pyridostigmine between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Pyridostigmine out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Pyridostigmine, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Pyridostigmine is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Pyridostigmine. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Pyridostigmine resources Pyridostigmine Side Effects (in more detail) Pyridostigmine Dosage Pyridostigmine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Pyridostigmine Drug Interactions Pyridostigmine Support Group 12 Reviews for Pyridostigmine - Add your own review/rating Compare Pyridostigmine with other medications Dysautonomia Myasthenia Gravis Nerve Agent Pretreatment Reversal of Nondepolarizing Muscle Relaxants
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Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets


Pronunciation: peer-id-oh-STIG-meen
Generic Name: Pyridostigmine
Brand Name: Mestinon
Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets are used for:

Treating myasthenia gravis. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets are a cholinesterase inhibitor. It works by improving nerve impulses in muscles so that the muscles are better able to work.

Do NOT use Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets you are taking quinine or quinidine you have a stomach, intestinal, or urinary blockage

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets:

Some medical conditions may interact with Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have heart problems (eg, heart block, slow heartbeat), a urinary tract infection, asthma, or kidney problems

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Quinine or quinidine because effectiveness of Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets may be decreased Succinylcholine because actions and side effects may be increased by Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets:

Use Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets may be taken with or without food. Take with food if it upsets your stomach. Swallow Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. If you miss a dose of Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets.

Important safety information: Before you have any medical or dental treatments, emergency care, or surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are using Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets. Use Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets with extreme caution in CHILDREN. Safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant while taking Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets during pregnancy. Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets are excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. When used in small doses, no COMMON side effects have been reported with this product. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); diarrhea; fainting; increased production of saliva; increased sweating; muscle weakness; nausea; small pupils; stomach cramps; trouble breathing; vision changes; vomiting; weakness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Mestinon side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include diarrhea; fainting; increased production of saliva; increased sweating; muscle weakness; nausea; small pupils; stomach cramps; trouble breathing; vision changes; vomiting; weakness.

Proper storage of Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets:

Store Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets are to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Mestinon Controlled-Release Tablets. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Mestinon resources Mestinon Side Effects (in more detail) Mestinon Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Mestinon Drug Interactions Mestinon Support Group 6 Reviews for Mestinon - Add your own review/rating Compare Mestinon with other medications Dysautonomia Myasthenia Gravis Nerve Agent Pretreatment Reversal of Nondepolarizing Muscle Relaxants
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Mestinon Timespan


Generic Name: pyridostigmine (py rid o STIG meen)
Brand Names: Mestinon, Mestinon Timespan

What is Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)?

Pyridostigmine affects chemicals in the body that are involved in the communication between nerve impulses and muscle movement.

Pyridostigmine is used to treat the symptoms of myasthenia gravis. It is also used in military personnel who have been exposed to nerve gas.

Pyridostigmine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)? You should not use pyridostigmine if you are allergic to it, or if you have a bladder or bowel obstruction.

Before taking pyridostigmine, tell your doctor if you have asthma, kidney disease, an ulcer or other serious stomach disorder, high blood pressure, heart disease, overactive thyroid, or a history of seizures.

The amount and timing of this medicine is extremely important to the success of your treatment. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions about how much medicine to take and when to take it.

This medication may cause blurred vision or impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. You may be asked to keep a daily record of when you took each dose and how long the effects lasted. This will help your doctor determine if your dose needs to be adjusted.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using pyridostigmine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)? You should not use pyridostigmine if you are allergic to it, or if you have a bladder or bowel obstruction.

To make sure you can safely take pyridostigmine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

asthma;

kidney disease;

an ulcer or other serious stomach disorder;

high blood pressure, heart disease;

overactive thyroid; or

a history of seizures.

It is not known whether pyridostigmine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether pyridostigmine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with food or milk if it upsets your stomach. Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The amount and timing of this medicine is extremely important to the success of your treatment. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions about how much medicine to take and when to take it.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. You may be asked to keep a daily record of when you took each dose and how long the effects lasted. This will help your doctor determine if your dose needs to be adjusted.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using pyridostigmine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep the tablets in their original container, along with the canister of moisture-absorbing preservative that comes with this medicine.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps, sweating, blurred vision, drooling, and weak or shallow breathing.

Worsening muscle weakness, or no change in your myasthenia gravis symptoms, may also be signs of overdose.

What should I avoid while taking Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)? This medication may cause blurred vision or impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of pyridostigmine. Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using pyridostigmine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

extreme muscle weakness, muscle twicthing;

slurred speech, vision problems;

severe vomiting or diarrhea;

cough with mucus;

confusion, anxiety, panic attacks;

seizure (convulsions); or

worsening or no improvement in your symptoms of myasthenia gravis.

Less serious side effects may include:

cold sweat, pale skin;

urinating more than usual;

watery eyes;

mild nausea, vomiting, or upset stomach;

warmth or tingly feeling; or

mild rash or itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

atropine (Atreza, Sal-Tropine);

belladonna (Donnatal, and others);

benztropine (Cogentin);

clidinium (Quarzan);

clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo);

dimenhydrinate (Dramamine);

methscopolamine (Pamine), scopolamine (Transderm Scop);

glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

mepenzolate (Cantil);

bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare);

bronchodilators such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);

cold medicine, allergy medicine, or sleeping pills that contain an antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (Tylenol PM) or doxylamine (Unisom);

heart rhythm medication such as quinidine (Quin-G), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), disopyramide (Norpace), flecaininde (Tambocor), mexiletine (Mexitil), propafenone, (Rythmol), and others;

irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Hyomax), or propantheline (Pro Banthine);

medicine to treat Alzheimer's dementia, such as donepezil (Aricept), rivastigmine (Exelon), or tacrine (Cognex); or

a steroid such as betamethasone (Celestone) or dexamethasone (Cortastat, Dexasone, Solurex, DexPak).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with pyridostigmine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Mestinon Timespan resources Mestinon Timespan Side Effects (in more detail)Mestinon Timespan Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesMestinon Timespan Drug InteractionsMestinon Timespan Support Group1 Review for Mestinon Timespan - Add your own review/rating Pyridostigmine Prescribing Information (FDA) Mestinon MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Mestinon Prescribing Information (FDA) Pyridostigmine Bromide Monograph (AHFS DI) Regonol Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Mestinon Timespan with other medications DysautonomiaMyasthenia GravisNerve Agent PretreatmentReversal of Nondepolarizing Muscle Relaxants Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about pyridostigmine.

See also: Mestinon Timespan side effects (in more detail)


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Pamine Forte


Generic Name: methscopolamine (METH skoe POL a meen)
Brand Names: Pamine, Pamine Forte

What is Pamine Forte (methscopolamine)?

Methscopolamine reduces the secretions of certain organs in the body, such as the stomach.

Methscopolamine is used to reduce stomach acid secretion to help control peptic ulcers.

This medication does not help heal a stomach ulcer.

Methscopolamine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Pamine Forte (methscopolamine)? You should not take this medication if you have glaucoma, urination problems due to a bladder obstruction, myasthenia gravis, a stomach disorder called paralytic ileus, or a blockage in your intestines, or severe ulcerative colitis with toxic megacolon.

Before taking methscopolamine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have ulcerative colitis, kidney or liver disease, a thyroid disorder, high blood pressure or heart disease, a heart rhythm disorder, an enlarged prostate, or if you have had an ileostomy or colostomy.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, you may need blood tests and x-rays or other scans of your stomach or intestines on a regular basis. Your stools may also need to be tested for the presence of blood. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Methscopolamine can cause side effects that may impair your vision, thinking, or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by methscopolamine. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of methscopolamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Methscopolamine can decrease perspiration and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you diarrhea, fast or pounding heartbeats, or if you are urinating less than usual or not at all. Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of methscopolamine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Pamine Forte (methscopolamine)? You should not take this medication if you are allergic to methscopolamine, or if you have:

glaucoma;

if you are unable to urinate due to a bladder obstruction;

myasthenia gravis;

a stomach disorder called paralytic ileus; or

a blockage in your intestines, or severe ulcerative colitis with toxic megacolon.

Before taking methscopolamine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

ulcerative colitis;

kidney disease; liver disease;

a thyroid disorder;

high blood pressure (hypertension);

heart disease, congestive heart failure;

a heart rhythm disorder;

an enlarged prostate and problems with urination; or

if you have had an ileostomy or colostomy.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use methscopolamine.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether methscopolamine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of methscopolamine. How should I take Pamine Forte (methscopolamine)?

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Methscopolamine is usually taken 30 minutes before meals and at bedtime.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, you may need blood tests and x-rays or other scans of your stomach or intestines on a regular basis. Your stools may also need to be tested for the presence of blood. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Store methscopolamine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include muscle weakness or limpness, feeling restless or excited, unusual thoughts or behavior, numbness, warmth or tingling under your skin, or feeling like you might pass out.

What should I avoid while taking Pamine Forte (methscopolamine)? Methscopolamine can cause side effects that may impair your vision, thinking, or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by methscopolamine. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of methscopolamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Methscopolamine can decrease perspiration and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

Pamine Forte (methscopolamine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using methscopolamine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

diarrhea;

fast or pounding heartbeats;

urinating less than usual or not at all.

Less serious side effects may include:

drowsiness;

sleep problems (insomnia);

blurred vision, increased sensitivity to light;

headache, dizziness, confusion;

dry mouth, decreased sense of taste;

nausea, vomiting, bloating, constipation;

impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm;

decreased sweating; or

mild itching or skin rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Pamine Forte (methscopolamine)?

Many drugs can interact with methscopolamine. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), clomipramine (Anafranil), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others;

medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluperazine (Stelazine);

atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop);

bronchodilators such as ipratroprium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);

glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

mepenzolate (Cantil);

bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare); or

irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with methscopolamine. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Pamine Forte resources Pamine Forte Side Effects (in more detail) Pamine Forte Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pamine Forte Drug Interactions Pamine Forte Support Group 3 Reviews for Pamine Forte - Add your own review/rating Pamine Forte MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Methscopolamine Prescribing Information (FDA) Methscopolamine Bromide Monograph (AHFS DI) Pamine Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Pamine Forte with other medications Irritable Bowel Syndrome Peptic Ulcer Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about methscopolamine.

See also: Pamine Forte side effects (in more detail)


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Levofloxacin


Pronunciation: LEE-voe-FLOX-a-sin
Generic Name: Levofloxacin
Brand Name: Levaquin

Levofloxacin is associated with an increased risk of tendon problems. These include pain, swelling, inflammation, and possible breakage of tendons. The risk of tendon problems is greater in patients who are older than 60 years, patients who take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), and in those who have received kidney, heart, or lung transplants. The Achilles tendon in the back of the foot/ankle is most often affected. However, problems may also occur in other tendons (eg, in the shoulder, arm, or hand). Problems may occur while you take Levofloxacin or up to several months after you stop taking it.

Signs of tendon problems may include pain, soreness, redness, or swelling of a tendon or joint; bruising right after an injury in a tendon area; hearing or feeling a snap or pop in a joint or tendon area; or inability to move or bear weight on a joint or tendon area. Tell your doctor right away if you experience any of these symptoms while you take Levofloxacin or within several months after you stop taking it.

Levofloxacin may worsen muscle weakness and breathing problems in patients with myasthenia gravis. Do not take Levofloxacin if you have a history of myasthenia gravis.


Levofloxacin is used for:

Treating infections caused by certain bacteria. It may also be used to prevent or slow anthrax after exposure.

Levofloxacin is a quinolone antibiotic. It works by killing sensitive bacteria.

Do NOT use Levofloxacin if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Levofloxacin or to any other quinolone antibiotic (eg, ciprofloxacin) you have a certain type of irregular heartbeat (QT prolongation, long QT syndrome) or low blood potassium levels you have a history of myasthenia gravis you are taking cisapride or certain antiarrhythmics (eg, amiodarone, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Levofloxacin:

Some medical conditions may interact with Levofloxacin. Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of severe or persistent diarrhea, skin sensitivity to the sun, diabetes, low blood potassium levels, chest pain, angina, heart problems (eg, enlarged heart, heart failure), a heart attack, irregular heartbeat (eg, QT prolongation), or if you have a family member with a history of fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat (eg, QT prolongation) if you have a stomach infection, liver problems, brain or nervous system problems, muscle problems (eg, myasthenia gravis), increased pressure in the brain, Alzheimer disease, brain blood vessel problems, or a history of seizures if you have a history of bone, joint, or tendon problems; rheumatoid arthritis; liver problems; kidney problems or decreased kidney function; or a heart, kidney, or lung transplant if you take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone) or participate in strenuous physical work or exercise

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Levofloxacin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Antiarrhythmics (eg, amiodarone , procainamide, quinidine, sotalol), arsenic, astemizole, cisapride, dofetilide, droperidol, haloperidol, imidazoles (eg, ketoconazole), macrolides (eg, erythromycin), methadone, paliperidone, phenothiazines (eg, chlorpromazine), pimozide, ranolazine, serotonin receptor antagonists (eg, dolasetron), telithromycin, terfenadine, or ziprasidone because the risk of serious heart problems, including irregular heartbeat, may be increased Insulin or oral diabetes medicines (eg, glyburide) because the risk of high or low blood sugar may be increased Corticosteroids (eg, prednisone) because the risk of tendon problems may be increased Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because the risk of bleeding may be increased Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen) or theophylline because the risk of serious side effects, including seizures, may be increased Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (eg, duloxetine) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Levofloxacin

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Levofloxacin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Levofloxacin:

Use Levofloxacin as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Levofloxacin comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Levofloxacin refilled. Drinking extra fluids while you are taking Levofloxacin is recommended. Check with your doctor for instructions. Levofloxacin is usually given as an injection at your doctor's office, hospital, or clinic. If you will be using Levofloxacin at home, a health care provider will teach you how to use it. Be sure you understand how to use Levofloxacin. Follow the procedures you are taught when you use a dose. Contact your health care provider if you have any questions. Do not use Levofloxacin if it contains particles, is cloudy or discolored, or if the vial is cracked or damaged. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Ask your health care provider how to dispose of these materials after use. Follow all local rules for disposal. Levofloxacin works best if it is used at the same time each day. To clear up your infection completely, use Levofloxacin for the full course of treatment. Keep using it even if you feel better in a few days. Do not miss any doses of Levofloxacin. If you miss a dose of Levofloxacin, use it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Levofloxacin.

Important safety information: Levofloxacin may cause dizziness or light-headedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Levofloxacin with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Mild diarrhea is common with antibiotic use. However, a more serious form of diarrhea (pseudomembranous colitis) may rarely occur. This may develop while you use the antibiotic or within several months after you stop using it. Contact your doctor right away if stomach pain or cramps, severe diarrhea, or bloody stools occur. Do not treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Levofloxacin only works against bacteria; it does not treat viral infections (eg, the common cold). Be sure to use Levofloxacin for the full course of treatment. If you do not, the medicine may not clear up your infection completely. The bacteria could also become less sensitive to this or other medicines. This could make the infection harder to treat in the future. Long-term or repeated use of Levofloxacin may cause a second infection. Tell your doctor if signs of a second infection occur. Your medicine may need to be changed to treat this. Tell your doctor right away if you experience pain or swelling of a tendon or weakness or loss of use of a joint area. Rest the area and avoid exercise until further instruction from your doctor. Levofloxacin may cause you to become sunburned more easily. Avoid the sun, sunlamps, or tanning booths until you know how you react to Levofloxacin. Use a sunscreen or wear protective clothing if you must be outside for more than a short time. If you are scheduled to receive a typhoid vaccine while you are using Levofloxacin, talk with your doctor. Levofloxacin may decrease the effectiveness of the vaccine. Diabetes patients - Levofloxacin may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine. Levofloxacin may interfere with certain lab tests. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are using Levofloxacin. Lab tests, including liver and kidney function and complete blood cell counts, may be performed while you use Levofloxacin. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Levofloxacin with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects (eg, tendon problems), especially if they take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone). They may also be more sensitive to other effects (eg, irregular heartbeat, liver problems). Levofloxacin should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially joint and tendon problems. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Levofloxacin while you are pregnant. Levofloxacin is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while using Levofloxacin. Possible side effects of Levofloxacin:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; gas; headache; light-headedness; nausea; stomach pain.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); bloody or tarry stools; chest pain; decreased or painful urination; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, sore throat, or unusual cough; hallucinations; inability to move or bear weight on a joint or tendon area; moderate or severe sunburn; mood or mental changes (eg, new or worsening anxiety, nervousness, agitation, confusion, depression, restlessness, sleeplessness); muscle pain or weakness; new or worsening nightmares; pain, soreness, redness, swelling, weakness, or bruising of a tendon or joint area; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; seizures; severe or persistent diarrhea; severe or persistent dizziness, light-headedness, tiredness, or weakness; severe or persistent stomach pain or cramps; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; suicidal thoughts or actions; symptoms of high or low blood sugar (eg, dizziness; fainting; fast breathing; flushing; increased thirst, hunger, or urination; increased sweating; vision changes); symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, loss of appetite, pale stools, yellowing of the skin or eyes); symptoms of nerve problems (eg, changes in perception of heat or cold; decreased sensation of touch; unusual burning, numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness of the arms, hands, legs, or feet); tremors; unusual bruising or bleeding; vaginal discharge, irritation, or odor; vision changes; wheezing.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Levofloxacin:

Levofloxacin is usually handled and stored by a health care provider. If you are using Levofloxacin at home, store Levofloxacin as directed by your pharmacist or health care provider. Keep Levofloxacin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Levofloxacin, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Levofloxacin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Levofloxacin. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Levofloxacin resources Levofloxacin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Levofloxacin Drug Interactions Levofloxacin Support Group 157 Reviews for Levofloxacin - Add your own review/rating Levofloxacin Prescribing Information (FDA) Levofloxacin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Levofloxacin Monograph (AHFS DI) levofloxacin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Levaquin Prescribing Information (FDA) Levaquin Consumer Overview Compare Levofloxacin with other medications Anthrax Anthrax Prophylaxis Bacterial Infection Bladder Infection Bronchitis Chlamydia Infection Epididymitis, Sexually Transmitted Gonococcal Infection, Disseminated Gonococcal Infection, Uncomplicated Kidney Infections Nongonococcal Urethritis Nosocomial Pneumonia Otitis Media Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Pneumonia Prostatitis Sinusitis Skin Infection Streptococcal Infection Tuberculosis, Active Urinary Tract Infection
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Levaquin Solution


Pronunciation: LEE-voe-FLOX-a-sin
Generic Name: Levofloxacin
Brand Name: Levaquin

Levaquin Solution is associated with an increased risk of tendon problems. These include pain, swelling, inflammation, and possible breakage of tendons. The risk of tendon problems is greater in patients who are older than 60 years, patients who take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), and in those who have received kidney, heart, or lung transplants. The Achilles tendon in the back of the foot/ankle is most often affected. However, problems may also occur in other tendons (eg, in the arm, hand, shoulder). Problems may occur while you take Levaquin Solution or up to several months after you stop taking it.

Signs of tendon problems may include pain, soreness, redness, or swelling of a tendon or joint; bruising right after an injury in a tendon area; hearing or feeling a snap or pop in a joint or tendon area; or inability to move or bear weight on a joint or tendon area. Tell your doctor right away if you experience any of these symptoms while you take Levaquin Solution or within several months after you stop taking it.

Levaquin Solution may worsen muscle weakness and breathing problems in patients with myasthenia gravis. Do not take Levaquin Solution if you have a history of myasthenia gravis.


Levaquin Solution is used for:

Treating infections caused by certain bacteria. It may also be used to prevent or slow anthrax after exposure.

Levaquin Solution is a quinolone antibiotic. It works by killing sensitive bacteria.

Do NOT use Levaquin Solution if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Levaquin Solution or to any other quinolone antibiotic (eg, ciprofloxacin) you have a certain type of irregular heartbeat (QT prolongation, long QT syndrome) or low blood potassium levels you have a history of myasthenia gravis you are taking cisapride or certain antiarrhythmics (eg, amiodarone, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Levaquin Solution:

Some medical conditions may interact with Levaquin Solution. Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of severe or persistent diarrhea, skin sensitivity to the sun, diabetes, low blood potassium levels, chest pain, angina, heart problems (eg, enlarged heart, heart failure), a heart attack, irregular heartbeat (eg, QT prolongation), or if you have a family member with a history of fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat (eg, QT prolongation) if you have a stomach infection, liver problems, brain or nervous system problems, muscle problems (eg, myasthenia gravis), increased pressure in the brain, Alzheimer disease, brain blood vessel problems, or a history of seizures if you have a history of bone, joint, or tendon problems; liver problems; rheumatoid arthritis; a heart, kidney, or lung transplant; or kidney problems or decreased kidney function if you take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone) or participate in strenuous physical work or exercise

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Levaquin Solution. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Antiarrhythmics (eg, amiodarone, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol), arsenic, astemizole, cisapride, dofetilide, droperidol, haloperidol, imidazoles (eg, ketoconazole), macrolides (eg, erythromycin), methadone, paliperidone, phenothiazines (eg, chlorpromazine), pimozide, ranolazine, serotonin receptor antagonists (eg, dolasetron), telithromycin, terfenadine, or ziprasidone because the risk of serious heart problems, including irregular heartbeat, may be increased Insulin or oral diabetes medicines (eg, glyburide) because the risk of high or low blood sugar may be increased Corticosteroids (eg, prednisone) because the risk of tendon problems may be increased Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because the risk of bleeding may be increased Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen) or theophylline because the risk of serious side effects, including seizures, may be increased Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (eg, duloxetine) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Levaquin Solution

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Levaquin Solution may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Levaquin Solution:

Use Levaquin Solution as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Levaquin Solution comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Levaquin Solution refilled. Take Levaquin Solution by mouth on an empty stomach at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating. Use a measuring device marked for medicine dosing. Ask your pharmacist for help if you are unsure of how to measure your dose. Drinking extra fluids while you are taking Levaquin Solution is recommended. Check with your doctor for instructions. Do not take a product that has magnesium or aluminum, calcium, zinc, or iron in it within 2 hours before or 2 hours after you take Levaquin Solution. Examples of these products include antacids, multivitamins, quinapril, and calcium-fortified orange juice. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have a question about whether you should separate Levaquin Solution from a certain food or product. If you also take sucralfate or didanosine, do not take them within 2 hours before or 2 hours after taking Levaquin Solution. Check with your doctor if you have questions. Levaquin Solution works best if it is taken at the same time each day. To clear up your infection completely, take Levaquin Solution for the full course of treatment. Keep taking it even if you feel better in a few days. Do not miss any doses of Levaquin Solution. If you miss a dose of Levaquin Solution, take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Levaquin Solution.

Important safety information: Levaquin Solution may cause dizziness or light-headedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Levaquin Solution with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Mild diarrhea is common with antibiotic use. However, a more serious form of diarrhea (pseudomembranous colitis) may rarely occur. This may develop while you use the antibiotic or within several months after you stop using it. Contact your doctor right away if stomach pain or cramps, severe diarrhea, or bloody stools occur. Do not treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Levaquin Solution only works against bacteria; it does not treat viral infections (eg, the common cold). Be sure to use Levaquin Solution for the full course of treatment. If you do not, the medicine may not clear up your infection completely. The bacteria could also become less sensitive to this or other medicines. This could make the infection harder to treat in the future. Long-term or repeated use of Levaquin Solution may cause a second infection. Tell your doctor if signs of a second infection occur. Your medicine may need to be changed to treat this. Tell your doctor right away if you experience pain or swelling of a tendon or weakness or loss of use of a joint area. Rest the area and avoid exercise until further instruction from your doctor. Levaquin Solution may cause you to become sunburned more easily. Avoid the sun, sunlamps, or tanning booths until you know how you react to Levaquin Solution. Use a sunscreen or wear protective clothing if you must be outside for more than a short time. If you are scheduled to receive a typhoid vaccine while you are taking Levaquin Solution, talk with your doctor. Levaquin Solution may decrease the effectiveness of the vaccine. Diabetes patients - Levaquin Solution may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine. Levaquin Solution may interfere with certain lab tests. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are taking Levaquin Solution. Lab tests, including liver and kidney function and complete blood cell counts, may be performed while you use Levaquin Solution. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Levaquin Solution with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects (eg, tendon problems), especially if they take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone). They may also be more sensitive to other effects (eg, irregular heartbeat, liver problems). Levaquin Solution should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially joint and tendon problems PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Levaquin Solution while you are pregnant. Levaquin Solution is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while using Levaquin Solution. Possible side effects of Levaquin Solution:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; gas; headache; light-headedness; nausea; stomach pain.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); bloody or tarry stools; chest pain; decreased or painful urination; decreased sensation of touch; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, sore throat, or unusual cough; hallucinations; inability to move or bear weight on a joint or tendon area; moderate or severe sunburn; mood or mental changes (eg, agitation, confusion, depression, nervousness, new or worsening anxiety, restlessness, sleeplessness); muscle pain or weakness; new or worsening nightmares; pain, soreness, redness, swelling, weakness, or bruising of a tendon or joint area; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; seizures; severe or persistent diarrhea; severe or persistent dizziness, light-headedness, tiredness, or weakness; severe or persistent stomach pain or cramps; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; suicidal thoughts or actions; symptoms of high or low blood sugar (eg, dizziness; fainting; fast breathing; flushing; increased sweating; increased thirst, hunger, or urination; vision changes); symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, loss of appetite, pale stools, yellowing of the skin or eyes); symptoms of nerve problems (eg, changes in perception of heat or cold; unusual burning, numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness of the arms, hands, legs, or feet); tremors; unusual bruising or bleeding; vaginal discharge, irritation, or odor; vision changes; wheezing.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Levaquin side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Levaquin Solution:

Store Levaquin Solution at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Levaquin Solution out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Levaquin Solution, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Levaquin Solution is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Levaquin Solution. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Levaquin resources Levaquin Side Effects (in more detail) Levaquin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Levaquin Drug Interactions Levaquin Support Group 151 Reviews for Levaquin - Add your own review/rating Compare Levaquin with other medications Anthrax Anthrax Prophylaxis Bacterial Infection Bladder Infection Bronchitis Chlamydia Infection Epididymitis, Sexually Transmitted Gonococcal Infection, Disseminated Gonococcal Infection, Uncomplicated Kidney Infections Nongonococcal Urethritis Nosocomial Pneumonia Otitis Media Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Pneumonia Prostatitis Sinusitis Skin Infection Streptococcal Infection Tuberculosis, Active Urinary Tract Infection
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Floxin


Pronunciation: oh-FLOX-a-sin
Generic Name: Ofloxacin
Brand Name: Floxin

Floxin is associated with an increased risk of tendon problems. These include pain, swelling, inflammation, and possible breakage of tendons. The risk of tendon problems is greater in patients who are older than 60 years, patients who take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), and in those who have received kidney, heart, or lung transplants. The Achilles tendon in the back of the foot/ankle is most often affected. However, problems may also occur in other tendons (eg, in the shoulder, arm, hand). Problems may occur while you take Floxin or up to several months after you stop taking it.

Signs of tendon problems may include pain, soreness, redness, or swelling of a tendon or joint; bruising right after an injury in a tendon area; hearing or feeling a snap or pop in a joint or tendon area; or inability to move or bear weight on a joint or tendon area. Tell your doctor right away if you experience any of these symptoms while you take Floxin or within several months after you stop taking it.

Floxin may worsen muscle weakness and breathing problems in patients with myasthenia gravis. Do not take Floxin if you have a history of myasthenia gravis.


Floxin is used for:

Treating mild to moderate infections caused by certain bacteria.

Floxin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic. It kills sensitive bacteria by stopping the production of essential proteins needed by the bacteria to survive.

Do NOT use Floxin if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Floxin or any other fluoroquinolone antibiotic (eg, ciprofloxacin) you have a history of myasthenia gravis you have abnormal blood electrolyte levels (eg, low potassium or magnesium) or a history of a certain type of irregular heartbeat (eg, QTc interval prolongation) you are taking certain antiarrhythmic medicines (eg, quinidine, procainamide, amiodarone, sotalol) you are taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen) or typhoid oral vaccine

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Floxin:

Some medical conditions may interact with Floxin. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have diabetes, liver problems, or a recent heart attack if you or a family member have heart problems (eg, angina), irregular heartbeat (eg, QT prolongation), fast or slow heartbeat, or low potassium levels if you have Alzheimer disease, hardening in the arteries in the brain, seizures, increased pressure on the brain, or another central nervous system disorder if you have a history of joint or tendon problems; rheumatoid arthritis; kidney problems or decreased kidney function; or a heart, kidney, or lung transplant if your skin is sensitive to sunlight

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Floxin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Antiarrhythmics (eg, amiodarone, disopyramide, dofetilide, quinidine, sotalol), cisapride, diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide), macrolide or ketolide antibiotics (eg, erythromycin, telithromycin), medicines for mental or mood disorders, medicines that may affect your heartbeat, phenothiazines (eg, chlorpromazine), or tricyclic antidepressants (eg, amitriptyline) because the risk of serious side effects, including irregular heartbeat and other heart problems, may be increased. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are unsure if any of your medicines may affect your heartbeat Corticosteroids (eg, prednisone) because the risk of tendon problems may be increased Foscarnet, NSAIDs (eg, ibuprofen), or tramadol because the risk of seizures may be increased Insulin or other medicines for diabetes (eg, glipizide) because the risk of low blood sugar may be increased Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), procainamide, or theophylline because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Floxin Live typhoid vaccine because its effectiveness may be decreased by Floxin Aluminum salts (eg, aluminum hydroxide), iron salts (oral) (eg, ferrous sulfate), or magnesium salts (eg, magnesium hydroxide) because they may decrease Floxin's effectiveness. Take ofloxacin 2 hours before or 2 hours after these medicines to offset this effect

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Floxin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Floxin:

Use Floxin as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Floxin by mouth with or without food. Take Floxin with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Drink several glasses of water daily, unless otherwise instructed by your doctor. Do not drink milk or eat dairy products, or take antacids, didanosine, sucralfate, or vitamins within 2 hours before or after taking Floxin. Floxin works best if it is taken at the same time each day. To clear up your infection completely, take Floxin for the full course of treatment. Keep taking it even if you feel better in a few days. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Floxin.

Important safety information: Floxin may cause drowsiness, dizziness, or light-headedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Floxin with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Floxin may cause you to become sunburned more easily. Avoid the sun, sunlamps, or tanning booths until you know how you react to Floxin. Use a sunscreen or wear protective clothing if you must be outside for more than a short time. Diabetes patients - Floxin may affect your blood sugar when taken along with insulin or other medicines for diabetes. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Floxin before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Floxin only works against bacteria; it does not treat viral infections (eg, the common cold). Long-term or repeated use of Floxin may cause a second infection. Tell your doctor if signs of a second infection occur. Your medicine may need to be changed to treat this. If you experience pain or inflammation, or rupture a tendon during or shortly after taking ofloxacin, contact your health care provider immediately. Mild diarrhea is common with antibiotic use. However, a more serious form of diarrhea (pseudomembranous colitis) may rarely occur. This may develop while you use the antibiotic or within several months after you stop using it. Contact your doctor right away if stomach pain or cramps, severe diarrhea, or bloody stools occur. Do not treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Be sure to use Floxin for the full course of treatment. If you do not, the medicine may not clear up your infection completely. The bacteria could also become less sensitive to this or other medicines. This could make the infection harder to treat in the future. Lab tests, including kidney function, may be performed while you use Floxin. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Floxin with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects (eg, tendon problems), especially if they take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone). They may also be more sensitive to other effects (eg, irregular heartbeat). Floxin should not be used in CHILDREN younger than 18 years; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of taking Floxin while you are pregnant. Floxin is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Floxin. Possible side effects of Floxin:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; dizziness; headache; loss of appetite; nausea; sensitivity to sunlight; trouble sleeping; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); agitation; anxiety; bizarre behavior; bloody stools; burning, numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness of the arms, hands, legs, or feet; change in sense of touch or temperature; confusion; convulsions; dark urine; decreased urination; depression; diarrhea (severe or continuing); difficulty swallowing; excessive urination, thirst, or hunger; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fatigue; fever, chills, or unusual cough; hallucinations; joint pain or swelling; light-headedness; loss of consciousness; mental or mood changes; muscle pain or weakness; nervousness; nightmares; pale stools; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; restlessness; seizures; shortness of breath; shock (pale skin); sleeplessness; severe or persistent stomach pain or cramps; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; suicidal thoughts; tendon pain, inflammation, or swelling; tightness of the throat; tremors; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness or weakness; urination problems; vaginal irritation or discharge; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Floxin side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center (http://www.aapcc.org ), or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include facial swelling and numbness; hot and cold flushes; mild to moderate disorientation; slurring of speech.

Proper storage of Floxin:

Store Floxin below 86 degrees F (30 degrees C). Store in a tightly closed container. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Floxin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Floxin, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Floxin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is summary only. It does not contain all information about Floxin. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Floxin resources Floxin Side Effects (in more detail) Floxin Dosage Floxin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Floxin Drug Interactions Floxin Support Group 1 Review for Floxin - Add your own review/rating Floxin Consumer Overview Floxin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Floxin Prescribing Information (FDA) Ofloxacin Prescribing Information (FDA) Ofloxacin Monograph (AHFS DI) Ofloxacin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Floxin I.V. Compare Floxin with other medications Anthrax Anthrax Prophylaxis Bladder Infection Bone infection Bronchitis Campylobacter Gastroenteritis Cervicitis Chancroid Chlamydia Infection Epididymitis, Non-Specific Epididymitis, Sexually Transmitted Gonococcal Infection, Disseminated Gonococcal Infection, Uncomplicated Joint Infection Kidney Infections Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Treatment Nongonococcal Urethritis Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Plague Pneumonia Prostatitis Salmonella Enteric Fever Salmonella Gastroenteritis Shigellosis Skin Infection Traveler's Diarrhea Tuberculosis, Active Urinary Tract Infection
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Cystospaz


Generic Name: hyoscyamine (hye oh SYE a meen)
Brand Names: Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Ed Spaz, HyoMax, HyoMax DT, HyoMax FT, HyoMax SL, HyoMax SR, Hyospaz, Hyosyne, IB-Stat, Levbid, Levsin, Levsin SL, Levsinex SR, NuLev, Nulev, Symax Duotab, Symax FasTab, Symax SL, Symax SR

What is Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)?

Hyoscyamine produces many effects in the body, including relief from muscle spasms.

Hyoscyamine also reduces the fluid secretions of many organs and glands in the body, such as the stomach, pancreas, lungs, saliva glands, sweat glands, and nasal passages.

Hyoscyamine is used to treat many different stomach and intestinal disorders, including peptic ulcer and irritable bowel syndrome. It is also used to control muscle spasms in the bladder, kidneys, or digestive tract, and to reduce stomach acid. Hyoscyamine is sometimes used to reduce tremors and rigid muscles in people with symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

Hyoscyamine is also used as a drying agent to control excessive salivation, runny nose, or excessive sweating.

Hyoscyamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a bladder or intestinal obstruction, severe ulcerative colitis, toxic megacolon, glaucoma, or myasthenia gravis.

Before taking hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, congestive heart failure, a heart rhythm disorder, high blood pressure, overactive thyroid, or hiatal hernia with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

an enlarged prostate or problems with urination;

intestinal blockage;

severe ulcerative colitis, or toxic megacolon;

glaucoma; or

myasthenia gravis.

To make sure you can safely take hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart disease, congestive heart failure;

a heart rhythm disorder;

high blood pressure;

overactive thyroid; or

hiatal hernia with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether hyoscyamine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Hyoscyamine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your medication may come with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Hyoscyamine is usually taken before a meal. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Do not crush, chew, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or crushing the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Your doctor may want you to break an extended-release tablet and take only half of it. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Measure the oral liquid form of hyoscyamine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The sublingual tablet form of this medication must be placed under the tongue, where it will dissolve. Do not swallow the sublingual tablet whole or wash it down with water. You may drink water after the pill has completely dissolved in your mouth.

Before using hyoscyamine oral spray for the first time, you must prime the spray pump. To do this, spray 3 test sprays into the air and away from your face. Prime the spray pump at least 1 test spray any time you have not used the oral spray for longer than 2 days. Spray until a fine mist appears.

After using the oral spray, try not to swallow right away. Do not rinse your mouth or spit for 5 to 10 minutes after using the oral spray.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Do not use hyoscyamine oral spray for more than 30 sprays, even if there is medicine still left in the bottle.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include headache, dizziness, dry mouth, trouble swallowing, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, hot dry skin, and feeling restless or nervous.

What should I avoid while taking Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)?

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

Cystospaz (hyoscyamine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using hyoscyamine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

diarrhea;

confusion, hallucinations;

unusual thoughts or behavior;

fast, pounding, or uneven heart rate;

rash or flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling); or

eye pain.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, drowsiness, feeling nervous;

blurred vision, headache;

sleep problems (insomnia);

nausea, vomiting, bloating, heartburn, or constipation;

changes in taste;

problems with urination;

decreased sweating;

dry mouth; or

impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

amantadine (Symmetrel);

haloperidol (Haldol);

an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro), promethazine (Pentazine, Phenergan, Anergan, Antinaus), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine); or

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip), doxepin (Sinequan), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with hyoscyamine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Cystospaz resources Cystospaz Side Effects (in more detail)Cystospaz Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesCystospaz Drug InteractionsCystospaz Support Group0 Reviews for Cystospaz - Add your own review/rating Hyoscyamine Monograph (AHFS DI) Hyoscyamine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Anaspaz MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) HyoMax Prescribing Information (FDA) Hyosyne Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hyosyne Prescribing Information (FDA) IB-Stat Spray MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levbid Extended-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levsin Prescribing Information (FDA) NuLev Orally Disintegrating Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Symax Duotab Controlled-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Cystospaz with other medications AnesthesiaCrohn's DiseaseEndoscopy or Radiology PremedicationIrritable Bowel SyndromeUrinary Incontinence Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about hyoscyamine.

See also: Cystospaz side effects (in more detail)


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Levsin SL


Generic Name: hyoscyamine (hye oh SYE a meen)
Brand Names: Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Ed Spaz, HyoMax, HyoMax DT, HyoMax FT, HyoMax SL, HyoMax SR, Hyospaz, Hyosyne, IB-Stat, Levbid, Levsin, Levsin SL, Levsinex SR, NuLev, Nulev, Symax Duotab, Symax FasTab, Symax SL, Symax SR

What is Levsin SL (hyoscyamine)?

Hyoscyamine produces many effects in the body, including relief from muscle spasms.

Hyoscyamine also reduces the fluid secretions of many organs and glands in the body, such as the stomach, pancreas, lungs, saliva glands, sweat glands, and nasal passages.

Hyoscyamine is used to treat many different stomach and intestinal disorders, including peptic ulcer and irritable bowel syndrome. It is also used to control muscle spasms in the bladder, kidneys, or digestive tract, and to reduce stomach acid. Hyoscyamine is sometimes used to reduce tremors and rigid muscles in people with symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

Hyoscyamine is also used as a drying agent to control excessive salivation, runny nose, or excessive sweating.

Hyoscyamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Levsin SL (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a bladder or intestinal obstruction, severe ulcerative colitis, toxic megacolon, glaucoma, or myasthenia gravis.

Before taking hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, congestive heart failure, a heart rhythm disorder, high blood pressure, overactive thyroid, or hiatal hernia with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Levsin SL (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

an enlarged prostate or problems with urination;

intestinal blockage;

severe ulcerative colitis, or toxic megacolon;

glaucoma; or

myasthenia gravis.

To make sure you can safely take hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart disease, congestive heart failure;

a heart rhythm disorder;

high blood pressure;

overactive thyroid; or

hiatal hernia with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether hyoscyamine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Hyoscyamine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Levsin SL (hyoscyamine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your medication may come with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Hyoscyamine is usually taken before a meal. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Do not crush, chew, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or crushing the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Your doctor may want you to break an extended-release tablet and take only half of it. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Measure the oral liquid form of hyoscyamine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The sublingual tablet form of this medication must be placed under the tongue, where it will dissolve. Do not swallow the sublingual tablet whole or wash it down with water. You may drink water after the pill has completely dissolved in your mouth.

Before using hyoscyamine oral spray for the first time, you must prime the spray pump. To do this, spray 3 test sprays into the air and away from your face. Prime the spray pump at least 1 test spray any time you have not used the oral spray for longer than 2 days. Spray until a fine mist appears.

After using the oral spray, try not to swallow right away. Do not rinse your mouth or spit for 5 to 10 minutes after using the oral spray.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Do not use hyoscyamine oral spray for more than 30 sprays, even if there is medicine still left in the bottle.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include headache, dizziness, dry mouth, trouble swallowing, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, hot dry skin, and feeling restless or nervous.

What should I avoid while taking Levsin SL (hyoscyamine)?

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

Levsin SL (hyoscyamine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using hyoscyamine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

diarrhea;

confusion, hallucinations;

unusual thoughts or behavior;

fast, pounding, or uneven heart rate;

rash or flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling); or

eye pain.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, drowsiness, feeling nervous;

blurred vision, headache;

sleep problems (insomnia);

nausea, vomiting, bloating, heartburn, or constipation;

changes in taste;

problems with urination;

decreased sweating;

dry mouth; or

impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Levsin SL (hyoscyamine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

amantadine (Symmetrel);

haloperidol (Haldol);

an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro), promethazine (Pentazine, Phenergan, Anergan, Antinaus), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine); or

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip), doxepin (Sinequan), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with hyoscyamine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Levsin SL resources Levsin SL Side Effects (in more detail) Levsin SL Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Levsin SL Drug Interactions Levsin SL Support Group 2 Reviews for Levsin SL - Add your own review/rating Hyoscyamine Monograph (AHFS DI) Hyoscyamine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Anaspaz MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) HyoMax Prescribing Information (FDA) Hyosyne Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hyosyne Prescribing Information (FDA) IB-Stat Spray MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levbid Extended-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levsin Prescribing Information (FDA) NuLev Orally Disintegrating Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Symax Duotab Controlled-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Levsin SL with other medications Anesthesia Crohn's Disease Endoscopy or Radiology Premedication Irritable Bowel Syndrome Urinary Incontinence Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about hyoscyamine.

See also: Levsin SL side effects (in more detail)


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Anaspaz


Generic Name: hyoscyamine (hye oh SYE a meen)
Brand Names: Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Ed Spaz, HyoMax, HyoMax DT, HyoMax FT, HyoMax SL, HyoMax SR, Hyospaz, Hyosyne, IB-Stat, Levbid, Levsin, Levsin SL, Levsinex SR, NuLev, Nulev, Symax Duotab, Symax FasTab, Symax SL, Symax SR

What is Anaspaz (hyoscyamine)?

Hyoscyamine produces many effects in the body, including relief from muscle spasms.

Hyoscyamine also reduces the fluid secretions of many organs and glands in the body, such as the stomach, pancreas, lungs, saliva glands, sweat glands, and nasal passages.

Hyoscyamine is used to treat many different stomach and intestinal disorders, including peptic ulcer and irritable bowel syndrome. It is also used to control muscle spasms in the bladder, kidneys, or digestive tract, and to reduce stomach acid. Hyoscyamine is sometimes used to reduce tremors and rigid muscles in people with symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

Hyoscyamine is also used as a drying agent to control excessive salivation, runny nose, or excessive sweating.

Hyoscyamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Anaspaz (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a bladder or intestinal obstruction, severe ulcerative colitis, toxic megacolon, glaucoma, or myasthenia gravis.

Before taking hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, congestive heart failure, a heart rhythm disorder, high blood pressure, overactive thyroid, or hiatal hernia with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Anaspaz (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

an enlarged prostate or problems with urination;

intestinal blockage;

severe ulcerative colitis, or toxic megacolon;

glaucoma; or

myasthenia gravis.

To make sure you can safely take hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart disease, congestive heart failure;

a heart rhythm disorder;

high blood pressure;

overactive thyroid; or

hiatal hernia with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether hyoscyamine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Hyoscyamine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Anaspaz (hyoscyamine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your medication may come with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Hyoscyamine is usually taken before a meal. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Do not crush, chew, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or crushing the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Your doctor may want you to break an extended-release tablet and take only half of it. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Measure the oral liquid form of hyoscyamine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The sublingual tablet form of this medication must be placed under the tongue, where it will dissolve. Do not swallow the sublingual tablet whole or wash it down with water. You may drink water after the pill has completely dissolved in your mouth.

Before using hyoscyamine oral spray for the first time, you must prime the spray pump. To do this, spray 3 test sprays into the air and away from your face. Prime the spray pump at least 1 test spray any time you have not used the oral spray for longer than 2 days. Spray until a fine mist appears.

After using the oral spray, try not to swallow right away. Do not rinse your mouth or spit for 5 to 10 minutes after using the oral spray.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Do not use hyoscyamine oral spray for more than 30 sprays, even if there is medicine still left in the bottle.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include headache, dizziness, dry mouth, trouble swallowing, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, hot dry skin, and feeling restless or nervous.

What should I avoid while taking Anaspaz (hyoscyamine)?

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

Anaspaz (hyoscyamine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using hyoscyamine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

diarrhea;

confusion, hallucinations;

unusual thoughts or behavior;

fast, pounding, or uneven heart rate;

rash or flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling); or

eye pain.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, drowsiness, feeling nervous;

blurred vision, headache;

sleep problems (insomnia);

nausea, vomiting, bloating, heartburn, or constipation;

changes in taste;

problems with urination;

decreased sweating;

dry mouth; or

impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Anaspaz (hyoscyamine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

amantadine (Symmetrel);

haloperidol (Haldol);

an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro), promethazine (Pentazine, Phenergan, Anergan, Antinaus), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine); or

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip), doxepin (Sinequan), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with hyoscyamine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Anaspaz resources Anaspaz Side Effects (in more detail) Anaspaz Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Anaspaz Drug Interactions Anaspaz Support Group 0 Reviews for Anaspaz - Add your own review/rating Anaspaz MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hyoscyamine Monograph (AHFS DI) Hyoscyamine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) HyoMax Prescribing Information (FDA) Hyosyne Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hyosyne Prescribing Information (FDA) IB-Stat Spray MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levbid Extended-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levsin Prescribing Information (FDA) NuLev Orally Disintegrating Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Symax Duotab Controlled-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Anaspaz with other medications Anesthesia Crohn's Disease Endoscopy or Radiology Premedication Irritable Bowel Syndrome Urinary Incontinence Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about hyoscyamine.

See also: Anaspaz side effects (in more detail)


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Symax Duotab


Generic Name: hyoscyamine (hye oh SYE a meen)
Brand Names: Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Ed Spaz, HyoMax, HyoMax DT, HyoMax FT, HyoMax SL, HyoMax SR, Hyospaz, Hyosyne, IB-Stat, Levbid, Levsin, Levsin SL, Levsinex SR, NuLev, Nulev, Symax Duotab, Symax FasTab, Symax SL, Symax SR

What is Symax Duotab (hyoscyamine)?

Hyoscyamine produces many effects in the body, including relief from muscle spasms.

Hyoscyamine also reduces the fluid secretions of many organs and glands in the body, such as the stomach, pancreas, lungs, saliva glands, sweat glands, and nasal passages.

Hyoscyamine is used to treat many different stomach and intestinal disorders, including peptic ulcer and irritable bowel syndrome. It is also used to control muscle spasms in the bladder, kidneys, or digestive tract, and to reduce stomach acid. Hyoscyamine is sometimes used to reduce tremors and rigid muscles in people with symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

Hyoscyamine is also used as a drying agent to control excessive salivation, runny nose, or excessive sweating.

Hyoscyamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Symax Duotab (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a bladder or intestinal obstruction, severe ulcerative colitis, toxic megacolon, glaucoma, or myasthenia gravis.

Before taking hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, congestive heart failure, a heart rhythm disorder, high blood pressure, overactive thyroid, or hiatal hernia with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Symax Duotab (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

an enlarged prostate or problems with urination;

intestinal blockage;

severe ulcerative colitis, or toxic megacolon;

glaucoma; or

myasthenia gravis.

To make sure you can safely take hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart disease, congestive heart failure;

a heart rhythm disorder;

high blood pressure;

overactive thyroid; or

hiatal hernia with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether hyoscyamine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Hyoscyamine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Symax Duotab (hyoscyamine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your medication may come with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Hyoscyamine is usually taken before a meal. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Do not crush, chew, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or crushing the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Your doctor may want you to break an extended-release tablet and take only half of it. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Measure the oral liquid form of hyoscyamine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The sublingual tablet form of this medication must be placed under the tongue, where it will dissolve. Do not swallow the sublingual tablet whole or wash it down with water. You may drink water after the pill has completely dissolved in your mouth.

Before using hyoscyamine oral spray for the first time, you must prime the spray pump. To do this, spray 3 test sprays into the air and away from your face. Prime the spray pump at least 1 test spray any time you have not used the oral spray for longer than 2 days. Spray until a fine mist appears.

After using the oral spray, try not to swallow right away. Do not rinse your mouth or spit for 5 to 10 minutes after using the oral spray.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Do not use hyoscyamine oral spray for more than 30 sprays, even if there is medicine still left in the bottle.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include headache, dizziness, dry mouth, trouble swallowing, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, hot dry skin, and feeling restless or nervous.

What should I avoid while taking Symax Duotab (hyoscyamine)?

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

Symax Duotab (hyoscyamine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using hyoscyamine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

diarrhea;

confusion, hallucinations;

unusual thoughts or behavior;

fast, pounding, or uneven heart rate;

rash or flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling); or

eye pain.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, drowsiness, feeling nervous;

blurred vision, headache;

sleep problems (insomnia);

nausea, vomiting, bloating, heartburn, or constipation;

changes in taste;

problems with urination;

decreased sweating;

dry mouth; or

impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Symax Duotab (hyoscyamine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

amantadine (Symmetrel);

haloperidol (Haldol);

an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro), promethazine (Pentazine, Phenergan, Anergan, Antinaus), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine); or

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip), doxepin (Sinequan), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with hyoscyamine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Symax Duotab resources Symax Duotab Side Effects (in more detail) Symax Duotab Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Symax Duotab Drug Interactions Symax Duotab Support Group 3 Reviews for Symax Duotab - Add your own review/rating Symax Duotab Controlled-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hyoscyamine Monograph (AHFS DI) Hyoscyamine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Anaspaz MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) HyoMax Prescribing Information (FDA) Hyosyne Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hyosyne Prescribing Information (FDA) IB-Stat Spray MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levbid Extended-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levsin Prescribing Information (FDA) NuLev Orally Disintegrating Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Symax Duotab with other medications Anesthesia Crohn's Disease Endoscopy or Radiology Premedication Irritable Bowel Syndrome Urinary Incontinence Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about hyoscyamine.

See also: Symax Duotab side effects (in more detail)


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Factive


Pronunciation: JEM-i-FLOX-a-sin
Generic Name: Gemifloxacin
Brand Name: Factive

Factive is associated with an increased risk of tendon problems. These include pain, swelling, inflammation, and possible breakage of tendons. The risk of tendon problems is greater in patients who are older than 60 years old, patients who take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), or in those who have received kidney, heart, or lung transplants. The Achilles tendon in the back of the foot/ankle area is most often affected. However, problems may also occur in other tendons (eg, in the shoulder, arm, or hand). Problems may occur while you take Factive or up to several months after you stop taking it.

Signs of tendon problems may include pain, soreness, redness, or swelling of a tendon or joint; bruising right after an injury in a tendon area; hearing or feeling a snap or pop in a joint or tendon area; or inability to move or bear weight on a joint or tendon area. Tell your doctor right away if you experience any of these symptoms while you take Factive or within several months after you stop taking it.

Factive may worsen muscle weakness and breathing problems in patients with myasthenia gravis. Do not take Factive if you have a history of myasthenia gravis.


Factive is used for:

Treating infections caused by certain bacteria.

Factive is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic. It works by killing sensitive bacteria.

Do NOT use Factive if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Factive or to any other fluoroquinolone antibiotic (eg, ciprofloxacin) you have uncorrected blood electrolyte levels (eg, low potassium or magnesium) you have a history of myasthenia gravis or of a certain type of irregular heartbeat (eg, QT interval prolongation) you are taking certain medicines for heart rhythm problems (eg, amiodarone, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Factive:

Some medical conditions may interact with Factive. Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of diabetes, severe or persistent diarrhea, skin sensitivity to the sun, heart problems (eg, abnormal heart function tests, congestive heart failure, a heart attack, slow or irregular heartbeat), heart blood vessel problems, or low blood potassium or magnesium levels if you have a family history of irregular heartbeat (QT prolongation) if you have a stomach infection, brain or nervous system problems, increased pressure in the brain, Alzheimer disease, or brain blood vessel problems if you have a history of seizures or you are at risk of seizures if you have a history of joint or tendon problems; rheumatoid arthritis; liver problems; kidney problems or decreased kidney function; or a heart, kidney, or lung transplant if you take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or if you participate in strenuous physical work or exercise

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Factive. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Arsenic, astemizole, azole antifungals (eg, ketoconazole), cisapride, diuretics (eg, hydrochlorothiazide, furosemide), droperidol, haloperidol, ketolides (eg, telithromycin), macrolide antibiotics (eg, erythromycin), certain medicines for heart rhythm disturbances (eg, dofetilide, quinidine, procainamide, amiodarone, sotalol), phenothiazines (eg, thioridazine), pimozide, terfenadine, tricyclic antidepressants (eg, amitriptyline), ziprasidone, or any other medicine that may increase the risk of a certain type of irregular heartbeat (prolonged QT interval) because side effects, such as racing heartbeat, dizziness, fainting, or life-threatening irregular heartbeat leading to unconsciousness, may be increased by Factive. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are unsure if any of your medicines may increase the risk of this type of irregular heartbeat Corticosteroids (eg, prednisone) because the risk of tendon problems may be increased Oral anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because the risk of bleeding may be increased by Factive Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen) or probenecid because they may increase the risk of Factive's side effects Sulfonylureas (eg, glyburide) because the risk of side effects, including low blood sugar, may be increased by Factive

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Factive may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Factive:

Use Factive as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Factive comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Factive refilled. Take Factive by mouth with or without food. Swallow Factive whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. Take Factive with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Factive works best if it is taken at the same time each day. Drinking extra fluids while you are taking Factive is recommended. Check with your doctor for instructions. Avoid taking Factive with dairy products (eg, milk, yogurt) or calcium-fortified juices by themselves. However, taking Factive as part of a full meal that contains these products is permitted. If you are also taking aluminum or magnesium (eg, certain antacids), calcium, iron, zinc, multivitamins, or certain forms of didanosine (chewable/buffered tablets, pediatric powder for oral solution), do not take it within 3 hours before or 2 hours after you take Factive. If you are also taking sucralfate, take Factive at least 2 hours before taking sucralfate. To clear up your infection completely, take Factive for the full course of treatment. Keep taking it even if you feel better in a few days. Do not miss any doses of Factive. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take more than 1 dose in the same day.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Factive.

Important safety information: Factive may cause dizziness, drowsiness, or light-headedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Factive with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Factive only works against bacteria; it does not treat viral infections (eg, the common cold). Be sure to use Factive for the full course of treatment. If you do not, the medicine may not clear up your infection completely. The bacteria could also become less sensitive to this or other medicines. This could make the infection harder to treat in the future. Long-term or repeated use of Factive may cause a second infection. Tell your doctor if signs of a second infection occur. Your medicine may need to be changed to treat this. Mild diarrhea is common with antibiotic use. However, a more serious form of diarrhea (pseudomembranous colitis) may rarely occur. This may develop while you take the antibiotic or within several months after you stop taking it. Contact your doctor right away if stomach pain or cramps, severe diarrhea, or bloody stools occur. Do not treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Tell your doctor right away if you experience pain or swelling of a tendon, or weakness or loss of use of a joint area. Rest the area and avoid exercise until your doctor gives you instructions. Factive may cause you to become sunburned more easily. Avoid the sun, sunlamps, or tanning booths until you know how you react to Factive. Use a sunscreen or wear protective clothing if you must be outside for more than a short time. Some patients taking Factive have developed a rash. This may be more likely if you are younger than 40 years old, are a woman, are taking hormone replacement therapy, or take Factive for longer than 5 days. Contact your doctor if you develop a rash. Diabetes patients - Factive may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine. Use Factive with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects (eg, tendon problems), especially if they take corticosteroids (eg, prednisone). They may also be more sensitive to other effects (eg, irregular heartbeat). Factive should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. They may also be more sensitive to the effects of Factive, including bone and joint problems. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of taking Factive while you are pregnant. It is not known if Factive is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you take Factive, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Factive:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; dizziness; headache; mild stomach pain; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing or swallowing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, throat, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); bloody or tarry stools; burning, numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness of the arms, hands, legs, or feet; chest pain or pounding in the chest; decreased urination; excessive hunger, thirst, or urination; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, sore throat, or unusual cough; fruit-like breath odor; hallucinations; inability to move or bear weight on a joint or tendon area; joint pain; moderate or severe sunburn; mood or mental changes (eg, new or worsening anxiety, agitation, confusion, depression, nervousness, paranoia, restlessness); muscle pain or weakness; nightmares; pain, soreness, redness, swelling, weakness, or bruising of a tendon or joint area; pale stools; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; seizures; severe or persistent diarrhea; severe or persistent dizziness, headache, or light-headedness; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; sleeplessness; stomach pain or cramps; suicidal thoughts or actions; sweating; symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, loss of appetite, pale stools, yellowing of the skin or eyes); tremors; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual swelling or weight gain; unusual weakness or tiredness; vaginal odor or discharge; vision changes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Factive side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Factive:

Store Factive at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Factive out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Factive, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Factive is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Factive. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Factive resources Factive Side Effects (in more detail) Factive Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Factive Drug Interactions Factive Support Group 5 Reviews for Factive - Add your own review/rating Factive Prescribing Information (FDA) Factive Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Factive Monograph (AHFS DI) Factive Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Factive with other medications Bronchitis Pneumonia Strep Throat
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Immune globulins


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

In healthy individuals immune globulins are made by plasma cells when exposed by an immunogen such as a virus. Immune globulins act as antibodies against an infection. They are made up of different classes and subclasses of molecules.

The immune globulin used for therapeutic purposes is made from healthy human blood that has a high level of antibodies. Immune globulins are given to those with a weak immune system to strengthen or act as the body

See also

Medical conditions associated with immune globulins:

Autoimmune Neutropenia Bone Marrow Transplantation Botulism Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cytomegalovirus Infection Evan's Syndrome Exposure to Hepatitis B Virus Hepatitis A HIV Infection Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Kawasaki Disease Measles Myasthenia Gravis Polymyositis/Dermatomyositis Primary Immunodeficiency Syndrome Rabies Prophylaxis Respiratory Syncytial Virus Rh-Isoimmunization Rubella Smallpox Vaccine Reaction Tetanus Tetanus Prophylaxis Varicella-Zoster Drug List: Vivaglobin Gamunex Octagam Privigen Hizentra Winrho-Sdf Rhophylac Babybig Baygam Bayhep-B Bayrab Bayrho-D Baytet Carimune-Igiv Cytogam Flebogamma Gamastan-S-D Gamimune Gamimune-N-10-Igiv Gammagard Gammagard-S-D-Igiv Gammaplex-Igiv Gammar-Piv Gamunex-C Hepagam_B Hepagam-B-Novaplus Hyperhep-B Hyperrho-S-D-Full-Dose Hyperrho-S-D-Mini-Dose Hypertet-S-D Imogam-Rabies-Ht Iveegam-En-Igiv Micrhogam Micrhogam-Ultra-Filtered-Plus Nabi-Hb Nabi-Hb-Novaplus Panglobulin-Nf Polygam-S-D-Igiv Respigam Rhogam Rhogam-Ultra-Filtered-Plus Sandoglobulin-Igiv Synagis
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hydrochlorothiazide and timolol


Generic Name: hydrochlorothiazide and timolol (HYE droe klor oh THYE a zide and TYE moe lol)
Brand Names: Timolide 10-25

What is hydrochlorothiazide and timolol?

Hydrochlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic (water pill) that helps prevent your body from absorbing too much salt, which can cause fluid retention.

Timolol is in a group of drugs called beta-blockers. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

The combination of hydrochlorothiazide and timolol is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension).

Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about hydrochlorothiazide and timolol? You should not use this medication if you have a history of asthma or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), severe or uncontrolled heart failure, a heart condition called "sick sinus syndrome" or "AV block," an allergy to sulfa drugs, or if you are unable to urinate.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure, kidney or liver disease, cirrhosis, bronchospastic lung disease, gout, lupus, diabetes, a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis, a history of stroke, a thyroid disorder, or if you are allergic to sulfa drugs..

If you are diabetic, check your blood sugar carefully. Using timolol can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Your insulin or diabetic medication needs may change while you are taking hydrochlorothiazide and timolol. Talk with your doctor before changing any doses.

Avoid drinking alcohol, which can lower your blood pressure and may add to the side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and timolol.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

Keep using this medication even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms.

There are many other medicines that can interact with hydrochlorothiazide and timolol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use.

What should I discuss with my doctor before taking hydrochlorothiazide and timolol? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to hydrochlorothiazide or timolol, or if you have:

a history of asthma or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD);

severe or uncontrolled heart failure;

a heart condition called "sick sinus syndrome" or "AV block" (2nd or 3rd degree); or

if you are unable to urinate.

Before using hydrochlorothiazide and timolol, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

congestive heart failure;

kidney disease; liver disease (or cirrhosis);

bronchospastic lung disease;

a thyroid disorder;

a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis;

a history of stroke;

lupus;

gout;

diabetes; or

if you are allergic to sulfa drugs.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take hydrochlorothiazide and timolol?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take the medicine with a meal or right after you eat.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

Do not stop using hydrochlorothiazide and timolol suddenly, or you could have a serious or life-threatening heart problem. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood pressure will need to be checked on a regular basis, and you may need blood tests. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Your blood and urine may both be tested if you have been vomiting or are dehydrated.

If you are diabetic, check your blood sugar carefully. Using timolol can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Your insulin or diabetic medication needs may change while you are taking hydrochlorothiazide and timolol. Talk with your doctor before changing any doses.

Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol can affect the results of certain thyroid tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medication.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using hydrochlorothiazide and timolol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Keep using hydrochlorothiazide and timolol even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. Store this medication in a tightly closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and light.

See also: Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include fast or slow heart rate, dizziness, ringing in your ears, or feeling like you might pass out. What should I avoid while taking hydrochlorothiazide and timolol? Avoid drinking alcohol, which can lower your blood pressure and may add to the side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and timolol.

Avoid using other medicines that make you light-headed (especially narcotic pain medication or barbiturates). They can add to the side effects of hydrochlorothiazide and timolol. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

This medication can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

swelling, rapid weight gain, feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

fast, slow, or uneven heartbeat;

easy bruising or bleeding;

sudden numbness or weakness on one side of the body, problems with vision or speech, chest pain, or pain in one or both legs;

numbness or tingly feeling in your hands or feet;

feeling weak, drowsy, restless, or light-headed;

nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, extreme thirst, headache, confusion, hallucinations, seizure (convulsions);

increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle pain or weakness or limp feeling;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

upper stomach pain, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

diarrhea, constipation, upset stomach;

dizziness, spinning sensation;

depressed mood; or

blurred vision.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Initial and maintenance dose: 1 tablet orally twice a day or 2 tablets orally once a day.

What other drugs will affect hydrochlorothiazide and timolol?

Many drugs can interact with hydrochlorothiazide and timolol. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

insulin or diabetes medicine you take by mouth;

colestipol (Colestid) or cholestyramine (Prevalite, Questran);

steroids (prednisone and others);

lithium (Lithobid);

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin, naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and others;

other heart or blood pressure medications such as clonidine (Catapres), digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), or reserpine; or

a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem), isradipine (Dynacirc), felodipine (Plendil), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with hydrochlorothiazide and timolol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More hydrochlorothiazide and timolol resources Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol Side Effects (in more detail) Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol Dosage Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol Drug Interactions Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol Support Group 0 Reviews for Hydrochlorothiazide and timolol - Add your own review/rating Compare hydrochlorothiazide and timolol with other medications High Blood Pressure Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about hydrochlorothiazide and timolol.

See also: hydrochlorothiazide and timolol side effects (in more detail)


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Persantin 100mg tablets


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

PERSANTIN Tablets 100 mg

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Dipyridamole 100 mg.

For excipients, see 6.1.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Coated Tablets.

Round, white, biconvex, shiny, sugar-coated tablets.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

An adjunct to oral anti-coagulation for prophylaxis of thrombo-embolism associated with prosthetic heart valves.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Adults: 300-600 mg daily in three or four doses.

Children: PERSANTIN is not recommended for children.

PERSANTIN should usually be taken before meals.

4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to any of the components of the product.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Among other properties, dipyridamole acts as a vasodilator. It should be used with caution in patients with severe coronary artery disease, including unstable angina and/or recent myocardial infarction, left ventricular outflow obstruction or haemodynamic instability (e.g. decompensated heart failure).

Patients being treated with regular oral doses of PERSANTIN should not receive additional intravenous dipyridamole. Clinical experience suggests that patients being treated with oral dipyridamole who also require pharmacological stress testing with intravenous dipyridamole, should discontinue drugs containing oral dipyridamole for twenty-four hours prior to stress testing.

In patients with myasthenia gravis, readjustment of therapy may be necessary after changes in dipyridamole dosage (see Drug Interactions).

PERSANTIN should be used with caution in patients with coagulation disorders.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Dipyridamole increases plasma levels and cardiovascular effects of adenosine. Adjustment of adenosine dosage should be considered if use with dipyridamole is unavoidable.

There is evidence that the effects of aspirin and dipyridamole on platelet behaviour are additive.

The administration of antacids may reduce the efficacy of PERSANTIN. It is possible that PERSANTIN may enhance the effects of oral anti-coagulants.

When dipyridamole is used in combination with anticoagulants and acetylsalicylic acid, the statements on intolerance and risks for these preparations must be observed. Addition of dipyridamole to acetylsalicylic acid does not increase the incidence of bleeding events. When dipyridamole was administered concomitantly with warfarin, bleeding was no greater in frequency or severity than that observed when warfarin was administered alone.

Dipyridamole may increase the hypotensive effect of drugs which reduce blood pressure and may counteract the anticholinesterase effect of cholinesterase inhibitors thereby potentially aggravating myasthenia gravis.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

There is inadequate evidence of safety in human pregnancy, but PERSANTIN has been used for many years without apparent ill-consequence. Animal studies have shown no hazard. Medicines should not be used in pregnancy, especially the first trimester unless the expected benefit is thought to outweigh the possible risk to the foetus.

Dipyridamole is excreted in breast milk at levels approximately 6% of the plasma concentration. Therefore PERSANTIN should only be used during lactation if considered essential by the physician.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

None stated.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

If these occur, it is usually during the early part of treatment. The vasodilating properties of PERSANTIN may occasionally produce a vascular headache which normally disappears with long-term use. Vomiting, diarrhoea and symptoms such as dizziness, faintness, nausea, dyspepsia and myalgia have been observed.

As a result of its vasodilator properties, PERSANTIN may cause hypotension, hot flushes and tachycardia. Worsening of symptoms of coronary heart disease such as angina and arrhythmias.

Hypersensitivity reactions such as rash, urticaria, severe bronchospasm and angio-oedema have been reported.

In very rare cases, increased bleeding during or after surgery has been observed. Isolated cases of thrombocytopenia have been reported in conjunction with treatment with PERSANTIN.

Dipyridamole has been shown to be incorporated into gallstones.

4.9 Overdose

Symptoms

Due to the low number of observations, experience with dipyridamole overdose is limited. Symptoms such as a warm feeling, flushes, sweating, restlessness, feeling of weakness, dizziness and anginal complaints can be expected. A drop in blood pressure and tachycardia might be observed.

Therapy

Symptomatic therapy is recommended. Administration of xanthine derivatives (e.g. aminophylline) may reverse the haemodynamic effects of dipyridamole overdose. Due to its wide distribution to tissues and its predominantly hepatic elimination, dipyridamole is not likely to be accessible to enhanced removal procedures.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Dipyridamole has an antithrombotic action based on its ability to modify various aspects of platelet function, such as platelet aggregation, adhesion and survival, which have been shown to be factors associated with the initiation of thrombus formation. Dipyridamole also has coronary vasodilator properties.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Oral administration of dipyridamole gives a peak plasma level 1-2 hours after dosing. The drug has an apparent bioavailability of 37-66%.

In man the volume of distribution is 2.43±1.1 l/kg. When given orally, the elimination half life is 30-50 minutes. In man the major route of excretion of dipyridamole is in the bile.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

None

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Core:

Calcium hydrogen phosphate, anhydrous

Maize starch, dried

Maize starch, soluble

Colloidal silica

Magnesium stearate

Coating:

Sucrose

Talc

Acacia

Titanium dioxide, E171

Macrogol 6000

Wax, bleached

Carnauba Wax

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not applicable.

6.3 Shelf Life

5 years.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Do not store above 30°C. Protect from light.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Marketed packs: Blister pack containing 84 white sugar coated tablets

Non-marketed packs: Blister packs of 100 and 112 white sugar coated tablets.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

None.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Boehringer Ingelheim Limited

Ellesfield Avenue

Bracknell

Berkshire

RG12 8YS

United Kingdom

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 0015/5016R

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

24 November 1988 / 01 May 2007

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

01/05/2007

11. Legal category

POM

P2c/100mg/UK/SPC/7


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