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Benadryl Skin Allergy Relief Cream


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Benadryl Skin Allergy Relief Cream

Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream contains:

1% w/v diphenhydramine hydrochloride Ph Eur

8% w/v zinc oxide Ph Eur

0.1% w/v racemic camphor Ph Eur.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Cream.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream is indicated for the relief of irritation associated with urticaria, herpes zoster and other minor skin affections and alleviate the discomforts of sunburn, prickly heat, insect bites and nettle stings. In infants it may be used for hives.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Adults:

Topical. Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream may be applied to the affected area, three or four times daily.

Children and Infants:

Topical. As for adults.

The Elderly:

Topical. As for adults.

4.3 Contraindications

Do not use on chicken pox or measles or exudative dermatoses, unless supervised by a doctor. Do not use on extensive areas of the skin except as directed by a doctor. Do not use any other drugs containing diphenhydramine while using this product.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream should not be applied to raw, or broken surfaces or mucous membranes as this may result in percutaneous absorption giving rise to systemic effects. Avoid contact with the eyes. If a burning sensation or rash develops or if the condition persists, treatment should be discontinued. If necessary, remove by washing with soap and water.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

None known.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

The safety of Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream in pregnancy and lactation has not been established. Like any medicine, Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream should only be used if the possible benefits outweigh the potential risks involved. Diphenhydramine is known to be absorbed through the skin. Diphenhydramine crosses the placental barrier and is secreted in breast milk.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

None known.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Rarely, sensitivity, eczematous reactions and photosensitivity have been reported after topical application of antihistamines. If this occurs, treatment should be discontinued.

4.9 Overdose

Symptoms and signs

Accidental ingestion or excessive absorption of Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream may lead to dose-related signs of diphenhydramine toxicity. These include drowsiness and sedation with anti-cholinergic symptoms prevailing. Camphor may produce nausea, vomiting and dizziness. At higher doses, delirium leading to coma, ataxia, increased muscle reflexes and cloniform convulsions may appear.

Treatment

The stomach should be emptied by lavage and aspiration. In cases of acute poisoning, activated charcoal may be useful. A sodium sulphate purgative may be given. Convulsions may be controlled with diazepam or thiopental sodium. In the case of camphor poisoning, lipid haemodialysis or resin haemoperfusion may be useful.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream contains diphenhydramine hydrochloride, zinc oxide and camphor. Diphenhydramine is a powerful antihistamine and local anaesthetic (antipruritic). In concentrations of between 0.1 – 3.0 %, camphor depresses cutaneous receptors and is an effective analgesic, anaesthetic and antipruritic, which provides a feeling of coolness when applied topically.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream is intended only for topical application to the skin. At the recommended dose little of the active ingredients will be absorbed. Percutaneous penetration of diphenhydramine and camphor has been demonstrated during inappropriate use of these compounds separately, but has not been quantified.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

There are no preclinical data of relevance to the prescriber which are additional to that already included in other sections of the SPC.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

White ceresin

Cetostearyl alcohol

Ferric oxide red (E172)

Ferric oxide yellow (E172)

Sorbitan stearate

Propyl hydroxybenzoate

Propylene glycol

Polysorbate 60

Perfume oil soleil 78087

Purified water

6.2 Incompatibilities

None known.

6.3 Shelf Life

3 years.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Do not store above 25°C.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Benadryl Allergy Skin Cream is stored in a 42 g epoxy phenolic-based lacquered aluminium tube with a white, polyethylene or polypropylene cap.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

None applicable.

Administrative Data 7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

McNeil Products Limited

Foundation Park

Roxborough Way

Maidenhead

Berkshire SL6 3UG

United Kingdom

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 15513/0078

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

5th January 2000

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

2 December 2009


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Miscellaneous anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics are drugs that work on the central nervous system to treat anxiety and insomnia. The main classes of drugs are benzodiazepines and barbiturates.

See also

Medical conditions associated with miscellaneous anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics:

ADHD Allergic Reactions Allergic Urticaria Allergies Anxiety Cataplexy Cold Symptoms Conjunctivitis, Allergic Cough Depression Extrapyramidal Reaction Fibromyalgia Hay Fever Insomnia Interstitial Cystitis Irritable Bowel Syndrome Jet Lag Motion Sickness Narcolepsy Nasal Congestion Nausea/Vomiting Pain Panic Disorder Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Pruritus Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Rhinorrhea Sedation Sexual Dysfunction, SSRI Induced Smoking Cessation Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Urticaria Drug List: Compoz-Nighttime-Sleep-Aid Sominex Unisom-Sleepmelts Edluar Unisom Xyrem Aquachloral-Supprettes-Suppositories Children-S-Allergy Miltown Nytol Silenor Simply-Sleep Sinequan Sonata Adapin Ambien Atarax Benadryl-Allergy-Chewable-Tablets Lunesta Ambien-Cr-Extended-Release-Tablets Benadryl Banophen Hyzine Placidyl Somnote Unisom-Sleepgels-Maximum-Strength Buspar Calm-Aid Zolpimist Vistaril Rozerem 40-Winks Triaminic-Thin-Strips-Orally-Disintegrating-Strips Nytol-Caplet Aldex-An-Suspension Aldex-An-Chewable-Chewable-Tablets Aler-Dryl Aler-Tab Allermax Altaryl Aminomine Ben-Tann-Suspension Care-One-Sleep-Aid Complete-Allergy-Chewable-Tablets Dicopanol Diphedryl Diphen Diphen-Cough Diphenhist Doxytex-Liquid Dytan-Suspension Dytuss-Elixir Equaline-Sleep-Aid Equanil Equate-Sleep-Aid Genahist Hydramine Intermezzo Mb-Tab Medi-Sleep Nu-Med Nytol-Maximum-Strength Pediacare-Children-S-Allergy Precedex Q-Dryl Q-Dryl-A-F Quenalin Siladryl Siladryl-Allergy Silphen-Cough Sleep Sleep-Ettes Sleep-Ettes-D Sleep-Aid-Tablets Sleepinal Sominex-Maximum-Strength-Caplet Sunmark-Sleep-Aid Theraflu-Multi-Symptom-Orally-Disintegrating-Strips Twilite Valu-Dryl Vanspar
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Antihistamines


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Antihistamines are drugs that inhibit the action of histamine in the body by blocking the receptors of histamine. There are two types of histamine receptors H1 and H2. When H1 receptors are stimulated by histamine it may produce allergic reactions such as itching, hay fever and rash or hives.

Antihistamines treat the symptoms of allergic reactions. Some antihistamines are sedating and although some are classed as non-sedating antihistamines, they may still cause drowsiness in some people.

See also

Medical conditions associated with antihistamines:

Allergic Reactions Allergic Urticaria Allergies Anaphylaxis Anorexia Anorexia Nervosa Anxiety Cluster Headaches Cold Symptoms Conjunctivitis, Allergic Cough Cushing's Syndrome Dermatographism Extrapyramidal Reaction Eye Dryness/Redness Eye Redness/Itching Failure to Thrive Hay Fever Insomnia Interstitial Cystitis Light Sedation Migraine Motion Sickness Nasal Congestion Nausea/Vomiting Opiate Adjunct Pain Pruritus Rhinorrhea Sedation Sexual Dysfunction, SSRI Induced Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Urticaria Vasomotor Rhinitis Vertigo Drug List: Allegra-Odt-Orally-Disintegrating-Tablets Children-S-Claritin-Allergy-Chewable-Tablets Claritin-Hives-Relief Nolahist Palgic Polaramine Seldane Zymine-Syrup Adgan-Injection Lodrane-24-24-Hour-Sustained-Release-Capsules Chlor-Trimeton All-Day-Allergy Compoz-Nighttime-Sleep-Aid Sominex Unisom-Sleepmelts Wal-Finate Periactin Allegra Ahist Phenergan Xyzal Children-S-Allergy Nytol Promethegan-Rectal Simply-Sleep Antinaus-50-Injection Atarax Zyrtec Benadryl-Allergy-Chewable-Tablets Clarinex Benadryl Allerhist-1 Banophen Hyzine Unisom-Sleepgels-Maximum-Strength Calm-Aid Lodrane-12-Hour-12-Hour-Sustained-Release-Tablets Vistaril Claritin 40-Winks Phenadoz-Rectal Alavert-Syrup Triaminic-Thin-Strips-Orally-Disintegrating-Strips Nytol-Caplet Aler-Dryl Aler-Tab All-Day-Allergy-Children-S Aller-Chlor-Syrup Allergy-Relief Allergy-Relief-Tablets Allermax Alleroff-Syrup-Drug-Facts Altaryl Anergan-50-Injection Arbinoxa Bactimicina-Allergy Ben-Tann-Suspension Bromax-Tablets Brovex-Suspension Brovex-Ct-Chewable-Tablets C-P-M Zyrtec-Children-S-Dye-Free-Sugar-Free Chlo-Amine Chlor-Mal Chlor-Phenit Chlor-Trimeton-Allergy-Sr Chlor-Phen Chlortan Clarinex-Reditabs-Orally-Disintegrating-Tablets Claritin-24-Hour-Allergy Claritin-Reditabs-Orally-Disintegrating-Tablets Clear-Atadine Clear-Atadine-Children-S Complete-Allergy-Chewable-Tablets Contac-12-Hour-Allergy Cordron-Nr Dicopanol Dimetane Dimetapp-Allergy Dimetapp-Nd Diphedryl Diphen Diphen-Cough Diphenhist Dytan-Suspension Dytuss-Elixir Ed-Chlor-Tan Ed-Chlorped-Suspension-Drops Genahist Hismanal Histex-Ct-Extended-Release-Capsules Histex-I-E-Extended-Release-Capsules Histex-Pd-Liquid Hydramine J-Tan-Suspension Leader-Allerhist Lo-Hist-12-12-Hour-Sustained-Release-Tablets Loratadine-Reditab Nu-Med Ohm-Allergy-Relief Optimine Pbz Pbz-Sr Pediacare-Children-S-Allergy Pediatan Pediatex-Liquid Pediatex-12 Poly-Histine-Elixir Q-Dryl Q-Dryl-A-F Quenalin Ricobid-H-Suspension Siladryl Siladryl-Allergy Silphen-Cough Sleep Sleep-Ettes Sleep-Ettes-D Sleepinal Sominex-Maximum-Strength-Caplet Tanahist-Pd Tavist Tavist-1 Tavist-Nd Theraflu-Multi-Symptom-Orally-Disintegrating-Strips Topco-Allergy Tri-Histine-Elixir Tripohist Twilite Valu-Dryl Vazol-Liquid Wal-Itin Zymine-Xr-Suspension Zyrtec-Hives
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Sleep-ettes D


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Sleep-ettes D (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Sleep-ettes D (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Sleep-ettes D (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Sleep-ettes D (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Sleep-ettes D (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Sleep-ettes D (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Sleep-ettes D (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Sleep-ettes D resources Sleep-ettes D Side Effects (in more detail) Sleep-ettes D Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Sleep-ettes D Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Sleep-ettes D - Add your own review/rating Banophen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ben-Tann Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Consumer Overview Benadryl Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Allergy Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Children's Allergy Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphen Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Diphenhydramine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Diphenhydramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Dytuss Elixir MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Simply Sleep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Sominex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Sleep-ettes D with other medications Insomnia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Sleep-ettes D side effects (in more detail)


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Sominex


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Sominex (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Sominex (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Sominex (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Sominex (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Sominex (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Sominex (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Sominex (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Sominex resources Sominex Side Effects (in more detail) Sominex Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Sominex Drug Interactions Sominex Support Group 2 Reviews for Sominex - Add your own review/rating Sominex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Banophen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ben-Tann Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Consumer Overview Benadryl Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Allergy Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Children's Allergy Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphen Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Diphenhydramine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Diphenhydramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Dytuss Elixir MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Simply Sleep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Sominex with other medications Insomnia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Sominex side effects (in more detail)


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Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid resources Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid Side Effects (in more detail) Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid Drug Interactions 2 Reviews for Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid - Add your own review/rating Banophen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ben-Tann Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Consumer Overview Benadryl Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Allergy Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Children's Allergy Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphen Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Diphenhydramine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Diphenhydramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Dytuss Elixir MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Simply Sleep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Sominex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid with other medications Insomnia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid side effects (in more detail)


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Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength resources Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength Side Effects (in more detail) Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength Drug Interactions 5 Reviews for Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength - Add your own review/rating Banophen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ben-Tann Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Consumer Overview Benadryl Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Allergy Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Children's Allergy Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphen Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Diphenhydramine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Diphenhydramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Dytuss Elixir MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Simply Sleep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Sominex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength with other medications Insomnia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength side effects (in more detail)


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Q-Dryl


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Q-Dryl (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Q-Dryl (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Q-Dryl (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Q-Dryl (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Q-Dryl (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Q-Dryl (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Q-Dryl (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Q-Dryl resources Q-Dryl Side Effects (in more detail) Q-Dryl Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Q-Dryl Drug Interactions Q-Dryl Support Group 0 Reviews for Q-Dryl - Add your own review/rating Banophen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ben-Tann Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Consumer Overview Benadryl Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Allergy Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Children's Allergy Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphen Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Diphenhydramine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Diphenhydramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Dytuss Elixir MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Simply Sleep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Sominex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Q-Dryl with other medications Allergic Reactions Cold Symptoms Cough Extrapyramidal Reaction Hay Fever Insomnia Motion Sickness Nausea/Vomiting Pruritus Urticaria Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Q-Dryl side effects (in more detail)


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Altaryl


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Altaryl (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Altaryl (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Altaryl (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Altaryl (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Altaryl (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Altaryl (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Altaryl (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Altaryl resources Altaryl Side Effects (in more detail) Altaryl Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Altaryl Drug Interactions Altaryl Support Group 0 Reviews for Altaryl - Add your own review/rating Banophen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ben-Tann Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Consumer Overview Benadryl Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Allergy Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Children's Allergy Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphen Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Diphenhydramine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Diphenhydramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Dytuss Elixir MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Simply Sleep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Sominex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Altaryl with other medications Allergic Reactions Cold Symptoms Cough Extrapyramidal Reaction Hay Fever Insomnia Motion Sickness Nausea/Vomiting Pruritus Urticaria Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Altaryl side effects (in more detail)


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Allermax


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Allermax (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Allermax (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Allermax (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Allermax (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Allermax (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Allermax (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Allermax (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Allermax resources Allermax Side Effects (in more detail) Allermax Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Allermax Drug Interactions Allermax Support Group 0 Reviews for Allermax - Add your own review/rating Banophen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ben-Tann Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Consumer Overview Benadryl Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Allergy Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Children's Allergy Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphen Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Diphenhydramine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Diphenhydramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Dytuss Elixir MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Simply Sleep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Sominex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Allermax with other medications Allergic Reactions Cold Symptoms Cough Extrapyramidal Reaction Hay Fever Insomnia Motion Sickness Nausea/Vomiting Pruritus Urticaria Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Allermax side effects (in more detail)


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Aler-Dryl


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Aler-Dryl (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Aler-Dryl (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Aler-Dryl (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Aler-Dryl (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Aler-Dryl (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Aler-Dryl (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Aler-Dryl (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Aler-Dryl resources Aler-Dryl Side Effects (in more detail) Aler-Dryl Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Aler-Dryl Drug Interactions Aler-Dryl Support Group 0 Reviews for Aler-Dryl - Add your own review/rating Banophen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ben-Tann Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Consumer Overview Benadryl Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Benadryl Allergy Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Children's Allergy Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphen Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Diphenhydramine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Diphenhydramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Dytuss Elixir MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Simply Sleep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Sominex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Aler-Dryl with other medications Allergic Reactions Cold Symptoms Cough Extrapyramidal Reaction Hay Fever Insomnia Motion Sickness Nausea/Vomiting Pruritus Urticaria Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Aler-Dryl side effects (in more detail)


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Nytol Caplet


Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)
Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Nytol Caplet resources Nytol Caplet Side Effects (in more detail)Nytol Caplet Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingNytol Caplet Drug InteractionsNytol Caplet Support Group0 Reviews for Nytol Caplet - Add your own review/rating Compare Nytol Caplet with other medications Insomnia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Nytol Caplet side effects (in more detail)


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Ampyra


Generic Name: dalfampridine (dal FAM pri deen)
Brand Names: Ampyra

What is dalfampridine?

Dalfampridine is a potassium channel blocker.

Dalfampridine is used to improve walking in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Dalfampridine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about dalfampridine? You should not use dalfampridine if you are allergic to it, or if you have moderate to severe kidney disease, if you have ever had a seizure (convulsions), or if you are also taking another multiple sclerosis drug called Fampridine.

Before you take dalfampridine, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease.

Do not take more than 2 tablets in a 24-hour period. Do not use a tablet that has been broken or crushed. A broken tablet can release too much of the drug at one time. This can increase your risk of having a seizure. Stop taking dalfampridine and call your doctor at once if you a seizure, pain or burning when you urinate, problems with your balance, numbness or tingly feeling, or a relapse of your MS symptoms. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking dalfampridine? You should not use dalfampridine if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

moderate to severe kidney disease;

if you have ever had a seizure (convulsions); or

if you are also taking another MS drug called Fampridine (4-aminopyridine).

To make sure you can safely take dalfampridine, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether dalfampridine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.. It is not known whether dalfampridine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using dalfampridine. Do not give this medication to anyone under 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. How should I take dalfampridine?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Dalfampridine is usually taken once every 12 hours. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Do not take more than 2 tablets in a 24-hour period.

Dalfampridine may be taken with or without food.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Do not dissolve the tablet in liquid. Breaking or dissolving the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Do not use a dalfampridine tablet that has been accidentally crushed or broken. This can increase your risk of having a seizure. Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Throw away any leftover medicine after the expiration date on the label has passed.

See also: Ampyra dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose can cause confusion, problems with thinking or memory, tremors, sweating, or seizures.

What should I avoid while taking dalfampridine?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Dalfampridine side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking dalfampridine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

seizure (convulsions);

pain or burning when you urinate;

problems with balance;

numbness, burning pain, or tingly feeling;

relapse or worsening of MS symptoms;

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, dizziness;

sleep problems (insomnia);

nausea, constipation, upset stomach;

weakness;

stuffy nose, sinus pain, sore throat; or

back pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect dalfampridine?

There may be other drugs that can interact with dalfampridine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Ampyra resources Ampyra Side Effects (in more detail)Ampyra DosageAmpyra Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingAmpyra Drug InteractionsAmpyra Support Group17 Reviews for Ampyra - Add your own review/rating Ampyra Prescribing Information (FDA) Ampyra Monograph (AHFS DI) Ampyra Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Ampyra Consumer Overview Ampyra MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Dalfampridine Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Ampyra with other medications Multiple Sclerosis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about dalfampridine.

See also: Ampyra side effects (in more detail)


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Gris-PEG


griseofulvin
Dosage Form: tablet, film coated
Gris-PEG®
(griseofulvin ultramicrosize)
Tablets, USP 125 mg; 250 mg Gris-PEG Description

Gris-PEG® Tablets contain ultramicrosize crystals of griseofulvin, an antibiotic derived from a species of Penicillium.

Each Gris-PEG tablet contains:

Active Ingredient: griseofulvin ultramicrosize 125 mg

Inactive Ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, lactose, magnesium stearate, methylcellulose, methylparaben, polyethylene glycol 400 and 8000, povidone, and titanium dioxide.

OR

Active Ingredient: griseofulvin ultramicrosize 250 mg

Inactive Ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, methylcellulose, methylparaben, polyethylene glycol 400 and 8000, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, and titanium dioxide.

ACTION Microbiology

Griseofulvin is fungistatic with in vitro activity against various species of Microsporum, Epidermophyton and Trichophyton. It has no effect on bacteria or other genera of fungi.

Pharmacokinetics

Following oral administration, griseofulvin is deposited in the keratin precursor cells and has a greater affinity for diseased tissue. The drug is tightly bound to the new keratin which becomes highly resistant to fungal invasions.

The efficiency of gastrointestinal absorption of ultramicrocrystalline griseofulvin is approximately one and one-half times that of the conventional microsize griseofulvin. This factor permits the oral intake of two-thirds as much ultramicrocrystalline griseofulvin as the microsize form. However, there is currently no evidence that this lower dose confers any significant clinical differences with regard to safety and/or efficacy.

In a bioequivalence study conducted in healthy volunteers (N=24) in the fasted state, 250 mg ultramicrocrystalline griseofulvin tablets were compared with 250 mg ultramicrocrystalline griseofulvin tablets that were physically altered (crushed) and administered with applesauce. The 250 mg ultramicrocrystalline griseofulvin tablets were found to be bioequivalent to the physically altered (crushed) 250 mg ultramicrocrystalline griseofulvin tablets (See Table 1).

Table 1: Mean (± SD) of the Pharmacokinetic Parameters for Griseofulvin administered in applesauce as a Single Dose of Gris-PEG® 250-mg Tablets Uncrushed and Crushed to fasted Healthy Volunteers (N=24) 250 mg Ultramicrocrystalline Griseofulvin Tablets Unaltered 250 mg Ultramicrocrystalline Griseofulvin Tablets Physically Altered (Crushed and in Applesauce) Cmax (ng/mL) 600.61 (± 167.6) 672.61 (± 146.2) Tmax (hr) 4.04 (± 2.2) 3.08 (± 1.02) AUC (ng?hr/mL) 8618.89 (± 1907.2) 9023.71 (± 1911.5) INDICATIONS

Gris-PEG (griseofulvin ultramicrosize) is indicated for the treatment of the following ringworm infections; tinea corporis (ringworm of the body), tinea pedis (athlete's foot), tinea cruris (ringworm of the groin and thigh), tinea barbae (barber's itch), tinea capitis (ringworm of the scalp), and tinea unguium (onychomycosis, ringworm of the nails), when caused by one or more of the following genera of fungi: Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton interdigitalis, Trichophyton verrucosum, Trichophyton megnini, Trichophyton gallinae, Trichophyton crateriform, Trichophyton sulphureum, Trichophyton schoenleini, Microsporum audouini, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum and Epidermophyton floccosum. NOTE: Prior to therapy, the type of fungi responsible for the infection should be identified. The use of the drug is not justified in minor or trivial infections which will respond to topical agents alone. Griseofulvin is not effective in the following: bacterial infections, candidiasis (moniliasis), histoplasmosis, actinomycosis, sporotrichosis, chromoblastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, North American blastomycosis, cryptococcosis (torulosis), tinea versicolor and nocardiosis.

Contraindications

Two cases of conjoined twins have been reported since 1977 in patients taking griseofulvin during the first trimester of pregnancy. Griseofulvin should not be prescribed to pregnant patients. If the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

This drug is contraindicated in patients with porphyria or hepatocellular failure and in individuals with a history of hypersensitivity to griseofulvin.

Warnings Prophylactic Usage

Safety and efficacy of griseofulvin for prophylaxis of fungal infections have not been established.

Serious Skin Reactions

Severe skin reactions (e.g. Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis) and erythema multiforme have been reported with griseofulvin use. These reactions may be serious and may result in hospitalization or death. If severe skin reactions occur, griseofulvin should be discontinued (see ADVERSE REACTIONS section).

Hepatotoxicity

Elevations in AST, ALT, bilirubin, and jaundice have been reported with griseofulvin use. These reactions may be serious and may result in hospitalization or death. Patients should be monitored for hepatic adverse events and discontinuation of griseofulvin considered if warranted (see ADVERSE REACTIONS section).

Animal Toxicology

Chronic feeding of griseofulvin, at levels ranging from 0.5%-2.5% of the diet resulted in the development of liver tumors in several strains of mice, particularly in males. Smaller particle sizes result in an enhanced effect. Lower oral dosage levels have not been tested. Subcutaneous administration of relatively small doses of griseofulvin once a week during the first three weeks of life has also been reported to induce hepatomata in mice. Thyroid tumors, mostly adenomas but some carcinomas, have been reported in male rats receiving griseofulvin at levels of 2.0%, 1.0% and 0.2% of the diet, and in female rats receiving the two higher dose levels. Although studies in other animal species have not yielded evidence of tumorigenicity, these studies were not of adequate design to form a basis for conclusion in this regard. In subacute toxicity studies, orally administered griseofulvin produced hepatocellular necrosis in mice, but this has not been seen in other species. Disturbances in porphyrin metabolism have been reported in griseofulvin-treated laboratory animals. Griseofulvin has been reported to have a colchicine-like effect on mitosis and cocarcinogenicity with methylcholanthrene in cutaneous tumor induction in laboratory animals.

Usage in Pregnancy

see CONTRAINDICATIONS section.

Animal Reproduction Studies

It has been reported in the literature that griseofulvin was found to be embryotoxic and teratogenic on oral administration to pregnant rats. Pups with abnormalities have been reported in the litters of a few bitches treated with griseofulvin. Suppression of spermatogenesis has been reported to occur in rats, but investigation in man failed to confirm this.

Precautions

Patients on prolonged therapy with any potent medication should be under close observation. Periodic monitoring of organ system function, including renal, hepatic and hematopoietic, should be done. Since griseofulvin is derived from species of Penicillium, the possibility of cross-sensitivity with penicillin exists; however, known penicillin-sensitive patients have been treated without difficulty. Since a photosensitivity reaction is occasionally associated with griseofulvin therapy, patients should be warned to avoid exposure to intense natural or artificial sunlight. Lupus erythematosus or lupus-like syndromes have been reported in patients receiving griseofulvin. Griseofulvin decreases the activity of warfarin-type anticoagulants so that patients receiving these drugs concomitantly may require dosage adjustment of the anticoagulant during and after griseofulvin therapy. Barbiturates usually depress griseofulvin activity and concomitant administration may require a dosage adjustment of the antifungal agent. There have been reports in the literature of possible interactions between griseofulvin and oral contraceptives. The effect of alcohol may be potentiated by griseofulvin, producing such effects as tachycardia and flush.

Adverse Reactions

There have been post-marketing reports of severe skin and hepatic adverse events associated with griseofulvin use (see WARNINGS section).

When adverse reactions occur, they are most commonly of the hypersensitivity type such as skin rashes, urticaria, erythema multiforme-like drug reactions, and rarely, angioneurotic edema, and may necessitate withdrawal of therapy and appropriate countermeasures. Paresthesia of the hands and feet have been reported after extended therapy. Other side effects reported occasionally are oral thrush, nausea, vomiting, epigastric distress, diarrhea, headache, fatigue, dizziness, insomnia, mental confusion, and impairment of performance of routine activities. Proteinuria and leukopenia have been reported rarely. Administration of the drug should be discontinued if granulocytopenia occurs. When rare, serious reactions occur with griseofulvin, they are usually associated with high dosages, long periods of therapy, or both.

Gris-PEG Dosage and Administration

Accurate diagnosis of infecting organism is essential. Identification should be made either by direct microscopic examination of a mounting of infected tissue in a solution of potassium hydroxide or by culture on an appropriate medium. Medication must be continued until the infecting organism is completely eradicated as indicated by appropriate clinical or laboratory examination. Representative treatment periods are tinea capitis, 4 to 6 weeks; tinea corporis, 2 to 4 weeks; tinea pedis, 4 to 8 weeks; tinea unguium-depending on rate of growth-fingernails, at least 4 months; toenails, at least 6 months.

General measures in regard to hygiene should be observed to control sources of infection or reinfection. Concomitant use of appropriate topical agents is usually required, particularly in treatment of tinea pedis. In some forms of athlete's foot, yeasts and bacteria may be involved as well as fungi. Griseofulvin will not eradicate the bacterial or monilial infection.

Gris-PEG® tablets may be swallowed whole or crushed and sprinkled onto 1 tablespoonful of applesauce and swallowed immediately without chewing.

Adults

Daily administration of 375 mg (as a single dose or in divided doses) will give a satisfactory response in most patients with tinea corporis, tinea cruris, and tinea capitis. For those fungal infections more difficult to eradicate, such as tinea pedis and tinea unguium, a divided dose of 750 mg is recommended.

Pediatric Use

Approximately 3.3 mg per pound of body weight per day of ultramicrosize griseofulvin is an effective dose for most pediatric patients. On this basis, the following dosage schedule is suggested: Children weighing 35-60 pounds - 125 mg to 187.5 mg daily. Pediatric patients weighing over 60 pounds - 187.5 mg to 375 mg daily. Children and infants 2 years of age and younger - dosage has not been established.

Clinical experience with griseofulvin in children with tinea capitis indicates that a single daily dose is effective. Clinical relapse will occur if the medication is not continued until the infecting organism is eradicated.

How is Gris-PEG Supplied

Gris-PEG® (griseofulvin ultramicrosize) Tablets, 125 mg, white scored, elliptical-shaped, embossed "Gris-PEG" on one side and "125" on the other. Gris-PEG (griseofulvin ultramicrosize) Tablets, 250 mg, white scored, capsule-shaped, embossed "Gris-PEG" on one side and "250" on the other. The 125 mg strength is available in bottles of 100 (NDC 0884-0763-04). The 250 mg strength is available in bottles of 100 (NDC 0884-0773-04). Both strengths are film-coated.

Rx ONLY

STORAGE

Store Gris-PEG tablets at controlled room temperature 15° - 30°C (59° - 86°F) in tight, lightresistant containers.

Manufactured for:
PEDiNOL™ PHARMACAL INC.
Farmingdale, NY 11735 U.S.A.

By: NOVARTIS CONSUMER HEALTH INC.
Lincoln, NE 68501

Printed in U.S.A. REV 10/10

PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL - 250 mg Bottle Label

NDC 0884-0773-50

GRIS•PEG®
(griseofulvin
ultramicrosize)

Tablets USP

250mg

500 Tablets

Active Ingredient:
Griseofulvin ultramicrosize...250mg

CAUTION: Federal (U.S.A.) law prohibits
dispensing without prescription.


Gris-PEG 
griseofulvin  tablet, film coated Product Information Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 0884-0773 Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength Griseofulvin (Griseofulvin) Griseofulvin 250 mg Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength SILICON DIOXIDE   MAGNESIUM STEARATE   METHYLCELLULOSE (15 CPS)   METHYLPARABEN   POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 400   POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 8000   POVIDONE   SODIUM LAURYL SULFATE   TITANIUM DIOXIDE   Product Characteristics Color WHITE Score 2 pieces Shape OVAL (capsule-shaped) Size 16mm Flavor Imprint Code GRIS;PEG;250 Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 0884-0773-50 500 TABLET In 1 BOTTLE, PLASTIC None
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date NDA NDA050475 06/01/2000 06/30/2013
Labeler - Pedinol Pharmacal, Inc. (064737125) Establishment Name Address ID/FEI Operations Novartis Consumer Health 129836151 ANALYSIS, MANUFACTURE Revised: 05/2011Pedinol Pharmacal, Inc. More Gris-PEG resources Gris-PEG Side Effects (in more detail) Gris-PEG Dosage Gris-PEG Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Gris-PEG Drug Interactions Gris-PEG Support Group 3 Reviews for Gris-PEG - Add your own review/rating Gris-PEG Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Gris-PEG Ultramicrosize Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Gris-PEG Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Griseofulvin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Griseofulvin Monograph (AHFS DI) Grifulvin V Microsize MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Grisactin 250 Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Compare Gris-PEG with other medications Dermatophytosis Onychomycosis, Fingernail Onychomycosis, Toenail Tinea Barbae Tinea Capitis Tinea Corporis Tinea Cruris Tinea Pedis
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DHC Continus prolonged release tablets 60mg, 90mg and 120 mg


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

DHC® Continus® prolonged release tablets 60 mg, 90 mg, 120 mg.

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Dihydrocodeine tartrate 60 mg, 90 mg, 120 mg.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Prolonged release tablet.

White capsule shaped tablets, 60 mg are marked DHC 60, 90 mg are marked DHC 90 and 120 mg are marked DHC 120.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

For the relief of severe pain in cancer and other chronic conditions.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Adults and children over 12 years: 60 mg - 120 mg every 12 hours.

Elderly: Dosage should be reduced.

Children 12 years or under: Not recommended.

Method of administration

Oral.

4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to dihydrocodeine or any of the tablet constituents; respiratory depression; obstructive airways disease; paralytic ileus; head injury; raised intracranial pressure; acute alcoholism. As dihydrocodeine may cause the release of histamine, it should not be given during an asthma attack and should be given with caution to asthmatics.

Patients with rare hereditary problems of galactose intolerance, the Lapp lactase deficiency or glucose-galactose malabsorption should not take this medicine.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Dosage should be reduced in the elderly, in hypothyroidism, chronic hepatic disease and renal insufficiency.

Dihydrocodeine should be administered with caution to patients with a history of opioid abuse, biliary tract disorders, prostatic hypertrophy, pancreatitis, constipation, obstructive bowel disorder and severe cor pulmonale.

Dihydrocodeine has a recognised abuse and addiction profile similar to other opioids. Tolerance to analgesic effects may develop upon repeated administration.

The risk-benefit of continued use should be assessed regularly by the prescriber, and in particular the prescriber should take care to avoid any unnecessary increase in dosage especially where there is evidence of a previous history of drug dependence or abuse.

DHC Continus tablets must be swallowed whole, and not broken, chewed or crushed. The administration of broken, chewed or crushed tablets may lead to a rapid release and absorption of a potential overdose of dihydrocodeine (see Section 4.9).

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Other central nervous system depressants, including sedatives or hypnotics, phenothiazines, other tranquillisers and alcohol, may result in respiratory depression or sedation. Dihydrocodeine should be used with caution in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors or within two weeks of such therapy.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

There is little published evidence on safety in human pregnancy but dihydrocodeine has been used for many years without apparent ill effects. Dihydrocodeine has not been reported to be excreted in breast milk. However, it is advisable that dihydrocodeine only be administered to breast-feeding mothers if considered essential.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Dihydrocodeine may cause drowsiness and, if affected, patients should not drive or operate machinery.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Common adverse drug reactions seen during therapy are constipation, nausea, vomiting, headache, somnolence, pruritus and rash.

Uncommon adverse reactions are urinary retention, ureteric or biliary spasm, dry mouth, mood changes, blurred vision, sweating, decreased libido, flushing, abdominal pain, hypotension, paraesthesia, confusion, dizziness, hallucinations, urticaria, paralytic ileus and respiratory depression.

Dependence may occur. Regular prolonged use of dihydrocodeine is known to lead to addiction and tolerance. Symptoms of restlessness and irritability may result when treatment is stopped.

Prolonged use of a painkiller for headaches can make them worse.

4.9 Overdose

Acute overdosage with dihydrocodeine can be manifested by somnolence progressing to stupor or coma, miotic pupils, rhabdomyolysis, non-cardiac pulmonary oedema, bradycardia, hypotension and respiratory depression or apnoea.

Primary attention should be given to the establishment of a patent airway and institution of assisted or controlled ventilation.

In the case of massive overdosage, administer naloxone intravenously (0.4 to 2 mg for an adult and 0.01 mg/kg body weight for children) if the patient is in a coma or respiratory depression is present. Repeat the dose at 2 minute intervals if there is no response, or by an infusion. An infusion of 60% of the initial dose per hour is a useful starting point. A solution of 10 mg made up in 50 ml dextrose will produce 200 micrograms/ml for infusion using an IV pump (dose adjusted to the clinical response). Infusions are not a substitute for frequent review of the patient's clinical state. Intramuscular naloxone is an alternative in the event that IV access is not possible.

As the duration of action of naloxone is relatively short, the patient must be carefully monitored until spontaneous respiration is reliably re-established. Naloxone is a competitive antagonist and large doses (4 mg) may be required in seriously poisoned patients. For less severe overdosage, administer naloxone 0.2 mg intravenously followed by increments of 0.1 mg every 2 minutes if required.

Naloxone should not be administered in the absence of clinically significant respiratory or circulatory depression secondary to dihydrocodeine overdosage. Naloxone should be administered cautiously to persons who are known, or suspected, to be physically dependent on dihydrocodeine. In such cases, an abrupt or complete reversal of opioid effects may precipitate pain and an acute withdrawal syndrome.

Additional/other considerations:

• Consider activated charcoal (50 g for adults, 10-15 g for children), if a substantial amount has been ingested within 1 hour, provided the airway can be protected. It may be reasonable to assume that late administration of activated charcoal may be beneficial for prolonged release preparations but there is no evidence to support this.

DHC Continus tablets will continue to release and add to the dihydrocodeine load for up to 12 hours after administration and the management of overdosage should be modified accordingly. Gastric contents may therefore need to be emptied, as this can be useful in removing unabsorbed drug, particularly when a prolonged release formulation has been taken.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Dihydrocodeine is a semisynthetic narcotic analgesic with a potency between morphine and codeine. It acts on opioid receptors in the brain to reduce the patient's perception of pain and improve the psychological reaction to pain by reducing the associated anxiety.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Dihydrocodeine is well absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract following administration of DHC Continus tablets and plasma levels are maintained throughout the twelve hour dosing interval.

Like other phenanthrene derivatives, dihydrocodeine is mainly metabolised in the liver with the resultant metabolites being excreted mainly in the urine. Metabolism of dihydrocodeine includes o-demethylation, n-demethylation and 6-keto reduction.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

There are no pre-clinical data of relevance to the prescriber which are additional to that already included in other sections of the SPC.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Lactose (anhydrous)

Hydroxyethylcellulose

Cetostearyl alcohol

Magnesium stearate

Purified talc

Purified water

6.2 Incompatibilities

None known.

6.3 Shelf Life

Three years.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Do not store above 25°C.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Polypropylene containers with polyethylene lids (56 tablets)

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

None stated.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Napp Pharmaceuticals Limited

Cambridge Science Park

Milton Road

Cambridge

CB4 0GW

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 16950/0019 - 0021

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

60 mg

5 November 1986 / 5 March 2001

90 mg and 120 mg

12 July 1990 / 5 March 2001

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

February 2007

Legal Category

POM

® The Napp device, DHC and DHC CONTINUS are Registered Trade Marks

© Napp Pharmaceuticals Ltd 2007.


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Isosorbide


In the US, Isosorbide (isosorbide mononitrate systemic) is a member of the drug class miscellaneous uncategorized agents.

US matches:

Isosorbide Isosorbide Dinitrate Isosorbide Dinitrate Extended-Release Isosorbide Dinitrate/Hydralazine Isosorbide Mononitrate Isosorbide Mononitrate Sustained-Release Tablets Isosorbide dinitrate Oral, Sublingual Isosorbide Mononitrate Extended Release Isosorbide Dinitrate/Hydralazine Hydrochloride

UK matches:

Isosorbide Dinitrate Tablets 10mg, 20mgIsosorbide Mononitrate Tablets 10mg, 20mg, 40mg (Actavis UK Ltd)Isosorbide Dinitrate Injection Concentrate BP 1mg/ml (SPC)Isosorbide Dinitrate Tablets BP 10mg (SPC)Isosorbide Dinitrate Tablets BP 20mg (SPC)Isosorbide mononitrate 20mg tablets (SPC)Isosorbide Mononitrate 40mg (SPC)Isosorbide Mononitrate Tablets 40mg (SPC)Ingredient matches for Isosorbide Isosorbide

Isosorbide (BAN, JAN, USAN) is known as Isosorbide in the US.

Isosorbide Mononitrate

Isosorbide Mononitrate is reported as an ingredient of Isosorbide in the following countries:

Bosnia & Herzegowina Cyprus

International Drug Name Search

Glossary

BANBritish Approved NameJANJapanese Accepted NameSPC Summary of Product Characteristics (UK)USANUnited States Adopted Name
Click for further information on drug naming conventions and International Nonproprietary Names.
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sumatriptan and naproxen


Generic Name: sumatriptan and naproxen (soo ma TRIP tan and na PROX en)
Brand Names: Treximet

What is sumatriptan and naproxen?

Sumatriptan is a headache medicine. It is believed to work by narrowing the blood vessels around the brain.

Naproxen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Naproxen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

The combination of sumatriptan and naproxen is used to treat migraine headaches.

Sumatriptan and naproxen will only treat a headache that has already begun. It will not prevent headaches or reduce the number of attacks.

Sumatriptan and naproxen may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about sumatriptan and naproxen

Do not take more than 2 sumatriptan and naproxen tablets in 24 hours.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to sumatriptan (Imitrex) or naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprosyn), or if you have a history of asthma or allergic reaction caused by aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Do not take if you have liver disease, uncontrolled high blood pressure, or a history of heart disease, angina (chest pain), blood circulation problems, heart attack, stroke, or heart bypass surgery. Do not take sumatriptan and naproxen within 24 hours before or after taking any of the following medications: almotriptan (Axert), eletriptan (Relpax), frovatriptan (Frova), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt, Maxalt-MLT), sumatriptan (Imitrex), or zolmitriptan (Zomig), or ergot medicine such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Cafergot, Migergot), dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal), or methylergonovine (Methergine). What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking sumatriptan and naproxen? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to sumatriptan (Imitrex), naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprosyn), or if you have a history of asthma or allergic reaction caused by aspirin or other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), and others.

Do not take sumatriptan and naproxen if you have:

liver disease;

untreated or uncontrolled high blood pressure; or

a history of heart disease, angina (chest pain), blood circulation problems, heart attack, stroke, or heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Do not take sumatriptan and naproxen if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the past 14 days. Do not take sumatriptan and naproxen within 24 hours before or after taking any of the following medicines:

almotriptan (Axert), eletriptan (Relpax), frovatriptan (Frova), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt, Maxalt-MLT), sumatriptan (Imitrex), or zolmitriptan (Zomig); or

ergot medicine such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Cafergot, Migergot), dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal), or methylergonovine (Methergine).

To make sure you can safely take sumatriptan and naproxen, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

kidney disease;

high blood pressure, congestive heart failure; or

coronary artery disease (or risk factors that include diabetes, menopause, smoking, being overweight, having high blood pressure or high cholesterol, having a family history of coronary artery disease, being older than 40 and a man, or being a woman who has had a hysterectomy).

FDA pregnancy category C. Taking naproxen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Sumatriptan and naproxen can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking this medication. How should I take sumatriptan and naproxen? Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Never use more than the recommended dose. Overuse of migraine headache medicine can actually make your headaches worse. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well.

Take one (1) sumatriptan and naproxen tablet as soon as you notice headache symptoms, or after an attack has already begun. You may take the medicine with or without food.

Do not crush, chew, or break the tablet. Swallow the pill whole.

After taking a tablet: If your headache does not completely go away, or goes away and comes back, you may take a second tablet two (2) hours after the first.

You must wait at least 2 hours before taking a second tablet. Do not take more than 2 sumatriptan and naproxen tablets in 24 hours. If your symptoms have not improved, contact your doctor before taking any more tablets.

Contact your doctor if you have more than five headaches in one month (30 days).

Naproxen can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you if you have taken sumatriptan and naproxen within the past 72 hours.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Sumatriptan and naproxen dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since sumatriptan and naproxen is taken only when needed, it does not have a daily dosing schedule. Do not take more than 2 sumatriptan and naproxen tablets in 24 hours.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include dizziness, drowsiness, heartburn, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, breathing problems, black or bloody stools, coughing up blood, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking sumatriptan and naproxen? Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other over-the-counter cold, allergy, or pain medicine. Many combination medicines contain medicines similar to naproxen (such as ibuprofen or ketoprofen). Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much of this type of medicine. Check the label to see if a medicine contains aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of stomach bleeding caused by naproxen. This medicine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Sumatriptan and naproxen side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: runny or stuffy nose; hives; wheezing or trouble breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you a serious side effect such as:

chest pain or pressure, tight feeling in your neck or jaw, pain spreading to your arm or shoulder;

sudden numbness or weakness, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

swelling or rapid weight gain, urinating less than usual or not at all;

pale skin, weakness, easy bruising, flu symptoms;

numbness, tingling, pale or blue-colored appearance in your fingers or toes;

severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;

seizure (convulsions); or

(if you are also taking an antidepressant) -- agitation, hallucinations, fever, fast heart rate, overactive reflexes, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of coordination, fainting.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, drowsiness;

constipation, upset stomach, dry mouth;

warmth or tingly feeling, redness in your face;

tight muscles; or

mild pressure or heavy feeling in any part of your body.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Sumatriptan and naproxen Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Migraine:

Dose: 1 tablet orally once (Note: The fixed combination tablet contains naproxen sodium (500 mg) and sumatriptan (85 mg).
Maximum Dose: 2 naproxen-sumatriptan tablets in 24 hours. Dosing of tablets should be at least 2 hours apart. The safety of treating an average of more than 5 migraine headaches in a 30 day period has not been established.
Naproxen-sumatriptan may be administered with or without food. Tablets should not be split, crushed, or chewed.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Migraine:

Naproxen-sumatriptan is contraindicated for use in elderly patients who have abnormal hepatic function. Naproxen-sumatriptan is not recommended for use in elderly patients who have decreased renal function, higher risk for unrecognized CAD, and increases in blood pressure that may be more pronounced in the elderly.
Dose: 1 tablet orally once (Note: The fixed combination tablet contains naproxen sodium (500 mg) and sumatriptan (85 mg).
Maximum Dose: 2 naproxen-sumatriptan tablets in 24 hours. Dosing of tablets should be at least 2 hours apart. The safety of treating an average of more than 5 migraine headaches in a 30 day period has not been established.
Naproxen-sumatriptan may be administered with or without food. Tablets should not be split, crushed, or chewed.

What other drugs will affect sumatriptan and naproxen?

Many drugs can interact with sumatriptan and naproxen. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid);

methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall);

probenecid (Benemid);

a diuretic (water pill) such as furosemide (Lasix);

steroids (prednisone and others);

aspirin or other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others;

heart or blood pressure medication such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), metoprolol (Dutoprol, Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), quinapril (Accupril), and others; or

an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), desvenlafaxine (Pristiq), duloxetine (Cymbalta), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or venlafaxine (Effexor).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with sumatriptan and naproxen. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More sumatriptan and naproxen resources Sumatriptan and naproxen Dosage Sumatriptan and naproxen Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Sumatriptan and naproxen Drug Interactions Sumatriptan and naproxen Support Group 58 Reviews for Sumatriptan and naproxen - Add your own review/rating Compare sumatriptan and naproxen with other medications Migraine Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about sumatriptan and naproxen.
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Borderline Personality Disorder Medications


Definition of Borderline Personality Disorder: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious mental illness characterized by pervasive instability in moods, interpersonal relationships, self-image, and behavior.

Drugs associated with Borderline Personality Disorder

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Borderline Personality Disorder

Medical Encyclopedia:

Borderline personality disorder

Harvard Health Guide:

Symptoms and treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder
Drug List: Abilify Abilify-Discmelt-Orally-Disintegrating-Tablets Clozaril Deplin Duleek-Dp Fazaclo Latuda Seroquel Seroquel-Xr-Sustained-Release-Tablets Zervalx Zyprexa Zyprexa-Zydis-Orally-Disintegrating-Tablets
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procyclidine


Generic Name: procyclidine (proe SYE kli deen)
Brand Names: Kemadrin

What is procyclidine?

Procyclidine reduces the effects of certain chemicals in your body that may become unbalanced as a result of disease (such as Parkinson's disease), drug therapy, or other causes.

Procyclidine is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. It is also used to treat and prevent these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

Procyclidine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about procyclidine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Procyclidine may cause dizziness or blurred vision. If you experience dizziness or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking procyclidine.

Avoid becoming overheated. Procyclidine may cause decreased sweating. This could lead to heat stroke in hot weather or with vigorous exercise.

Who should not take procyclidine? You cannot take procyclidine if you

have ever had an allergic reaction to it

have narrow-angle glaucoma,

have an obstruction in your bowel or a complication of bowel disease known as megacolon; or

have myasthenia gravis.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

an enlarged prostate or difficulty urinating,

epilepsy or another seizure disorder,

heart disease or an irregular heartbeat,

depression or any other psychiatric illness, or

kidney or liver disease.

You may need a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Procyclidine is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether procyclidine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. It is also not known whether procyclidine passes into breast milk. Do not take procyclidine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take procyclidine?

Take procyclidine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Take procyclidine after meals to lessen stomach upset.

Procyclidine is usually taken three to four times a day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Store procyclidine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and only take your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a procyclidine overdose include large pupils; warm, dry skin; flushed face; fever; dry mouth; fast or irregular heartbeat; anxiety; hallucinations; confusion; agitation; hyperactivity; loss of consciousness; and seizures.

What should I avoid while taking procyclidine? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Procyclidine may cause dizziness or blurred vision. If you experience dizziness or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking procyclidine.

Avoid becoming overheated. Procyclidine may cause decreased sweating. This could lead to heat stroke in hot weather or with vigorous exercise. Try to keep as cool as possible and watch for signs of heat stroke such as decreased sweating, nausea, and dizziness.

Procyclidine side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking procyclidine and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

unusual fever;

fast or irregular heartbeat;

anxiety, hallucinations, confusion, hyperactivity, or loss of consciousness;

agitation, disorientation, or unusual behavior;

seizures;

eye pain; or

a rash.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take procyclidine and talk to your doctor if you experience

a dry mouth,

large pupils or blurred vision,

drowsiness,

difficulty urinating or constipation,

upset stomach, or

decreased sweating.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect procyclidine?

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all medicines you are taking especially any of the following:

a tricyclic antidepressant (used to treat depression, pain, or obsessive-compulsive disorders) such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), doxepin (Sinequan), or clomipramine (Anafranil); other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and protriptyline (Vivactil);

a phenothiazine (used to treat mania, schizophrenia, other psychiatric conditions, and nausea and vomiting) chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), mesoridazine (Serentil), thioridazine (Mellaril), promazine (Sparine), trifluoperazine (Stelazine), and others;

an antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others), chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton, others), triprolidine (Actifed, others), brompheniramine (Dimetapp, others), clemastine (Tavist), and others, (antihistamines are often found in prescription and over-the-counter cold, allergy, and sleep medicines);

quinidine (Quinora, Quinaglute, Quinidex, Cardioquin);

amantadine (Symmetrel)

digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); or

haloperidol (Haldol).

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with procyclidine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More procyclidine resources Procyclidine Side Effects (in more detail) Procyclidine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Procyclidine Drug Interactions Procyclidine Support Group 3 Reviews for Procyclidine - Add your own review/rating Procyclidine Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Procyclidine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Kemadrin Prescribing Information (FDA) Kemadrin Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare procyclidine with other medications Extrapyramidal Reaction Parkinson's Disease Parkinsonian Tremor Parkinsonism Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has more information about procyclidine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Procyclidine is available with a prescription under the brand name Kemadrin. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

Kemadrin 5 mg--white, round, scored tablets

See also: procyclidine side effects (in more detail)


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Friars' Balsam BP


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Benzoin Tincture Compound BP or Friars Balsam BP

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Storax prepared BP 10.0% w/v

Benzoin sumatra crushed BP 10.0% w/v

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Tincture

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

1. As an inhalant for relief of the symptoms of colds.

2. As a mild antiseptic dressing.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

1. Through the mouth and nasal passages.

2. Topical.

1. As an inhalant

Adults, children over 3 months of age and the elderly: Add one 5ml spoonful to a pint of hot, but not boiling water.

The dose may be repeated after 4 hours if required.

The product is suitable for use under this clinical indication by adults, children over 3 months and the elderly.

Not suitable for children under 3 months of age.

2. As an antiseptic

Adults, children and the elderly: Apply undiluted to the affected area twice daily. The product is suitable for use under this clinical indication by adults, children and the elderly.

4.3 Contraindications

Contraindicated in patients with known sensitivity to sumatra benzoin or storax.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Not suitable for children under 3 months when used as an inhalant.

For external use only.

Keep all medicines away from children.

Caution: Highly flammable. Keep away from a naked flame.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

None known.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

Use of this product by the indicated routes is not considered likely to cause any undesirable effects in the above conditions.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

None known.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

None known.

4.9 Overdose

This product is for external use only. Accidental ingestion is likely to cause a severe burning sensation in the mouth and mucous membranes due to the high alcohol content and the bitter taste of the aloes and balsamic acids. Dilution of the product in the mouth will cause the separation of an unpleasant gummy residue. It is considered unlikely that a significant quantity could be swallowed. However the main effects would be those of alcohol intoxication.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Sumatra benzoin has been used as an ingredient in inhalations used in the treatment of catarrh of the upper respiratory tract for many years. It has also been used topically for its antiseptic and protective properties.

Storax has mild antiseptic action.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

No information available.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

None.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Aloes powdered BP, purified water BP, ethanol (96%) BP

6.2 Incompatibilities

None known.

6.3 Shelf Life

25ml: 36 months unopened.

50ml: 36 months unopened.

500ml: 36 months unopened.

2000ml: 36 months unopened.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Store below 25°C.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container    

25ml:

glass bottle and plastic cap with liner.

50ml:

glass bottle and plastic cap with liner or white 28mm polypropylene cap with Tamper Evident band and EPE/Saranex liner.

500ml:

glass bottle and plastic cap with liner.

2000ml:

glass bottle and plastic cap with liner.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

None.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

L.C.M. Ltd.,

Linthwaite Laboratories

Huddersfield

HD7 5QH

England

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 12965/0002

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

11/10/93 19/11/98

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

March 2005

11 DOSIMETRY (IF APPLICABLE)

Not Applicable

12 INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS (IF APPLICABLE)

Not Applicable


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