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Asthma, Maintenance Medications


Drugs associated with Asthma, Maintenance

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Asthma, Maintenance. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Asthma, Maintenance

Medical Encyclopedia:

Asthma Asthma - children Asthma and allergy - resources Occupational asthma
Drug List: A-Methapred-Solution Accolate Accuneb-Solution Advair Advair-Hfa-Inhaler Airet-Solution Alupent Alvesco Asmanex Brethaire Brethine Bricanyl Choledyl Choledyl-Sa Depo-Medrol-Suspension Dulera Elixophyllin-Elixir Flovent Flovent-Diskus-Powder Flovent-Hfa-Aerosol-Inhaler Flovent-Rotadisk-Powder Foradil Intal-Aerosol-Solution Intal-Inhaler-Inhalation Maxair Maxair-Autohaler Medrol Medrol-Dosepak Metaprel Methylprednisolone-Dose-Pack Perforomist Proair-Hfa-Aerosol Proventil Proventil-Hfa-Aerosol Pulmicort-Flexhaler-Powder Pulmicort-Nebuamp Pulmicort-Respules-Suspension Pulmicort Quibron-T Quibron-T-Sr Qvar-Aerosol-Solution Serevent Singulair Solu-Medrol-Solution Symbicort Theo-24-Sustained-Release-Capsules Theo-Dur Theo-Time Theocap-Sustained-Release-Capsules Theochron-Sustained-Release-Tablets Theolair-Tablets Tilade-Aerosol Tornalate Truxophyllin Uniphyl-Sustained-Release-Tablets Ventolin Ventolin-Hfa-Aerosol Volmax Vospire-Er-Extended-Release-Tablets Xolair Xopenex Xopenex-Concentrate Xopenex-Hfa-Aerosol Zyflo Zyflo-Cr-Extended-Release-Tablets
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Ventolin Aerosol


Pronunciation: al-BUE-ter-ol
Generic Name: Albuterol
Brand Name: Examples include Proventil and Ventolin
Ventolin Aerosol is used for:

Treating or preventing breathing problems in patients who have asthma or certain other airway diseases. It may be used to prevent breathing problems caused by exercise. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Ventolin Aerosol is a sympathomimetic (beta agonist) bronchodilator. It works by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airway, which allows air to flow in and out of the lungs more easily.

Do NOT use Ventolin Aerosol if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Ventolin Aerosol you are using another short-acting sympathomimetic bronchodilator (eg, metaproterenol)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Ventolin Aerosol:

Some medical conditions may interact with Ventolin Aerosol. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of heart problems, (eg, fast or irregular heartbeat, low blood output), blood vessel problems, high blood pressure, or low blood potassium levels if you have a history of seizures, diabetes, an overactive thyroid, kidney problems, or an adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma) if you have ever had an unusual reaction to another sympathomimetic medicine (eg, pseudoephedrine) if you are taking a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) (eg, phenelzine) or tricyclic antidepressant (eg, amitriptyline), or if you have taken either of these medicines within the last 14 days

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Ventolin Aerosol. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because the risk of low blood potassium levels may be increased Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors (eg, entacapone), MAOIs (eg, phenelzine), short-acting sympathomimetic bronchodilators (eg, metaproterenol), stimulants (eg, amphetamine), sympathomimetics (eg, pseudoephedrine), or tricyclic antidepressants (eg, amitriptyline) because they may increase the risk of Ventolin Aerosol's side effects Beta-blockers (eg, propranolol) because they may decrease Ventolin Aerosol's effectiveness Digoxin because its effectiveness may be decreased by Ventolin Aerosol

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Ventolin Aerosol may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Ventolin Aerosol:

Use Ventolin Aerosol as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Ventolin Aerosol. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Ventolin Aerosol is for oral inhalation only. Do not spray in the eyes. If you get Ventolin Aerosol in the eyes, rinse immediately with cool tap water. Prime the inhaler before the first use, any time it has not been used for more than 2 weeks, or if it has been dropped. To prime the inhaler, point it away from you and others. Spray 4 times, shaking well before each spray. If the inhaler has not been used for at least 4 days, re-prime by spraying 2 times. Before using Ventolin Aerosol, be sure that the canister is properly placed in the inhaler unit. Shake well before each use. Remove the protective cap from the mouthpiece and check to make sure there are no hidden foreign objects. Breathe out slowly and completely. Place the mouthpiece between your lips and try to rest your tongue flat, unless your doctor has told you otherwise. Your doctor may have told you to hold the inhaler 1 or 2 inches (2 or 3 centimeters) away from the open mouth or to use a special spacing device. As you start to take a slow deep breath, press the canister and mouthpiece together at exactly the same time. This will release a dose of Ventolin Aerosol. Continue breathing in slowly and deeply and hold for as long as comfortable (up to 10 seconds), then breathe out slowly through pursed lips or your nose. If more than 1 inhalation is to be used, wait 1 minute and repeat the above steps. Keep the spray away from your eyes. Ventolin Aerosol may cause dry mouth or an unpleasant taste in your mouth. Rinsing your mouth with water after each dose may help relieve these effects. Clean the plastic mouthpiece and cap at least once a week to prevent blockage. Remove the metal canister. Rinse in warm running water for 30 seconds. Shake off excess water, and then allow the mouthpiece to air dry completely (eg, overnight). After the plastic case and cap dry, replace the canister. Spray 1 time into the air away from yourself and others. Place the cap back on the mouthpiece. Do NOT allow the metal canister to become wet. If you must use the inhaler before it is completely dry, shake the excess water off of the plastic mouthpiece. Shake the canister well, then insert into the plastic case and spray 1 time into the air away from yourself and others. You may then use a dose. After your dose, rewash the plastic case and air dry completely. If the inhaler becomes blocked, wash the plastic case as directed. This inhaler contains 200 sprays. Do not use this inhaler after 200 sprays have been used. It may not give the correct amount of medicine with each spray. Do not use Ventolin Aerosol with any other mouthpiece. Do not use this mouthpiece with any other medicine. Do not stop using Ventolin Aerosol without checking with your doctor. If you miss a dose of Ventolin Aerosol and you are using it regularly, use it as soon as possible. If several hours have passed or if it is nearing time for the next dose, do not double the dose to catch up, unless advised by your health care provider. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Ventolin Aerosol.

Important safety information: Ventolin Aerosol may cause dizziness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Ventolin Aerosol with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Ventolin Aerosol may sometimes cause severe breathing problems right after you use a dose. When this problem occurs, it is often after the first use of a new canister or vial. If this happens, seek medical care at once. If your usual dose does not work well, your symptoms become worse, or you need to use it more often than normal, contact your doctor at once. This may be a sign of seriously worsening asthma. Your doctor may need to change your dose or medicine. Ventolin Aerosol should work for up to 6 hours. Do NOT use more than the recommended dose or use more often than prescribed without checking with your doctor. The risk of severe heart problems and sometimes death may be increased with overuse of Ventolin Aerosol. Some patients may have trouble using Ventolin Aerosol correctly. Some may also get mouth sores or a bad taste in the mouth after using it. If you have any of these problems, ask your health care provider if a spacing device may help. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Ventolin Aerosol before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about all of your asthma medicines and how to use them. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any asthma medicine unless your doctor tells you to. Keep track of how many inhalations you use. When your medicine supply begins to run low, call your doctor or pharmacy as soon as possible for a refill. Do NOT place the canister in water to try to determine how much medicine you have left. The contents of this canister are under pressure. Do NOT puncture, break, or burn container, even if it appears empty. Diabetes patients - Ventolin Aerosol may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine. Use Ventolin Aerosol with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Caution is advised when using Ventolin Aerosol in CHILDREN; they may be more sensitive to its effects. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Ventolin Aerosol while you are pregnant. It is not known if Ventolin Aerosol is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Ventolin Aerosol, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Ventolin Aerosol:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Cough; headache; nausea; nervousness; sinus inflammation; sore or dry throat; tremor; trouble sleeping; unusual taste in mouth; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chest pain; fast or irregular heartbeat; new or worsened trouble breathing; pounding in the chest; severe headache or dizziness; unusual hoarseness; wheezing.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Ventolin side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include chest pain; fast or irregular heartbeat; seizures; severe headache or dizziness; severe or persistent nervousness or trouble sleeping; tremor.

Proper storage of Ventolin Aerosol:

Store Ventolin Aerosol upright between 59 and 77 degrees F (15 and 25 degrees C). Do not freeze. Contents are under pressure. Do not puncture. Do not use or store near heat or open flame. Do not expose the container to temperatures above 120 degrees F (48 degrees C). The container may burst. Store the inhaler with the mouthpiece down. Do not use after the expiration date on the container or box. Keep Ventolin Aerosol out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Ventolin Aerosol, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Ventolin Aerosol is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Ventolin Aerosol. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Ventolin resources Ventolin Side Effects (in more detail) Ventolin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Ventolin Drug Interactions Ventolin Support Group 6 Reviews for Ventolin - Add your own review/rating Compare Ventolin with other medications Asthma, acute Asthma, Maintenance Bronchospasm Prophylaxis COPD, Acute COPD, Maintenance
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Ventolin Solution for IV Infusion


Ventolin Solution for Intravenous Infusion

1 mg/ml

salbutamol sulphate

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1 What Ventolin Infusion is and what it is used for 2 Before you use Ventolin Infusion 3 How to use Ventolin Infusion 4 Possible side effects 5 How to store Ventolin Infusion 6 Further information What Ventolin Infusion is and what it is used for

Ventolin Solution for Intravenous Infusion (called ‘Ventolin Infusion’ in this leaflet) contains a medicine called salbutamol. This belongs to a group of medicines called ‘beta-agonists’. It acts on special receptor sites in the lungs and in the uterus (in women) to:

help the airways in your lungs to stay open. This makes it easier for air to get in and out. It helps to relieve chest tightness, wheezing and cough relax the muscles in the walls of the uterus.

This may stop the contractions associated with labour.

Ventolin Infusion is used: to treat severe breathing problems in people with asthma and similar conditions to stop premature labour. Before you use Ventolin Infusion Do not use Ventolin Infusion if: you are allergic (hypersensitive) to salbutamol sulphate or any of the other ingredients of Ventolin Infusion (listed in Section 6). Take special care with Ventolin Infusion

Check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking your medicine if:

you have high blood pressure you are diabetic you have an overactive thyroid gland you have a history of heart problems such as an irregular or fast heartbeat or angina. Taking other medicines

Please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. This includes herbal medicines.

In particular tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are taking:

medicines for an irregular or fast heartbeat other medicines for your asthma.

Ventolin Infusion should not be administered in the same syringe or infusion as any other medication.

Using Ventolin with food and drink

You can use Ventolin Infusion at any time of day, with or without food.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Talk to your doctor before taking this medicine if you are pregnant, might become pregnant or are breast-feeding.

Driving and using machines

Ventolin is not likely to affect you being able to drive or use any tools or machines.

How to use Ventolin Infusion

You will never be expected to give yourself this medicine. It will always be given to you by a person who is qualified to do so.

The Ventolin Infusion will be diluted before it is given to you. Your doctor or nurse will find information about how to dilute the medicine in the Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC).

To treat severe breathing problems The usual dose is 3 to 20 micrograms of salbutamol per minute for as long as required. Higher doses may be used in patients with ‘respiratory failure’. To treat premature labour The usual dose is 10 to 45 micrograms of salbutamol per minute until contractions stop. If your labour continues despite this treatment then the infusion should be stopped.

Ventolin Solution for Intravenous Infusion is not suitable for treating children.

If you receive more Ventolin Infusion than you should

Ventolin Infusion will always be given under carefully controlled conditions. However, if you think that you have been given more than you should tell your doctor or nurse as soon as possible.

The following effects may happen:

your heart beating faster than usual you feel shaky.

These effects usually wear off in a few hours.

If you stop taking Ventolin Infusion

Do not stop taking Ventolin without talking to your doctor.

If you have any further questions on the use of this product, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Ventolin Infusion can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

The following side effects may happen with this medicine:

Allergic reactions (affects less than 1 in 10,000 people)

If you have an allergic reaction, stop taking Ventolin and see a doctor straight away. Signs of an allergic reaction include: swelling of the face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat which may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing, itchy rash, feeling faint and light headed, and collapse.

Talk to your doctor as soon as possible if: you feel your heart is beating faster or stronger than usual (palpitations). This is usually harmless, and usually stops after you have used the medicine for a while you may feel your heartbeat is uneven or it gives an extra beat these affect less than 1 in 10 people.

If any of these happen to you, talk to your doctor as soon as possible. Do not stop using this medicine unless told to do so.

Tell your doctor if you have any of the following side effects which may also happen with this medicine:

Very common (affects more than 1 in 10 people)

feeling shaky.

Common (affects less than 1 in 10 people)

headache muscle cramps.

Uncommon (affects less than 1 in 100 people)

patients receiving Ventolin Infusion for the treatment of premature labour: cough, wheezing, chest pain or shortness of breath, which may be signs of pulmonary oedema (fluid in the lungs). Tell your doctor immediately.

Rare (affects less than 1 in 1,000 people)

low level of potassium in your blood increased blood flow to your extremities (peripheral dilatation).

Very rare (affects less than 1 in 10,000 people)

changes in sleep patterns and changes in behaviour, such as restlessness and excitability. The following side effects can also happen but the frequency of these are not known: in the treatment of premature labour feeling sick and being sick (nausea and vomiting) chest pain, due to heart problems such as angina. Tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if this occurs. Do not stop using this medicine unless told to do so a condition known as lactic acidosis which may cause stomach pain, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, cold feet and hands, irregular heartbeat or thirst.

If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

If you think this medicine is not working well enough for you

If your medicine does not seem to be working as well as usual, talk to your doctor as soon as possible. Your chest problem may be getting worse and you may need a different medicine.

Do not take extra Ventolin unless your doctor tells you to.

How to store Ventolin Infusion Keep out of the reach and sight of children. Do not store above 30°C. Keep the ampoules in the outer carton to protect from light. Use the medicine within 24 hours of mixing with infusion fluids. Do not use Ventolin Infusion after the expiry date, which is stated on the ampoule label and carton after ‘EXP’. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month. If you are told to stop taking this medicine return any unused Ventolin Infusion to your pharmacist to be destroyed.

Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment

Further information What Ventolin Infusion contains The active substance is salbutamol sulphate. The other ingredients are water, salt (sodium chloride) and sulphuric acid. What Ventolin Infusion looks like and contents of the pack

Ventolin Infusion comes in a 5 ml glass ampoule.

Each 5 ml ampoule contains 5 mg of salbutamol sulphate in sterile normal saline adjusted to pH 3.5.

Each carton contains 10 ampoules.

Marketing Authorisation Holder Glaxo Wellcome UK Limited trading as: Allen & Hanburys Stockley Park West Uxbridge Middlesex UB11 1BT Manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline Manufacturing S.p.A. San Polo di Torrile Parma Italy

Other formats:

To listen to or request a copy of this leaflet in Braille, large print or audio please call, free of charge:

0800 198 5000 (UK Only)

Please be ready to give the following information:

Product name Ventolin Infusion

Reference number 10949/0087

This is a service provided by the Royal National Institute of Blind People.

Leaflet date: January 2008

Ventolin is a trademark of the GlaxoSmithKline group of companies

© 2008 GlaxoSmithKline group of companies

10000000060960


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cromolyn Inhalation, oral/nebulization


KROE-mo-lin

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Intal Intal Inhaler

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Capsule Aerosol Liquid Aerosol Powder

Therapeutic Class: Antiasthma

Pharmacologic Class: Mast Cell Stabilizer

Uses For cromolyn

Cromolyn is used to prevent the symptoms of asthma. When it is used regularly, cromolyn lessens the number and severity of asthma attacks by reducing inflammation in the lungs. Cromolyn is also used just before exposure to conditions or substances (for example, exercise, allergens, such as pollen, aspirin, chemicals, cold air, or air pollutants) that cause bronchospasm (wheezing or difficulty in breathing). Cromolyn will not help an asthma or bronchospasm attack that has already started.

Cromolyn may be used alone or with other asthma medicines, such as bronchodilators (medicines that open up narrowed breathing passages) or corticosteroids (cortisone-like medicines).

Cromolyn inhalation works by acting on certain inflammatory cells in the lungs to prevent them from releasing substances that cause asthma symptoms or bronchospasm.

cromolyn is available only with your doctor's prescription.

It is very important that you read and understand the following information. If any of it causes you special concern, check with your doctor. Also, if you have any questions or if you want more information about cromolyn or your medical problem, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

Before Using cromolyn

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For cromolyn, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to cromolyn or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Although there is no specific information comparing the use of cromolyn in children with use in other age groups, cromolyn is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than it does in adults. The inhalation solution form of cromolyn should not be used in children younger than 2 years of age, and the inhalation aerosol should not be used in children younger than 5 years of age.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is no specific information comparing the use of cromolyn inhalation in the elderly with use in other age groups, cromolyn is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than it does in younger adults.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of cromolyn. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Heart disease or Irregular heartbeat—The propellants used to deliver the medicine in the aerosol inhaler may worsen these conditions Proper Use of cromolyn

Cromolyn oral inhalation is used to help prevent symptoms of asthma or bronchospasm (wheezing or difficulty in breathing). Cromolyn will not relieve an asthma or a bronchospasm attack that has already started. It is important to use cromolyn at regular times as directed by your doctor.

Use cromolyn inhalation only as directed. Do not use more of it and do not use it more often than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of side effects.

Cromolyn inhalation usually comes with patient directions. Read them carefully before using cromolyn. If you do not understand the directions that come with the inhaler or if you are not sure how to use the inhaler, ask your health care professional to show you how to use it. Also, ask your health care professional to check regularly how you use the inhaler to make sure you are using it properly.

For patients using cromolyn inhalation aerosol:

The cromolyn aerosol canister provides about 112 or 200 inhalations, depending on the size of the canister your doctor ordered. You should try to keep a record of the number of inhalations you use so you will know when the canister is almost empty. This canister, unlike some other aerosol canisters, cannot be floated in water to test its fullness. When you use the inhaler for the first time, or if you have not used it in a while, the inhaler may not deliver the right amount of medicine with the first puff. Therefore, before using the inhaler, test or prime it. To test or prime the inhaler: Insert the medicine container (canister) firmly into the clean mouthpiece according to the manufacturer's directions. Check to make sure the canister is placed properly into the mouthpiece. Take the cap off the mouthpiece and shake the inhaler three or four times. Hold the inhaler well away from you at arm's length and press the top of the canister, spraying the medicine one time into the air. The inhaler will now be ready to provide the right amount of medicine when you use it. To use the inhaler: Using your thumb and one or two fingers, hold the inhaler upright, with the mouthpiece end down and pointing toward you. Take the cap off the mouthpiece. Check the mouthpiece to make sure it is clear. Do not use the inhaler with any other mouthpieces. Gently shake the inhaler three or four times. Hold the mouthpiece away from your mouth and breathe out slowly and completely to the end of a normal breath. Use the inhalation method recommended by your doctor. Open-mouth method: Place the mouthpiece about 1 to 2 inches (2 fingerwidths) in front of your widely opened mouth. Make sure the inhaler is aimed into your mouth so the spray does not hit the roof of your mouth or your tongue. Avoid spraying in eyes. Closed-mouth method: Place the mouthpiece in your mouth between your teeth and over your tongue with your lips closed tightly around it. Make sure your tongue or teeth are not blocking the opening. Tilt your head back a little. Start to breathe in slowly through your mouth. At the same time, press the top of the canister once to get one puff of medicine. Continue to breathe in slowly for 3 to 4 seconds until you have taken a full deep breath. It is important to press down on the canister and breathe in slowly at the same time so the medicine gets into your lungs. This step may be difficult at first. If you are using the closed-mouth method and you see a fine mist coming from your mouth or nose, the inhaler is not being used correctly. Hold your breath as long as you can up to 10 seconds (count slowly to ten). This gives the medicine time to settle into your airways and lungs. Take the mouthpiece away from your mouth and breathe out slowly. If your doctor has told you to inhale more than 1 puff of medicine at each dose, wait about 1 minute between puffs. Then, gently shake the inhaler again, and take the second puff following exactly the same steps you used for the first puff. Breathe in only one puff at a time. When you are finished using the inhaler, wipe off the mouthpiece and replace the cap. Keep track of the number of sprays you have used from the inhaler, and discard the inhaler after the labeled maximum number of sprays has been used.

Your doctor may want you to use a spacer device with the inhaler. A spacer makes the inhaler easier to use. It allows more of the medicine to reach your lungs, rather than staying in your mouth and throat.

To use a spacer device with the inhaler: Attach the spacer to the inhaler according to the manufacturer's directions. There are different types of spacers available, but the method of breathing remains the same with most spacers. Gently shake the inhaler and spacer well. Hold the mouthpiece of the spacer away from your mouth and breathe out slowly and completely. Place the mouthpiece of the spacer into your mouth between your teeth and over your tongue with your lips closed around it. Press down on the canister top once to release one puff of medicine into the spacer. Then, within 1 or 2 seconds, begin to breathe in slowly and deeply through your mouth for 5 to 10 seconds. Count the seconds while inhaling. Hold your breath as long as you can up to 10 seconds (count slowly to 10). Breathe out slowly. Wait a minute between puffs. Then, gently shake the inhaler and spacer again and take the second puff, following exactly the same steps you used for the first puff. Do not spray more than one puff at a time into the spacer. When you are finished using the inhaler, remove the spacer device from the inhaler and replace the cap.

Clean the inhaler, mouthpiece, and spacer at least once a week.

To clean the inhaler: Remove the canister from the inhaler and set the canister aside. Do not get the canister wet. Wash the mouthpiece, cap, and the spacer in warm soapy water. Rinse well with warm, running water. Shake off the excess water and let the inhaler parts air dry completely before putting the inhaler back together.

For patients using cromolyn capsules for inhalation :

Do not swallow the capsules. The medicine will not work if you swallow it. cromolyn is used with a special inhaler, either the Spinhaler or the Halermatic. If you do not understand the directions that come with the inhaler or if you are not sure how to use the inhaler, ask your health care professional to show you how to use it. Also, ask your health care professional to check regularly how you use the inhaler to make sure you are using it properly. If you are using cromolyn capsules for inhalation with the Spinhaler: To load the Spinhaler: Make sure your hands are clean and dry. Insert the capsule into the inhaler just before using cromolyn. Hold the inhaler upright with the mouthpiece pointing down. Unscrew the body of the inhaler from the mouthpiece. Keep the mouthpiece pointing down and the propeller on the spindle. Remove the foil from the capsule and insert the colored end of the cromolyn capsule firmly into the cup of the propeller. Avoid too much handling of the capsule, because moisture from your hands may make the capsule soft. Make sure the propeller moves freely. Screw the body of the inhaler back into the mouthpiece and make certain that it is fastened well. While keeping the inhaler upright with the mouthpiece pointing down, slide the grey outer sleeve down firmly until it stops. This will puncture the capsule. Then slide the sleeve up as far as it will go. This step may be repeated a second time to make sure the capsule is punctured. To use the Spinhaler: Check to make sure the mouthpiece is properly attached to the body of the inhaler. Hold the inhaler away from your mouth and breathe out slowly to the end of a normal breath. Place the mouthpiece in your mouth, close your lips around it, and tilt your head back. Do not block the mouthpiece with your teeth or tongue. Take a deep and rapid breath. You should hear and feel the vibrations of the rotating propeller as you breathe in. Take the inhaler from your mouth and hold your breath for a few seconds or as long as possible. Hold the inhaler away from your mouth and breathe out slowly and completely to the end of a normal breath. Do not breathe out through the inhaler because this may prevent the inhaler from working properly. Keep taking inhalations of cromolyn until all the powder from the capsule is inhaled. A light dusting of powder remaining in the capsule is normal and is not a sign that the inhaler is not working properly. Throw away the empty capsule. Then return the inhaler to the container and replace the lid on the container. To clean the Spinhaler: At least once a week, brush off any powder left sticking to the propeller. Take the inhaler apart and wash the parts of the inhaler with clean, warm water. Wash the inside of the propeller shaft by moving the propeller on and off the steel spindle under water. Shake out the excess water. Allow all parts of the inhaler to dry completely before putting it back together. The Spinhaler should be replaced after 6 months. If you are using cromolyn capsules for inhalation with the Halermatic: To load the Halermatic: Make sure your hands are clean and dry. Insert the capsule cartridge into the inhaler just before using cromolyn. Remove the mouthpiece cover. Then pull off the mouthpiece. Push a cromolyn capsule cartridge firmly down to the bottom of the slot. Slide the mouthpiece back on the body of the inhaler. Push down slowly as far as the mouthpiece will go. This punctures the capsule cartridge and lifts it into the rotation chamber. Do not repeat this step because the capsule cartridge needs to be punctured only once. To use the Halermatic: Hold the inhaler away from your mouth and breathe out slowly to the end of a normal breath. Place the mouthpiece in your mouth, close your lips around it, and tilt your head back. Do not block the flow of medicine into the lungs with your teeth or tongue. Breathe in quickly and steadily through the mouthpiece. Hold your breath for a few seconds to keep the medicine in the lungs as long as possible. Then take the inhaler away from your mouth. Hold the inhaler well away from your mouth and breathe out to the end of a normal breath. Do not breathe out through the inhaler because this may prevent the inhaler from working properly. Keep taking inhalations of cromolyn until all the powder from the capsule is inhaled. A light dusting of powder remaining in the capsule is normal and is not a sign that the inhaler is not working properly. Throw away the empty capsule cartridge. To clean the Halermatic: Brush away powder deposits each day with a brush. When powder deposits build up, wipe them away with a slightly damp cloth. The mouthpiece may be washed separately if necessary. However, do not wet the blue-based body of the inhaler. Be sure the mouthpiece grid is dry before putting the inhaler back together. The Halermatic should be replaced every 6 months.

For patients using cromolyn inhalation solution:

Cromolyn inhalation solution comes in a small glass container called an ampul. The ampul must be broken gently to empty the contents. If you do not understand the manufacturer's directions, ask your health care professional to show you what to do. Do not use the solution in the ampul if it is cloudy or contains particles. To break and empty the ampul: The glass ampul is weak at each end so the ends can be broken easily by hand. Hold the ampul away from the nebulizer and your face when you break it. Hold the ampul at an angle and carefully break off the lower end. No solution will come out. Turn the ampul over so the open end faces up. Place a forefinger carefully over the open end. Keep your finger firmly in place and break off the lower end of the ampul. To empty the ampul, hold it over the bowl of the nebulizer unit and remove your finger to let the solution flow out. Throw away any solution left in the nebulizer after you have taken your treatment. Use cromolyn only in a power-operated nebulizer that has an adequate flow rate and is equipped with a face mask or mouthpiece. Your doctor will advise you on which nebulizer to use. Make sure you understand exactly how to use it. Hand-squeezed bulb nebulizers cannot be used with cromolyn. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

For patients using cromolyn oral inhalation regularly (for example, every day):

In order for cromolyn to work properly, it must be inhaled every day in regularly spaced doses as ordered by your doctor. Up to 4 weeks may pass before you feel the full effects of the medicine. Dosing

The dose of cromolyn will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of cromolyn. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For inhalation aerosol dosage form: For prevention of asthma symptoms: Adults and children 5 years of age or older—2 inhalations (puffs) taken four times a day with doses spaced four to six hours apart. Children up to 5 years of age—Cromolyn inhalation aerosol should not be used in children younger than 5 years of age. For prevention of bronchospasm caused by exercise or a condition or substance: Adults and children 5 years of age or older—2 inhalations (puffs) taken at least ten to fifteen (but not more than sixty) minutes before exercise or exposure to any condition or substance that may cause an attack. Children up to 5 years of age—Cromolyn inhalation aerosol should not be used in children younger than 5 years of age. For capsule for inhalation dosage form: For prevention of asthma symptoms: Adults and children 2 years of age or older—20 mg (contents of 1 capsule) used in an inhaler, taken four times a day with doses spaced four to six hours apart. Children up to 2 years of age—The capsule for inhalation should not be used in children younger than 2 years of age. For prevention of bronchospasm caused by exercise or a condition or substance: Adults and children 2 years of age or older—20 mg (contents of 1 capsule) used in an inhaler, taken at least ten to fifteen (but not more than sixty) minutes before exercise or exposure to any condition or substance that may cause an attack. Children up to 2 years of age—The capsule for inhalation should not be used in children younger than 2 years of age. For inhalation solution dosage form: For prevention of asthma symptoms: Adults and children 2 years of age or older—20 mg (contents of 1 ampul) used in a nebulizer. cromolyn should be used four times a day with doses spaced four to six hours apart. Use a new ampul of solution for each dose. Children up to 2 years of age—Cromolyn inhalation solution should not be used in children younger than 2 years of age. For prevention of bronchospasm caused by exercise or a condition or substance: Adults and children 2 years of age or older—20 mg (contents of 1 ampul) used in a nebulizer. cromolyn should be used at least ten to fifteen (but not more than sixty) minutes before exercise or exposure to any condition or substance that may cause an attack. Use a new ampul of solution for each dose. Children up to 2 years of age—Cromolyn inhalation solution should not be used in children younger than 2 years of age. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of cromolyn, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Store the canister at room temperature, away from heat and direct light. Do not freeze. Do not keep cromolyn inside a car where it could be exposed to extreme heat or cold. Do not poke holes in the canister or throw it into a fire, even if the canister is empty.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using cromolyn

If your symptoms do not improve within 4 weeks or if your condition becomes worse after you begin using cromolyn, check with your doctor.

If you are also taking a corticosteroid or a bronchodilator for your asthma along with cromolyn, do not stop taking the corticosteroid or bronchodilator even if your asthma seems better, unless you are told to do so by your doctor.

Dryness of the mouth or throat or throat irritation may occur after you use cromolyn. Gargling and rinsing your mouth or taking a drink of water after each dose may help prevent these effects.

cromolyn Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Difficulty in swallowing hives increased wheezing or difficulty in breathing itching of skin low blood pressure shortness of breath swelling of face, lips, or eyelids tightness in chest

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Coughing nausea throat irritation or dryness

If you are using the cromolyn inhalation aerosol, you may notice an unpleasant taste. This may be expected and will go away when you stop using the medicine.

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

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More cromolyn Inhalation, oral/nebulization resources Cromolyn Inhalation, oral/nebulization Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Cromolyn Inhalation, oral/nebulization Drug Interactions Cromolyn Inhalation, oral/nebulization Support Group 6 Reviews for Cromolyn Inhalation,/nebulization - Add your own review/rating Compare cromolyn Inhalation, oral/nebulization with other medications Asthma, Maintenance Inflammatory Bowel Disease Systemic Mastocytosis
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Adrenergic bronchodilators


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Adrenergic bronchodilators (specifically beta2-adrenoreceptor agonists) dilate the bronchi by a direct action on the beta2-adrenoreceptors on the bronchial smooth muscle and relax the muscle.

There are two categories of beta2-adrenoreceptor agonists used in asthma. The short acting adrenergic bronchodilators are used on an as needed basis to control symptoms of asthma. The longer acting bronchodilators are used regularly, twice daily, as adjunct therapy in patients whose asthma is poorly controlled by inhaled corticosteroids.

See also

Medical conditions associated with adrenergic bronchodilators:

Adams-Stokes SyndromeAllergic ReactionsAsthmaAsthma, acuteAsthma, MaintenanceAsystoleAV Heart BlockBronchitisBronchospasm During AnesthesiaBronchospasm ProphylaxisCardiac ArrhythmiaCOPDCOPD, AcuteCOPD, MaintenanceElectromechanical DissociationPremature LaborShock Drug List:/tags/epipen-auto-injector/
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/tags/xopenex/
/tags/primatene-mist-aerosol/
/tags/bricanyl/
/tags/volmax/
/tags/proventil-hfa-aerosol/
/tags/proventil/
/tags/maxair-autohaler/
/tags/perforomist/
/tags/vospire-er-extended-release-tablets/
/tags/adrenaclick-auto-injector/
/tags/adrenalin-chloride/
/tags/arcapta/
/tags/brethaire/
/tags/bronkosol/
/tags/epipen-auto-injector/
/tags/epipen-jr-2-pak/
/tags/medihaler-epi/
/tags/metaprel/
/tags/twinject-auto-injector/
Twinject-Auto-Injector-Two-Pack
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Follicle Stimulation Medications


Drugs associated with Follicle Stimulation

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Follicle Stimulation. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Follicle Stimulation

Medical Encyclopedia:

Infertility
Drug List: Bravelle Fertinex Follistim Follistim-Aq Follistim-Aq-Cartridge Gonal-F-Powder Gonal-F-Rff Gonal-F-Rff-Pen-Solution Luveris Menopur Metrodin Repronex
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pirbuterol inhaler


Generic Name: pirbuterol inhaler (peer BYOO ter ole)
Brand Names: Maxair, Maxair Autohaler

What is pirbuterol inhalation?

Pirbuterol is a bronchodilator. It works by relaxing muscles in the airways to improve breathing.

Pirbuterol inhalation is used to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema.

Pirbuterol inhalation may also be used for conditions other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about pirbuterol inhalation?

It is very important that you use your pirbuterol inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into your lungs. Your doctor may want you to use a spacer with your inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

Who should not use pirbuterol inhalation?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have

heart disease or high blood pressure,

epilepsy or another seizure disorder,

diabetes,

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism), or

any type of liver or kidney disease.

You may require a lower dose or special monitoring during therapy with pirbuterol if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Pirbuterol is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether pirbuterol inhalation will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether pirbuterol passes into breast milk. Do not use pirbuterol inhalation without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Pirbuterol inhalation is not approved for use by children younger than 12 years of age. How should I use pirbuterol inhalation?

Take pirbuterol inhalation exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse or doctor to explain them to you.

Shake the inhaler several times and uncap the mouthpiece. Breathe out fully and place your lips around the mouthpiece. Take a deep, slow breath as you push down on the canister. Hold your breath for several seconds, then exhale slowly.

The Autohaler releases the correct amount of drug. The force of your inhalation will trigger the release. You do not have to press down on a canister. Follow the instructions that accompany your inhaler.

If you take more than one dose at a time, wait for at least 1 full minute, then repeat the procedure.

Rinse your mouth after each use of the inhaler.

If you also use a steroid inhaler, use your pirbuterol inhaler first to open up your airways, then use the steroid inhaler as directed.

It is very important that you use your pirbuterol inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into your lungs. Your doctor may want you to use a spacer with your inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

Keep your inhaler clean and dry. Keep the mouthpiece capped to avoid getting dirt inside it. Clean your inhaler once a day by removing the canister and mouthpiece and immersing it in warm water or alcohol. Allow the parts to dry, then reassemble the inhaler.

Carry your inhaler with you at all times in case of emergencies. Get a refill before you run out of medicine and before going on vacation.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and use the next one as directed. Do not use a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a pirbuterol overdose include angina or chest pain, irregular heartbeats or a fluttering heart, seizures, tremor, weakness, headache, nausea, and vomiting.

What should I avoid while using pirbuterol inhalation?

Avoid situations that may trigger an asthma attack such as exercising in cold, dry air; smoking; breathing in dust; and exposure to allergens such as pet fur.

Pirbuterol inhalation side effects Stop using pirbuterol and seek emergency medical attention if you experience any of the following serious side effects:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or

chest pain or irregular heartbeats.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to use pirbuterol inhalation and talk to your doctor if you experience

headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, or insomnia;

tremor or nervousness;

sweating;

nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; or

dry mouth.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Pirbuterol inhaler Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Asthma -- Acute:

2 puffs (0.4 mg) orally repeated every 4 to 6 hours. One puff (0.2 mg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours may be sufficient for some patients. A total daily dose of 12 inhalations should not be exceeded.

Usual Adult Dose for Asthma -- Maintenance:

2 puffs (0.4 mg) orally repeated every 4 to 6 hours. One puff (0.2 mg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours may be sufficient for some patients. A total daily dose of 12 inhalations should not be exceeded.

Usual Adult Dose for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Acute:

2 puffs (0.4 mg) orally repeated every 4 to 6 hours. One puff (0.2 mg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours may be sufficient for some patients. A total daily dose of 12 inhalations should not be exceeded.

Usual Adult Dose for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Maintenance:

2 puffs (0.4 mg) orally repeated every 4 to 6 hours. One puff (0.2 mg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours may be sufficient for some patients. A total daily dose of 12 inhalations should not be exceeded.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Asthma -- Acute:

>=12 years:
2 puffs (0.4 mg) orally repeated every 4 to 6 hours. One puff (0.2 mg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours may be sufficient for some patients. A total daily dose of 12 inhalations should not be exceeded.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Asthma -- Maintenance:

>=12 years:
2 puffs (0.4 mg) orally repeated every 4 to 6 hours. One puff (0.2 mg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours may be sufficient for some patients. A total daily dose of 12 inhalations should not be exceeded.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Acute:

>=12 years:
2 puffs (0.4 mg) orally repeated every 4 to 6 hours. One puff (0.2 mg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours may be sufficient for some patients. A total daily dose of 12 inhalations should not be exceeded.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Maintenance:

>=12 years:
2 puffs (0.4 mg) orally repeated every 4 to 6 hours. One puff (0.2 mg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours may be sufficient for some patients. A total daily dose of 12 inhalations should not be exceeded.

What other drugs will affect pirbuterol?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

a beta-blocker (used to treat high blood pressure and other heart conditions) such as atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), or propranolol (Inderal). These medicines may greatly decrease the effects of pirbuterol and lead to an asthma attack. other commonly used beta-blockers, including acebutolol (Sectral), bisoprolol (Zebeta), carteolol (Cartrol), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), nadolol (Corgard), and pindolol (Visken). a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), or nortriptyline (Pamelor). Very high blood pressure and other effects harmful to the heart may occur if these medicines are taken with pirbuterol. other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), and protriptyline (Vivactil). a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). Very high blood pressure and other effects harmful to the heart may also occur if these medicines are taken with pirbuterol.

another inhaled bronchodilator such as albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil), bitolterol (Tornalate), isoetharine (Bronkometer, Bronkosol), isoproterenol (Isuprel, Medihaler-Iso), metaproterenol (Alupent, Metaprel), salmeterol (Servent), or terbutaline (Brethaire, Brethine, Bricanyl). Using other inhaled medicines to open up your lungs will increase the risk of damage to your heart when you are taking pirbuterol.

caffeine, diet pills, or decongestants. These may also increase heart-related side effects.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with pirbuterol inhalation, or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More pirbuterol inhaler resources Pirbuterol inhaler Side Effects (in more detail) Pirbuterol inhaler Dosage Pirbuterol inhaler Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pirbuterol inhaler Drug Interactions Pirbuterol inhaler Support Group 5 Reviews for Pirbuterol inhaler - Add your own review/rating Compare pirbuterol inhaler with other medications Asthma, acute Asthma, Maintenance COPD, Acute COPD, Maintenance Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about pirbuterol written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: pirbuterol inhaler side effects (in more detail)


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Maxair


Generic Name: pirbuterol inhaler (peer BYOO ter ole)
Brand Names: Maxair, Maxair Autohaler

What is pirbuterol inhalation?

Pirbuterol is a bronchodilator. It works by relaxing muscles in the airways to improve breathing.

Pirbuterol inhalation is used to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema.

Pirbuterol inhalation may also be used for conditions other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about pirbuterol inhalation?

It is very important that you use your pirbuterol inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into your lungs. Your doctor may want you to use a spacer with your inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

Who should not use pirbuterol inhalation?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have

heart disease or high blood pressure,

epilepsy or another seizure disorder,

diabetes,

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism), or

any type of liver or kidney disease.

You may require a lower dose or special monitoring during therapy with pirbuterol if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Pirbuterol is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether pirbuterol inhalation will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether pirbuterol passes into breast milk. Do not use pirbuterol inhalation without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Pirbuterol inhalation is not approved for use by children younger than 12 years of age. How should I use pirbuterol inhalation?

Take pirbuterol inhalation exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse or doctor to explain them to you.

Shake the inhaler several times and uncap the mouthpiece. Breathe out fully and place your lips around the mouthpiece. Take a deep, slow breath as you push down on the canister. Hold your breath for several seconds, then exhale slowly.

The Autohaler releases the correct amount of drug. The force of your inhalation will trigger the release. You do not have to press down on a canister. Follow the instructions that accompany your inhaler.

If you take more than one dose at a time, wait for at least 1 full minute, then repeat the procedure.

Rinse your mouth after each use of the inhaler.

If you also use a steroid inhaler, use your pirbuterol inhaler first to open up your airways, then use the steroid inhaler as directed.

It is very important that you use your pirbuterol inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into your lungs. Your doctor may want you to use a spacer with your inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

Keep your inhaler clean and dry. Keep the mouthpiece capped to avoid getting dirt inside it. Clean your inhaler once a day by removing the canister and mouthpiece and immersing it in warm water or alcohol. Allow the parts to dry, then reassemble the inhaler.

Carry your inhaler with you at all times in case of emergencies. Get a refill before you run out of medicine and before going on vacation.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and use the next one as directed. Do not use a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a pirbuterol overdose include angina or chest pain, irregular heartbeats or a fluttering heart, seizures, tremor, weakness, headache, nausea, and vomiting.

What should I avoid while using pirbuterol inhalation?

Avoid situations that may trigger an asthma attack such as exercising in cold, dry air; smoking; breathing in dust; and exposure to allergens such as pet fur.

Pirbuterol inhalation side effects Stop using pirbuterol and seek emergency medical attention if you experience any of the following serious side effects:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or

chest pain or irregular heartbeats.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to use pirbuterol inhalation and talk to your doctor if you experience

headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, or insomnia;

tremor or nervousness;

sweating;

nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; or

dry mouth.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect pirbuterol?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

a beta-blocker (used to treat high blood pressure and other heart conditions) such as atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), or propranolol (Inderal). These medicines may greatly decrease the effects of pirbuterol and lead to an asthma attack. other commonly used beta-blockers, including acebutolol (Sectral), bisoprolol (Zebeta), carteolol (Cartrol), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), nadolol (Corgard), and pindolol (Visken). a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), or nortriptyline (Pamelor). Very high blood pressure and other effects harmful to the heart may occur if these medicines are taken with pirbuterol. other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), and protriptyline (Vivactil). a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). Very high blood pressure and other effects harmful to the heart may also occur if these medicines are taken with pirbuterol.

another inhaled bronchodilator such as albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil), bitolterol (Tornalate), isoetharine (Bronkometer, Bronkosol), isoproterenol (Isuprel, Medihaler-Iso), metaproterenol (Alupent, Metaprel), salmeterol (Servent), or terbutaline (Brethaire, Brethine, Bricanyl). Using other inhaled medicines to open up your lungs will increase the risk of damage to your heart when you are taking pirbuterol.

caffeine, diet pills, or decongestants. These may also increase heart-related side effects.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with pirbuterol inhalation, or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More Maxair resources Maxair Side Effects (in more detail) Maxair Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Maxair Drug Interactions Maxair Support Group 1 Review for Maxair - Add your own review/rating Maxair Prescribing Information (FDA) Maxair Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Maxair Autohaler Prescribing Information (FDA) Maxair Autohaler MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Maxair with other medications Asthma, acute Asthma, Maintenance COPD, Acute COPD, Maintenance Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about pirbuterol written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: Maxair side effects (in more detail)


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Short Stature for Age Medications


Definition of Short Stature for Age: Short stature refers to any person who is significantly below the average height for a person of the same age and sex -- specifically, the shortest 3 - 5% of the population. More...

Drugs associated with Short Stature for Age

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Short Stature for Age. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Short Stature for Age

Medical Encyclopedia:

Short stature
Drug List: Accretropin Genotropin Humatrope-Cartridge Norditropin Norditropin-Flexpro Norditropin-Nordiflex Nutropin Nutropin-Aq Nutropin-Depot Omnitrope Saizen Serostim Tev-Tropin Zorbtive
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Ovulation Induction Medications


Definition of Ovulation Induction: Techniques for the artifical induction of ovulation.

Drugs associated with Ovulation Induction

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Ovulation Induction. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.


Drug List: Cetrotide Chorex Chorionic-Gonadotropin Clomid Follistim Follistim-Aq Follistim-Aq-Cartridge Gonal-F-Powder Gonal-F-Rff Gonal-F-Rff-Pen-Solution Hcg Menopur Novarel Ovidrel Pregnyl Profasi Profasi-Hp Repronex Serophene
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Nicotine Inhaler


Pronunciation: NIK-oh-teen
Generic Name: Nicotine
Brand Name: Nicotrol
Nicotine Inhaler is used for:

Helping you to quit smoking.

Nicotine Inhaler is a smoking deterrent. It works by providing low levels of nicotine, which may help you to quit smoking by lessening the physical signs of withdrawal symptoms.

Do NOT use Nicotine Inhaler if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Nicotine Inhaler or to menthol you have had a recent heart attack you have severe or worsening chest pain or a severely irregular heartbeat you continue to smoke, chew tobacco, use snuff, or any other nicotine-containing products

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Nicotine Inhaler:

Some medical conditions may interact with Nicotine Inhaler. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have chest pain (eg, angina), heart problems (eg, coronary artery disease, irregular heartbeat), a history of heart attack, high blood pressure, breathing problems (eg, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]), an overactive thyroid, an ulcer, a tumor on your adrenal gland (pheochromocytoma), diabetes, kidney or liver problems, or blood vessel problems (eg, Buerger disease, Raynaud phenomena)

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Nicotine Inhaler. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Acetaminophen, adrenergic antagonists (eg, prazosin), beta-blockers (eg, labetalol, propranolol), caffeine, imipramine, insulin, oxazepam, pentazocine, or theophylline because the risk of their side effects may be increased when you stop smoking Adrenergic agonists (eg, isoproterenol, phenylephrine) because their effectiveness may be decreased when you stop smoking

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Nicotine Inhaler may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Nicotine Inhaler:

Use Nicotine Inhaler as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Nicotine Inhaler. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Do not exceed 16 cartridges per day. Clean the mouthpiece regularly with soap and water. If you miss a dose of Nicotine Inhaler, use it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Nicotine Inhaler.

Important safety information: Nicotine Inhaler may cause dizziness or blurred vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Nicotine Inhaler with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Nicotine Inhaler before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Avoid getting Nicotine Inhaler in your eyes. If you get Nicotine Inhaler in your eyes, wash them out immediately with cool tap water. Do not smoke or use tobacco products while you are using Nicotine Inhaler. Nicotine Inhaler should be used as part of a larger program to help you stop smoking. If you need help choosing a program, talk with your health care provider. Do NOT use Nicotine Inhaler for longer than 6 months. If you still feel the need to use Nicotine Inhaler after 6 months, check with your doctor. Diabetes patients - Nicotine Inhaler may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine. Use Nicotine Inhaler with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Use Nicotine Inhaler with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Nicotine Inhaler may cause harm to the fetus. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Nicotine Inhaler while you are pregnant. Nicotine Inhaler is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Nicotine Inhaler, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

When used for long periods of time or at high doses, some people develop a need to continue taking Nicotine Inhaler. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction.

Do not suddenly stop taking Nicotine Inhaler without your doctor's approval. Stopping Nicotine Inhaler suddenly may cause serious WITHDRAWAL symptoms. These may include anxiety; depression; dizziness; fatigue; muscle aches; sleep problems.

Possible side effects of Nicotine Inhaler:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Anxiety; coughing; diarrhea; flu-like symptoms; headache; hiccups; indigestion; mouth or throat irritation; muscle aches; nausea; pain in the jaw and neck; runny nose; taste changes.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); abnormal skin sensations; chest pain; depression; fever; irregular or fast heartbeat; pounding in the chest; severe dizziness or headache; shortness of breath.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Nicotine side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include cold and clammy skin; confusion; diarrhea; difficulty breathing; dizziness; excessive drooling; fainting; headache; hearing and vision problems; nausea; rapid, weak, or irregular heartbeat; seizures; stomach pain; sweating; tremor; vomiting; weakness.

Proper storage of Nicotine Inhaler:

Store Nicotine Inhaler at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Store the mouthpiece and cartridges in the plastic case provided. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Nicotine Inhaler out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Nicotine Inhaler, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Nicotine Inhaler is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Nicotine Inhaler. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Nicotine resources Nicotine Side Effects (in more detail) Nicotine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Nicotine Drug Interactions Nicotine Support Group 42 Reviews for Nicotine - Add your own review/rating Compare Nicotine with other medications Smoking Cessation
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terbutaline inhalation


Generic Name: terbutaline inhalation (ter BYOO ta leen)
Brand Names: Brethaire

What is terbutaline inhalation?

Terbutaline is a bronchodilator. It works by relaxing muscles in the airways to improve breathing.

Terbutaline inhalation is used to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema.

Terbutaline inhalation may also be used for conditions other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about terbutaline inhalation?

It is very important that you use the terbutaline inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into your lungs. You doctor may want you to use a spacer with the inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using terbutaline inhalation?

Before using terbutaline inhalation, tell your doctor if you have

heart disease or high blood pressure;

epilepsy or another seizure disorder;

diabetes;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism); or

liver or kidney disease.

You may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment with terbutaline inhalation if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Terbutaline is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use terbutaline inhalation without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether terbutaline passes into breast milk. Do not use terbutaline inhalation without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Terbutaline inhalation is not approved for use by children younger than 12 years of age. How should I use terbutaline inhalation?

Use terbutaline inhalation exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Shake the inhaler several times and uncap the mouthpiece. Breathe out fully. For best results, hold the inhaler 1 to 2 inches in front of your open mouth or attach a spacer to the inhaler and place the spacer in your mouth, above your tongue and past your teeth. Take a deep, slow breath as you push down on the canister. Hold your breath for 10 seconds, then exhale slowly. If you place the inhaler directly into your mouth, you may not receive the correct amount of medicine because it will be propelled onto the back of your tongue and/or throat. If you do use the inhaler directly in your mouth, be sure that it is above your tongue and past your teeth.

If you take more than one dose at a time, wait for at least 1 full minute, then repeat the procedure.

If you also use a steroid inhaler, use the terbutaline inhaler first to open up your airways, then use the steroid inhaler as directed.

It is very important that you use the terbutaline inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into your lungs. Your doctor may want you to use a spacer with the inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

It is important to use terbutaline inhalation regularly to get the most benefit.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

Your doctor may want you to have lung function test or other medical evaluations during treatment with terbutaline inhalation to monitor progress and side effects.

Keep the inhaler clean and dry. Keep the mouthpiece capped to avoid getting dirt inside it. The inhaler can be cleaned by removing the canister and immersing the mouthpiece in warm water or alcohol. Allow the parts to dry, then reassemble the inhaler.

Carry the inhaler with you at all times in case of emergencies. Get a refill before you run out of medicine and before going on vacation.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and use the next one as directed. Do not use a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a terbutaline overdose include angina or chest pain, irregular heartbeats or a fluttering heart, seizures, tremor, weakness, headache, nausea, and vomiting.

What should I avoid while using terbutaline inhalation?

Avoid situations that may trigger an asthma attack such as exercising in cold, dry air; smoking; breathing in dust; and exposure to allergens such as pet fur.

Terbutaline inhalation side effects Stop using terbutaline inhalation and seek emergency medical attention if you experience any of the following serious side effects:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or

chest pain or irregular heartbeats.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to use terbutaline inhalation and talk to your doctor if you experience

headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, or insomnia;

tremor or nervousness;

sweating;

nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; or

dry mouth.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Terbutaline inhalation Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Asthma -- Maintenance:

Tablets: 5 mg orally 3 times a day at 6 hour intervals during waking hours. May decrease to 2.5 mg/dose if side effects are pronounced. Do not exceed 15 mg in 24 hours.
Inhalation aerosol: 2 inhalations separated by 60 seconds every 4 to 6 hours. Do not repeat more often than every 4 to 6 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Premature Labor:

Tablets: 2.5 to 7.5 mg orally every 6 hours. Therapy should be continued until 36 to 37 weeks gestation.
Continuous intravenous infusion: 10 to 25 mcg/min. Therapy should be continued until labor has been arrested. Maximum dose 80 mcg/min.
Subcutaneous injection: 0.25 mg every 6 hours. Subcutaneous therapy should be continued until labor has been arrested.

Usual Adult Dose for Asthma -- Acute:

Inhalation aerosol: 2 inhalations separated by 60 seconds every 4 to 6 hours. Do not repeat more often than every 4 to 6 hours.
Subcutaneous Injection: 0.25 mg into the lateral deltoid area. A second 0.25 mg dose can be administered in 15 to 30 minutes if needed. Do not exceed 0.5 mg in 4 hours.
Continuous intravenous infusion: 0.08 to 6 mcg/kg/min.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Asthma -- Acute:

Subcutaneous Injection: 0.005 to 0.01 mg/kg/dose to a maximum dose of 0.4 mg every 15 to 20 minutes for 2 doses.
Nebulization: 0.01 to 0.03 mg/kg/dose with a minimum dose of 0.1 mg; maximum dose is 2.5 mg diluted with 1 to 2 mL of normal saline every 4 to 6 hours.
Continuous intravenous infusion: 0.08 to 6 mcg/kg/min.
> 12 years:
Inhalation aerosol: 2 inhalations separated by 60 seconds every 4 to 6 hours. Do not repeat more often than every 4 to 6 hours.
Subcutaneous Injection: 0.25 mg into the lateral deltoid area. A second 0.25 mg dose can be administered in 15-30 minutes if needed. Maximum dose 0.5 mg in 4 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Asthma -- Maintenance:

Tablets: 0.05 mg/kg/day divided into three doses. Gradually increase to 0.15 mg/kg/day. Maximum dose is 5 mg per day.
>=12 years:
Inhalation aerosol: 2 inhalations separated by 60 seconds every 4 to 6 hours. Do not repeat more often than every 4 to 6 hours.
>=12 Tablets: 2.5 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours. Do not exceed 7.5 mg in 24 hours
>=15 years:
Tablets: 2.5 mg to 5 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours. Do not exceed 15 mg in 24 hours.

What other drugs will affect terbutaline?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

a beta-blocker (used to treat high blood pressure and other heart conditions) such as atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), propranolol (Inderal), acebutolol (Sectral), bisoprolol (Zebeta), carteolol (Cartrol), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), nadolol (Corgard), and pindolol (Visken), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), and others; a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

another inhaled bronchodilator such as albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil), bitolterol (Tornalate), isoetharine (Bronkometer, Bronkosol), isoproterenol (Isuprel, Medi Haler-Iso), metaproterenol (Alupent, Metaprel), pirbuterol (Maxair), or salmeterol (Serevent); or

caffeine, diet pills, or decongestants.

You may not be able to use terbutaline inhalation, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with terbutaline inhalation, or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More terbutaline inhalation resources Terbutaline inhalation Side Effects (in more detail)Terbutaline inhalation DosageTerbutaline inhalation Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesTerbutaline inhalation Drug InteractionsTerbutaline inhalation Support Group5 Reviews for Terbutaline - Add your own review/rating Compare terbutaline inhalation with other medications Asthma, acuteAsthma, MaintenancePremature Labor Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about terbutaline written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: terbutaline side effects (in more detail)


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Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler


Pronunciation: floo-TIK-a-sone
Generic Name: Fluticasone HFA
Brand Name: Flovent HFA
Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler is used for:

Preventing or reducing the frequency and seriousness of asthma attacks. Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler will NOT help to stop an asthma attack once one starts.

Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler is a corticosteroid. It works by reducing inflammation in the airway.

Do NOT use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler you are having a severe asthma attack requiring quick relief

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler:

Some medical conditions may interact with Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have active or inactive tuberculosis (TB) or a history of a positive skin test for TB if you have an infection of the airways or lungs, untreated fungal or bacterial infections, parasitic or viral infections, measles, chickenpox, or a herpes simplex infection in or around the eye, or if you have recently received a vaccination if you have diarrhea, glaucoma, or cataracts

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Certain medicines that act on the liver (eg, ketoconazole, ritonavir) because they may increase the actions of Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler and the risk of Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler's side effects

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler:

Use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. You must prime the inhaler before you use it for the first time. To prime the inhaler, remove the mouthpiece cap and shake the inhaler well for 5 seconds. Spray the inhaler into the air away from your face and eyes. Repeat 3 more times to finish priming it. You will need to prime the inhaler again if you go without using it for more than 7 days or if you drop it. To prime the inhaler again, take the cap off the mouthpiece and shake the inhaler well for 5 seconds. Spray it 1 time into the air away from your face and eyes. For best results, the canister should be at room temperature before use. Before using Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler, be sure that the canister is properly placed in the inhaler unit. Shake well before each use. Breathe out slowly and completely. Place the mouthpiece between your lips and try to rest your tongue flat, unless your doctor has told you otherwise. Your doctor may have told you to hold the inhaler 1 or 2 inches (2 or 3 centimeters) away from the open mouth or to use a special spacing device. As you start to take a slow deep breath, press the canister and mouthpiece together at exactly the same time. This will release a dose of Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler. Continue breathing in slowly and deeply and hold for as long as comfortable, then breathe out slowly through pursed lips or your nose. If more than 1 inhalation is to be used, wait a few minutes and repeat the above steps. Keep the spray away from your eyes. After inhaling, rinse your mouth with water and spit it out. Keep track of the number of sprays you use and subtract this number from the number of doses in the container. This will help you know when the container is becoming empty. Continue to use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler, use it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler.

Important safety information: Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler is used to prevent asthma attacks. Do NOT use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler to treat a severe asthma attack that requires quick relief. If you are also using a bronchodilator inhaler, be sure to always carry the bronchodilator inhaler with you to use if you have an asthma attack. Use caution if you switch from an oral steroid (eg, prednisone) to Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler. It may take several months for your body to make enough natural steroids to handle events that cause physical stress. Such events may include injury, surgery, infection, loss of blood electrolytes, or a sudden asthma attack. These may be severe and sometimes fatal. Contact your doctor right away if any of these events occur. You may need to take an oral steroid (eg, prednisone) again. Carry a card at all times that says you may need an oral steroid (eg, prednisone) if any of these events occur. Improvement may be noticeable within the first 1 or 2 days of starting Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler. However, you may need to use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler for 1 to 2 weeks before the full benefit is achieved. Do NOT take more than the recommended dose without checking with your doctor. Contact your health care provider right away if you experience an asthma attack that does not improve with bronchodilator therapy (eg, albuterol). Some patients may have trouble using Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler correctly. Some may also get mouth sores or a bad taste in the mouth after using it. If you have any of these problems, ask your health care provider if a spacing device may help. If you have not had chickenpox, shingles, or measles, avoid contact with anyone who does. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 4 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. Corticosteroids may affect growth rate in CHILDREN and teenagers in some cases. They may need regular growth checks while they use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler while you are pregnant. It is not known if Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

Contact your health care provider if WITHDRAWAL symptoms (joint or muscle pain, lack of energy, depression) occur.

Possible side effects of Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Dry mouth; flu; headache; hoarseness; mouth or throat irritation; nasal discharge; runny nose; sinus swelling; sore throat; stuffy nose; upper respiratory tract infection.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); fainting; lack of energy; nausea; severe dizziness; slowed growth in children; sudden weight loss; tingling of the arms and legs; tiredness; vision changes; vomiting; weakness; wheezing; white patches or sores in the mouth.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler:

Store Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store canister with mouthpiece down. Store away from heat and direct sunlight. Do not puncture, break, or burn the canister even if it appears to be empty. Contents are under pressure. Keep Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Fluticasone HFA Aerosol Inhaler. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Fluticasone HFA resources Fluticasone HFA Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingFluticasone HFA Drug InteractionsFluticasone HFA Support Group4 Reviews for Fluticasone HFA - Add your own review/rating Compare Fluticasone HFA with other medications Asthma, MaintenanceBronchopulmonary DysplasiaEosinophilic Esophagitis
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Flovent Aerosol Inhaler


Pronunciation: flue-TIK-a-sone
Generic Name: Fluticasone
Brand Name: Flovent
Flovent Aerosol Inhaler is used for:

Preventing or reducing the frequency and seriousness of bronchial asthma attacks. Flovent Aerosol Inhaler does not help during an acute asthma attack.

Flovent Aerosol Inhaler is a corticosteroid. It works by reducing inflammatory reactions in the airways in response to allergens and irritants in the air.

Do NOT use Flovent Aerosol Inhaler if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Flovent Aerosol Inhaler you are having a severe asthma attack requiring quick relief

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Flovent Aerosol Inhaler:

Some medical conditions may interact with Flovent Aerosol Inhaler. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines or other substances if you have active or inactive tuberculosis or a positive skin test for tuberculosis if you have infections of the respiratory tract, untreated fungal or bacterial infections, parasitic or viral infections, measles, chickenpox, herpes simplex in or around the eye, or recently received a vaccination if you have diarrhea if you have glaucoma or cataracts

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Flovent Aerosol Inhaler. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Certain medicines that act on the liver (eg, protease inhibitors [eg, ritonavir], ketoconazole) because they may increase the actions and side effects of Flovent Aerosol Inhaler

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Flovent Aerosol Inhaler may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Flovent Aerosol Inhaler:

Use Flovent Aerosol Inhaler as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Flovent Aerosol Inhaler. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. If needed, prime the inhaler according to the directions in the extra patient leaflet. For best results, the canister should be at room temperature before use. Before using Flovent Aerosol Inhaler, be sure that the canister is properly placed in the inhaler unit. Shake well before each use. Breathe out slowly and completely. Place the mouthpiece between your lips and try to rest your tongue flat, unless your doctor has told you otherwise. Your doctor may have told you to hold the inhaler 1 or 2 inches (2 or 3 centimeters) away from the open mouth or to use a special spacing device. As you start to take a slow deep breath, press the canister and mouthpiece together at exactly the same time. This will release a dose of Flovent Aerosol Inhaler. Continue breathing in slowly and deeply and hold for as long as comfortable, then breathe out slowly through pursed lips or your nose. If more than 1 inhalation is to be used, wait a few minutes and repeat the above steps. Keep the spray away from your eyes. After inhaling, rinse your mouth with water without swallowing. Keep track of the number of sprays you use and subtract this number from the number of doses in the container. This will help you know when the container is becoming empty. Continue to use Flovent Aerosol Inhaler even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of Flovent Aerosol Inhaler, use it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Flovent Aerosol Inhaler.

Important safety information: Flovent Aerosol Inhaler is used to prevent asthma attacks. It is not to be used for a severe asthma attack that requires quick relief. If you are also using a bronchodilator inhaler, be sure to always carry the bronchodilator inhaler with you to use during asthma attacks. Use caution if you switch from an oral steroid (eg, prednisone) to Flovent Aerosol Inhaler. It may take several months for your body to make enough natural steroids to handle events that cause physical stress. Such events may include injury, surgery, infection, loss of blood electrolytes, or a sudden asthma attack. These may be severe and sometimes fatal. Contact your doctor right away if any of these events occur. You may need to take an oral steroid (eg, prednisone) again. Carry a card at all times that says you may need an oral steroid (eg, prednisone) if any of these events occur. Improvement may be noticeable within the first day or 2 of using Flovent Aerosol Inhaler. However, you may need to use Flovent Aerosol Inhaler for 1 to 2 weeks before the full benefit is achieved. If your symptoms do not get better or if they get worse, check with your doctor. Some patients may have trouble using Flovent Aerosol Inhaler correctly. Some may also get mouth sores or a bad taste in the mouth after using it. If you have any of these problems, ask your health care provider if a spacing device may help. Contact your health care provider at once if episodes of asthma that are not responsive to bronchodilators occur. Contact your health care provider at once if signs of an infection occur. If you have not had chickenpox, shingles, or measles, avoid contact with anyone who does. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Flovent Aerosol Inhaler before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Flovent Aerosol Inhaler is for oral inhalation only. Avoid spraying in the eyes. Flovent Aerosol Inhaler should not be used in CHILDREN younger than 12 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. Corticosteroids may affect growth rate in CHILDREN and teenagers in some cases. They may need regular growth checks while they use Flovent Aerosol Inhaler. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Flovent Aerosol Inhaler while you are pregnant. It is not known if Flovent Aerosol Inhaler is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Flovent Aerosol Inhaler, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

Contact your health care provider if WITHDRAWAL symptoms (joint or muscle pain, lack of energy, depression) occur.

Possible side effects of Flovent Aerosol Inhaler:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Dry mouth; flu; headache; hoarseness; nasal discharge; runny nose; sinus swelling; sore throat; stuffy nose; upper respiratory tract infection.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); fainting; lack of energy; nausea; severe dizziness; slowed growth in children; sudden weight loss; tingling of the arms and legs; tiredness; vomiting; weakness; wheezing; white curd-like patches in the mouth.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Flovent side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Flovent Aerosol Inhaler:

Store Flovent Aerosol Inhaler between 36 and 86 degrees F (2 and 30 degrees C). Protect from freezing. Store canister with mouthpiece down. Store away from heat and direct sunlight. Do not puncture, break, or burn the canister even if it appears to be empty. Contents are under pressure. Keep Flovent Aerosol Inhaler out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Flovent Aerosol Inhaler, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Flovent Aerosol Inhaler is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Flovent Aerosol Inhaler. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Flovent resources Flovent Side Effects (in more detail) Flovent Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Flovent Drug Interactions Flovent Support Group 3 Reviews for Flovent - Add your own review/rating Compare Flovent with other medications Asthma, Maintenance Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Eosinophilic Esophagitis
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Gonadotropins


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Gonadotropins are hormones synthesized and released by the anterior pituitary, and act on the gonads (testes and ovaries) to promote production of sex hormones and stimulate production of either sperm or ova. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormones (LH) are the main gonadotropins. Human chorionic gonadotropin is a gonadotropin that is only produced during pregnancy by the placenta.

Gonadotropin production is controlled by gonadotropin-releasing hormone, which is released by the hypothalamus. The effects of gonadotrophins differ in males and females.

Gonadotropins are used in fertility treatment to produce mature follicles and ovulation induction, in women. In men, it is used to increase sperm count as part of fertility treatment.

See also

Medical conditions associated with gonadotropins:

Female InfertilityFollicle StimulationHypogonadism, MaleObesityOvulation InductionPrepubertal Cryptorchidism Drug List:/tags/gonal-f-powder/
/tags/pregnyl/
/tags/novarel/
/tags/chorex/
/tags/fertinex/
/tags/follistim-antagon-injectable-kit/
/tags/follistim-aq-cartridge/
/tags/gonal-f-rff-pen-solution/
/tags/menopur/
/tags/profasi/
Repronex
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Asthma, acute Medications


Drugs associated with Asthma, acute

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Asthma, acute. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Asthma, acute

Medical Encyclopedia:

Asthma Asthma - children Asthma and allergy - resources Occupational asthma
Drug List: A-Hydrocort A-Methapred-Solution Accuneb-Solution Adrenaclick-Auto-Injector Adrenalin Adrenalin-Chloride Airet-Solution Alupent Asthmahaler-Aerosol Baycadron Brethaire Brethine Bricanyl Bubbli-Pred Cortef De-Sone-La-Injection Decadron Depo-Medrol-Suspension Dexacen-4-Injection Dexacort-Phosphate-In-Turbinaire Dexamethasone-Intensol Dexasone-Injection Dexasone-La-Injection Dexpak-Tablets-Dose-Pack Elixophyllin-Elixir Epipen-Auto-Injector Epipen-2-Pak Epipen-Auto-Injector Epipen-Jr-Auto-Injector Epipen-Jr-2-Pak Epipen-Jr-Auto-Injector Flo-Pred Hydeltrasol Hydrocortone Isuprel Isuprel-Mistometer Key-Pred-Sp Maxair Maxair-Autohaler Medihaler-Epi Medihaler-Iso Medrol Medrol-Dosepak Metaprel Methylprednisolone-Dose-Pack Millipred Millipred-Dp Orapred Orapred-Odt Pediapred-Liquid Phyllocontin Pred-Ject-50 Predacort-50 Predalone-50 Predate-50 Prelone-Syrup Primatene-Mist-Aerosol Proair-Hfa-Aerosol Proventil Proventil-Hfa-Aerosol Quibron-T Quibron-T-Sr Solu-Cortef-Solution Solu-Medrol-Solution Solurex-Injection Solurex-La-Injection Theo-24-Sustained-Release-Capsules Theo-Dur Theo-Time Theocap-Sustained-Release-Capsules Theochron-Sustained-Release-Tablets Theolair-Tablets Tornalate Truphylline Truxophyllin Twinject-Auto-Injector Twinject-Auto-Injector Twinject-Auto-Injector-Two-Pack Uniphyl-Sustained-Release-Tablets Ventolin Ventolin-Hfa-Aerosol Veripred-20-Solution Volmax Vospire-Er-Extended-Release-Tablets Xopenex Xopenex-Concentrate Xopenex-Hfa-Aerosol Zema-Pak-10-Day
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albuterol and ipratropium inhalation


Generic Name: albuterol and ipratropium (inhalation) (al BYOO ter ol and ip ra TRO pee um)
Brand Names: Combivent, DuoNeb

What is albuterol and ipratropium inhalation?

Albuterol and ipratropium are bronchodilators that relax muscles in the airways and increase air flow to the lungs.

The combination of albuterol and ipratropium is used as an inhaled medication to prevent bronchospasm in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are also using other medicines to control their condition.

Albuterol and ipratropium inhalation may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about albuterol and ipratropium inhalation? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to albuterol (Proventil, Ventolin), ipratropium (Atrovent), or atropine (Atreza, Sal-Tropine). Do not use Combivent if you are allergic to soybeans, peanuts, or other food products that contain soya lecithin.

Before you use this medicine, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, a heart rhythm disorder, seizures, diabetes, overactive thyroid, an enlarged prostate, urination problems, liver disease, or kidney disease.

Call your doctor right away if any of your medications do not seem to work as well in preventing bronchospasm. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using albuterol and ipratropium inhalation? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to albuterol (Proventil, Ventolin), ipratropium (Atrovent), or atropine (Atreza, Sal-Tropine). Do not use Combivent if you are allergic to soybeans, peanuts, or other food products that contain soya lecithin.

To make sure you can safely use this medication, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart disease, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, or heart rhythm disorder;

a seizure disorder such as epilepsy;

diabetes;

overactive thyroid;

glaucoma;

enlarged prostate, problems with urination; or

liver or kidney disease. FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this medication is harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using albuterol and ipratropium inhalation. How should I use albuterol and ipratropium inhalation?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

This medication may increase the risk of asthma-related death. It is critical that you use only the prescribed dose of this medicine and follow all patient instructions for safe use of the medication.

Albuterol and ipratropium inhalation comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

To use the inhaler (Combivent):

Shake the canister vigorously for at least 10 seconds before each spray.

Uncap the mouthpiece of the inhaler. Breathe out fully. Put the mouthpiece into your mouth and close your lips. Keep your eyes closed to prevent spraying any medicine into your eyes. Breathe in slowly while pushing down on the canister. Hold your breath for 10 seconds, then breathe out slowly.

If you use more than one inhalation at a time, wait at least 2 minutes before using the second inhalation.

Keep your inhaler clean and dry, and store it with the cap on the mouthpiece. Clean your inhaler once a week by removing the canister and placing the mouthpiece under warm running water for at least 30 seconds. Allow the parts to dry before putting the inhaler back together.

To use the solution with a nebulizer (Duoneb):

Open the foil pouch and remove one vial. Squeeze all of the medicine out into the chamber of the nebulizer.

Attach the mouthpiece or face mask to the drug chamber. Then, attach the drug chamber to the compressor. Sit upright in a comfortable position. Place the mouthpiece into your mouth or put the face mask on, covering your nose and mouth.

Breathe in slowly and evenly until you have inhaled all of the medicine (usually 5 to 15 minutes). The treatment is complete when no more mist is formed by the nebulizer and the drug chamber is empty.

Clean the nebulizer after each use. Follow the cleaning directions that came with your nebulizer.

Call your doctor right away if any of your medications do not seem to work as well in preventing attacks.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your lung function will need to be tested often. You may also need blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Store Combivent at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Extreme heat can cause the medicine canister to burst. Do not store it in your car on hot days. Do not throw an empty canister into open flame.

Use albuterol and ipratropium inhalation regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store Duoneb at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep each vial in its foil pouch until you are ready to use it.

Keep track of the number of sprays you have used and throw away the inhaler canister after 200 sprays, even if it feels like there is still medicine in it.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of albuterol and ipratropium can be fatal. Overdose symptoms may include chest pain or heavy feeling, rapid or uneven heart rate, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, weakness, or general ill feeling. What should I avoid while using albuterol and ipratropium inhalation? Avoid getting this medication in your eyes. If this does happen, rinse the eyes with water and seek medical attention. This medication may cause blurred vision and may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Albuterol and ipratropium inhalation side effects Stop using this medication and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using albuterol and ipratropium and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

bronchospasm (wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing), especially after starting a new canister of this medicine;

chest pain and fast, pounding, or uneven heart beats;

swelling of your ankles or feet;

vision problems, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;

pain or burning with urination; or

increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure).

Less serious side effects may include:

hoarse voice, sore throat, cough, runny or stuffy nose;

constipation, diarrhea;

nausea, upset stomach;

headache; or

leg cramps.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Albuterol and ipratropium Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Maintenance:

2 puffs by metered dose inhaler 4 times a day. Patients may take an extra dose as warranted by symptomatology. The maximum recommended dose is 12 puffs/day.
or
One 3 mL vial by nebulization 4 times a day. Patients may take extra doses as warranted by symptomatology. The maximum recommended dose is 6 vials (18 mL)/ day.

What other drugs will affect albuterol and ipratropium inhalation?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

atropine (Atreza, Sal-Tropine), belladonna (Donnatal, and others), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm Scop);

bronchodilators such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);

clidinium (Quarzan);

glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others);

dicyclomine (Bentyl);

mepenzolate (Cantil);

methantheline (Provocholine);

bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare);

irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl) or propantheline (Pro Banthine);

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), metoprolol (Lopressor), propranolol (Inderal), and others;

a diuretic (water pill);

an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

a stimulant, ADHD medication, diet pills, or over-the-counter cold or allergy medicines; or

medicines used to treat Parkinson's disease such as benztropine (Cogentin), orphenadrine (Norflex), trihexyphenidyl (Artane, Trihexane), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with albuterol and ipratropium inhalation. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More albuterol and ipratropium resources Albuterol and ipratropium Side Effects (in more detail) Albuterol and ipratropium Dosage Albuterol and ipratropium Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Albuterol and ipratropium Drug Interactions Albuterol and ipratropium Support Group 9 Reviews for Albuterol and ipratropium - Add your own review/rating Compare albuterol and ipratropium with other medications COPD, Maintenance Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about albuterol and ipratropium inhalation.

See also: albuterol and ipratropium side effects (in more detail)


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Lantus Cartridge Systems


Pronunciation: IN-su-lin GLAR-jeen
Generic Name: Insulin Glargine
Brand Name: Examples include Lantus and Lantus Solostar
Lantus Cartridge Systems are used for:

Treating diabetes mellitus.

Lantus Cartridge Systems are a long-acting form of the hormone insulin. It works by helping your body to use sugar properly. This lowers the amount of glucose in the blood, which helps to treat diabetes.

Do NOT use Lantus Cartridge Systems if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Lantus Cartridge Systems

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Lantus Cartridge Systems:

Some medical conditions may interact with Lantus Cartridge Systems. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you drink alcoholic beverages if you have liver or kidney problems, diabetic ketoacidosis, or nerve problems if you have high blood sodium levels or are on a low salt diet

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Lantus Cartridge Systems. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Beta-blockers (eg, propranolol), clonidine, guanethidine, lithium, or reserpine because they may increase the risk of high or low blood sugar or may hide the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar, if it occurs Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril), disopyramide, fenfluramine, fibrates (eg, clofibrate, gemfibrozil), fluoxetine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) (eg, phenelzine), oral medicine for diabetes (eg, glipizide, metformin, nateglinide), pentamidine, propoxyphene, salicylates (eg, aspirin), somatostatin analogs (eg, octreotide), or sulfonamide antibiotics (eg, sulfamethoxazole) because the risk of low blood sugar may be increased Atypical antipsychotics (eg, olanzapine), corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), danazol, diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide), estrogen, hormonal contraceptives (eg, birth control pills), isoniazid, phenothiazines (eg, chlorpromazine), progesterones (eg, medroxyprogesterone), protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir), somatropin, sympathomimetics (eg, albuterol, epinephrine, terbutaline), or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because they may decrease Lantus Cartridge Systems's effectiveness, resulting in high blood sugar

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Lantus Cartridge Systems may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Lantus Cartridge Systems:

Use Lantus Cartridge Systems as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Extra patient leaflets are available with Lantus Cartridge Systems. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Use Lantus Cartridge Systems at the same time each day, as directed by your doctor. A health care provider will teach you how to use Lantus Cartridge Systems. Be sure you understand how to use it. Follow the procedures you are taught when you use a dose. Contact your health care provider if you have any questions. Wash your hands before you use Lantus Cartridge Systems. Always check before each use to be sure you are injecting the correct dose of insulin. Using too much or too little insulin may result in serious side effects. Lantus Cartridge Systems should be clear and colorless. Do not use Lantus Cartridge Systems if it contains particles or is discolored, or if the container is cracked or damaged. Do NOT dilute Lantus Cartridge Systems or mix it with other insulin. Do NOT use it in an insulin pump. Use the proper technique taught to you by your doctor. Inject deep under the skin, NOT into a vein or muscle. Injection sites within an injection area (abdomen, thigh, or upper arm) must be rotated from one injection to the next. Be sure you have purchased the correct insulin. Insulin comes in a variety of containers, including vials, cartridges, and pens. Make sure that you understand how to properly measure and prepare your dose. If you have any questions about measuring and preparing your dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for information. The effect of Lantus Cartridge Systems lasts for up to 24 hours. Lantus Cartridge Systems begins lowering blood sugar about 1 to 2 hours after an injection. There is no peak effect. The effect lasts for up to 24 hours. Do not mix this insulin together with any other type of insulin or any other medicine in the same syringe. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Ask your health care provider how to dispose of these materials after use. Follow all local rules for disposal. It is very important to follow your insulin regimen exactly. Do NOT miss any doses. Ask your doctor for specific instructions to follow in case you ever miss a dose of insulin.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Lantus Cartridge Systems.

Important safety information: Lantus Cartridge Systems may cause drowsiness, dizziness, blurred vision, or lightheadedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Lantus Cartridge Systems with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Do not drink alcohol without discussing it with your doctor. Drinking alcohol may increase your risk of developing high or low blood sugar. Do not exceed the recommended dose, use Lantus Cartridge Systems more often than prescribed, or change the type or dose of insulin you are taking without checking with your doctor. Proper diet, regular exercise, and regular testing of the blood sugar are important for best results when using Lantus Cartridge Systems. Illness, especially with nausea and vomiting, emotional problems, stress, or changes in diet or activity level, may cause your insulin requirements to change. Even if you are not eating, you still require insulin. You and your doctor should establish a sick day plan to use in case of illness. When you are sick, test your blood/urine frequently and call your doctor as instructed. If you will be traveling across time zones, consult your doctor concerning adjustments in your insulin schedule. An insulin reaction resulting from low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) may occur if you take too much insulin, skip a meal, or exercise too much. Low blood sugar may make you anxious, sweaty, weak, dizzy, drowsy, or faint. It may also make your heart beat faster; make your vision change; give you a headache, chills, or tremors; or make you more hungry. It is a good idea to carry a reliable source of glucose (eg, tablets or gel) to treat low blood sugar. If this is not available, you should eat or drink a quick source of sugar like table sugar, honey, candy, orange juice, or non-diet soda. This will raise your blood sugar level quickly. Tell your doctor right away if this happens. To prevent low blood sugar, eat meals at the same time each day and do not skip meals. Developing a fever or infection, eating significantly more than usual, or missing your dose of insulin may cause high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). High blood sugar may make you feel confused, drowsy, or thirsty. It can also make you flush, breathe faster, or have a fruit-like breath odor. If these symptoms occur, tell your doctor right away. If not treated, loss of consciousness, coma, or death may occur. Carry an ID card at all times that says you have diabetes. Lab tests, including fasting blood glucose levels or glycosylated hemoglobin levels, may be performed while you use Lantus Cartridge Systems. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Lantus Cartridge Systems with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially low blood sugar. Lantus Cartridge Systems should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 6 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Lantus Cartridge Systems while you are pregnant. Lantus Cartridge Systems are found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Lantus Cartridge Systems, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Lantus Cartridge Systems:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Redness, swelling, itching, or mild pain at the injection site.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); changes in vision; chills; confusion; dizziness; drowsiness; fainting; fast heartbeat; fast, shallow breathing; headache; hoarseness; increased hunger, thirst, or urination; loss of consciousness; nervousness; seizures; slurred speech; stomach pain; sweating; sweet or fruity breath odor; swelling of the arms or legs; tremor; weakness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Lantus side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include chills; dizziness; drowsiness; fainting; headache; increased heartbeat; increased hunger; loss of consciousness; nervousness; seizures; shakiness; sweating; tremor; vision changes; weakness.

Proper storage of Lantus Cartridge Systems:

VIALS: Store new (unopened) vials in a refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C). Do not freeze Lantus Cartridge Systems. Store used (open) vials either in the refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C), or at room temperature, below 86 degrees F (30 degrees C). Store away from heat and light. If Lantus Cartridge Systems has been frozen or overheated, throw it away. Throw away unrefrigerated or used vials after 28 days, even if they still contain medicine.

CARTRIDGE SYSTEMS and PENS: Store new (unopened) cartridge systems and pens in a refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C). Do not freeze Lantus Cartridge Systems. Store used (open) cartridge systems and pens at room temperature, below 86 degrees F (30 degrees C). Do NOT store used (open) cartridges and pens in the refrigerator. Store away from heat and light. If Lantus Cartridge Systems has been frozen or overheated, throw it away. Throw away unrefrigerated or used cartridge systems pens after 28 days, even if they still contain medicine.

Do not leave Lantus Cartridge Systems in a car on a warm or sunny day. Do not use Lantus Cartridge Systems after the expiration date stamped on the label. Keep Lantus Cartridge Systems, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Lantus Cartridge Systems, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Lantus Cartridge Systems are to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Lantus Cartridge Systems. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Lantus resources Lantus Side Effects (in more detail) Lantus Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Lantus Drug Interactions Lantus Support Group 7 Reviews for Lantus - Add your own review/rating Compare Lantus with other medications Diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2
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Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems


Pronunciation: IN-su-lin GLAR-jeen
Generic Name: Insulin Glargine
Brand Name: Examples include Lantus and Lantus Solostar
Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems are used for:

Treating diabetes mellitus.

Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems are a long-acting form of the hormone insulin. It works by helping your body to use sugar properly. This lowers the amount of glucose in the blood, which helps to treat diabetes.

Do NOT use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems:

Some medical conditions may interact with Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you drink alcoholic beverages if you have liver or kidney problems, diabetic ketoacidosis, or nerve problems if you have high blood sodium levels or are on a low salt diet

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Beta-blockers (eg, propranolol), clonidine, guanethidine, lithium, or reserpine because they may increase the risk of high or low blood sugar or may hide the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar, if it occurs Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril), disopyramide, fenfluramine, fibrates (eg, clofibrate, gemfibrozil), fluoxetine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) (eg, phenelzine), oral medicine for diabetes (eg, glipizide, metformin, nateglinide), pentamidine, propoxyphene, salicylates (eg, aspirin), somatostatin analogs (eg, octreotide), or sulfonamide antibiotics (eg, sulfamethoxazole) because the risk of low blood sugar may be increased Atypical antipsychotics (eg, olanzapine), corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), danazol, diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide), estrogen, hormonal contraceptives (eg, birth control pills), isoniazid, phenothiazines (eg, chlorpromazine), progesterones (eg, medroxyprogesterone), protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir), somatropin, sympathomimetics (eg, albuterol, epinephrine, terbutaline), or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because they may decrease Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems's effectiveness, resulting in high blood sugar

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems:

Use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Extra patient leaflets are available with Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems at the same time each day, as directed by your doctor. A health care provider will teach you how to use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. Be sure you understand how to use it. Follow the procedures you are taught when you use a dose. Contact your health care provider if you have any questions. Wash your hands before you use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. Always check before each use to be sure you are injecting the correct dose of insulin. Using too much or too little insulin may result in serious side effects. Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems should be clear and colorless. Do not use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems if it contains particles or is discolored, or if the container is cracked or damaged. Do NOT dilute Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems or mix it with other insulin. Do NOT use it in an insulin pump. Use the proper technique taught to you by your doctor. Inject deep under the skin, NOT into a vein or muscle. Injection sites within an injection area (abdomen, thigh, or upper arm) must be rotated from one injection to the next. Be sure you have purchased the correct insulin. Insulin comes in a variety of containers, including vials, cartridges, and pens. Make sure that you understand how to properly measure and prepare your dose. If you have any questions about measuring and preparing your dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for information. The effect of Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems lasts for up to 24 hours. Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems begins lowering blood sugar about 1 to 2 hours after an injection. There is no peak effect. The effect lasts for up to 24 hours. Do not mix this insulin together with any other type of insulin or any other medicine in the same syringe. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Ask your health care provider how to dispose of these materials after use. Follow all local rules for disposal. It is very important to follow your insulin regimen exactly. Do NOT miss any doses. Ask your doctor for specific instructions to follow in case you ever miss a dose of insulin.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems.

Important safety information: Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems may cause drowsiness, dizziness, blurred vision, or lightheadedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Do not drink alcohol without discussing it with your doctor. Drinking alcohol may increase your risk of developing high or low blood sugar. Do not exceed the recommended dose, use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems more often than prescribed, or change the type or dose of insulin you are taking without checking with your doctor. Proper diet, regular exercise, and regular testing of the blood sugar are important for best results when using Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. Illness, especially with nausea and vomiting, emotional problems, stress, or changes in diet or activity level, may cause your insulin requirements to change. Even if you are not eating, you still require insulin. You and your doctor should establish a sick day plan to use in case of illness. When you are sick, test your blood/urine frequently and call your doctor as instructed. If you will be traveling across time zones, consult your doctor concerning adjustments in your insulin schedule. An insulin reaction resulting from low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) may occur if you take too much insulin, skip a meal, or exercise too much. Low blood sugar may make you anxious, sweaty, weak, dizzy, drowsy, or faint. It may also make your heart beat faster; make your vision change; give you a headache, chills, or tremors; or make you more hungry. It is a good idea to carry a reliable source of glucose (eg, tablets or gel) to treat low blood sugar. If this is not available, you should eat or drink a quick source of sugar like table sugar, honey, candy, orange juice, or non-diet soda. This will raise your blood sugar level quickly. Tell your doctor right away if this happens. To prevent low blood sugar, eat meals at the same time each day and do not skip meals. Developing a fever or infection, eating significantly more than usual, or missing your dose of insulin may cause high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). High blood sugar may make you feel confused, drowsy, or thirsty. It can also make you flush, breathe faster, or have a fruit-like breath odor. If these symptoms occur, tell your doctor right away. If not treated, loss of consciousness, coma, or death may occur. Carry an ID card at all times that says you have diabetes. Lab tests, including fasting blood glucose levels or glycosylated hemoglobin levels, may be performed while you use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially low blood sugar. Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 6 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems while you are pregnant. Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems are found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Redness, swelling, itching, or mild pain at the injection site.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); changes in vision; chills; confusion; dizziness; drowsiness; fainting; fast heartbeat; fast, shallow breathing; headache; hoarseness; increased hunger, thirst, or urination; loss of consciousness; nervousness; seizures; slurred speech; stomach pain; sweating; sweet or fruity breath odor; swelling of the arms or legs; tremor; weakness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Lantus Solostar side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include chills; dizziness; drowsiness; fainting; headache; increased heartbeat; increased hunger; loss of consciousness; nervousness; seizures; shakiness; sweating; tremor; vision changes; weakness.

Proper storage of Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems:

VIALS: Store new (unopened) vials in a refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C). Do not freeze Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. Store used (open) vials either in the refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C), or at room temperature, below 86 degrees F (30 degrees C). Store away from heat and light. If Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems has been frozen or overheated, throw it away. Throw away unrefrigerated or used vials after 28 days, even if they still contain medicine.

CARTRIDGE SYSTEMS and PENS: Store new (unopened) cartridge systems and pens in a refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C). Do not freeze Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. Store used (open) cartridge systems and pens at room temperature, below 86 degrees F (30 degrees C). Do NOT store used (open) cartridges and pens in the refrigerator. Store away from heat and light. If Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems has been frozen or overheated, throw it away. Throw away unrefrigerated or used cartridge systems pens after 28 days, even if they still contain medicine.

Do not leave Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems in a car on a warm or sunny day. Do not use Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems after the expiration date stamped on the label. Keep Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems are to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Lantus Solostar Cartridge Systems. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Lantus Solostar resources Lantus Solostar Side Effects (in more detail) Lantus Solostar Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Lantus Solostar Drug Interactions Lantus Solostar Support Group 5 Reviews for Lantus Solostar - Add your own review/rating Compare Lantus Solostar with other medications Diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2
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Isuprel Mistometer


Generic Name: isoproterenol inhalation (eye so proe TER e nole)
Brand Names: Isuprel Mistometer

What is Isuprel Mistometer (isoproterenol inhalation)?

Isoproterenol is a bronchodilator. It works by relaxing muscles in the airways to improve breathing.

Isoproterenol inhalation is used to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema.

Isoproterenol inhalation may also be used for conditions other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Isuprel Mistometer (isoproterenol inhalation)?

It is important to use the isoproterenol inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into the lungs. Your doctor may want you to use a spacer with the inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Isuprel Mistometer (isoproterenol inhalation)?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have

heart disease or high blood pressure;

epilepsy or a seizure disorder;

diabetes;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism); or

liver or kidney disease.

You may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Isoproterenol inhalation is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether it will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether isoproterenol passes into breast milk. Do not use isoproterenol inhalation without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Isuprel Mistometer (isoproterenol inhalation)?

Use isoproterenol inhalation exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

To use the inhaler:

Shake the inhaler several times and uncap the mouthpiece. Breathe out fully. Put the mouthpiece of the inhaler or spacer into your mouth. Be sure the mouthpiece is above the tongue and past the teeth. Alternatively, place the inhaler mouthpiece (not with spacer attached) several inches in front of your open mouth, if directed to do so by your doctor. Take a deep, slow breath as you push down on the canister. Hold your breath for 10 seconds, then exhale slowly.

If you take more than one dose at a time, wait for at least 1 full minute, then repeat the procedure.

Keep the inhaler clean and dry. Keep the mouthpiece capped to avoid getting dirt inside it. Clean the inhaler once a day by removing the canister and immersing the mouthpiece in warm water. Allow the parts to dry, then reassemble the inhaler.

To use the solution for nebulization:

Measure the correct amount of medication with the dropper provided or select the prescribed number of ampules. Transfer the liquid into the medication chamber of the nebulizer. If the medication has a dropper, do not allow the dropper to touch any surface including the hands or the chamber of the nebulizer. Dilute the medication with normal saline if prescribed by your doctor.

Attach the mouthpiece or face mask to the drug chamber. Then, attach the drug chamber to the compressor. Sit upright, in a comfortable position, and put the mouthpiece into the mouth or put the face mask on, covering the nose and mouth. Breathe slowly and evenly until all of the medicine has been inhaled (usually 5 to 15 minutes). The treatment is complete when no more mist is formed by the nebulizer and the drug chamber is empty.

Clean the nebulizer after a treatment as directed by the manufacturer.

If you also use a steroid inhaler, use the isoproterenol inhaler or nebulization solution first to open up the airways, then use the steroid inhaler as directed.

It is important to use the isoproterenol inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into the lungs. Your doctor may want you to use a spacer with the inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

Carry the inhaler with you at all times in case of emergencies. Store the solution for nebulization at room temperature. Get a refill before you run out of medicine and before going on vacation.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and use the next one as directed. Do not use a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of an isoproterenol inhalation overdose may include angina or chest pain, irregular heartbeats or a fluttering heart, seizures, tremor, weakness, headache, nausea, and vomiting.

What should I avoid while using Isuprel Mistometer (isoproterenol inhalation)?

Avoid situations that may trigger an asthma attack such as exercising in cold, dry air; smoking; breathing in dust; and exposure to allergens such as pet fur.

Isuprel Mistometer (isoproterenol inhalation) side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop using isoproterenol inhalation and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or

chest pain or an irregular heartbeat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to use isoproterenol inhalation and talk to your doctor if you experience

headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, or insomnia;

tremor or nervousness;

sweating;

nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; or

dry mouth.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect isoproterenol?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), propranolol (Inderal), and others; a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

another inhaled bronchodilator; or

caffeine, diet pills, or decongestants.

You may not be able to use ipratropium inhalation, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with isoproterenol inhalation or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Isuprel Mistometer resources Isuprel Mistometer Side Effects (in more detail) Isuprel Mistometer Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Isuprel Mistometer Drug Interactions Isuprel Mistometer Support Group 1 Review for Isuprel Mistometer - Add your own review/rating Isoproterenol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Isoproterenol Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Isoproterenol Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Medihaler-Iso Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Isuprel Mistometer with other medications Adams-Stokes Syndrome Asthma, acute AV Heart Block Bronchospasm During Anesthesia Cardiac Arrhythmia COPD, Acute Shock Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about isoproterenol written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: Isuprel Mistometer side effects (in more detail)


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