implanon high blood sugar
 

Pills
 

ED Pills

ED Drugs
 

Implanon


Generic Name: etonogestrel (Intradermal route)

e-toe-noe-JES-trel

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Implanon Nexplanon

Available Dosage Forms:

Implant

Therapeutic Class: Contraceptive, Progestin

Pharmacologic Class: Progestin

Uses For Implanon

Etonogestrel implant is a medicine that is used in women to prevent pregnancy. It is a form of birth control. This medicine contains a hormone in a flexible plastic rod about the size of a matchstick. It is effective for three years when inserted just beneath the skin of your upper arm.

Etonogestrel implant will not protect a woman from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The use of latex (rubber) condoms or abstinence (not having sex) is recommended for protection from these diseases.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Implanon

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of etonogestrel implant have not been performed in the pediatric population. However, pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of this medication in teenagers are not expected. This medicine may be used for birth control in teenage females but should not be used before the start of menstruation.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of etonogestrel implant have not been performed in the geriatric population. This medicine should not be used in elderly women.

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Isotretinoin Theophylline Tizanidine Tranexamic Acid

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Alprazolam Amoxicillin Ampicillin Amprenavir Aprepitant Atazanavir Bacampicillin Betamethasone Bexarotene Bosentan Carbamazepine Colesevelam Cyclosporine Darunavir Delavirdine Doxycycline Efavirenz Etravirine Fosamprenavir Fosaprepitant Fosphenytoin Griseofulvin Lamotrigine Licorice Minocycline Modafinil Mycophenolate Mofetil Mycophenolic Acid Nelfinavir Nevirapine Oxcarbazepine Oxytetracycline Phenobarbital Phenytoin Pioglitazone Prednisolone Primidone Rifabutin Rifampin Rifapentine Ritonavir Rosuvastatin Rufinamide Selegiline St John's Wort Telaprevir Tetracycline Topiramate Troglitazone Troleandomycin Voriconazole Warfarin Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following may cause an increased risk of certain side effects but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use this medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Caffeine Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Abnormal or unusual vaginal bleeding (non-menstrual) or Breast cancer, now or in the past or if suspected or Cancer (progestin-sensitive), now or in the past or Liver disease, active or Liver tumors, benign or malignant—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Blood clots, now or in the past—Should not be used in patients with blood clots in the brain, legs, lungs, eyes, or heart. Depression, or history of or Diabetes or Fluid retention (body swelling) or Gallbladder disease or Heart disease or Hypertension (high blood pressure) or Hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol or fats in the blood)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Obesity—This condition may cause the medicine to not work as well. Proper Use of etonogestrel

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain etonogestrel. It may not be specific to Implanon. Please read with care.

It is very important that you tell your doctor if you think you might be pregnant or if you missed a period before you receive this medicine. Tests will be done to make sure you are not pregnant before this medicine is inserted.

This medicine comes with patient instructions. After reading the instructions, you will be asked to sign a USER CARD and a Patient Consent Form before you receive this medicine. The Consent Form tells you about some possible risks when using this medicine, and when it must be removed. Make sure you understand what is in the patient instructions and the Consent Form before you sign it. Keep the USER CARD in a safe place at home with your health records. If you have any questions, ask your doctor to answer them.

After this medicine is inserted, you should check that it is in place. Gently press your fingertips over the skin in your arm where this medicine was inserted. You should be able to feel the small rod.

You may have to use another form of birth control (e.g., condoms, diaphragms, or spermicides) until the implant has been in place for 7 days. Talk with your doctor about this.

Your doctor must remove this medicine after 3 years. If you would like to stop using this medicine, your doctor can remove it at any time.

If you still want to prevent pregnancy after this medicine is removed, you should start using another form of birth control (e.g., condoms, diaphragms, or spermicides) right away. If you still want to continue using this medicine, your doctor can insert a new implant under your skin after taking the old one out.

Precautions While Using Implanon

If you will be using the etonogestrel implant for a long time, it is very important that your doctor check you at regular visits for any problems or unwanted effects that may be caused by this medicine.

If you become pregnant while using this medicine, you have a slightly higher chance of having an ectopic pregnancy (occurs outside the womb). Ectopic pregnancies can cause serious internal bleeding. Contact your doctor immediately to have the implant removed.

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. You may start using this medicine if you had a baby more than 4 weeks ago.

Etonogestrel implant will not protect you against HIV/AIDS or other sexually transmitted diseases. The use of latex (rubber) condoms or abstinence (not having sex) is recommended for protection from these diseases.

Tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction to numbing medicines (anesthetics) or skin cleansers (antiseptics). These medicines will be used when etonogestrel implant is inserted into your arm.

This medicine may cause several problems related to insertion and removal, such as pain, irritation, swelling, bruising, scarring, or other complications. Talk to your doctor about these possible risks.

Using this medicine may increase your risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis), lungs (pulmonary embolism), brain (stroke), heart (heart attack), or eyes (blindness). Make sure your doctor knows at least 4 weeks before if you are going to have a surgery or will need to be on bed rest. Your risk of these serious medical problems is greater during surgery or bed rest, or if you smoke cigarettes.

This medicine may also increase your risk of having irregular monthly periods, ovarian cysts, high blood pressure, gallbladder problems, or liver tumors.

Call your doctor right away if you have pain or tenderness in the upper stomach; pale stools; dark urine; loss of appetite; nausea; unusual tiredness or weakness; or yellow eyes or skin. These could be symptoms of a serious liver problem.

If you wear contact lenses and you have blurred vision, difficulty in reading, or any other change in vision while using this medicine, check with your doctor right away. Your doctor may want you to get your eyes checked by an eye doctor (ophthalmologist).

This medicine may affect blood sugar levels. If you notice a change in the results of your blood or urine sugar tests, or if you have any questions, check with your doctor.

Before you have any medical tests, tell the medical doctor in charge that you are using etonogestrel implant. The results of some tests may be affected by this medicine.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal (St. John's wort) or vitamin supplements.

Implanon Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Breast pain chills cough diarrhea fever general feeling of discomfort or illness headache joint pain loss of appetite muscle aches and pain nausea runny nose shivering sore throat sweating trouble sleeping unusual tiredness or weakness vomiting Less common Bleeding, blistering, burning, coldness, discoloration of the skin, feeling of pressure, hives, infection, inflammation, itching, lumps, numbness, pain, rash, redness, scarring, soreness, stinging, swelling, tenderness, tingling, ulceration, or warmth at the injection site bloating blurred vision or other changes in vision breast discharge breast enlargement burning while urinating difficult or painful urination difficulty with breathing difficulty with swallowing dizziness fast heartbeat headache, severe and throbbing hives itching lumps in the breasts nervousness noisy breathing painful or tender cysts in the breasts pounding in the ears puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue shortness of breath skin rash slow or fast heartbeat stomach or pelvic discomfort, aching, or heaviness swelling of the hands, ankles, feet, or lower legs tightness in the chest wheezing Rare Collection of blood under the skin at the injection site deep, dark purple bruise at the injection site

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Back pain blemishes on the skin, pimples body aches or pain crying depersonalization discouragement dysphoria ear congestion euphoria feeling sad or empty hoarseness increased clear or white vaginal discharge increased weight irregular bleeding cycle irritability itching of the vagina or genital area light vaginal bleeding between regular menstrual periods loss of interest or pleasure loss of voice mental depression nasal congestion pain, cramps, or heavy menstrual bleeding pain during sexual intercourse pain or tenderness around the eyes and cheekbones paranoia quick to react or overreact emotionally rapidly changing moods stomach pain tender, swollen glands in the neck thick, white vaginal discharge with no odor or with a mild odor trouble concentrating voice changes Less common Abdominal or stomach bloating and cramping abnormal ejaculation abnormal or decreased touch sensation acid or sour stomach belching bone pain burning feeling in the chest or stomach decreased interest in sexual intercourse difficulty having a bowel movement (stool) difficulty with moving dull ache or feeling of pressure or heaviness in the legs earache, redness, or swelling in the ear excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines feeling of vaginal pressure feeling of warmth hair loss or thinning of the hair heartburn inability to have or keep an erection increased appetite increased hair growth on the forehead, back, arms, and legs indigestion itching skin near damaged veins lack or loss of strength loss in sexual ability, desire, drive, or performance muscle cramping or stiffness passing gas pelvic pain redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally upper chest sleepiness or unusual drowsiness sleeplessness sneezing stomach upset or pain stuffy nose swollen joints tenderness in the stomach area unable to sleep vaginal burning or pain weight loss

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Implanon side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Implanon resources Implanon Side Effects (in more detail) Implanon Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Implanon Drug Interactions Implanon Support Group 593 Reviews for Implanon - Add your own review/rating Implanon Consumer Overview Implanon Prescribing Information (FDA) Etonogestrel Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Nexplanon Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Implanon with other medications Birth Control
read more / Download


Birth Control (Contraception) Medications


Definition of Birth Control: The prevention of conception or impregnation. More...

Drugs associated with Birth Control

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Birth Control. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

See sub-topics

Topics under Birth Control Emergency Contraception (14 drugs) Learn more about Birth Control (Contraception)

Medical Encyclopedia:

Birth control and family planning Emergency contraception Over-the-counter birth control
Drug List: Alesse Altavera Amethia Amethia-Lo Amethyst Apri Aranelle Aviane Balziva Beyaz Brevicon Briellyn Camila Camrese Caziant Cesia Cryselle-28 Cyclafem-1-35 Cyclafem-7-7-7 Cyclessa Demulen Depo-Provera Depo-Provera-Contraceptive-Injectable Depo-Subq-Provera-104-Injectable-Suspension-Subcutaneous Desogen Ella Emoquette Enpresse Errin Estrostep-Fe Femcon-Fe-Chewable-Tablets Femhrt Generess-Fe Genora-1-35 Gianvi Gildess-Fe-1-5-0-03 Gildess-Fe-1-0-2 Implanon Jenest Jevantique Jolessa Jolivette Junel-1-5-30 Junel-1-20 Junel-Fe-1-5-30 Junel-Fe-1-20 Kariva Kelnor Leena Lessina Levlen Levlite Levonest Levora Lo-Loestrin-Fe Lo-Ovral Lo-Ovral-28 Loestrin-1-20 Loestrin-21-1-5-30 Loestrin-21-1-20 Loestrin_24_Fe Loestrin-Fe-1-5-30 Loestrin-Fe-1-20 Loryna Loseasonique Low-Ogestrel Low-Ogestrel-28 Lunelle Lutera Lybrel Microgestin-1-5-30 Microgestin-1-20 Microgestin-Fe-1-5-30 Microgestin-Fe-1-20 Mircette Mirena Modicon Mononessa Natazia Necon-0-5-35 Necon-1-35 Necon-1-50 Necon-10-11 Necon-7-7-7 Nelova-0-5-35 Nexplanon Nor-Qd Nora-Be Nordette Norethin-1-35-E Norinyl-1-35 Norinyl-1-50 Norplant-System Nortrel-0-5-35 Nortrel-1-35 Nortrel-7-7-7 Nuvaring Ocella Ogestrel Ogestrel-28 Orsythia Ortho_Cyclen Ortho_Evra Ortho-Micronor Ortho-Tri-Cyclen Ortho-Tri-Cyclen-Lo Ortho-Cept Ortho-Novum-1-35 Ortho-Novum-1-50 Ortho-Novum-7-7-7 Ovcon-35 Ovcon-35-Fe Ovcon-50 Portia Previfem Provera Quasense-Extended-Cycle Reclipsen Safyral Seasonale Seasonique Solia Sprintec Sronyx Syeda Tilia-Fe Tri-Legest Tri-Legest-Fe Tri-Levlen Tri-Lo-Sprintec Tri-Norinyl Tri-Previfem Tri-Sprintec Trinessa Trinessa-Lo Triphasil Triphasil-21 Triphasil-28 Trivora Trivora-28 Velivet Vestura Yasmin Yaz Zarah Zenchent Zenchent-Fe Zeosa Zovia Zovia-1-35 Zovia-1-50
read more / Download


Contraceptives


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Contraceptives are used to prevent unwanted pregnancy. Hormonal contraceptives consist of one or more synthetic female sex hormones (estrogen and progestin or progestin only). These sex hormones prevent pregnancy by blocking the normal process of ovulation. They may also alter the lining of the uterus (endometrium) so that it is unable to support a fertilized egg and they change the mucus in the cervix so that it is hard for the sperm to travel hence conception is less likely should ovulation occur.

These hormones are either taken as regular doses in pill form (oral contraceptives), or are administered through the skin by means of a patch impregnated with hormones. They can also be given by three monthly injections of a long acting progestin, or by subcutaneous implants of progestin. They are also available as hormonal intrauterine devices and vaginal rings.

See also

Medical conditions associated with contraceptives:

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Acne Amenorrhea Birth Control Emergency Contraception Endometrial Cancer Endometrial Hyperplasia, Prophylaxis Endometriosis Gonadotropin Inhibition Menstrual Disorders Ovarian Cysts Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Postmenopausal Symptoms Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Premenstrual Syndrome Prevention of Osteoporosis Renal Cell Carcinoma Drug List: Junel-1-5-30 Nordette Norinyl-1-35 Zeosa Plan-B Triphasil Ortho-Novum-1-35 Loestrin-1-20 Plan-B-One-Step Demulen Zarah Ovcon-35 Trivora Lybrel Low-Ogestrel-28 Necon-1-35 Ortho-Novum-7-7-7 Aranelle Gildess-Fe-1-5-0-03 Modicon Nexplanon Next-Choice Tri-Legest-Fe Ortho_Cyclen Lutera Ortho_Evra Junel-1-20 Seasonale Yasmin Femcon-Fe-Chewable-Tablets Lo-Ovral Mircette Desogen Lo-Loestrin-Fe Low-Ogestrel Nora-Be Microgestin-1-20 Camila Kelnor Mirena Nuvaring Portia Provera Aviane Quasense-Extended-Cycle Trinessa Jolessa Lo-Ovral-28 Mononessa Yaz Alesse Beyaz Cryselle-28 Kariva Levlen Ocella Depo-Provera-Contraceptive-Injectable Loestrin_24_Fe Microgestin-Fe-1-5-30 Apri Aygestin Implanon Zovia-1-35 Depo-Provera Femhrt Ortho-Tri-Cyclen Ortho-Tri-Cyclen-Lo Tri-Lo-Sprintec Levora Natazia Sronyx Junel-Fe-1-5-30 Junel-Fe-1-20 Tri-Sprintec Seasonique Sprintec Cyclessa Microgestin-Fe-1-20 Safyral Necon-7-7-7 Ortho-Cept Loseasonique Ortho-Micronor Gianvi Jolivette Reclipsen Errin Lessina Zovia Tri-Previfem Briellyn Nortrel-7-7-7 Velivet Ogestrel-28 Loestrin-Fe-1-20 Nortrel-1-35 Loestrin-21-1-20 Orsythia Triphasil-28 Altavera Amethia Amethia-Lo Amethyst Balziva Brevicon Camrese Caziant Cesia Cyclafem-1-35 Cyclafem-7-7-7 Depo-Subq-Provera-104-Injectable-Suspension-Subcutaneous Emoquette Enpresse Estrostep-Fe Generess-Fe Genora-1-35 Gildess-Fe-1-0-2 Jenest Jevantique Jinteli Leena Levlite Levonest Loestrin-21-1-5-30 Loestrin-Fe-1-5-30 Loryna Lunelle Microgestin-1-5-30 Necon-0-5-35 Necon-1-50 Necon-10-11 Nelova-0-5-35 Nor-Qd Norethin-1-35-E Norinyl-1-50 Norplant-System Nortrel-0-5-35 Ogestrel Ortho-Novum-1-50 Ovcon-35-Fe Ovcon-50 Preven-Ec Previfem Solia Syeda Tilia-Fe Tri-Legest Tri-Levlen Tri-Norinyl Trinessa-Lo Triphasil-21 Trivora-28 Vestura Zenchent Zenchent-Fe Zovia-1-50
read more / Download


potassium aminobenzoate


Generic Name: potassium aminobenzoate (po TAS ee um a MEE noe BEN zoe ate)
Brand Names: Potaba

What is potassium aminobenzoate?

Potassium aminobenzoate is a form of Vitamin B, which supports many important body functions.

Potassium aminobenzoate works by causing a softening of skin or tissues when used over time. It also raises oxygen levels in tissues of the body.

Potassium aminobenzoate is used to treat conditions that cause skin or tissues to harden, including scleroderma (skler-oh-DERM-a), dermatomyositis (der-mat-oh-mye-oh-SYE-tis), and Peyronie's (pe-ROE-neez) disease.

Potassium aminobenzoate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about potassium aminobenzoate?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, diabetes, or chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Tell your doctor if you are taking a sulfa antibiotic, such as Bactrim, Cotrim, Septra, and others.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking potassium aminobenzoate?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

kidney disease;

diabetes; or

chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

Potassium aminobenzoate may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether potassium aminobenzoate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take potassium aminobenzoate?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

The oral powder and tablet forms of this medicine should be mixed with cold water or juice. Crush the tablets before dissolving them in liquid. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Store potassium aminobenzoate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Be sure to take the medicine with food. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I avoid while taking potassium aminobenzoate? Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Potassium aminobenzoate side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low while you are taking this medicine. You may have hypoglycemia if you take potassium aminobenzoate without food.

Symptoms of low blood sugar include:

hunger, headache, confusion, irritability;

drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors;

sweating, fast heartbeat;

seizure (convulsions); or

fainting, coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

nausea;

loss of appetite;

fever; or

mild skin rash.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect potassium aminobenzoate?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are using a sulfa antibiotic such as:

Bactrim;

Cotrim;

Proloprim;

Septra;

SMX / TMP; or

Trimpex.

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect potassium aminobenzoate. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More potassium aminobenzoate resources Potassium aminobenzoate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Potassium aminobenzoate Drug Interactions Potassium aminobenzoate Support Group 0 Reviews for Potassium aminobenzoate - Add your own review/rating Potaba Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Potaba MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare potassium aminobenzoate with other medications Dietary Supplementation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about potassium aminobenzoate written for health professionals that you may read.
read more / Download


Potaba


Generic Name: potassium aminobenzoate (po TAS ee um a MEE noe BEN zoe ate)
Brand Names: Potaba

What is Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Potassium aminobenzoate is a form of Vitamin B, which supports many important body functions.

Potassium aminobenzoate works by causing a softening of skin or tissues when used over time. It also raises oxygen levels in tissues of the body.

Potassium aminobenzoate is used to treat conditions that cause skin or tissues to harden, including scleroderma (skler-oh-DERM-a), dermatomyositis (der-mat-oh-mye-oh-SYE-tis), and Peyronie's (pe-ROE-neez) disease.

Potassium aminobenzoate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, diabetes, or chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Tell your doctor if you are taking a sulfa antibiotic, such as Bactrim, Cotrim, Septra, and others.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

kidney disease;

diabetes; or

chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

Potassium aminobenzoate may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether potassium aminobenzoate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

The oral powder and tablet forms of this medicine should be mixed with cold water or juice. Crush the tablets before dissolving them in liquid. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Store potassium aminobenzoate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Be sure to take the medicine with food. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I avoid while taking Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)? Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low while you are taking this medicine. You may have hypoglycemia if you take potassium aminobenzoate without food.

Symptoms of low blood sugar include:

hunger, headache, confusion, irritability;

drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors;

sweating, fast heartbeat;

seizure (convulsions); or

fainting, coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

nausea;

loss of appetite;

fever; or

mild skin rash.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are using a sulfa antibiotic such as:

Bactrim;

Cotrim;

Proloprim;

Septra;

SMX / TMP; or

Trimpex.

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect potassium aminobenzoate. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Potaba resources Potaba Side Effects (in more detail) Potaba Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Potaba Drug Interactions Potaba Support Group 0 Reviews for Potaba - Add your own review/rating Potaba Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Potaba MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Potaba with other medications Dietary Supplementation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about potassium aminobenzoate written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: Potaba side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Simple Linctus Sugar Free (Pinewood Healthcare)


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Simple Linctus Sugar Free

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Simple Linctus Sugar Free: Citric Acid Monohydrate 125 mg/5 ml equivalent to 114.29mg/5ml Anhydrous Citric Acid.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Clear Pink Sugar Free Syrup

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

For the management of a mild non-specific cough.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Adults: One 5 ml spoonful orally 3-4 times daily.

Children: Not appropriate

4.3 Contraindications

Not known

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

This medicine contains maltitol liquid. Patients with rare hereditary problems of fructose intolerance should not take this medicine.

This medicinal product contains small amounts of ethanol (alcohol), less than 100mg per 5ml dose

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

None Known

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

No data available

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Not applicable

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Not Applicable

4.9 Overdose

Sufficient prolonged overdose of citric acid may cause erosion of the teeth and have a local irritant action.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Absorption: Citric Acid Monohydrate is absorbed after oral administration.

Distribution: Citric Acid is found naturally in the body and is widely distributed, about 70% of the citric acid in the body is in hard bone and this accounts for 1.5% of bone content.

Metabolic Reactions: It is an important intermediate in carbohydrate metabolism and its major role is in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (Krebs citric acid cycle); it is metabolised to carbon dioxide and water.

Excretion: Citric acid is normally excreted in the urine in amounts ranging from 0.4 to 1.5g daily and this amount is not increased unless very large doses are administered. The urinary excretion of citric acid is increased in alkaline urine

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Not applicable

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

None stated

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Glycerol (E422)

Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose

Sodium Benzoate (E211)

Saccharin Sodium (E954)

Lycasin 80/55 (E965)

Ethanol (96%)

Anise Oil

Chloroform

Natural Red DI (E163)

Purified Water

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not appropriate

6.3 Shelf Life

2 years

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Do not Store above 25°C.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Amber glass bottles with pilfer screw closure

High density Polyethylene with screw on closure

Pack sizes of 100ml, 125ml, and 200ml for Amber Glass Bottles

Pack size of 2000ml for High Density Polyethylene dispensary pack.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

As with all medicines.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Pinewood Laboratories Limited

Ballymacarbry

Clonmel

Co Tipperary

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 04917/0006

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

28 August 1991

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

November 2008


read more / Download


Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free


Generic Name: psyllium (SIL ee um)
Brand Names: Fiberall, Hydrocil, Konsyl, Konsyl Orange Sugar-free, Konsyl-D, Konsyl-Orange, Laxmar, Laxmar Orange, Laxmar Sugar Free, Metamucil, Metamucil Berry Burst Smooth Texture Sugar Free, Metamucil Orange Coarse Milled Original Texture, Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture, Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free, Metamucil Original Texture Regular, Metamucil Pink Lemonade Smooth Texture Sugar-Free, Metamucil Unflavored Coarse Milled Original Texture, Metamucil Unflavored Smooth Texture Sugar Free, Natural Fiber Therapy, Perdiem Fiber Powder, Reguloid

What is Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free (psyllium)?

Psyllium is a bulk-forming fiber laxative. Psyllium works by absorbing liquid in the intestines and swelling to create a softer, bulky stool that is easier to pass.

Psyllium is used to treat occasional constipation or bowel irregularity. Psyllium may also be used to treat diarrhea and may help lower cholesterol when used together with a diet low in cholesterol and saturated fat.

Psyllium may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free (psyllium)? Laxatives may be habit-forming if they are used too often or for too long. This can lead to damage of intestinal nerves or muscle tissues. Do not take psyllium for longer than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor. You should not take this product if you are allergic to psyllium, or if you have trouble swallowing, a sudden change in bowel habits that lasts longer than 2 weeks, severe nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain, or if you have ever had a skin rash while taking psyllium.

Also talk with your doctor before using psyllium if you have a colostomy or ileostomy, rectal bleeding, or a blockage in your intestines.

Stop using psyllium and call your doctor at once if you have choking or trouble swallowing, severe stomach pain or cramping, nausea or vomiting, constipation that lasts longer than 7 days, rectal bleeding, or itchy skin rash. Do not take psyllium for longer than 7 days in a row unless your doctor has told you to. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free (psyllium)? Laxatives may be habit-forming if they are used too often or for too long. This can lead to damage of intestinal nerves or muscle tissues. Do not take psyllium for longer than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor. You should not take this product if you are allergic to psyllium, or if you have:

trouble swallowing;

a sudden change in bowel habits that lasts longer than 2 weeks;

severe nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain; or

if you have ever had a skin rash while taking psyllium.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

a colostomy or ileostomy;

rectal bleeding; or

a blockage in your intestines.

Psyllium products may contain sugar, sodium, or artificial sweeteners. This may be of concern to you if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or phenylketonuria (PKU). Check the product label if you have any of these conditions.

Psyllium is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether psyllium passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free (psyllium)?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take psyllium with a full glass (at least 8 ounces) of water or another liquid. Taking psyllium without enough liquid may cause it to swell in your throat and cause choking. Drinking plenty of fluids each day while you are taking psyllium will also help improve bowel regularity.

The psyllium wafer must be chewed before you swallow it.

Do not swallow psyllium powder dry. It must be mixed with liquid. Place the psyllium powder into an empty glass and add at least 8 ounces of water or other liquid such as fruit juice. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away.

If the powder and liquid mixture is too thick, add more liquid. After drinking the entire mixture, add a little more liquid to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away to make sure you get the entire dose of psyllium.

Psyllium may be only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

It may take up to 3 days of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 2 or 3 days of treatment.

Do not take psyllium for longer than 7 days in a row unless your doctor has told you to. Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Since psyllium is used as needed, it does not have a daily dosing schedule. Call your doctor promptly if your symptoms do not improve after using psyllium.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Using a laxative too often or for too long may cause severe medical problems involving your intestines.

What should I avoid while taking Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free (psyllium)?

Avoid taking other oral (by mouth) medications within 2 hours before or after you take psyllium. Bulk-forming laxatives can make it harder for your body to absorb other medications, possibly making them less effective.

Avoid breathing in the dust from psyllium powder when mixing. Inhaling psyllium dust may cause an allergic reaction.

If you take psyllium as part of a cholesterol-lowering treatment plan, avoid eating foods that are high in fat or cholesterol. Your treatment will not be as effective in lowering your cholesterol if you do not follow a cholesterol-lowering diet plan.

Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free (psyllium) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using psyllium and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

choking or trouble swallowing;

severe stomach pain, cramping, nausea or vomiting;

constipation that lasts longer than 7 days;

rectal bleeding; or

itchy skin rash.

Less serious side effects may include:

bloating; or

minor change in your bowel habits.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free (psyllium)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); or

demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with psyllium. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free resources Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free Side Effects (in more detail) Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free - Add your own review/rating Konsyl Powder MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Metamucil MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free with other medications Constipation Dietary Fiber Supplementation Irritable Bowel Syndrome Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about psyllium.

See also: Metamucil Orange Smooth Texture Sugar Free side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


JANUVIA 100mg film-coated tablets


Januvia 100 mg film-coated tablets

Sitagliptin

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Januvia is and what it is used for 2. Before you take Januvia 3. How to take Januvia 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Januvia 6. Further information What Januvia Is And What It Is Used For

Januvia is a member of a class of medicines you take by mouth called DPP-4 inhibitors (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) that lowers blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes is also called non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, or NIDDM.

Januvia helps to improve the levels of insulin after a meal and decreases the amount of sugar made by the body. It is unlikely to cause low blood sugar because it does not work when your blood sugar is low. However, when Januvia is used in combination with a sulphonylurea medicine or with insulin, low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) can occur.

Your doctor has prescribed Januvia to help lower your blood sugar, which is too high because of your type 2 diabetes. Januvia can be used alone or in combination with certain other medicines (insulin, metformin, sulphonylureas, or glitazones) that lower blood sugar, which you may already be taking for your diabetes together with a food and exercise plan.

What is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which your body does not make enough insulin, and the insulin that your body produces does not work as well as it should. Your body can also make too much sugar. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems like heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and amputation.

Before You Take Januvia Do not take Januvia if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to sitagliptin or any of the other ingredients of Januvia. Take special care with Januvia

Tell your doctor if you have or have had:

type 1 diabetes diabetic ketoacidosis (a complication of diabetes with high blood sugar, rapid weight loss, nausea or vomiting) any kidney problems, or any past or present medical problems. If you have kidney problems, Januvia may not be the right medicine for you. an allergic reaction to Januvia.

If you are taking a sulphonylurea or insulin with Januvia you may experience low blood sugar. Your doctor may reduce the dose of your sulphonylurea or insulin medication.

Taking other medicines

Januvia may be taken with most medicines. Tell your doctor or pharmacist about all the medicines you take or have recently taken. This includes prescription and non-prescription medicines, and herbal supplements.

Taking Januvia with food and drink

You can take Januvia with or without food and drink.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Women who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant should consult their doctor before taking Januvia. You should not use Januvia during pregnancy.

It is not known if Januvia passes into breast milk. You should not use Januvia if you are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed.

Driving and using machines

Januvia is not expected to interfere with your ability to drive or to use machines. However, when driving or operating machinery, it should be taken into account that dizziness and drowsiness have been reported.

How To Take Januvia

Always take Januvia exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.

The usual dose is:

one 100 mg film-coated tablet once a day by mouth

Your doctor may prescribe Januvia alone or with certain other medicines that lower blood sugar.

Continue to take Januvia as long as your doctor prescribes it so you can continue to help control your blood sugar.

Diet and exercise can help your body use its blood sugar better. It is important to stay on the diet, exercise and weight loss program recommended by your doctor while taking Januvia.

If you take more Januvia than you should

If you take more than the prescribed dosage of Januvia, contact your doctor immediately.

If you forget to take Januvia

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If you do not remember until it is time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take a double dose of Januvia.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, Januvia may cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Very common side effects (more than 1 per 10 patients)

Common side effects (less than 1 per 10 but more than 1 per 100 patients)

Uncommon side effects (less than 1 per 100 but more than 1 per 1000 patients)

Some patients have experienced the following side effects after adding sitagliptin to metformin:

Common: nausea

Uncommon: weight loss, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, low blood sugar, drowsiness.

Some patients have experienced stomach discomfort when starting the combination of sitagliptin and metformin together.

Some patients have experienced the following side effects while taking Januvia in combination with a sulphonylurea:

Common: low blood sugar

Some patients have experienced the following side effects while taking Januvia in combination with a sulphonylurea and metformin:

Very common: low blood sugar

Common: constipation

Some patients have experienced the following side effects while taking Januvia and pioglitazone:

Common: low blood sugar and flatulence. In addition, some patients have reported foot swelling while taking Januvia and pioglitazone. These side effects may be seen with sitagliptin and any glitazone (e.g., rosiglitazone).

Some patients have experienced the following side effects while taking Januvia in combination with rosiglitazone and metformin:

Common: headache, cough, diarrhoea, vomiting, low blood sugar, fungal skin infection, upper respiratory infection, swelling of the hands or legs.

Some patients have experienced the following side effects while taking Januvia in combination with insulin (with or without metformin):

Common: headache, low blood sugar and flu

Uncommon: dry mouth, constipation

Some patients have experienced the following side effects while taking Januvia alone:

Common: low blood sugar, headache

Uncommon: dizziness, constipation

In addition, some patients have reported the following side effects while taking Januvia:

Common: upper respiratory infection, stuffy or runny nose and sore throat, osteoarthritis, arm or leg pain.

During post-marketing experience the following side effects have also been reported (frequency not known): allergic reactions, which may be serious, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have an allergic reaction, stop taking Januvia and call your doctor right away. Your doctor may prescribe a medication to treat your allergic reaction and a different medication for your diabetes. Inflammation of the pancreas has also been reported.

If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How To Store Januvia

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not use Januvia after the expiry date which is stated on the blister and the carton. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.

This medicinal product does not require any special storage conditions.

Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

Further Information What Januvia contains The active substance is sitagliptin. Each film-coated tablet contains sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate, equivalent to 100 mg sitagliptin. The other ingredients are: microcrystalline cellulose (E460), calcium hydrogen phosphate, anhydrous (E341), croscarmellose sodium (E468), magnesium stearate (E470b), and sodium stearyl fumarate. The tablet film coating contains: polyvinyl alcohol, macrogol 3350, talc (E553b), titanium dioxide (E171), red iron oxide (E172), and yellow iron oxide (E172). What Januvia looks like and contents of the pack

Round, beige film-coated tablet with “277” on one side.

Opaque blisters (PVC/PE/PVDC and aluminum). Packs of 14, 28, 56, 84 or 98 film-coated tablets and 50 x 1 film-coated tablets in perforated unit dose blisters.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer

The Marketing Authorisation Holder is:

Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd. Hertford Road Hoddesdon Hertfordshire EN11 9BU United Kingdom

The Manufacturer is:

Merck Sharp & Dohme (Italia) S.p.A. Via Emilia, 21 27100 - Pavia Italy

For any information about this medicine, please contact the local representative of the Marketing Authorisation Holder:

United Kingdom Merck Sharp and Dohme Limited Tel: +44 (0) 1992 467272 Email:medinfo_uk@merck.com

This leaflet was last approved in November 2009.

Detailed information on this medicinal product is available on the website of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) web site: http://www.emea.europa.eu/.

denotes registered trademark of

Merkc & Co Inc. Whitehouse Station NJ USA

© Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited 2009. All rights reserved.

PIL.JAN.09.UK.3169 II-011 F.T.131109

Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited Hertford Road Hoddesdon Hertfordshire EN11 9BU UK
read more / Download


Januvia


Pronunciation: SYE-ta-GLIP-tin
Generic Name: Sitagliptin
Brand Name: Januvia
Januvia is used for:

Treating type 2 diabetes in patients who cannot control blood sugar levels by diet and exercise alone. It is used along with diet and exercise. It may be used alone or with other antidiabetic medicines.

Januvia is a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. It works by increasing the amount of insulin released by your body and decreasing the amount of sugar made by your body.

Do NOT use Januvia if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Januvia you have type 1 diabetes you have high blood ketone levels (diabetic ketoacidosis)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Januvia:

Some medical conditions may interact with Januvia. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have kidney problems if you have a history of inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), stones in your gallbladder (gallstones), alcoholism, or high blood triglyceride levels

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Januvia. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Digoxin, insulin, meglitinides (eg, repaglinide), or sulfonylureas (eg, glipizide) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Januvia

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Januvia may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Januvia:

Use Januvia as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Januvia comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Januvia refilled. Take Januvia by mouth with or without food. Take Januvia on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Continue to take Januvia even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of Januvia, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Januvia.

Important safety information: Carry an ID card at all times that says you have diabetes. Follow the diet and exercise program given to you by your health care provider. Proper diet, regular exercise, and regular blood sugar testing are important for best results with Januvia. Check your blood sugar levels as directed by your doctor. If they are often higher or lower than they should be and you take Januvia exactly as prescribed, tell your doctor. It may be harder to control your blood sugar during times of stress such as fever, infection, injury, or surgery. Talk with your doctor about how to control your blood sugar if any of these occur. Do not change the dose of your medicine without checking with your doctor. Januvia usually does not cause low blood sugar. However, low blood sugar may occur when it is used along with certain other medicines for diabetes (eg, insulin, sulfonylureas). Low blood sugar may make you anxious, sweaty, weak, dizzy, drowsy, or faint. It may also make your heart beat faster; make your vision change; give you a headache, chills, or tremors; or make you hungrier. It is a good idea to carry a reliable source of glucose (eg, tablets, gel) to treat low blood sugar. If this is not available, you should eat or drink a quick source of sugar like table sugar, honey, candy, orange juice, or non-diet soda. This will raise your blood sugar level quickly. Tell your doctor right away if this happens. To prevent low blood sugar, eat meals at the same time each day and do not skip meals. Lab tests, including fasting blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, and kidney function, may be performed while you use Januvia. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Januvia with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Januvia should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY AND BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of taking Januvia while you are pregnant. It is not known if Januvia is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you take Januvia, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Januvia:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; headache; nausea; runny or stuffy nose; sore throat; upper respiratory infection; upset stomach.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing or swallowing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, throat, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); decreased urination; red, blistered, swollen, or peeling skin; symptoms of pancreas inflammation (eg, severe stomach or back pain with or without nausea or vomiting).

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Januvia side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center ( http://www.aapcc.org), or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Januvia:

Store Januvia at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Januvia out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Januvia, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Januvia is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Januvia. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Januvia resources Januvia Side Effects (in more detail) Januvia Dosage Januvia Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Januvia Drug Interactions Januvia Support Group 25 Reviews for Januvia - Add your own review/rating Januvia Prescribing Information (FDA) Januvia Monograph (AHFS DI) Januvia Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Januvia Consumer Overview Compare Januvia with other medications Diabetes, Type 2
read more / Download


Rinstead Sugar Free Pastilles


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Rinstead Sugar Free Pastilles

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Menthol BP 0.033% w/w

Cetylpyridinium chloride BP 0.128% w/w

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Pastille.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

For the temporary relief of pain and discomfort from recurrent mouth ulcers and denture sore spots.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Adults and children over 12 years:

Allow one pastille to dissolve slowly in the mouth about every two hours.

4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to cetylpyridinium chloride or menthol or to any component of the formulation.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

If symptoms persist, a physician or dentist should be consulted.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

None known

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

The safety of Rinstead Sugar Free Pastilles in pregnancy and lactation has not been established. Therefore, this product should only be used in pregnancy when considered essential by a physician.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

None known.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Sensitisation to the product is a possible undesirable effect.

4.9 Overdose

If overdose is suspected, this should be treated symptomatically with gastric lavage and supportive therapy, if indicated.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Menthol, applied locally in low concentrations, provides a soothing effect.

Cetylpyridinium chloride is an antiseptic, active against a wide spectrum of micro-organisms.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Menthol is excreted in the urine and bile as a glucuronide.

Cetylpyridinium chloride is poorly absorbed and is excreted mainly via the faeces.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Not applicable.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Tartaric acid

Amaranth, Rinstead Oils

Sodium ricinoleate (50% sln)

Acesulfame potassium

Acacia gum

Sorbitol

Silicone Antifoam

Vegetable Oil

Beeswax

Water

6.2 Incompatibilities

None known

6.3 Shelf Life

24 months

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Store below 25°C

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Aluminium foil/clear PVC blister strips contained in a cardboard carton. Pack sizes of 12, 24, 30, 36 and 48 pastilles.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

Not applicable.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited

Hertford Road

Hoddesdon

Hertfordshire

EN11 9BU

UK

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 00025/0586

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

16 April 1996 / 16 April 2001

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

22 January 2011

11. LEGAL CATEGORY

GSL

© Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited 2011. All rights reserved.

Rinstead SFP/01-11/02


read more / Download


Starlix


Generic Name: nateglinide (oral) (na ta GLYE nide)
Brand Names: Starlix

What is nateglinide?

Nateglinide is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. This medication helps your body respond better to insulin produced by your pancreas.

Nateglinide is used together with diet and exercise to treat type 2 diabetes. Other diabetes medicines are sometimes used in combination with nateglinide if needed.

Nateglinide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about nateglinide? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to nateglinide, if you have type 1 diabetes, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Nateglinide is only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

What should I discuss with my doctor before taking nateglinide? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to nateglinide, if you have type 1 diabetes, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

To make sure you can safely take nateglinide, tell your doctor if you have liver disease or gout.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether nateglinide will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether nateglinide passes into breast milk or if it could be harmful to a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking nateglinide. How should I take nateglinide?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Nateglinide is usually taken 3 times daily, within 30 minutes before eating a meal. Follow your doctor's instructions. If you skip a meal, do not take your dose of nateglinide. Wait until your next meal.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating.

Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Sugar sources include orange juice, glucose gel, candy, or milk. If you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink, use an injection of glucagon. Your doctor can give you a prescription for a glucagon emergency injection kit and tell you how to give the injection.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your dose needs may also change.

Your doctor may want you to stop taking nateglinide for a short time if you become ill, have a fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency.

Ask your doctor how to adjust your nateglinide dose if needed. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice.

Nateglinide is only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Use nateglinide regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Starlix dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember, but only if you are getting ready to eat a meal. . Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

You may have symptoms of severe hypoglycemia such as extreme weakness, blurred vision, sweating, trouble speaking, tremors, stomach pain, confusion, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking nateglinide? Avoid drinking alcohol. It lowers blood sugar and may interfere with your diabetes treatment. Nateglinide side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

seizure (convulsions); or

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, cough, cold or flu symptoms;

diarrhea, nausea;

back pain;

dizziness; or

joint pain or stiffness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect nateglinide?

Using a beta-blocker can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you take atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others;

You may be more likely to have hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) if you take nateglinide with other drugs that can raise blood sugar, such as:

isoniazid;

somatropin (Genotropin, Humatrope, Norditropin, Nutropin, Omnitrope, Saizen, Serostim, Zorbtive, and others);

diuretics (water pills);

steroids (prednisone and others);

heart or blood pressure medication (Cartia, Cardizem, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan, and others);

niacin (Advicor, Niaspan, Niacor, Simcor, Slo-Niacin, and others);

phenothiazines (Compazine and others);

thyroid medicine (Synthroid and others);

birth control pills and other hormones;

seizure medicines (Dilantin and others); and

diet pills or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies.

You may be more likely to have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if you take nateglinide with other drugs that can lower blood sugar, such as:

probenecid (Benemid);

some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs);

aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol);

antifungal medication such as fluconazole (Diflucan), miconazole (Oravig), or voriconazole (Vfend);

a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven, and others);

heart or blood pressure medication (Accupril, Altace, Cordarone, Lotensin, Pacerone, Prinivil, Vasotec, Zestril, and others);

sulfa drugs (Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, SMX-TMP, and others);

a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI); or

other oral diabetes medications, especially acarbose (Precose), metformin (Glucophage), miglitol (Glyset), pioglitazone (Actos), or rosiglitazone (Avandia).

These lists are not complete and there are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of nateglinide on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Starlix resources Starlix Side Effects (in more detail) Starlix Dosage Starlix Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Starlix Drug Interactions Starlix Support Group 0 Reviews for Starlix - Add your own review/rating Starlix Prescribing Information (FDA) Starlix Consumer Overview Starlix Monograph (AHFS DI) Starlix Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Starlix MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nateglinide Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Nateglinide Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Starlix with other medications Diabetes, Type 2 Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about nateglinide.

See also: Starlix side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Precose


Generic Name: acarbose (ah KAR bose)
Brand Names: Precose

What is Precose (acarbose)?

Acarbose slows the digestion of carbohydrates in the body, which helps control blood sugar levels.

Acarbose is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Acarbose is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other diabetes medications you take by mouth.

Acarbose may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Precose (acarbose)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to acarbose, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). You also should not use acarbose if you have inflammatory bowel disease, an ulcer or blockage in your intestines, or cirrhosis of the liver.

Before taking acarbose, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, or any type of stomach or intestinal disorder.

Take acarbose with the first bite of a main meal, unless your doctor tells you otherwise.

Your medication needs may change if you become sick or injured, if you have a serious infection, or if you have any type of surgery. Do not change your dose or stop taking acarbose without first talking to your doctor.

If you take acarbose with insulin or other diabetes medications, your blood sugar could get too low. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating.

Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Acarbose is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Precose (acarbose)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to acarbose, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). You also should not use acarbose if you have:

inflammatory bowel disease;

a blockage in your intestines;

a digestive disorder affecting your intestines;

intestinal ulcer (of your colon); or

cirrhosis of the liver.

To make sure you can safely take acarbose, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease; or

a bowel or intestinal disorder; or

a stomach disorder.

FDA pregnancy category B. Acarbose is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether acarbose passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using acarbose. How should I take Precose (acarbose)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take acarbose with the first bite of a main meal, unless your doctor tells you otherwise.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you take acarbose with insulin or other diabetes medications, your blood sugar could get too low. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating.

Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Sugar sources include orange juice, glucose gel, candy, or milk. If you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink, use an injection of glucagon. Your doctor can give you a prescription for a glucagon emergency injection kit and tell you how to give the injection. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your dose needs may also change.

Your doctor may want you to stop taking acarbose for a short time if you become ill, have a fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency.

Ask your doctor how to adjust your acarbose dose if needed. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice.

Acarbose is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

See also: Precose dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember (be sure to take it with a meal). If it has been longer than 15 minutes since you started your meal, you may still take acarbose but it may be less effective than taking it with the first bite of the meal. Do not take acarbose between meals, and do not take extra medicine to make up a missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include bloating, gas, or stomach discomfort.

In case of overdose, do not eat or drink anything containing carbohydrates for the next 4 to 6 hours.

What should I avoid while taking Precose (acarbose)? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can lower your blood sugar.

Avoid taking a digestive enzyme such as pancreatin, amylase, or lipase at the same time you take acarbose. These enzymes can make it harder for your body to absorb acarbose. Products that contain digestive enzymes include Arco-Lase, Cotazym, Donnazyme, Pancrease, Creon, and Ku-Zyme.

Precose (acarbose) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe stomach pain;

easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin; or

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

mild stomach pain, gas, bloating;

diarrhea; or

mild skin rash or itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Precose (acarbose)?

You may be more likely to have hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) if you are taking acarbose with other drugs that raise blood sugar. Drugs that can raise blood sugar include:

isoniazid (for treating tuberculosis);

digoxin (Lanoxin);

niacin (Advicor, Niaspan, Niacor, Simcor, Slo Niacin, and others), nicotine patches or gum;

diuretics (water pills);

steroids (prednisone and others);

phenothiazines (Compazine and others);

thyroid medicine (Synthroid and others);

birth control pills and other hormones;

medicines for colds or asthma

seizure medications (Dilantin and others);

diet pills, stimulants, or medicines to treat ADHD; or

heart or blood pressure medicine such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta, Amturnide), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

insulin; or

an oral diabetes medication such as glipizide (Glucotrol, Metaglip), glimepiride (Amaryl, Avandaryl, Duetact), glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase, Glucovance), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may affect your blood sugar or interact with acarbose. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Precose resources Precose Side Effects (in more detail) Precose Dosage Precose Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Precose Drug Interactions Precose Support Group 0 Reviews for Precose - Add your own review/rating Precose Prescribing Information (FDA) Precose MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Precose Monograph (AHFS DI) Precose Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Acarbose Prescribing Information (FDA) Acarbose Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Precose with other medications Diabetes, Type 2 Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about acarbose.

See also: Precose side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Glucagon


Pronunciation: GLOO-ka-gon
Generic Name: Glucagon
Brand Name: GlucaGen
Glucagon is used for:

Treating severe low blood sugar in patients with diabetes who are unable to take sugar by mouth. Glucagon also may be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Glucagon is a hormone. It works by stimulating the liver to release glucose into the blood.

Do NOT use Glucagon if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Glucagon, including lactose you have certain tumors on your adrenal gland (pheochromocytoma) or pancreas (insulinoma)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Glucagon:

Some medical conditions may interact with Glucagon. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have adrenal gland problems, heart problems, chronic low blood sugar, a certain tumor on your pancreas (glucagonoma), or diabetes if you are malnourished or have been unable to eat, or if you have been fasting for a long period of time

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Glucagon. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because the risk of their side effects, including increased risk of bleeding, may be increased by Glucagon Beta-blockers (eg, propranolol) or indomethacin because they may decrease Glucagon's effectiveness Anticholinergics (eg, tolterodine) because the risk of stomach or bowel side effects may be increased

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Glucagon may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Glucagon:

Use Glucagon as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Glucagon. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Carefully follow the instructions for use, and be sure family members, friends, and coworkers know how and when to give you Glucagon. Contact your health care provider if you have questions about use. Symptoms of low blood sugar include: sweating; dizziness; irregular heartbeat; tremor; hunger; restlessness; tingling in the hands, feet, lips, or tongue; lightheadedness; inability to concentrate; headache; drowsiness; sleep disturbances; anxiety; blurred vision; slurred speech; depressed mood; irritability; abnormal behavior; unsteady movement; personality changes; seizures; loss of consciousness; confusion. Seek medical attention immediately after use. You may need further medical evaluation. Tell the doctor or health care provider that you have received an injection of glucagon. Do not use Glucagon if it contains particles, is cloudy or discolored, or if the vial is cracked or damaged. After mixing, use immediately. Throw away any unused portion. Do not use Glucagon after the date stamped on the bottle. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Ask your health care provider how to dispose of these materials after use. Follow all local rules for disposal. If you miss a dose of Glucagon, contact your doctor right away.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Glucagon.

Important safety information: Always carry a quick source of sugar such as candy or glucose tablets to take at the first warning sign of a low blood sugar reaction. Glucagon should only be given if the patient is unconscious, is having a seizure, or is confused and not able to eat sugar by mouth. Once the patient is awake and able to swallow after giving Glucagon, give a fast-acting source of sugar (eg, regular soft drink, fruit juice) and a long-acting source of sugar (eg, crackers and cheese, meat sandwich). Make sure your relatives or close friends know that medical attention is always required if you become unconscious. Patients who are unconscious because of high blood sugar will not respond to Glucagon and should not be given candy or glucose tablets. Check blood or urine sugar levels closely, as directed by your doctor. Lab tests, including blood glucose levels, may be performed while you use Glucagon. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Glucagon while you are pregnant. It is not known if Glucagon is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Glucagon, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Glucagon:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing or swallowing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, throat, or tongue); fainting; fast or slow heartbeat; severe headache or dizziness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Glucagon side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include diarrhea; fast heartbeat; nausea; severe headache or dizziness; vomiting.

Proper storage of Glucagon:

Before mixing, store Glucagon for up to 24 months between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Do not freeze. Store in the original packaging away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. After mixing, use immediately. Do not use Glucagon after the expiration date printed on the package. Keep Glucagon out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Glucagon, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Glucagon is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Glucagon. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Glucagon resources Glucagon Side Effects (in more detail)Glucagon Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingGlucagon Drug InteractionsGlucagon Support Group0 Reviews for Glucagon - Add your own review/rating Compare Glucagon with other medications Diagnosis and InvestigationHypoglycemia
read more / Download


Humulin R (Concentrated) U-500


Generic Name: insulin regular, concentrated (U-500) (IN soo lin)
Brand Names: HumuLIN R (Concentrated)

What is concentrated insulin?

Concentrated insulin is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Concentrated insulin (U-500) is a long-acting form of insulin that is different from other forms that are made from animal insulin.

Concentrated insulin is used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes in people with significant daily insulin needs (more than 200 units per day).

Concentrated insulin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about concentrated insulin? Concentrated insulin works differently from other types of insulin, and its effects may last for up to 24 hours after a single dose. Always check your medicine when it is refilled to make sure you have received the correct brand and type prescribed by your doctor.

While you are using concentrated insulin, do not use any other type of insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth unless your doctor tells you to.

Take care to keep your blood sugar from getting too low, causing hypoglycemia. Symptoms of hypoglycemia may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, or trouble concentrating.

If your blood sugar gets too high (hyperglycemia), you may have symptoms such as increased thirst, loss of appetite, fruity breath odor, increased urination, drowsiness, dry skin, nausea, and vomiting. Call your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using concentrated insulin? Measure each dose of this medication carefully. Concentrated insulin contains 500 units of insulin in each milliliter. This is five times the concentration of other Humulin or Novolin insulins. Using too much concentrated insulin can cause severely low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which could lead to insulin shock or death.

You should not use concentrated insulin if you are in a state of hypoglycemia.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while you are using concentrated insulin. It is not known whether concentrated insulin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use concentrated insulin?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use the medication in larger amounts or for longer than recommended by your doctor. It is important to use insulin regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Concentrated insulin works differently than other types of insulin, and its effects may last for up to 24 hours after a single dose. The length of insulin effect will depend on your dose, your level of physical activity, and many other factors.

Concentrated insulin is given as an injection under the skin. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will show you how to inject your medicine at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and syringes used in giving the medicine.

Use only an insulin or tuberculin syringe to inject this medication. Do not mix or dilute concentrated insulin with any other insulin.

Use a different place on your body each time you give yourself an injection. Your care provider will show you the places on your body where you can safely inject the medication.

Use a disposable needle and syringe only one time. Throw away used needles and syringes in a puncture-proof container. If your medicine does not come with such a container, ask your pharmacist where you can get one. Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets. Your pharmacist can tell you how to properly dispose of the container.

Some needles can be used more than once, depending on needle brand and type. But a reused needle must be properly cleaned, recapped, and inspected for bending or breakage. Reusing needles also increases your risk of infection. Ask your doctor or pharmacist whether you are able to reuse your insulin needles.

Check your blood sugar levels often, especially during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your doctor may adjust your insulin dose if your levels are too high or too low.

Take care to keep your blood sugar from getting too low, causing hypoglycemia. Know the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, which may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, or trouble concentrating.

Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Sugar sources include orange juice, glucose tablets or gel, candy, or milk. If you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink, use an injection of glucagon. Your doctor can give you a prescription for a glucagon emergency injection kit and tell you how to give the injection. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

If your blood sugar gets too high (hyperglycemia), you may have symptoms such as increased thirst, loss of appetite, fruity breath odor, increased urination, drowsiness, dry skin, nausea, and vomiting. Call your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms.

If there are any changes in the brand, strength, or type of insulin you use, your dosage needs may change. Always check your medicine when it is refilled to make sure you have received the correct brand and type prescribed by your doctor. Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have diabetes, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you are a diabetic.

Insulin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, overall proper health care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Store concentrated insulin in the refrigerator, but do not allow it to freeze.

Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has any particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription. Concentrated insulin should look as clear as water.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Follow your doctor's directions if you miss a dose of insulin. To prevent missed doses, be sure to keep insulin on hand at all times, especially when you are traveling away from home.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An insulin overdose can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia include extreme weakness, blurred vision, sweating, trouble speaking, tremors, stomach pain, confusion, seizure (convulsions), or coma.

What should I avoid while using concentrated insulin? Avoid drinking alcohol while using concentrated insulin. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Concentrated insulin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your doctor if you have any pain, redness, swelling, or skin changes where the insulin was injected.

Low blood sugar is the most common side effect of concentrated insulin. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, seizure (convulsions), or death. Watch for signs of low blood sugar.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect concentrated insulin?

Do not use any other insulins or diabetes medications you take by mouth, unless your doctor tells you to.

Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may be more likely to occur if you also use certain other medications such as:

diuretics (water pills);

steroids (prednisone and others);

phenothiazines (Compazine and others);

thyroid medicine (Synthroid and others);

birth control pills and other hormones;

seizure medicines (Dilantin and others);

diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies.

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may be more likely to occur if you also use certain other medications such as:

some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs);

aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol);

sulfa drugs (Bactrim and others);

a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI); or

beta-blockers (Tenormin and others).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with concentrated insulin. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Humulin R (Concentrated) resources Humulin R (Concentrated) Side Effects (in more detail) Humulin R (Concentrated) Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Humulin R (Concentrated) Drug Interactions Humulin R (Concentrated) Support Group 0 Reviews for Humulin R (Concentrated) - Add your own review/rating Compare Humulin R (Concentrated) with other medications Diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetic Ketoacidosis Gestational Diabetes Growth Hormone Reserve Test Hyperkalemia Insulin Resistance Syndrome Nonketotic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about concentrated insulin (U-500).

See also: Humulin R (Concentrated) side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Novolin N


Generic Name: insulin isophane (IN soo lin EYE soe fane)
Brand Names: HumuLIN N, HumuLIN N Pen, NovoLIN N, NovoLIN N Innolet, NovoLIN N PenFill, Relion NovoLIN N

What is Novolin N (insulin isophane)?

Insulin isophane is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made.

Insulin isophane is used to treat diabetes.

Insulin isophane may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Novolin N (insulin isophane)?

Take care to keep your blood sugar from getting too low, causing hypoglycemia. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, or trouble concentrating. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Also be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Also watch for signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia). These symptoms include increased thirst, loss of appetite, increased urination, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, dry skin, and dry mouth. Check your blood sugar levels and ask your doctor how to adjust your insulin doses if needed.

Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another.

Insulin isophane is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Novolin N (insulin isophane)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Before using insulin isophane, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including any oral (by mouth) diabetes medications.

Insulin isophane is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Your doctor will need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether insulin isophane passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Novolin N (insulin isophane)?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Insulin isophane is given as an injection (shot) under your skin. Your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will give you specific instructions on how and where to inject this medicine. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Choose a different place in your injection skin area each time you use this medication. Do not inject into the same place two times in a row.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

Some insulin needles can be used more than once, depending on needle brand and type. But a reused needle must be properly cleaned, recapped, and inspected for bending or breakage. Reusing needles also increases your risk of infection. Ask your doctor or pharmacist whether you are able to reuse your insulin needles.

Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your insulin dose needs may also change.

Watch for signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia). These symptoms include increased thirst, loss of appetite, increased urination, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, dry skin, and dry mouth. Check your blood sugar levels and ask your doctor how to adjust your insulin doses if needed.

Ask your doctor how to adjust your insulin isophane dose if needed. Do not change your dose without first talking to your doctor. Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have diabetes, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you are diabetic. Storing unopened vials, cartridges, injection pens: Keep in the carton and store in a refrigerator, protected from light. Throw away any insulin not used before the expiration date on the medicine label. Unopened vials may also be stored at room temperature for up to 28 days, away from heat and bright light. Throw away any insulin not used within 28 days. Storing after your first use: Keep the "in-use" vials, cartridges, or prefilled syringes at room temperature and use prior to the expiration date. Keep the in-use injection pen at room temperature and use it within 14 days. Do not refrigerate.

Do not freeze insulin isophane, and throw away the medication if it has become frozen.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since insulin isophane is used before meals or snacks, you may not be on a timed dosing schedule. Whenever you use insulin isophane, be sure to eat a meal or snack within 30 to 60 minutes. Do not use extra insulin isophane to make up a missed dose.

It is important to keep insulin isophane on hand at all times. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An insulin overdose can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia include extreme weakness, blurred vision, sweating, trouble speaking, tremors, stomach pain, confusion, seizure (convulsions), or coma.

What should I avoid while using Novolin N (insulin isophane)? Do not change the brand of insulin isophane or syringe you are using without first talking to your doctor or pharmacist. Avoid drinking alcohol. Your blood sugar may become dangerously low if you drink alcohol while using insulin isophane. Novolin N (insulin isophane) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out.

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin isophane. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar.

Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin isophane.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Novolin N (insulin isophane)?

Using certain medicines can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you use any of the following:

albuterol (Proventil, Ventolin);

clonidine (Catapres);

reserpine;

guanethidine (Ismelin); or

beta-blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), timolol (Blocadren), and others.

There are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of insulin isophane on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. More Novolin N resources Novolin N Side Effects (in more detail) Novolin N Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Novolin N Drug Interactions Novolin N Support Group 1 Review for Novolin N - Add your own review/rating Novolin N Prescribing Information (FDA) Novolin N InnoLets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humulin N Pens MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humulin N Prescribing Information (FDA) Humulin N Consumer Overview Compare Novolin N with other medications Diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Gestational Diabetes Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about insulin isophane.

See also: Novolin N side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Novolin N Innolet


Generic Name: insulin isophane (IN soo lin EYE soe fane)
Brand Names: HumuLIN N, HumuLIN N Pen, NovoLIN N, NovoLIN N Innolet, NovoLIN N PenFill, Relion NovoLIN N

What is Novolin N Innolet (insulin isophane)?

Insulin isophane is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made.

Insulin isophane is used to treat diabetes.

Insulin isophane may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Novolin N Innolet (insulin isophane)?

Take care to keep your blood sugar from getting too low, causing hypoglycemia. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, or trouble concentrating. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Also be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Also watch for signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia). These symptoms include increased thirst, loss of appetite, increased urination, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, dry skin, and dry mouth. Check your blood sugar levels and ask your doctor how to adjust your insulin doses if needed.

Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another.

Insulin isophane is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Novolin N Innolet (insulin isophane)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Before using insulin isophane, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including any oral (by mouth) diabetes medications.

Insulin isophane is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Your doctor will need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether insulin isophane passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Novolin N Innolet (insulin isophane)?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Insulin isophane is given as an injection (shot) under your skin. Your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will give you specific instructions on how and where to inject this medicine. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Choose a different place in your injection skin area each time you use this medication. Do not inject into the same place two times in a row.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

Some insulin needles can be used more than once, depending on needle brand and type. But a reused needle must be properly cleaned, recapped, and inspected for bending or breakage. Reusing needles also increases your risk of infection. Ask your doctor or pharmacist whether you are able to reuse your insulin needles.

Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your insulin dose needs may also change.

Watch for signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia). These symptoms include increased thirst, loss of appetite, increased urination, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, dry skin, and dry mouth. Check your blood sugar levels and ask your doctor how to adjust your insulin doses if needed.

Ask your doctor how to adjust your insulin isophane dose if needed. Do not change your dose without first talking to your doctor. Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have diabetes, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you are diabetic. Storing unopened vials, cartridges, injection pens: Keep in the carton and store in a refrigerator, protected from light. Throw away any insulin not used before the expiration date on the medicine label. Unopened vials may also be stored at room temperature for up to 28 days, away from heat and bright light. Throw away any insulin not used within 28 days. Storing after your first use: Keep the "in-use" vials, cartridges, or prefilled syringes at room temperature and use prior to the expiration date. Keep the in-use injection pen at room temperature and use it within 14 days. Do not refrigerate.

Do not freeze insulin isophane, and throw away the medication if it has become frozen.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since insulin isophane is used before meals or snacks, you may not be on a timed dosing schedule. Whenever you use insulin isophane, be sure to eat a meal or snack within 30 to 60 minutes. Do not use extra insulin isophane to make up a missed dose.

It is important to keep insulin isophane on hand at all times. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An insulin overdose can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia include extreme weakness, blurred vision, sweating, trouble speaking, tremors, stomach pain, confusion, seizure (convulsions), or coma.

What should I avoid while using Novolin N Innolet (insulin isophane)? Do not change the brand of insulin isophane or syringe you are using without first talking to your doctor or pharmacist. Avoid drinking alcohol. Your blood sugar may become dangerously low if you drink alcohol while using insulin isophane. Novolin N Innolet (insulin isophane) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out.

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin isophane. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar.

Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin isophane.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Novolin N Innolet (insulin isophane)?

Using certain medicines can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you use any of the following:

albuterol (Proventil, Ventolin);

clonidine (Catapres);

reserpine;

guanethidine (Ismelin); or

beta-blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), timolol (Blocadren), and others.

There are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of insulin isophane on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. More Novolin N Innolet resources Novolin N Innolet Side Effects (in more detail) Novolin N Innolet Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Novolin N Innolet Drug Interactions Novolin N Innolet Support Group 0 Reviews for Novolin N Innolet - Add your own review/rating Insulin Isophane InnoLets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humulin N Prescribing Information (FDA) Humulin N Consumer Overview Humulin N Pens MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Novolin N Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Novolin N Innolet with other medications Diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Gestational Diabetes Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about insulin isophane.

See also: Novolin N Innolet side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Tradjenta


Generic Name: linagliptin (LIN a GLIP tin)
Brand Names: Tradjenta

What is linagliptin?

Linagliptin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. It works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating.

Linagliptin is used together with diet and exercise to treat type 2 diabetes. Linagliptin is not for treating type 1 diabetes.

Linagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about linagliptin? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to linagliptin or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

Before you take linagliptin, tell your doctor if you have high cholesterol or triglycerides, or a history of pancreatitis.

Stop taking linagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, or fast heart rate.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Linagliptin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking linagliptin? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to linagliptin, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

To make sure you can safely take linagliptin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

high cholesterol or triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood); or

a history of pancreatitis.

FDA pregnancy category B. Linagliptin is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether linagliptin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not give this medication to anyone under 18 years old without medical advice. How should I take linagliptin?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Linagliptin is usually taken once per day. You may take this medicine with or without food. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating.

Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Sugar sources include orange juice, glucose gel, candy, or milk. If you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink, use an injection of glucagon. Your doctor can give you a prescription for a glucagon emergency injection kit and tell you how to give the injection.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your dose needs may also change.

Your doctor may want you to stop taking linagliptin for a short time if you become ill, have a fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Ask your doctor how to adjust your linagliptin dose if needed. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice.

Linagliptin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Tradjenta dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

You may have signs of low blood sugar, such as extreme weakness, blurred vision, sweating, trouble speaking, tremors, stomach pain, confusion, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking linagliptin?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Linagliptin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking linagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

pancreatitis - severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate; or

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash.

Less serious side effects may include:

runny or stuffy nose, sore throat;

cough;

weight gain;

muscle or joint pain;

headache; or

back pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect linagliptin?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

bosentan (Tracleer);

dexamethasone (Cortastat, Dexasone, Solurex, DexPak);

ketoconazole (Nizoral);

quinidine (Quin-G);

rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate), or rifapentine (Priftin);

St. John's wort;

verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan);

a barbiturate such as butabarbital (Butisol), secobarbital (Seconal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), or phenobarbital (Solfoton);

HIV/AIDS medication such as efavirenz (Sustiva, Atripla), etravirine (Intelence), nelfinavir (Viracept), nevirapine (Viramune), ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra), or saquinavir (Invirase);

medicines to treat narcolepsy, such as armodafanil (Nuvigil) or modafanil (Progivil);

medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, such as cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune) or tacrolimus (Prograf); or

seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), felbamate (Felbatol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), phenytoin (Dilantin), or primidone (Mysoline).

Although linagliptin is not as likely to cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) as some other oral diabetes medications, tell your doctor if you are taking any other drugs that can potentially lower blood sugar, such as:

probenecid (Benemid);

nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs);

aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol);

sulfa drugs (Bactrim and others);

a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI);

another oral diabetes medication such as glipizide (Glucotrol, Metaglip), glimepiride (Amaryl, Avandaryl, Duetact), glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase, Glucovance), and others.

beta-blockers (Tenormin and others); or

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with linagliptin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Tradjenta resources Tradjenta Side Effects (in more detail) Tradjenta Dosage Tradjenta Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Tradjenta Drug Interactions Tradjenta Support Group 4 Reviews for Tradjenta - Add your own review/rating Tradjenta Prescribing Information (FDA) Tradjenta Consumer Overview Tradjenta Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Tradjenta MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Linagliptin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Tradjenta with other medications Diabetes, Type 2 Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about linagliptin.

See also: Tradjenta side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


linagliptin


Generic Name: linagliptin (LIN a GLIP tin)
Brand Names: Tradjenta

What is linagliptin?

Linagliptin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. It works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating.

Linagliptin is used together with diet and exercise to treat type 2 diabetes. Linagliptin is not for treating type 1 diabetes.

Linagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about linagliptin? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to linagliptin or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

Before you take linagliptin, tell your doctor if you have high cholesterol or triglycerides, or a history of pancreatitis.

Stop taking linagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, or fast heart rate.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Linagliptin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking linagliptin? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to linagliptin, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

To make sure you can safely take linagliptin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

high cholesterol or triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood); or

a history of pancreatitis.

FDA pregnancy category B. Linagliptin is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether linagliptin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not give this medication to anyone under 18 years old without medical advice. How should I take linagliptin?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Linagliptin is usually taken once per day. You may take this medicine with or without food. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating.

Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Sugar sources include orange juice, glucose gel, candy, or milk. If you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink, use an injection of glucagon. Your doctor can give you a prescription for a glucagon emergency injection kit and tell you how to give the injection.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your dose needs may also change.

Your doctor may want you to stop taking linagliptin for a short time if you become ill, have a fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Ask your doctor how to adjust your linagliptin dose if needed. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice.

Linagliptin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Linagliptin dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

You may have signs of low blood sugar, such as extreme weakness, blurred vision, sweating, trouble speaking, tremors, stomach pain, confusion, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking linagliptin?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Linagliptin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking linagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

pancreatitis - severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate; or

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash.

Less serious side effects may include:

runny or stuffy nose, sore throat;

cough;

weight gain;

muscle or joint pain;

headache; or

back pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Linagliptin Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Mellitus Type II:

5 mg orally once daily.

What other drugs will affect linagliptin?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

bosentan (Tracleer);

dexamethasone (Cortastat, Dexasone, Solurex, DexPak);

ketoconazole (Nizoral);

quinidine (Quin-G);

rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate), or rifapentine (Priftin);

St. John's wort;

verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan);

a barbiturate such as butabarbital (Butisol), secobarbital (Seconal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), or phenobarbital (Solfoton);

HIV/AIDS medication such as efavirenz (Sustiva, Atripla), etravirine (Intelence), nelfinavir (Viracept), nevirapine (Viramune), ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra), or saquinavir (Invirase);

medicines to treat narcolepsy, such as armodafanil (Nuvigil) or modafanil (Progivil);

medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, such as cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune) or tacrolimus (Prograf); or

seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), felbamate (Felbatol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), phenytoin (Dilantin), or primidone (Mysoline).

Although linagliptin is not as likely to cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) as some other oral diabetes medications, tell your doctor if you are taking any other drugs that can potentially lower blood sugar, such as:

probenecid (Benemid);

nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs);

aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol);

sulfa drugs (Bactrim and others);

a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI);

another oral diabetes medication such as glipizide (Glucotrol, Metaglip), glimepiride (Amaryl, Avandaryl, Duetact), glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase, Glucovance), and others.

beta-blockers (Tenormin and others); or

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with linagliptin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More linagliptin resources Linagliptin Side Effects (in more detail) Linagliptin Dosage Linagliptin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Linagliptin Drug Interactions Linagliptin Support Group 5 Reviews for Linagliptin - Add your own review/rating linagliptin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Linagliptin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Linagliptin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tradjenta Prescribing Information (FDA) Tradjenta Consumer Overview Compare linagliptin with other medications Diabetes, Type 2 Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about linagliptin.

See also: linagliptin side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen


Generic Name: insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine (IN soo lin LISS pro and IN soo lin LISS pro PRO ta meen)
Brand Names: HumaLOG Mix 50/50, HumaLOG Mix 50/50 KwikPen, HumaLOG Mix 50/50 Pen, HumaLOG Mix 75/25, HumaLOG Mix 75/25 KwikPen, HumaLOG Mix 75/25 Pen

What is Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen (insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine)?

Insulin is a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin lispro is a fast-acting form of insulin. Insulin lispro protamine is an intermediate-acting form of insulin.

Insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine is used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults. It is usually given together with another long-acting insulin.

Insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen (insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine)? Use this medication within 15 minutes before eating a meal.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia) may include increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, and weight loss. Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need to adjust your insulin dose.

Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen (insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

To make sure you can safely use insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including any oral (by mouth) diabetes medications.

Insulin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen (insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine)?

Insulin is injected under the skin. You will be shown how to use injections at home. Do not self inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Use this medication within 15 minutes before eating a meal.

Insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine should appear cloudy after mixing. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has any particles in it. Return the medication to your pharmacy for a new supply.

Use a different place on your injection skin area each time you give the injection. Your care provider will show you the best places on your body to inject the medication. Do not inject into the same place two times in a row.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating.

Also watch for signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia). These symptoms include increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, and weight loss.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your dose needs may also change.

Ask your doctor how to adjust your insulin dose if needed. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice. Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you have diabetes. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you are diabetic. Storing unopened vials or injection pens: Keep in the carton and store in a refrigerator, protected from light. Throw away any insulin not used before the expiration date on the medicine label. Unopened vials may also be stored at room temperature for up to 28 days, away from heat and bright light. Throw away any insulin not used within 28 days. Unopened injection pens may also be stored at room temperature for up to 10 days, away from heat and bright light. Throw away any insulin not used within 10 days. Storing after your first use: You may keep "in-use" vials in the refrigerator, protected from light. Use within 28 days. Do not refrigerate an in-use injection pen. Keep it at room temperature and use within 10 days.

Do not freeze insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine, and throw away the medication if it has become frozen.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since this medication is used before meals, you may not be on a timed dosing schedule. Whenever you use insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine, be sure to eat a meal within 15 minutes. Do not use extra insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine to make up a missed dose.

Keep insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine on hand at all times. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An insulin overdose can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia include extreme weakness, confusion, tremors, sweating, fast heart rate, trouble speaking, nausea, vomiting, rapid breathing, fainting, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while using Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen (insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine)? Do not change the brand of insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine or syringe you are using without first talking to your doctor or pharmacist. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can lower your blood sugar. Do not expose insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine to high heat. Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen (insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out.

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar.

Insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine can also cause hypokalemia (low potassium levels in the blood). Call your doctor at once if you have symptoms such as confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling.

Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen (insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine)?

Using certain medicines can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you use any of the following:

albuterol (Proventil, Ventolin);

clonidine (Catapres);

reserpine; or

beta-blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Dutoprol, Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others.

There are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over the counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. More Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen resources Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen Side Effects (in more detail) Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen Drug Interactions Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen Support Group 0 Reviews for Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen - Add your own review/rating HumaLog Mix 50/50 Vials MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humalog Mix 50/50 Pens MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humalog Mix 50/50 Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Humalog Mix 75/25 Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen with other medications Diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about insulin lispro and insulin lispro protamine.

See also: Humalog Mix 75/25 Pen side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


tolbutamide


Generic Name: tolbutamide (tole BUE ta mide)
Brand names: Orinase, Orinase Diagnostic, Tol-Tab

What is tolbutamide?

Tolbutamide is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. This medication helps your pancreas produce insulin.

Tolbutamide is used together with diet and exercise to treat type 2 diabetes. Other diabetes medicines are sometimes used in combination with tolbutamide if needed.

Tolbutamide should not be used by itself to treat type 1 diabetes.

Tolbutamide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about tolbutamide? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to tolbutamide, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. Call your doctor for treatment with insulin.

Before taking tolbutamide, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, a disorder of your pituitary or adrenal glands, an enzyme deficiency called G6PD, a history of heart disease, or if you are malnourished.

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

Also watch for signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia). These symptoms include increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, and weight loss. Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need to adjust your tolbutamide dose.

Tolbutamide is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

What should I discuss with my doctor before taking tolbutamide? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to tolbutamide, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. Call your doctor for treatment with insulin.

To make sure you can safely take tolbutamide, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease; kidney disease;

a disorder of your pituitary or adrenal glands;

an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD);

a history of heart disease; or

if you are malnourished.

Certain oral diabetes medications may increase your risk of serious heart problems. However, not treating your diabetes can damage your heart and other organs. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of treating your diabetes with tolbutamide. FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether tolbutamide will harm an unborn baby. Similar diabetes medications have caused severe hypoglycemia in newborn babies whose mothers had used the medication near the time of delivery. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether tolbutamide passes into breast milk or if it could be harmful to a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking tolbutamide. How should I take tolbutamide?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Follow your doctor's instructions about how often to take tolbutamide, and whether or not you should take it with food.

Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating.

Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Sugar sources include orange juice, glucose gel, candy, or milk. If you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink, use an injection of glucagon. Your doctor can give you a prescription for a glucagon emergency injection kit and tell you how to give the injection.

Also watch for signs of blood sugar that is too high (hyperglycemia). These symptoms include increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, and weight loss.

Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, or skip meals. These things can affect your glucose levels and your dose needs may also change.

Your doctor may want you to stop taking tolbutamide for a short time if you become ill, have a fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency.

Ask your doctor how to adjust your tolbutamide dose if needed. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice.

Tolbutamide is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Use tolbutamide regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

See also: Tolbutamide dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Be sure to take the medication with food if your doctor instructs you to. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of tolbutamide can cause severe hypoglycemia.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia include extreme weakness, blurred vision, sweating, trouble speaking, tremors, stomach pain, confusion, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking tolbutamide? Avoid drinking alcohol. It lowers blood sugar and may interfere with your diabetes treatment. Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Tolbutamide can make you sunburn more easily. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors. Tolbutamide side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of tolbutamide. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar.

Stop taking tolbutamide and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, confusion; or

memory problems, loss of appetite, feeling unsteady, or hallucinations.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, heartburn, full feeling;

headache;

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth; or

skin rash, redness, or itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Tolbutamide Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Mellitus Type II:

Initial dose: 1 to 2 grams orally daily
Maintenance dose: 0.25 to 3 grams orally daily

What other drugs will affect tolbutamide?

You may be more likely to have hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) if you take tolbutamide with other drugs that can raise blood sugar, such as:

isoniazid;

diuretics (water pills);

steroids (prednisone and others);

heart or blood pressure medication (Cartia, Cardizem, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan, and others);

niacin (Advicor, Niaspan, Niacor, Simcor, Slo-Niacin, and others);

phenothiazines (Compazine and others);

thyroid medicine (Synthroid and others);

birth control pills and other hormones;

seizure medicines (Dilantin and others);

diet pills or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies; and

heart or blood pressure medication such as diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others.

You may be more likely to have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if you take tolbutamide with other drugs that can lower blood sugar, such as:

exenatide (Byetta);

probenecid (Benemid);

some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs);

aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol);

a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven, and others);

heart or blood pressure medication (Accupril, Altace, Lotensin, Prinivil, Vasotec, Zestril, and others);

sulfa drugs (Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, SMX-TMP, and others);

a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI); or

other oral diabetes medications, especially acarbose (Precose), metformin (Glucophage), miglitol (Glyset), pioglitazone (Actos), or rosiglitazone (Avandia).

These lists are not complete and there are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of tolbutamide on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More tolbutamide resources Tolbutamide Side Effects (in more detail) Tolbutamide Dosage Tolbutamide Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Tolbutamide Drug Interactions Tolbutamide Support Group 0 Reviews for Tolbutamide - Add your own review/rating tolbutamide Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Tolbutamide Prescribing Information (FDA) Tolbutamide Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Tolbutamide Monograph (AHFS DI) Tolbutamide MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare tolbutamide with other medications Diabetes, Type 2 Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about tolbutamide.

See also: tolbutamide side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Related Search:

Search


 

Best ED Pills

 

Erectile Dysfunction

 

RX Pharmacy Drugs List - Buy Pills Online

RSS | Site Map | Map | PageMap

Copyright © Online Pharmacy Drug Store. All rights reserved.