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Triple Antibiotic Ointment


bacitracin zinc, neomycin sulfate, and polymyxin b sulfate
Dosage Form: ointment
Triple Antibiotic
Ointment

Drug Facts

Active ingredients
(each gram contains) Purpose Bacitracin zinc 400 units First aid antibiotic Neomycin sulfate 3.5 mg First aid antibiotic Polymyxin B sulfate 5,000 units First aid antibiotic Uses

first aid to help prevent infection in minor:

cuts scrapes burns Warnings

For external use only

Do not use

in the eyes over large areas of the body if you are allergic to any of the ingredients

Ask a doctor before use if you have

deep or puncture wounds animal bites serious burns

Stop use and ask a doctor if

condition persists or gets worse condition persists for more than 7 days condition clears up and occurs again within a few days a rash or other allergic reaction develops

Keep out of reach of children. If swallowed, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

Directions clean the affected area apply a small amount of this product (an amount equal to the surface area of the tip of a finger) on the area 1 to 3 times daily may be covered with a sterile bandage Other information To open: unscrew cap, pull tab to remove foil seal. store at 20°-25°C (68°-77°F) See carton or tube crimp for lot number and expiration date. Inactive ingredient

white petrolatum

Questions?

Call 1-877-745-6888

Distributed by:
Phoenix Global Supply Group, Inc.
White Plains, NY 10604

PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL - 28.4 g Tube Carton

Triple Antibiotic
Ointment
Bacitracin Zinc • Neomycin Sulfate • Polymyxin B Sulfate

First Aid Antibiotic Ointment

Original Strength

NET WT 1 oz (28.4 g)


TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC 
bacitracin zinc, neomycin sulfate, and polymyxin b sulfate  ointment Product Information Product Type HUMAN OTC DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 52426-020 Route of Administration TOPICAL DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength Bacitracin zinc (Bacitracin zinc) Bacitracin zinc 400 [iU]  in 1 g Neomycin sulfate (Neomycin) Neomycin sulfate 3.5 mg  in 1 g Polymyxin B sulfate (Polymyxin B) Polymyxin B sulfate 5000 [iU]  in 1 g Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength petrolatum   Product Characteristics Color      Score      Shape Size Flavor Imprint Code Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 52426-020-06 1 TUBE In 1 CARTON contains a TUBE 1 28.4 g In 1 TUBE This package is contained within the CARTON (52426-020-06) 2 52426-020-05 1 TUBE In 1 CARTON contains a TUBE 2 14.2 g In 1 TUBE This package is contained within the CARTON (52426-020-05)
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date OTC MONOGRAPH FINAL part333B 09/23/2010
Labeler - Phoenix Global Supply Group, Inc (843189908) Establishment Name Address ID/FEI Operations SGS Life Science Services 093840643 ANALYSIS Establishment Name Address ID/FEI Operations Axellia Pharmaceuticals ApS 305814345 MANUFACTURE Establishment Name Address ID/FEI Operations Pharmacia and UpJohn Company 829076566 MANUFACTURE Establishment Name Address ID/FEI Operations Axellia Pharmaceuticals AS 561816174 MANUFACTURE Revised: 09/2010Phoenix Global Supply Group, Inc
More Triple Antibiotic Ointment resources Triple Antibiotic Ointment Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Triple Antibiotic Ointment Drug Interactions Triple Antibiotic Ointment Support Group 1 Review for Triple Antibiotic - Add your own review/rating Medi-Quik topical Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Neosporin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Neosporin Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triple Antibiotic Topical Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Triple Antibiotic Ointment with other medications Bacterial Skin Infection
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SSD


Generic Name: silver sulfadiazine topical (SIL ver SUL fa DYE a zeen TOP ik al)
Brand Names: Silvadene, SSD, SSD AF, Thermazene

What is SSD (silver sulfadiazine topical)?

Silver sulfadiazine is an antibiotic. It fights bacteria and fungus on the skin.

Silver sulfadiazine topical (for the skin) is used to treat or prevent infections on areas of burned skin.

Silver sulfadiazine topical may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about SSD (silver sulfadiazine topical)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to silver sulfadiazine or another sulfa medication.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, kidney disease, or an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

The person applying this medication to burn wounds should wear sterile disposable gloves. Take care to keep the treatment area as clean as possible to prevent further infection.

Use this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

Avoid exposing treated skin areas to sunlight, sunlamps, or tanning beds. Silver sulfadiazine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight, and a sunburn may result. Wear protective clothing when you are outdoors. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as fever, chills, flu symptoms, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, ulcers on treated skin areas, swelling or weight gain, urinating less than usual, or a severe blistering or peeling red skin rash. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using SSD (silver sulfadiazine topical)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to silver sulfadiazine or another sulfa medication.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

liver disease; kidney disease; or

an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

FDA pregnancy category B. Silver sulfadiazine is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether silver sulfadiazine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use SSD (silver sulfadiazine topical)?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Wash your hands before and after applying silver sulfadiazine cream. The person applying this medication to burn wounds should wear sterile disposable gloves. Take care to keep the treatment area as clean as possible to prevent further infection.

Clean the area to be treated as directed by your doctor. Apply enough of the medication to cover the affected area evenly. Silver sulfadiazine cream should be applied in a layer about one 16th of an inch thick (1.5 millimeter).

Silver sulfadiazine cream is usually applied 1 or 2 times daily. Burn wounds must be kept covered with this medication at all times. Treated skin areas can be left uncovered, or you may use a gauze bandage if directed by your doctor.

If needed, apply more cream to replace any medication that has come off on bandages, clothing, or bed linens. Reapply the cream after bathing or water therapy.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Use this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

Store silver sulfadiazine topical at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember. Your burn wounds should be kept covered with silver sulfadiazine cream at all times.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of silver sulfadiazine is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while using SSD (silver sulfadiazine topical)? Avoid exposing treated skin areas to sunlight, sunlamps, or tanning beds. Silver sulfadiazine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight, and a sunburn may result. Wear protective clothing when you are outdoors. Avoid getting this medication in your mouth or eyes. If it does get into any of these areas, rinse with water. Do not use silver sulfadiazine topical on sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, irritated, or broken skin. SSD (silver sulfadiazine topical) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine;

ulcers on treated skin areas;

blood in your urine;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

drowsiness, confusion, mood changes, nausea and vomiting;

swelling, weight gain; or

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash.

Less serious side effects may include:

brown or gray discoloration of treated skin;

mild itching or burning; or

upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect SSD (silver sulfadiazine topical)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially cimetidine (Tagamet).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with silver sulfadiazine. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More SSD resources SSD Side Effects (in more detail) SSD Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding SSD Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for SSD - Add your own review/rating Silvadene MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Silvadene Prescribing Information (FDA) Ssd Topical Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Thermazene Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare SSD with other medications Burns, External Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about silver sulfadiazine topical.

See also: SSD side effects (in more detail)


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SSD AF


Generic Name: silver sulfadiazine topical (SIL ver SUL fa DYE a zeen TOP ik al)
Brand Names: Silvadene, SSD, SSD AF, Thermazene

What is SSD AF (silver sulfadiazine topical)?

Silver sulfadiazine is an antibiotic. It fights bacteria and fungus on the skin.

Silver sulfadiazine topical (for the skin) is used to treat or prevent infections on areas of burned skin.

Silver sulfadiazine topical may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about SSD AF (silver sulfadiazine topical)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to silver sulfadiazine or another sulfa medication.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, kidney disease, or an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

The person applying this medication to burn wounds should wear sterile disposable gloves. Take care to keep the treatment area as clean as possible to prevent further infection.

Use this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

Avoid exposing treated skin areas to sunlight, sunlamps, or tanning beds. Silver sulfadiazine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight, and a sunburn may result. Wear protective clothing when you are outdoors. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as fever, chills, flu symptoms, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, ulcers on treated skin areas, swelling or weight gain, urinating less than usual, or a severe blistering or peeling red skin rash. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using SSD AF (silver sulfadiazine topical)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to silver sulfadiazine or another sulfa medication.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

liver disease; kidney disease; or

an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

FDA pregnancy category B. Silver sulfadiazine is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether silver sulfadiazine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use SSD AF (silver sulfadiazine topical)?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Wash your hands before and after applying silver sulfadiazine cream. The person applying this medication to burn wounds should wear sterile disposable gloves. Take care to keep the treatment area as clean as possible to prevent further infection.

Clean the area to be treated as directed by your doctor. Apply enough of the medication to cover the affected area evenly. Silver sulfadiazine cream should be applied in a layer about one 16th of an inch thick (1.5 millimeter).

Silver sulfadiazine cream is usually applied 1 or 2 times daily. Burn wounds must be kept covered with this medication at all times. Treated skin areas can be left uncovered, or you may use a gauze bandage if directed by your doctor.

If needed, apply more cream to replace any medication that has come off on bandages, clothing, or bed linens. Reapply the cream after bathing or water therapy.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Use this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

Store silver sulfadiazine topical at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember. Your burn wounds should be kept covered with silver sulfadiazine cream at all times.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of silver sulfadiazine is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while using SSD AF (silver sulfadiazine topical)? Avoid exposing treated skin areas to sunlight, sunlamps, or tanning beds. Silver sulfadiazine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight, and a sunburn may result. Wear protective clothing when you are outdoors. Avoid getting this medication in your mouth or eyes. If it does get into any of these areas, rinse with water. Do not use silver sulfadiazine topical on sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, irritated, or broken skin. SSD AF (silver sulfadiazine topical) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine;

ulcers on treated skin areas;

blood in your urine;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

drowsiness, confusion, mood changes, nausea and vomiting;

swelling, weight gain; or

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash.

Less serious side effects may include:

brown or gray discoloration of treated skin;

mild itching or burning; or

upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect SSD AF (silver sulfadiazine topical)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially cimetidine (Tagamet).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with silver sulfadiazine. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More SSD AF resources SSD AF Side Effects (in more detail) SSD AF Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding SSD AF Drug Interactions SSD AF Support Group 0 Reviews for SSD AF - Add your own review/rating SSD AF Topical Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Silvadene MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Silvadene Prescribing Information (FDA) Thermazene Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare SSD AF with other medications Burns, External Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about silver sulfadiazine topical.

See also: SSD AF side effects (in more detail)


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Krystexxa


Generic Name: pegloticase (peg LOE ti kase)
Brand Names: Krystexxa

What is pegloticase?

Pegloticase is an enzyme that metabolizes uric acid into a harmless chemical that is eliminated from the body in urine.

Pegloticase is used to treat chronic gout. Pegloticase is usually given after other gout medications have been tried without successful treatment of symptoms.

Pegloticase may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about pegloticase? You should not receive pegloticase if you are allergic to it, or if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

To make sure you can safely receive pegloticase, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure.

You may be given other medications to prevent certain side effects of pegloticase. You may need to start taking these medications at least a week before you receive your pegloticase injection. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor's advice. Tell your caregiver right away if you feel itchy, nervous, light-headed, short of breath, or have a fast heartbeat, chest discomfort, or redness of your skin when the medicine is injected into your vein. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking pegloticase? You should not receive pegloticase if you are allergic to it, or if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

To make sure you can safely take pegloticase, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

congestive heart failure;

other heart problems; or

high blood pressure.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether pegloticase will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether pegloticase passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using pegloticase. How should I take pegloticase?

Pegloticase is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting. Pegloticase must be given slowly, and the IV infusion can take at least 2 hours to complete.

You may be given other medications to prevent certain side effects of pegloticase. You may need to start taking these medications at least a week before you receive your pegloticase injection. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor's advice.

Pegloticase is usually given once every 2 weeks. Follow your doctor's dosing instructions very carefully.

When you first start using pegloticase, you may have an increase in gout flares. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 3 months of treatment.

Your doctor may recommend other gout medications during the first 6 months of your treatment with pegloticase.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. This will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with pegloticase. Visit your doctor regularly.

See also: Krystexxa dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since pegloticase is given by a healthcare professional, you are not likely to miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking pegloticase?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Pegloticase side effects Some people receiving a pegloticase injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Infusion reactions may also occur after the injection is given. Tell your caregiver right away if you feel itchy, nervous, light-headed, short of breath, or have a fast heartbeat, chest discomfort, or redness of your skin during the injection. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; wheezing, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

chest pain; or

flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling).

Less serious side effects may include:

new gout flares;

nausea, vomiting, constipation;

easy bruising; or

stuffy nose, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect pegloticase?

There may be other drugs that can interact with pegloticase. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Krystexxa resources Krystexxa Side Effects (in more detail) Krystexxa Dosage Krystexxa Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Krystexxa Drug Interactions Krystexxa Support Group 2 Reviews for Krystexxa - Add your own review/rating Krystexxa Prescribing Information (FDA) Krystexxa Monograph (AHFS DI) Krystexxa Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Krystexxa Consumer Overview Krystexxa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Pegloticase Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Krystexxa with other medications Gout Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about pegloticase.

See also: Krystexxa side effects (in more detail)


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Elitek


Pronunciation: ras-BURE-i-kase
Generic Name: Rasburicase
Brand Name: Elitek

Elitek can cause a severe allergic reaction. If you develop new symptoms such as chest pain, trouble breathing, severe dizziness, a rash, or hives, stop using Elitek and seek immediate medical attention. Do not restart Elitek if a severe allergic reaction has occurred. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Do not use Elitek if you have a metabolic condition called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency because it can severely damage your red blood cells, leading to anemia (hemolysis). If you are of African or Mediterranean descent, you may be at higher risk for G6PD deficiency and should be tested to see if you have this condition before starting Elitek.

Elitek can cause a condition that affects the ability of your red blood cells to carry oxygen (methemoglobinemia). Do not restart Elitek if this effect occurs. Consult your doctor for more details.

Elitek can interfere with accurate measurements of uric acid in the blood, resulting in falsely low levels. Be sure to tell all lab personnel that you are using Elitek.


Elitek is used for:

Preventing high blood levels of uric acid from occurring in patients with certain types of cancer (eg, leukemia, lymphoma, solid malignant tumors) who are receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment.

Elitek is a urate-oxidase enzyme. When chemotherapy is given, cancer cells are destroyed, releasing large amounts of uric acid into the blood. Elitek works by allowing uric acid to be more easily removed from the body by the kidneys.

Do NOT use Elitek if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Elitek you have a history of blood problems such as methemoglobinemia (a bluish discoloration to the skin and mucous membranes) or hemolysis after receiving Elitek you have a metabolic condition called G6PD deficiency

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Elitek:

Some medical conditions may interact with Elitek. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have kidney disease or are dehydrated

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Elitek. However, no specific interactions with Elitek are known at this time.

Ask your health care provider if Elitek may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Elitek:

Use Elitek as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Elitek is usually given as an injection at your doctor's office, hospital, or clinic. Ask your doctor or pharmacist any questions that you may have about Elitek. Do not shake Elitek. Do not use Elitek if it contains particles, is cloudy or discolored, or if the vial is cracked or damaged. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Ask your health care provider how to dispose of these materials after use. Follow all local rules for disposal. If you miss a dose of Elitek, contact your doctor immediately to establish a new dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Elitek.

Important safety information: Elitek may interfere with certain lab tests, including uric acid tests. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are using Elitek because they must follow special procedures to process your blood samples. Lab tests, including uric acid levels, may be performed while you use Elitek. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Elitek with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 2 years old; they may be more sensitive to its effects. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Elitek while you are pregnant. It is not known if Elitek is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Elitek. Possible side effects of Elitek:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; headache; mouth sores or ulcers; nausea; stomach pain; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blue or gray skin color; chest pain; chills; coughing up blood; dark urine; fever; irregular heartbeat; numbness or tingling of the skin; persistent sore throat; severe dizziness; shortness of breath, trouble breathing, or wheezing; swelling of the hands or feet; weakness; yellowing of the eyes and skin.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Elitek side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Elitek:

Elitek is usually handled and stored by a health care provider. If you are using Elitek at home, store Elitek as directed by your pharmacist or health care provider. Keep Elitek out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Elitek, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Elitek is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Elitek. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Elitek resources Elitek Side Effects (in more detail) Elitek Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Elitek Support Group 0 Reviews for Elitek - Add your own review/rating Elitek Prescribing Information (FDA) Elitek Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Elitek Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Elitek Monograph (AHFS DI) Rasburicase Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Elitek with other medications Hyperuricemia Secondary to Chemotherapy
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Boots Anaesthetic & Antibiotic Throat Lozenges


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Boots Anaesthetic and Antibiotic Throat Lozenges

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition Active ingredient   Tyrothricin USP 1.0 mg/lozenge Benzocaine BP Fine Pdr Ph Eur 5.0 mg/lozenge 3. Pharmaceutical Form

Tablet

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

For the relief of sore throats.

For oral administration.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Adults and children over 12 years: one lozenge to be sucked slowly as required. Not more than eight lozenges to be taken in any one day.

Children under 12 years: not suitable for children under 12 years.

Elderly: The normal adult dose is still appropriate in the elderly.

4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to ester type local anaesthetics or the antibiotic tyrothricin, or any of the other ingredients.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Boots Anaesthetic and Antibiotic Throat Lozenges should be used with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis, patients with low plasma cholinesterase concentrations or in those receiving anticholinesterases.

If symptoms persist consult your doctor.

Warning: do no exceed the stated dose.

Keep all medicines out of the reach of children.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

These lozenges may interfere with the action of sulphonamides.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

The safety of Boots Anaesthetic and Antibiotic Throat Lozenges during pregnancy and lactation has not been established. As local anaesthetics can cross the placenta, it is recommended that this product is not taken during pregnancy.

No information on the use of this product in lactation is available and it is recommended that this product is not taken whilst breast feeding.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

No adverse effects known.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Occasional hypersensitivity reaction and soreness of the tongue. Methaemoglobinaemia can rarely occur.

4.9 Overdose

Overdosage with Boots Anaesthetic and Antibiotic Throat Lozenges will produce excessive anaesthesia in the upper alimentary tract. Treatment should be symptomatic and supportive. Gastric lavage and emesis may be required.

In severe overdosage, methaemoglobinaemia may occur and should be treated by intravenous administration of 1% solution of methylene blue in a dose of 1-4 mg per kg of bodyweight.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Tyrothricin is an antibiotic. It is a mixture consisting of gramicidin and tyrocidine, both components being mixtures of polypeptides. It is active against many gram positive bacteria.

Benzocaine is a local anaesthetic of the ester type, used exclusively for surface anaesthesia.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Not applicable

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Not applicable

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Sodium Chloride

Icing sugar

Industrial methylated spirit

Acacia pdrd sieved

Purified water

Clove leaf oil

Star anise Oil

Isopropyl alcohol

Magnesium stearate

Carmine extract OF63

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not applicable

6.3 Shelf Life

24 months

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Do not store above 25EC.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

A push-through blister pack consisting of a clear PVC blister heat sealed to aluminium foil, each carton contains 24 lozenges contained in a cardboard carton.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

Not applicable.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

The Boots Company PLC

1 Thane Road West

Nottingham NG2 3AA

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 0014/5172R

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

Date of last renewal: 19 November 1990

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

February 2011


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pegloticase


Generic Name: pegloticase (peg LOE ti kase)
Brand Names: Krystexxa

What is pegloticase?

Pegloticase is an enzyme that metabolizes uric acid into a harmless chemical that is eliminated from the body in urine.

Pegloticase is used to treat chronic gout. Pegloticase is usually given after other gout medications have been tried without successful treatment of symptoms.

Pegloticase may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about pegloticase? You should not receive pegloticase if you are allergic to it, or if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

To make sure you can safely receive pegloticase, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure.

You may be given other medications to prevent certain side effects of pegloticase. You may need to start taking these medications at least a week before you receive your pegloticase injection. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor's advice. Tell your caregiver right away if you feel itchy, nervous, light-headed, short of breath, or have a fast heartbeat, chest discomfort, or redness of your skin when the medicine is injected into your vein. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking pegloticase? You should not receive pegloticase if you are allergic to it, or if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

To make sure you can safely take pegloticase, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

congestive heart failure;

other heart problems; or

high blood pressure.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether pegloticase will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether pegloticase passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using pegloticase. How should I take pegloticase?

Pegloticase is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting. Pegloticase must be given slowly, and the IV infusion can take at least 2 hours to complete.

You may be given other medications to prevent certain side effects of pegloticase. You may need to start taking these medications at least a week before you receive your pegloticase injection. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor's advice.

Pegloticase is usually given once every 2 weeks. Follow your doctor's dosing instructions very carefully.

When you first start using pegloticase, you may have an increase in gout flares. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 3 months of treatment.

Your doctor may recommend other gout medications during the first 6 months of your treatment with pegloticase.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. This will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with pegloticase. Visit your doctor regularly.

See also: Pegloticase dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since pegloticase is given by a healthcare professional, you are not likely to miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking pegloticase?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Pegloticase side effects Some people receiving a pegloticase injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Infusion reactions may also occur after the injection is given. Tell your caregiver right away if you feel itchy, nervous, light-headed, short of breath, or have a fast heartbeat, chest discomfort, or redness of your skin during the injection. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; wheezing, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

chest pain; or

flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling).

Less serious side effects may include:

new gout flares;

nausea, vomiting, constipation;

easy bruising; or

stuffy nose, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Pegloticase Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Gout:

The recommended dose and regimen of pegloticase for adult patients is 8 mg given as an intravenous infusion every two weeks.
The pegloticase admixture should only be administered by intravenous infusion over no less than 120 minutes via gravity feed, syringe type pump, or infusion pump.
Patients should receive preinfusion medications (e.g. antihistamines, corticosteroids), to minimize the risk of anaphylaxis and infusion reactions. Pegloticase should be administered in a healthcare setting and by healthcare providers prepared to manage anaphylaxis and infusion reactions, and observe patients for an appropriate period of time after administration.

What other drugs will affect pegloticase?

There may be other drugs that can interact with pegloticase. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More pegloticase resources Pegloticase Side Effects (in more detail)Pegloticase DosagePegloticase Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingPegloticase Drug InteractionsPegloticase Support Group2 Reviews for Pegloticase - Add your own review/rating pegloticase Intravenous Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Pegloticase Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Pegloticase MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Pegloticase Monograph (AHFS DI) Krystexxa Prescribing Information (FDA) Krystexxa Consumer Overview Compare pegloticase with other medications Gout Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about pegloticase.

See also: pegloticase side effects (in more detail)


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primaquine


Generic Name: primaquine (PRIM a kwin)
Brand Names:

What is primaquine?

Primaquine is an antimalarial drug. The exact way that primaquine works is unknown.

Primaquine is used to treat and prevent malaria.

Primaquine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about primaquine?

Notify your doctor if your urine turns dark.

Use caution when driving or performing other hazardous activities until you know how this medication affects you. Primaquine may cause visual disturbances such as blurred vision, misty vision, and difficulty focusing. Report any vision or hearing changes to your doctor. Who should not take primaquine?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

a history of an allergic reaction to previous primaquine therapy,

glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency,

rheumatoid arthritis,

lupus erythematosus, or

quinacrine (Atabrine) therapy.

You may not be able to take primaquine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during your therapy if you have any of the conditions listed above.

It is not known whether primaquine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take primaquine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known how primaquine will affect a nursing baby. Do not take primaquine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take primaquine?

Take primaquine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Take primaquine with food to lessen stomach upset. Store primaquine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Primaquine dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and only take your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a primaquine overdose include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, and stomach cramps.

What should I avoid while taking primaquine? Use caution when driving or performing other hazardous activities until you know how this medication affects you. Primaquine may cause visual disturbances such as blurred vision, misty vision, and difficulty focusing. Report any vision or hearing changes to your doctor. Primaquine side effects Stop taking primaquine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (flushing; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face, difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; vision problems; a rash; or itching).

Notify your doctor if you experience darkening of your urine.

Nausea, stomach pain or upset, vomiting, and loss of appetite may also occur during therapy.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Primaquine Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria:

Manufacturer recommendation: 15 mg base (26.3 mg salt) orally once a day for 14 days
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation: 30 mg base (52.6 mg salt) orally once a day for 14 days; for patients with borderline glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency or as an alternative regimen, 45 mg base (78.9 mg salt) orally once a week for 8 weeks has been recommended

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria Prophylaxis:

Primary prophylaxis of malaria (including chloroquine-resistant malaria):
CDC recommendation: 30 mg base (52.6 mg salt) orally once a day
Primaquine should be taken 1 to 2 days before travel to malarious areas, while in such areas, and for 7 days after leaving the areas. It is generally used for short-duration travel to areas with primarily P vivax.
Terminal prophylaxis of P vivax or P ovale malaria:
Manufacturer recommendation: 15 mg base (26.3 mg salt) orally once a day for 14 days
CDC recommendation: 30 mg base (52.6 mg salt) orally once a day for 14 days

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumocystis Pneumonia:

15 to 30 mg base (26.3 to 52.6 mg salt) orally once a day for 21 days; effective in combination with clindamycin
Primaquine plus clindamycin is recommended as an alternative regimen by the CDC, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Seriously ill patients should receive IV trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or pentamidine therapy.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Malaria:

Manufacturer recommendation: 0.3 mg/kg base (0.526 mg/kg salt) orally once a day for 14 days (not to exceed 15 mg base/day)
CDC recommendation: 0.5 mg/kg base (0.88 mg/kg salt) orally once a day for 14 days (not to exceed 30 mg base/day); for patients with borderline G6PD deficiency or as an alternative regimen, 0.75 mg/kg base (1.3 mg/kg salt) orally once a week for 8 weeks (not to exceed 45 mg base/week) has been recommended

Usual Pediatric Dose for Malaria Prophylaxis:

Primary prophylaxis of malaria (including chloroquine-resistant malaria):
CDC recommendation: 0.5 mg/kg base (0.88 mg/kg salt) orally once a day (not to exceed 30 mg base/day)
Primaquine should be taken 1 to 2 days before travel to malarious areas, while in such areas, and for 7 days after leaving the areas. It is generally used for short-duration travel to areas with primarily P vivax.
Terminal prophylaxis of P vivax or P ovale malaria:
Manufacturer recommendation: 0.3 mg/kg base (0.526 mg/kg salt) orally once a day for 14 days (not to exceed 15 mg base/day)
CDC recommendation: 0.5 mg/kg base (0.88 mg/kg salt) orally once a day for 14 days (not to exceed 30 mg base/day)

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumocystis Pneumonia:

0.3 mg/kg base (0.526 mg/kg salt) orally once a day for 21 days (not to exceed 30 mg base/day); effective in combination with clindamycin
Primaquine plus clindamycin is recommended as an alternative regimen by the CDC, NIH, IDSA, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and American Academy of Pediatrics. Seriously ill patients should receive IV trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or pentamidine therapy.

What other drugs will affect primaquine?

Do not take primaquine if you have recently taken quinacrine (Atabrine). These two drugs are similar and can cause dangerous side effects if they are taken together.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with primaquine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More primaquine resources Primaquine Side Effects (in more detail) Primaquine Dosage Primaquine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Primaquine Drug Interactions Primaquine Support Group 0 Reviews for Primaquine - Add your own review/rating primaquine Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Primaquine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Primaquine Prescribing Information (FDA) Primaquine Phosphate Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare primaquine with other medications Malaria Malaria Prevention Pneumocystis Pneumonia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about primaquine.

See also: primaquine side effects (in more detail)


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C-Time


Generic Name: ascorbic acid (vitamin C) (as KORE bik AS id)
Brand Names: Acerola, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cecon, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Ester-C, N Ice with Vitamin C, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips

What is ascorbic acid?

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) occurs naturally in foods such as citrus fruit, tomatoes, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Ascorbic acid is important for bones and connective tissues, muscles, and blood vessels. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron, which is needed for red blood cell production.

Ascorbic acid is used to treat and prevent vitamin C deficiency.

Ascorbic acid may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about ascorbic acid? You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to ascorbic acid.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using ascorbic acid if you have kidney disease or a history of kidney stones, liver disease (especially cirrhosis), or an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

It is not known whether ascorbic acid is harmful to an unborn baby or a nursing baby. Some vitamins and minerals are needed during pregnancy or for breast milk production, but some may be harmful if taken in large doses. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Ascorbic acid can be harmful to the kidneys, and this effect is increased when ascorbic acid is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor if you are receiving chemotherapy, or using medicines to treat a bowel disorder, medication to prevent organ transplant rejection, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, or any injected antibiotics. You may need dose adjustments or special tests when taking any of these medications together with ascorbic acid.

Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor about all other medications you take.

Stop using ascorbic acid and call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your lower back or side, blood in your urine, pain when you urinate, severe or ongoing diarrhea, or feel like you might pass out. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking ascorbic acid? You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to ascorbic acid.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using ascorbic acid if you have:

kidney disease or a history of kidney stones; liver disease (especially cirrhosis); or

an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

It is not known whether ascorbic acid is harmful to an unborn baby. Some vitamins and minerals can harm an unborn baby if taken in large doses. You may need to use a prenatal vitamin specially formulated for pregnant women. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are pregnant. Ascorbic acid can pass into breast milk, but it is not known whether it would be harmful to a nursing baby. Some vitamins and minerals are needed for breast milk production, but some may harm a nursing baby. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take ascorbic acid?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

The recommended dietary allowance of ascorbic acid increases with age, and whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Follow your doctor's instructions. You may also consult the National Academy of Sciences "Dietary Reference Intake" or the U.S. Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Reference Intake" (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances" or RDA) listings for more information.

Take the ascorbic acid regular tablet or capsule with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

The ascorbic acid chewable tablet must be chewed before swallowing. Ascorbic acid gum may be chewed over a long period and then spit out and thrown away.

Remove the disintegrating tablet from the package using dry hands, and place the tablet in your mouth. It will begin to dissolve right away. Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing. Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Dissolve the powder form of ascorbic acid in a small amount of water or other liquid. Follow the directions on the package label about what types of liquid you may use. Stir the mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Store ascorbic acid at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ascorbic acid is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while taking ascorbic acid?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Smoking can make ascorbic acid less effective. Ascorbic acid side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using ascorbic acid and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe pain in your lower back or side;

blood in your urine;

pain when you urinate;

severe or ongoing diarrhea; or

feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects may include:

heartburn, stomach cramps;

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;

headache, dizziness;

flushing (warmth, redness, or tingling under your skin);

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect ascorbic acid?

Ascorbic acid can be harmful to the kidneys, and this effect is increased when ascorbic acid is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor if you are receiving chemotherapy, or using medicines to treat a bowel disorder, medication to prevent organ transplant rejection, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, or any injected antibiotics.

You may need dose adjustments or special tests when taking any of these medications together with ascorbic acid.

The following drugs can interact with ascorbic acid. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol);

fluphenazine (Permitil);

indinavir (Crixivan);

levodopa (Atamet, Larodopa, Parcopa, Sinemet);

nicotine patches (Nicoderm, Habitrol, Commit);

antacids that contain aluminum (such as Amphojel, Maalox, Mylanta, Rulox, and others);

an antibiotic such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap); or

a barbiturate such as butabarbital (Butisol), secobarbital (Seconal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), or phenobarbital (Solfoton);

birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, including Premarin, Estratest, Vivelle, Climara, Estring, Estrace, and others; or

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ascorbic acid. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More C-Time resources C-Time Side Effects (in more detail) C-Time Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding C-Time Drug Interactions C-Time Support Group 0 Reviews for C-Time - Add your own review/rating Ascorbic Acid Monograph (AHFS DI) ascorbic acid Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Ascorbic Acid MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acerola Natural MedFacts for Consumers (Wolters Kluwer) Acerola Natural MedFacts for Professionals (Wolters Kluwer) Cecon Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Cenolate Injection MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Cevi-Bid Controlled-Release Capsules MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare C-Time with other medications Dietary Supplementation Scurvy Urinary Acidification Where can I get more information? Your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider may have more information about ascorbic acid.

See also: C-Time side effects (in more detail)


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Ester-C


Generic Name: ascorbic acid (vitamin C) (as KORE bik AS id)
Brand Names: Acerola, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cecon, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Ester-C, N Ice with Vitamin C, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips

What is ascorbic acid?

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) occurs naturally in foods such as citrus fruit, tomatoes, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Ascorbic acid is important for bones and connective tissues, muscles, and blood vessels. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron, which is needed for red blood cell production.

Ascorbic acid is used to treat and prevent vitamin C deficiency.

Ascorbic acid may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about ascorbic acid? You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to ascorbic acid.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using ascorbic acid if you have kidney disease or a history of kidney stones, liver disease (especially cirrhosis), or an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

It is not known whether ascorbic acid is harmful to an unborn baby or a nursing baby. Some vitamins and minerals are needed during pregnancy or for breast milk production, but some may be harmful if taken in large doses. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Ascorbic acid can be harmful to the kidneys, and this effect is increased when ascorbic acid is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor if you are receiving chemotherapy, or using medicines to treat a bowel disorder, medication to prevent organ transplant rejection, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, or any injected antibiotics. You may need dose adjustments or special tests when taking any of these medications together with ascorbic acid.

Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor about all other medications you take.

Stop using ascorbic acid and call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your lower back or side, blood in your urine, pain when you urinate, severe or ongoing diarrhea, or feel like you might pass out. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking ascorbic acid? You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to ascorbic acid.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using ascorbic acid if you have:

kidney disease or a history of kidney stones; liver disease (especially cirrhosis); or

an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

It is not known whether ascorbic acid is harmful to an unborn baby. Some vitamins and minerals can harm an unborn baby if taken in large doses. You may need to use a prenatal vitamin specially formulated for pregnant women. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are pregnant. Ascorbic acid can pass into breast milk, but it is not known whether it would be harmful to a nursing baby. Some vitamins and minerals are needed for breast milk production, but some may harm a nursing baby. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take ascorbic acid?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

The recommended dietary allowance of ascorbic acid increases with age, and whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Follow your doctor's instructions. You may also consult the National Academy of Sciences "Dietary Reference Intake" or the U.S. Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Reference Intake" (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances" or RDA) listings for more information.

Take the ascorbic acid regular tablet or capsule with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

The ascorbic acid chewable tablet must be chewed before swallowing. Ascorbic acid gum may be chewed over a long period and then spit out and thrown away.

Remove the disintegrating tablet from the package using dry hands, and place the tablet in your mouth. It will begin to dissolve right away. Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing. Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Dissolve the powder form of ascorbic acid in a small amount of water or other liquid. Follow the directions on the package label about what types of liquid you may use. Stir the mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Store ascorbic acid at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ascorbic acid is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while taking ascorbic acid?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Smoking can make ascorbic acid less effective. Ascorbic acid side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using ascorbic acid and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe pain in your lower back or side;

blood in your urine;

pain when you urinate;

severe or ongoing diarrhea; or

feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects may include:

heartburn, stomach cramps;

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;

headache, dizziness;

flushing (warmth, redness, or tingling under your skin);

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect ascorbic acid?

Ascorbic acid can be harmful to the kidneys, and this effect is increased when ascorbic acid is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor if you are receiving chemotherapy, or using medicines to treat a bowel disorder, medication to prevent organ transplant rejection, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, or any injected antibiotics.

You may need dose adjustments or special tests when taking any of these medications together with ascorbic acid.

The following drugs can interact with ascorbic acid. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol);

fluphenazine (Permitil);

indinavir (Crixivan);

levodopa (Atamet, Larodopa, Parcopa, Sinemet);

nicotine patches (Nicoderm, Habitrol, Commit);

antacids that contain aluminum (such as Amphojel, Maalox, Mylanta, Rulox, and others);

an antibiotic such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap); or

a barbiturate such as butabarbital (Butisol), secobarbital (Seconal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), or phenobarbital (Solfoton);

birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, including Premarin, Estratest, Vivelle, Climara, Estring, Estrace, and others; or

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ascorbic acid. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Ester-C resources Ester-C Side Effects (in more detail) Ester-C Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Ester-C Drug Interactions Ester-C Support Group 0 Reviews for Ester-C - Add your own review/rating Ascorbic Acid Monograph (AHFS DI) ascorbic acid Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Ascorbic Acid MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acerola Natural MedFacts for Consumers (Wolters Kluwer) Acerola Natural MedFacts for Professionals (Wolters Kluwer) Cecon Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Cenolate Injection MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Cevi-Bid Controlled-Release Capsules MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Ester-C with other medications Dietary Supplementation Scurvy Urinary Acidification Where can I get more information? Your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider may have more information about ascorbic acid.

See also: Ester-C side effects (in more detail)


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Vicks Vitamin C Drops


Generic Name: ascorbic acid (vitamin C) (as KORE bik AS id)
Brand Names: Acerola, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cecon, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Ester-C, N Ice with Vitamin C, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips

What is ascorbic acid?

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) occurs naturally in foods such as citrus fruit, tomatoes, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Ascorbic acid is important for bones and connective tissues, muscles, and blood vessels. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron, which is needed for red blood cell production.

Ascorbic acid is used to treat and prevent vitamin C deficiency.

Ascorbic acid may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about ascorbic acid? You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to ascorbic acid.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using ascorbic acid if you have kidney disease or a history of kidney stones, liver disease (especially cirrhosis), or an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

It is not known whether ascorbic acid is harmful to an unborn baby or a nursing baby. Some vitamins and minerals are needed during pregnancy or for breast milk production, but some may be harmful if taken in large doses. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Ascorbic acid can be harmful to the kidneys, and this effect is increased when ascorbic acid is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor if you are receiving chemotherapy, or using medicines to treat a bowel disorder, medication to prevent organ transplant rejection, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, or any injected antibiotics. You may need dose adjustments or special tests when taking any of these medications together with ascorbic acid.

Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor about all other medications you take.

Stop using ascorbic acid and call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your lower back or side, blood in your urine, pain when you urinate, severe or ongoing diarrhea, or feel like you might pass out. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking ascorbic acid? You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to ascorbic acid.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using ascorbic acid if you have:

kidney disease or a history of kidney stones; liver disease (especially cirrhosis); or

an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

It is not known whether ascorbic acid is harmful to an unborn baby. Some vitamins and minerals can harm an unborn baby if taken in large doses. You may need to use a prenatal vitamin specially formulated for pregnant women. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are pregnant. Ascorbic acid can pass into breast milk, but it is not known whether it would be harmful to a nursing baby. Some vitamins and minerals are needed for breast milk production, but some may harm a nursing baby. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take ascorbic acid?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

The recommended dietary allowance of ascorbic acid increases with age, and whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Follow your doctor's instructions. You may also consult the National Academy of Sciences "Dietary Reference Intake" or the U.S. Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Reference Intake" (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances" or RDA) listings for more information.

Take the ascorbic acid regular tablet or capsule with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

The ascorbic acid chewable tablet must be chewed before swallowing. Ascorbic acid gum may be chewed over a long period and then spit out and thrown away.

Remove the disintegrating tablet from the package using dry hands, and place the tablet in your mouth. It will begin to dissolve right away. Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing. Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Dissolve the powder form of ascorbic acid in a small amount of water or other liquid. Follow the directions on the package label about what types of liquid you may use. Stir the mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Store ascorbic acid at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ascorbic acid is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while taking ascorbic acid?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Smoking can make ascorbic acid less effective. Ascorbic acid side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using ascorbic acid and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe pain in your lower back or side;

blood in your urine;

pain when you urinate;

severe or ongoing diarrhea; or

feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects may include:

heartburn, stomach cramps;

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;

headache, dizziness;

flushing (warmth, redness, or tingling under your skin);

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect ascorbic acid?

Ascorbic acid can be harmful to the kidneys, and this effect is increased when ascorbic acid is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor if you are receiving chemotherapy, or using medicines to treat a bowel disorder, medication to prevent organ transplant rejection, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, or any injected antibiotics.

You may need dose adjustments or special tests when taking any of these medications together with ascorbic acid.

The following drugs can interact with ascorbic acid. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol);

fluphenazine (Permitil);

indinavir (Crixivan);

levodopa (Atamet, Larodopa, Parcopa, Sinemet);

nicotine patches (Nicoderm, Habitrol, Commit);

antacids that contain aluminum (such as Amphojel, Maalox, Mylanta, Rulox, and others);

an antibiotic such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap); or

a barbiturate such as butabarbital (Butisol), secobarbital (Seconal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), or phenobarbital (Solfoton);

birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, including Premarin, Estratest, Vivelle, Climara, Estring, Estrace, and others; or

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ascorbic acid. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Vicks Vitamin C Drops resources Vicks Vitamin C Drops Side Effects (in more detail) Vicks Vitamin C Drops Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Vicks Vitamin C Drops Drug Interactions Vicks Vitamin C Drops Support Group 0 Reviews for Vicks Vitamin C - Add your own review/rating Ascorbic Acid Monograph (AHFS DI) ascorbic acid Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Ascorbic Acid MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acerola Natural MedFacts for Consumers (Wolters Kluwer) Acerola Natural MedFacts for Professionals (Wolters Kluwer) Cecon Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Cenolate Injection MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Cevi-Bid Controlled-Release Capsules MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Vicks Vitamin C Drops with other medications Dietary Supplementation Scurvy Urinary Acidification Where can I get more information? Your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider may have more information about ascorbic acid.

See also: Vicks Vitamin C side effects (in more detail)


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Aczone topical


Generic Name: Dapsone topical
Class: Skin and Mucous Membrane Agents, Miscellaneous
ATC Class: D10AX05
Chemical Name: Diaminodiphenylsulfone
Molecular Formula: C12H12N2O2S
CAS Number: 80-08-0

Introduction

Synthetic sulfone1 2 3 5 18 with anti-infective and anti-inflammatory effects.2 3 5 18

Uses for Aczone Acne Vulgaris

Topical treatment of acne vulgaris.1 2 3 4 11

Effective against inflammatory acne lesions and, to a lesser extent, noninflammatory acne lesions.2 3

Aczone Dosage and Administration Administration Topical Administration

Administer topically to the skin as a 5% gel.1

For external use only.1 Do not use orally or intravaginally; avoid contact with the mouth and eyes.1

Gently cleanse and dry the acne-affected area prior to application.1 Apply a pea-sized amount of dapsone 5% gel in a thin layer; rub in gently and completely.1

The gel is gritty with visible drug substance particles.1 Wash hands after applying the gel.1

Dosage Pediatric Patients Acne Vulgaris Topical

Children ?12 years of age: Apply a thin layer of dapsone 5% gel to cleansed affected area twice daily.1

Reassess use of the drug if improvement does not occur after 12 weeks of treatment.1

Has been used for up to 12 months in clinical studies.3

Adults Acne Vulgaris Topical

Apply a thin layer of dapsone 5% gel to the cleansed affected area twice daily.1

Reassess use of the drug if improvement does not occur after 12 weeks of treatment.1

Has been used for up to 12 months in clinical studies.3

Cautions for Aczone Contraindications

Manufacturer states none known.1

Warnings/Precautions Sensitivity Reactions

Moderate erythema has been reported when topical dapsone 5% gel was evaluated in combined contact sensitization/irritation studies.1 Pruritus,2 3 6 rash,3 and contact dermatitis6 were reported in some patients receiving the topical gel for treatment of acne vulgaris.

Oral dapsone has been associated with hypersensitivity reactions that include severe dermatologic reactions.1 7 16 (See Dermatologic Reactions under Cautions.) Hypersensitivity reactions reported with oral dapsone have also included fever, malaise, hepatitis, and hemolysis.10

Topical dapsone did not induce phototoxicity or photoallergy in human dermal safety studies.1

Hematologic Effects

Oral dapsone has been associated with dose-related hemolysis and hemolytic anemia.1 14 Agranulocytosis also reported in patients receiving oral dapsone.1 9 Individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are more prone to hemolysis when receiving certain drugs.1 G6PD deficiency is most prevalent in populations of African, South Asian, Middle Eastern, and Mediterranean ancestry.1

There were no reports of clinically relevant hemolysis or hemolytic anemia in clinical studies evaluating topical dapsone 5% gel in individuals with acne vulgaris, including individuals with G6PD deficiency.1 2 3 6 However, laboratory changes suggestive of hemolysis (slight decreases in hemoglobin) occurred in some individuals with G6PD deficiency using the topical gel.1 2 6

If signs and symptoms suggestive of hemolytic anemia occur, discontinue topical dapsone therapy.1

Because of the potential for hemolytic reactions, do not use topical dapsone 5% gel in individuals receiving oral dapsone or antimalarial agents.1 (See Specific Drugs under Interactions.)

Concomitant use of topical dapsone 5% gel and co-trimoxazole may increase the risk of hemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency.1 (See Specific Drugs under Interactions.)

Peripheral Neuropathy

Oral dapsone has been associated with peripheral neuropathy (motor loss and muscle weakness).1

Peripheral neuropathy was not reported in clinical studies evaluating topical dapsone 5% gel for the treatment of acne vulgaris.1

Dermatologic Reactions

Oral dapsone has been associated with serious skin reactions, including toxic epidermal necrolysis, erythema multiforme, morbilliform and scarlatiniform reactions, bullous and exfoliative dermatitis, erythema nodosum, and urticaria.1 7

Although erythema,1 pruritus,2 3 and rash3 were reported in clinical studies evaluating topical dapsone 5% gel for the treatment of acne vulgaris, more severe dermatologic reactions were not reported.1

Specific Populations Pregnancy

Category C.1

Oral dapsone has been associated with embryocidal effects in rats and rabbits when used in dosages approximately 800 and 500 times, respectively, the systemic exposure (based on AUC) observed in human females receiving the maximum recommended dosage of topical dapsone 5% gel.1 These effects were probably secondary to maternal toxicity.1

Use during pregnancy only if potential benefits outweigh potential risks to the fetus.1

Lactation

Distributed into milk following oral administration.1 Systemic absorption is low following topical application of dapsone 5% gel; however, because of the potential to cause adverse reactions in nursing infants, discontinue nursing or discontinue topical dapsone therapy.1

Pediatric Use

Safety and efficacy not established in children <12 years of age.1

Geriatric Use

Insufficient experience with topical dapsone 5% gel in geriatric patients ?65 years of age to determine whether such individuals respond differently than younger individuals.1

Common Adverse Effects

Local reactions at the application site (oiliness/peeling, dryness, erythema).1 2

Interactions for Aczone

Although only small amounts of dapsone are absorbed systemically following topical application to skin, the possibility that drug interactions could occur should be considered.1 Concomitant use of oral dapsone and certain drugs (e.g., rifampin, anticonvulsants, St. John's wort) may increase the formation of dapsone hydroxylamine, a dapsone metabolite associated with hemolysis.1 In addition, concomitant use of oral dapsone and folic acid antagonists (e.g., pyrimethamine) may increase the likelihood of adverse hematologic effects.1

Specific Drugs

Drug

Interaction

Comments

Antimalarial agents

Increased risk of hemolytic reactions if topical dapsone used concomitantly with antimalarial agents1

Do not use topical dapsone in patients receiving antimalarial agents1

Benzoyl peroxide

In vitro, combinations of topical dapsone 5% gel and topical benzoyl peroxide resulted in an orange discoloration17

Concomitant use of topical dapsone 5% gel and topical benzoyl peroxide in individuals with acne vulgaris may result in temporary local yellow or orange discoloration of the skin and facial hair;1 usually resolves in 4–57 days1

Co-trimoxazole

Concomitant use of topical dapsone 5% gel and oral co-trimoxazole results in increased systemic exposure to dapsone and dapsone metabolites; pharmacokinetics of co-trimoxazole not affected1 5

Possible increased risk of hemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency1

Dapsone, oral

Increased risk of hemolytic reactions if oral and topical dapsone used concomitantly1

Do not use topical dapsone in patients receiving oral dapsone1

Aczone Pharmacokinetics Absorption Bioavailability

Absorbed systemically following topical application to skin.1 5

In patients with acne vulgaris skin lesions, plasma concentrations of dapsone are detectable within 2 hours after the first dose of topical dapsone 5% gel.5

After topical application of dapsone 5% gel to acne vulgaris skin lesions on the face, upper back, shoulders, and/or upper chest (up to approximately 22.5% of total body surface area) twice daily for 14 days, mean peak plasma concentrations of the drug were 19.4 ng/mL and the median time to peak concentrations after a dose was 9 hours.5

In a long-term safety study of dapsone 5% gel, there was no evidence that systemic exposure increases over time.1

Systemic exposure (AUC) following a 14-day regimen of dapsone 5% gel is 126 times lower than systemic exposure (AUC) following a single 100-mg dose of oral dapsone.5

Special Populations

Systemic dapsone exposure following topical application of dapsone 5% gel in children 12–15 years of age is similar to that reported in those ?16 years of age.1

Stability Storage Topical Gel

20–25°C (may be exposed to 15–30°C).1 Do not freeze.1

ActionsActions

Synthetic sulfone1 2 3 5 18 with anti-infective and anti-inflammatory effects.3 5 18

For dermatologic use, dapsone is commercially available in an aqueous gel base.1

Mechanism of action in the treatment of acne vulgaris not known, but may result from a combination of both anti-inflammatory and anti-infective effects.1 2 3 18

Dapsone exerts a variety of anti-inflammatory effects.2 3 18 The drug may inhibit myeloperoxidase- and hydrogen peroxide-based cytotoxic systems in neutrophils or may act as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species, thereby minimizing inflammation associated with generation of these reactive species.18

The anti-infective effects of dapsone involve inhibition of folic acid synthesis in susceptible organisms.18

In vitro, dapsone has some antibacterial activity against Propionibacterium acnes.18 It is not known whether topical dapsone therapy results in decreased susceptibility of P. acnes to other drugs used to treat acne.1

Advice to Patients

Importance of using as directed by the clinician and only for condition prescribed.1

Advise patient that topical dapsone is for external use only and should not be used orally or intravaginally; importance of avoiding contact with the mouth and eyes.1

Importance of storing at room temperature and protecting the drug from freezing.1

Importance of informing clinician of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency.1

Importance of reporting any signs of adverse reactions to a clinician.1

Importance of informing clinician of existing or contemplated concomitant therapy, including prescription and OTC drugs, especially topical agents applied to the skin (e.g., preparations containing benzoyl peroxide).1

Importance of women informing clinicians if they are or plan to become pregnant or plan to breast-feed.1

Importance of informing patients of other important precautionary information.1 (See Cautions.)

Preparations

Excipients in commercially available drug preparations may have clinically important effects in some individuals; consult specific product labeling for details.

Dapsone

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Topical

Gel

5%

Aczone

Allergan

Disclaimer

This report on medications is for your information only, and is not considered individual patient advice. Because of the changing nature of drug information, please consult your physician or pharmacist about specific clinical use.

The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. and Drugs.com represent that the information provided hereunder was formulated with a reasonable standard of care, and in conformity with professional standards in the field. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. and Drugs.com make no representations or warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, any implied warranty of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose, with respect to such information and specifically disclaims all such warranties. Users are advised that decisions regarding drug therapy are complex medical decisions requiring the independent, informed decision of an appropriate health care professional, and the information is provided for informational purposes only. The entire monograph for a drug should be reviewed for a thorough understanding of the drug's actions, uses and side effects. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. and Drugs.com do not endorse or recommend the use of any drug. The information is not a substitute for medical care.

AHFS Drug Information. © Copyright, 1959-2011, Selected Revisions July 2010. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 7272 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.

References

1. Allergan. Aczone (dapsone) gel 5% prescribing information. Irvine, CA. 2009 Mar.

2. Draelos ZD, Carter E, Maloney JM et al. Two randomized studies demonstrate the efficacy and safety of dapsone gel, 5% for the treatment of acne vulgaris. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007; 56:439.e1-10.

3. Lucky AW, Maloney JM, Roberts J et al. Dapsone gel 5% for the treatment of acne vulgaris: safety and efficacy of long-term (1 year) treatment. J Drugs Dermatol. 2007; 6:981-7. [PubMed 17966175]

4. Raimer S, Maloney JM, Bourcier M et al. Efficacy and safety of dapsone gel 5% for the treatment of acne vulgaris in adolescents. Cutis. 2008; 81:171-8. [PubMed 18441772]

5. Thiboutot DM, Willmer J, Sharata H et al. Pharmacokinetics of dapsone gel, 5% for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Clin Pharmacokinet. 2007; 46:697-712. [PubMed 17655376]

6. Piette WW, Taylor S, Pariser D et al. Hematologic safety of dapsone gel, 5%, for topical treatment of acne vulgaris. Arch Dermatol. 2008; 144:1564-70. [PubMed 19075138]

7. Agrawal S, Agarwalla A. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome: a clinico-epidemiological review. J Dermatol. 2005; 32:883-9. [PubMed 16361748]

9. Coleman MD. Dapsone-mediated agranulocytosis: risks, possible mechanisms and prevention. Toxicology. 2001; 162:53-60. [PubMed 11311458]

10. Corp CC, Ghishan FK. The sulfone syndrome complicated by pancreatitis and pleural effusion in an adolescent receiving dapsone for treatment of acne vulgaris. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1998; 26:103-5. [PubMed 9443128]

11. Del Rosso JQ. Newer topical therapies for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Cutis. 2007; 80:400-10. [PubMed 18189027]

14. Ismail R. Acne fulminans with dapsone induced haemolysis: a case report. Med J Malaysia. 1987; 42:124-6. [PubMed 2971861]

16. Tomecki KJ, Catalano CJ. Dapsone hypersensitivity. The sulfone syndrome revisited. Arch Dermatol. 1981; 117:38-9. [PubMed 6450569]

17. Dubina MI, Fleischer AB. Interaction of topical sulfacetamide and topical dapsone with benzoyl peroxide. Arch Dermatol. 2009; 145:1027-9. [PubMed 19770443]

18. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Microbiology review of NDA application 21-794. 2005 Jun 20.

More Aczone topical resources Aczone topical Side Effects (in more detail) Aczone topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Aczone topical Drug Interactions Aczone topical Support Group 33 Reviews for Aczone - Add your own review/rating Compare Aczone topical with other medications Acne
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Furadantin


Generic Name: nitrofurantoin (NYE troe fue RAN toin)
Brand Names: Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin

What is Furadantin (nitrofurantoin)?

Nitrofurantoin is an antibiotic that fights bacteria in the body.

Nitrofurantoin is used to treat urinary tract infections.

Nitrofurantoin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Furadantin (nitrofurantoin)? You should not take nitrofurantoin if you are allergic to it, or if you have severe kidney disease, urination problems, or a history of jaundice or liver problems caused by nitrofurantoin. Do not take nitrofurantoin if you are in the last 2 to 4 weeks of pregnancy.

Before you take nitrofurantoin, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, anemia, diabetes, an electrolyte imbalance or vitamin B deficiency, a genetic enzyme deficiency, or any type of debilitating disease.

Take nitrofurantoin with food. Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice. Use only the type of antacid your doctor recommends. Some antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb nitrofurantoin. Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Nitrofurantoin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have sudden chest pain, dry cough, or breathing problems. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Furadantin (nitrofurantoin)? You should not take nitrofurantoin if you are allergic to it, or if you have: severe kidney disease;

a history of jaundice or liver problems caused by taking nitrofurantoin;

if you are urinating less than usual or not at all; or

if you are in the last 2 to 4 weeks of pregnancy.

To make sure you can safely take nitrofurantoin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney disease;

anemia;

diabetes;

an electrolyte imbalance or vitamin B deficiency;

glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency; or

any type of debilitating disease.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby, unless it is used during the last 2 to 4 weeks of pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Nitrofurantoin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking nitrofurantoin. How should I take Furadantin (nitrofurantoin)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Take nitrofurantoin with food. Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure the liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

You may mix your liquid dose with water, milk, or fruit juice to make it easier to swallow. Drink the entire mixture right away.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Nitrofurantoin is usually given for up to 1 week after lab tests show that the infection has cleared. Nitrofurantoin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

If you use this medication long-term, your kidney, liver, and lung function will need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain urine glucose (sugar) tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using nitrofurantoin.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Do not freeze. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking Furadantin (nitrofurantoin)?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to.

Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice. Use only the type of antacid your doctor recommends. Some antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb nitrofurantoin. Furadantin (nitrofurantoin) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using nitrofurantoin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

shortness of breath, running out of breath easily;

sudden chest pain or discomfort, wheezing, dry cough or hack;

fever, chills, body aches, unexplained weight loss;

peripheral neuropathy - numbness, tingling, or pain in your hands or feet;

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

pale skin, easy bruising, confusion or weakness;

patchy skin color, red spots, or a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

severe headache, ringing in your ears, dizziness, vision problems, pain behind your eyes.

Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach, vomiting;

mild diarrhea;

rust-colored or brownish urine; or

vaginal itching or discharge.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Furadantin (nitrofurantoin)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

magnesium salicylate (Nuprin Backache, Doan's Pills);

choline magnesium salicylate (Tricosal, Trilisate); or

probenecid (Benemid) or other gout medications.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with nitrofurantoin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Furadantin resources Furadantin Side Effects (in more detail) Furadantin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Furadantin Drug Interactions Furadantin Support Group 0 Reviews for Furadantin - Add your own review/rating Furadantin Prescribing Information (FDA) Furadantin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Furadantin Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitrofurantoin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Nitrofurantoin Monograph (AHFS DI) Macrobid Prescribing Information (FDA) Macrobid MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Macrobid Consumer Overview Macrodantin Prescribing Information (FDA) Macrodantin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Furadantin with other medications Bladder Infection Prevention of Bladder infection Urinary Tract Infection Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about nitrofurantoin.

See also: Furadantin side effects (in more detail)


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Beta-lactamase inhibitors


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Beta-lactamase inhibitors block the activity of beta-lactamase enzymes.

Some species of bacteria produce beta-lactamase enzymes, which cleave the beta-lactam group in antibiotics, such as penicillin, that have a beta-lactam ring in their structure. In doing so the beta-lactamase enzyme inactivates the antibiotic and becomes resistant to that antibiotic. To avoid development of resistance, beta-lactamase inhibitors are administered with the beta-lactam antibiotics so the action of beta-lactamase is inhibited. This tends to widen the spectrum of antibacterial activity.

See also

Medical conditions associated with beta-lactamase inhibitors:

Appendectomy Aspiration Pneumonia Bacteremia Bacterial Infection Bone infection Bronchitis Deep Neck Infection Endometritis Epiglottitis Febrile Neutropenia Intraabdominal Infection Joint Infection Kidney Infections Melioidosis Meningitis Nosocomial Pneumonia Otitis Media Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Peritonitis Pneumonia Pneumonia with Cystic Fibrosis Septicemia Sinusitis Skin and Structure Infection Skin Infection Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth Strep Throat Surgical Prophylaxis Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Urinary Tract Infection Drug List: Augmentin-Xr-Extended-Release-Tablets Unasyn Zosyn Augmentin Augmentin-Es-600-Suspension Amoclan-Suspension Timentin
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Micronase


Generic Name: glyburide (GLYE bue ride)
Brand Names: DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase

What is Micronase (glyburide)?

Glyburide is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels.

Glyburide is used to treat type 2 diabetes.

This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes.

Glyburide may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Micronase (glyburide)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to glyburide, if you are being treated with bosentan (Tracleer), if you have type 1 diabetes, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

Before taking glyburide, tell your doctor if you are allergic to sulfa drugs, if you have been using insulin or chlorpropamide (Diabinese), or if you have hemolytic anemia (a lack of red blood cells), an enzyme deficiency (G6PD), a nerve disorder, liver disease, or kidney disease.

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking Micronase (glyburide)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to glyburide, or:

if you are being treated with bosentan (Tracleer);

if you have type 1 diabetes; or

if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

To make sure you can safely take glyburide, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

hemolytic anemia (a lack of red blood cells);

an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD);

a nerve disorder affecting bodily functions;

liver or kidney disease;

if you are allergic to sulfa drugs; or

if you have been using insulin or taking chlorpropamide (Diabinese).

Certain oral diabetes medications may increase your risk of serious heart problems. However, not treating your diabetes can damage your heart and other organs. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of treating your diabetes with glyburide. FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether glyburide will harm an unborn baby. Similar diabetes medications have caused severe hypoglycemia in newborn babies whose mothers had used the medication near the time of delivery. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether glyburide passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Older adults may be more likely to have low blood sugar while taking glyburide. How should I take Micronase (glyburide)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Take glyburide with your first meal of the day, unless your doctor tells you otherwise.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating.

Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Sugar sources include orange juice, glucose gel, candy, or milk. If you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink, use an injection of glucagon. Your doctor can give you a prescription for a glucagon emergency injection kit and tell you how to give the injection.

Also watch for signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia). These symptoms include increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, and weight loss.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your dose needs may also change.

Your doctor may want you to stop taking glyburide for a short time if you become ill, have a fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency.

Ask your doctor how to adjust your glyburide dose if needed. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice.

If there are any changes in the brand, strength, or type of glyburide you use, your dosage needs may change. Always check your refills to make sure you have received the correct brand and type of medicine prescribed by your doctor.

Store at room temperature, protected from moisture, heat, and light.

See also: Micronase dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.A glyburide overdose can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia include extreme weakness, blurred vision, sweating, trouble speaking, tremors, stomach pain, confusion, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking Micronase (glyburide)? Avoid drinking alcohol. It lowers blood sugar and may interfere with your diabetes treatment. Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Glyburide can make you sunburn more easily. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors. Micronase (glyburide) side effects Stop using glyburide and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

pale skin, confusion or weakness;

easy bruising or bleeding, purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin; or

headache, trouble concentrating, memory problems, feeling unsteady, hallucinations, fainting, seizure, shallow breathing or breathing that stops.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, heartburn, feeling full;

joint or muscle pain;

blurred vision; or

mild itching or skin rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Micronase (glyburide)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);

disopyramide (Norpace);

fluconazole (Diflucan), ketoconazole (Nizoral);

fluoxetine (Prozac);

rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, Rifater);

an ACE inhibitor such as enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), ramipril (Altace), and others; or

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and others.

Using certain medicines can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you use any of the following:

albuterol (Proventil, Ventolin);

clonidine (Catapres);

reserpine; or

beta-blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), carvedilol (Coreg), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), and others.

You may be more likely to have hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) if you take glyburide with:

isoniazid;

diuretics (water pills);

steroids (prednisone and others);

phenothiazines (Compazine and others);

thyroid medicine (Synthroid and others);

birth control pills and other hormones;

heart or blood pressure medications (Cartia, Cardizem, Nifedical, Covera, Verelan, and others);

niacin (Advicor, Niaspan, Niacor, Simcor, Slo-Niacin, and others);

seizure medicines (Dilantin and others); and

diet pills or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies.

You may be more likely to have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if you take glyburide with:

clarithromycin (Biaxin);

exenatide (Byetta);

probenecid (Benemid);

heart or blood pressure medication (Accupril, Altace, Lotensin, Prinivil, Vasotec, Zestril, and others);

some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs);

aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol);

sulfa drugs (Bactrim, Gantanol, Septra, and others);

a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI); and

other oral diabetes medications, especially acarbose (Precose), metformin (Glucophage), miglitol (Glyset), pioglitazone (Actos), or rosiglitazone (Avandia).

These lists are not complete and there are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of glyburide on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Micronase resources Micronase Side Effects (in more detail) Micronase Dosage Micronase Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Micronase Drug Interactions Micronase Support Group 0 Reviews for Micronase - Add your own review/rating Micronase Prescribing Information (FDA) Micronase MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Micronase Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information DiaBeta Prescribing Information (FDA) Glyburide Monograph (AHFS DI) Glyburide Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Micronase with other medications Diabetes, Type 2 Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about glyburide.

See also: Micronase side effects (in more detail)


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Cephalosporins


Cephalosporins are a group of broad spectrum, semi-synthetic beta-lactam antibiotics derived from the mould Cephalosporium. They are divided into three groups: Cephalosporin N and C are chemically related to penicillins and Cephalosporin P a steroid antibiotic resembles fusidic acid.

The mechanism of action of cephalosporins is the same as penicillins. They interfere with bacterial cell wall synthesis.

Semisynthetic broad-spectrum cephalosporins have been produced by the addition of different side chains, to the Cephalosporin C nucleus.

They are classified according to the chronological order in which they were produced.

See also first generation cephalosporins fourth generation cephalosporins next generation cephalosporins second generation cephalosporins third generation cephalosporins Drug List:
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Ophthalmic steroids with anti-infectives


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Ophthalmic steroids with anti-infectives are preparations designed to be applied into the eyes. They contain steroids and anti-infectives. Steroids are effective anti-inflammatory agents and are used to treat pain and inflammation. The anti-infectives commonly present in eye drops are antibiotics that either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria.

Steroids and antibiotics in combination are used to treat eye infections, which have pain and inflammation component or they can be used post surgery to prevent infections and to treat the inflammation.

See also

Medical conditions associated with ophthalmic steroids with anti-infectives:

Blepharitis Conjunctivitis, Bacterial Cyclitis Iritis Keratitis Keratoconjunctivitis Uveitis Drug List: Fml-S-Liquifilm Neo-Decadron Tobradex Zylet Blephamide-Suspension Ak-Cide Ak-Neo-Dex Ak-Trol Blephamide-S-O-P-Ointment Cetapred Cortisporin-Ophthalmic Cortisporin-Ophthalmic-Suspension-Drops-Suspension Cortomycin-Eye-Ointment Cortomycin-Suspension Dexacidin Dexacine Dexasporin Fml-S-Suspension Isopto-Cetapred Maxitrol-Drops Methadex Metimyd Neo-Decadron-Ocumeter Neo-Dex Neo-Dexair Neo-Poly-Bac Neo-Poly-Dex Neotricin-Hc Npd-Ophthalmic-Ointment Ocu-Cort Ocu-Lone-C Ocu-Trol Ophthocort Poly-Dex-Drops Poly-Pred-Drops Pred-G Pred-G-S-O-P Tobradex-St-Drops Triple-Antibiotic-Hc-Ophthalmic-Ointment Vasocidin-Drops
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Cefpodoxime Suspension


Pronunciation: SEF-poe-DOX-eem
Generic Name: Cefpodoxime
Brand Name: Vantin
Cefpodoxime Suspension is used for:

Treating mild to moderate infections caused by certain bacteria.

Cefpodoxime Suspension is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It works by interfering with the formation of the bacteria's cell wall so that the wall ruptures, resulting in the death of the bacteria.

Do NOT use Cefpodoxime Suspension if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Cefpodoxime Suspension or to any other cephalosporin antibiotic (eg, cephalexin, cefprozil)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Cefpodoxime Suspension:

Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have diarrhea, a stomach or intestinal infection, or a blood clotting problem if you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, severe rash, hives, difficulty breathing, dizziness) to a penicillin antibiotic (eg, amoxicillin) or other beta-lactam antibiotic (eg, imipenem)

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Cefpodoxime Suspension. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Aminoglycosides (eg, gentamicin), cyclosporine, or diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because the risk of side effects on the kidney may be increased

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Cefpodoxime Suspension may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Cefpodoxime Suspension:

Use Cefpodoxime Suspension as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Cefpodoxime Suspension by mouth with or without food. Cefpodoxime Suspension works best if it is taken at the same time each day. To clear up your infection completely, take Cefpodoxime Suspension for the full course of treatment. Keep taking it even if you feel better in a few days. Shake well before each use. Use a measuring device marked for medicine dosing. Ask your pharmacist for help if you are unsure of how to measure this dose. Cefpodoxime Suspension should not be given within 2 hours of antacids or H2 antagonists (eg, famotidine). If you miss a dose of Cefpodoxime Suspension, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose, and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Cefpodoxime Suspension.

Important safety information: Mild diarrhea is common with antibiotic use. However, a more serious form of diarrhea (pseudomembranous colitis) may rarely occur. This may develop while you use the antibiotic or within several months after you stop using it. Contact your doctor right away if stomach pain or cramps, severe diarrhea, or bloody stools occur. Do not treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Cefpodoxime Suspension only works against bacteria; it does not treat viral infections (eg, the common cold). Be sure to use Cefpodoxime Suspension for the full course of treatment. If you do not, the medicine may not clear up your infection completely. The bacteria could also become less sensitive to this or other medicines. This could make the infection harder to treat in the future. Long-term or repeated use of Cefpodoxime Suspension may cause a second infection. Tell your doctor if signs of a second infection occur. Your medicine may need to be changed to treat this. Lab tests, including liver function, kidney function, and complete blood cell counts, may be performed while you use Cefpodoxime Suspension. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Cefpodoxime Suspension while you are pregnant. The medicine is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Cefpodoxime Suspension. Possible side effects of Cefpodoxime Suspension:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; headache; loose stools; nausea; upset stomach; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bloody stools; seizures; severe diarrhea; skin rash; stomach pain/cramps; vaginal irritation or discharge.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Cefpodoxime side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center ( http://www.aapcc.org), or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include abdominal pain; diarrhea; headache; nausea; seizures; vomiting.

Proper storage of Cefpodoxime Suspension:

Store Cefpodoxime Suspension in the refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C). The mixed solution may be used for up to 14 days. Keep the container tightly closed. Throw away any unused portion after 14 days. Keep Cefpodoxime Suspension out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Cefpodoxime Suspension, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Cefpodoxime Suspension is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Cefpodoxime Suspension. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Cefpodoxime resources Cefpodoxime Side Effects (in more detail)Cefpodoxime Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesCefpodoxime Drug InteractionsCefpodoxime Support Group2 Reviews for Cefpodoxime - Add your own review/rating Compare Cefpodoxime with other medications Bladder InfectionBronchitisGonococcal Infection, DisseminatedGonococcal Infection, UncomplicatedKidney InfectionsOtitis MediaPneumoniaSinusitisSkin InfectionTonsillitis/PharyngitisUpper Respiratory Tract Infection
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furazolidone


fure-a-ZOL-i-done

Available Dosage Forms:

Suspension Tablet

Therapeutic Class: Antibiotic

Chemical Class: Nitrofuran

Uses For furazolidone

Furazolidone is used to treat bacterial and protozoal infections. It works by killing bacteria and protozoa (tiny, one-celled animals). Some protozoa are parasites that can cause many different kinds of infections in the body.

Furazolidone is taken by mouth. It works inside the intestinal tract to treat cholera, colitis, and/or diarrhea caused by bacteria, and giardiasis. furazolidone is sometimes given with other medicines for bacterial infections.

Furazolidone may cause some serious side effects when taken with certain foods, beverages, or other medicines. Check with your health care professional for a list of products that should be avoided.

Furazolidone is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using furazolidone

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For furazolidone, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to furazolidone or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Because furazolidone may cause anemia, use in infants up to 1 month of age is not recommended.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults or if they cause different side effects or problems in older people. There is no specific information comparing use of furazolidone in the elderly with use in other age groups.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking furazolidone, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using furazolidone with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Amitriptyline Apraclonidine Atomoxetine Benzphetamine Brimonidine Citalopram Clovoxamine Cyclobenzaprine Cyproheptadine Dexmethylphenidate Dextroamphetamine Diethylpropion Escitalopram Femoxetine Fluoxetine Fluvoxamine Guanadrel Guanethidine Isocarboxazid Levomethadyl Maprotiline Mazindol Methamphetamine Methyldopa Methylphenidate Milnacipran Morphine Morphine Sulfate Liposome Nefazodone Nefopam Opipramol Paroxetine Phendimetrazine Phenmetrazine Phentermine Phenylalanine Pseudoephedrine Reserpine Sertraline Sibutramine Tapentadol Tetrabenazine Tranylcypromine Venlafaxine Zimeldine

Using furazolidone with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Albuterol Altretamine Amphetamine Arformoterol Avocado Bambuterol Bitolterol Bitter Orange Broxaterol Clenbuterol Difenoxin Diphenoxylate Droperidol Ephedrine Ethchlorvynol Fenoterol Fentanyl Formoterol Guarana Hexoprenaline Hydromorphone Indacaterol Isoetharine Kava Levalbuterol Licorice Lisdexamfetamine Ma Huang Mate Meperidine Metaraminol Norepinephrine Oxycodone Phenylephrine Phenylpropanolamine Pirbuterol Procaterol Reboxetine Rimiterol Ritodrine Salmeterol St John's Wort Terbutaline Tulobuterol Tyrosine

Using furazolidone with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Ginseng Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using furazolidone with any of the following is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication, change some of the other medicines you take, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Ethanol

Using furazolidone with any of the following is usually not recommended, but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use furazolidone, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Tyramine Containing Food Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of furazolidone. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (lack of G6PD enzyme)—Patients with G6PD-deficiency may develop mild anemia while taking furazolidone Proper Use of furazolidone

Do not give furazolidone to infants up to 1 month of age, unless otherwise directed by your doctor. furazolidone may cause anemia in these patients.

Furazolidone may be taken with food to lessen the chance of an upset stomach.

To use the oral suspension:

Use a specially marked measuring spoon or other device to measure each dose accurately. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid.

To help clear up your infection completely, keep taking furazolidone for the full time of treatment, even if you begin to feel better after a few days. If you stop taking furazolidone too soon, your symptoms may return. Do not miss any doses.

Dosing

The dose of furazolidone will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of furazolidone. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For oral dosage forms (oral suspension or tablets): For cholera or diarrhea caused by bacteria: Adults—100 milligrams (mg) taken four times a day for five to seven days. Children up to 1 month of age—Use is not recommended. Children 1 month of age and over—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 1.25 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.56 mg per pound) of body weight taken four times a day for five to seven days. For giardiasis: Adults—100 mg taken four times a day for seven to ten days. Children up to 1 month of age—Use is not recommended. Children 1 month of age and over—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 1.25 mg to 2 mg per kg (0.56 to 0.90 mg per pound) of body weight taken four times a day for seven to ten days. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of furazolidone, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using furazolidone

It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits. This is to check whether or not the infection is cleared up completely.

If your symptoms do not improve within a week, or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Drinking alcoholic beverages or taking other alcohol-containing preparations (for example, elixirs, cough syrups, tonics, or injections of alcohol) while taking furazolidone may rarely cause problems. These problems include increased side effects such as redness of the face, difficult breathing, fainting, and a feeling of tightness in the chest. These side effects usually go away within 24 hours without treatment. However, these effects may occur if you drink alcoholic beverages for up to 4 days after you stop taking furazolidone. Therefore, you should not drink alcoholic beverages or take other alcohol-containing preparations while you are taking furazolidone and for 4 days after stopping it.

Certain foods, drinks, or other medicines may cause very dangerous reactions, such as severe high blood pressure, when taken with furazolidone. Aged or fermented foods and drinks commonly contain tyramine or other substances that increase blood pressure. To avoid such reactions, the following measures are recommended:

Do not eat foods that have a high tyramine content (most common in foods that are aged or fermented to increase their flavor), such as cheeses; yeast or meat extracts; fava or broad bean pods; smoked or pickled meat, poultry, or fish; fermented sausage (bologna, pepperoni, salami, summer sausage) or other fermented meat; or any overripe fruit. If a list of these foods is not given to you, ask your health care professional to provide one. Do not drink alcoholic beverages or alcohol-free or reduced-alcohol beer and wine. Do not eat or drink large amounts of caffeine-containing food or beverages such as chocolate, coffee, tea, or cola. Do not take any other medicines unless approved or prescribed by your doctor. This includes nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) appetite suppressants (diet pills) or medicine for colds, sinus problems, or hay fever or other allergies. Do not take any of the above-listed foods, drinks, or medicine for at least 2 weeks after you stop taking furazolidone. They may continue to react with furazolidone during that time. Other foods may also contain tyramine or other substances that increase blood pressure. However, these products generally do not cause serious problems when taken with furazolidone, especially if eaten when fresh and in small amounts. These include yogurt, sour cream, cream cheese, cottage cheese, chocolate, and soy sauce. If you have any questions about this, ask your health care professional. Also ask for a list of foods, beverages, or medicines that may cause serious problems when taken with furazolidone. furazolidone Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Fever itching joint pain skin rash or redness sore throat

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common Abdominal or stomach pain diarrhea headache nausea or vomiting

furazolidone commonly causes dark yellow to brown discoloration of urine. This side effect does not usually need medical attention.

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More furazolidone resources Furazolidone Drug InteractionsFurazolidone Support Group0 Reviews · Be the first to review/rate this drug
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Carbenicillin Indanyl


Pronunciation: KAR-ben-i-SIL-in
Generic Name: Carbenicillin Indanyl
Brand Name: Geocillin
Carbenicillin Indanyl is used for:

Treating infections caused by certain bacteria.

Carbenicillin Indanyl is a penicillin antibiotic. It works by blocking the bacteria's cell wall growth, which kills the bacteria.

Do NOT use Carbenicillin Indanyl if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Carbenicillin Indanyl or to another penicillin antibiotic (eg, amoxicillin, ampicillin) you are taking a tetracycline antibiotic (eg, doxycycline)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Carbenicillin Indanyl:

Some medical conditions may interact with Carbenicillin Indanyl. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, severe rash, hives, difficulty breathing, dizziness) to a cephalosporin (eg, cephalexin) or other beta-lactam antibiotic (eg, imipenem) if you have bleeding problems, kidney problems, or liver failure if you are on a low-salt diet

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Carbenicillin Indanyl. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Tetracyclines (eg, doxycycline) because they may decrease Carbenicillin Indanyl's effectiveness Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because their actions and the risk of their side effects may be increased or decreased by Carbenicillin Indanyl Heparin or methotrexate because their actions and the risk of their side effects may be increased by Carbenicillin Indanyl Aminoglycosides (eg, gentamicin) or oral contraceptives (eg, ethinyl estradiol/norethindrone) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Carbenicillin Indanyl

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Carbenicillin Indanyl may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Carbenicillin Indanyl:

Use Carbenicillin Indanyl as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Carbenicillin Indanyl by mouth with or without food. To clear up your infection completely, take Carbenicillin Indanyl for the full course of treatment. Keep taking it even if you feel better in a few days. If you miss a dose of Carbenicillin Indanyl, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Carbenicillin Indanyl.

Important safety information: Carbenicillin Indanyl only works against bacteria; it does not treat viral infections (eg, the common cold). Be sure to use Carbenicillin Indanyl for the full course of treatment. If you do not, the medicine may not clear up your infection completely. The bacteria could also become less sensitive to this or other medicines. This could make the infection harder to treat in the future. Long-term or repeated use of Carbenicillin Indanyl may cause a second infection. Tell your doctor if signs of a second infection occur. Your medicine may need to be changed to treat this. Mild diarrhea is common with antibiotic use. However, a more serious form of diarrhea (pseudomembranous colitis) may rarely occur. This may develop while you use the antibiotic or within several months after you stop using it. Contact your doctor right away if stomach pain or cramps, severe diarrhea, or bloody stools occur. Do not treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Hormonal birth control (eg, birth control pills) may not work as well while you are using Carbenicillin Indanyl. To prevent pregnancy, use an extra form of birth control (eg, condoms). Lab tests, including liver function, kidney function, or blood cell counts, may be performed while you use Carbenicillin Indanyl. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Carbenicillin Indanyl should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Carbenicillin Indanyl while you are pregnant. Carbenicillin Indanyl is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Carbenicillin Indanyl, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Carbenicillin Indanyl:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Bad taste in mouth; diarrhea; gas; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bloody or water stools; fever, chills, or sore throat; severe or persistent diarrhea; stomach pain or cramps; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness or weakness; vaginal irritation or discharge.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Carbenicillin Indanyl side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include seizures.

Proper storage of Carbenicillin Indanyl:

Store Carbenicillin Indanyl at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C), in a tightly closed container. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Carbenicillin Indanyl out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Carbenicillin Indanyl, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Carbenicillin Indanyl is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Carbenicillin Indanyl. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Carbenicillin Indanyl resources Carbenicillin Indanyl Side Effects (in more detail) Carbenicillin Indanyl Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Carbenicillin Indanyl Drug Interactions Carbenicillin Indanyl Support Group 0 Reviews for Carbenicillin Indanyl - Add your own review/rating Compare Carbenicillin Indanyl with other medications Bladder Infection Prostatitis
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