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Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction) Medications


Definition of Heart Attack: A heart attack (myocardial infarction) occurs when an area of heart muscle dies or is permanently damaged because of an inadequate supply of oxygen to that area.

Drugs associated with Heart Attack

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Heart Attack. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

See sub-topics

Topics under Heart Attack Myocardial Infarction, Prophylaxis (39 drugs) Post MI Syndrome (0 drugs) Learn more about Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction)

Micromedex Care Notes:

Acute Coronary Syndromes Myocardial Infarction

Medical Encyclopedia:

Anesthesia Heart attack

Harvard Health Guide:

Symptoms and treatment for Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction)
Drug List: Abbokinase Aceon Activase Altace Arthritis-Pain Arthritis-Pain-Formula Ascriptin Ascriptin-Maximum-Strength Aspergum-Gum Aspir-81 Aspir-Low Aspirin-Buffered Aspirin-Lite-Coat Aspirin-Low-Dose Aspiritab Bayer Bayer-Plus Bayer-Low-Adult-Strength-Controlled-Release-Tablets Bayer-Aspirin-With-Calcium Blocadren Buffered-Aspirin Bufferin Bufferin-Arthritis-Strength Bufferin-Extra-Strength Chloromag Coumadin Easprin Ecotrin-Delayed-Release-Tablets Ecotrin-Adult-Low-Strength Ecotrin-Maximum-Strength Empirin Fasprin Fragmin Genacote Halfprin Heparin-Sodium Inderal Integrilin Jantoven Kinlytic Litecoat-Aspirin Lopressor Lovenox Mag-64 Mag-Sr-Sustained-Release-Tablets Mag-Delay Mavik Medi-Seltzer-Effervescent-Tablets Metoprolol-Succinate-Er Minitran-Patch Nitrek-Transdermal Nitro-Td-Patch-A-Transdermal Nitro-Bid-Ointment Nitro-Dur-Patch Nitro-Time-Controlled-Release-Capsules Nitrocot Nitrogard Nitrol-Appli-Kit-Topical Nitrolingual-Pumpspray-Spray Nitromist Nitroquick Nitrostat Norwich-Aspirin Plavix Prinivil Retavase Retavase-Half-Kit Slow-Mag-Sustained-Release-Tablets St-Joseph-Aspirin-Adult-Ec St-Joseph-Aspirin-Adult-Chewable St-Joseph-81-Mg-Adult-Chewable-Tablets Stanback-Analgesic Streptase Tenormin Tnkase Transderm-Nitro Tri-Buffered-Aspirin Univasc Ysp-Aspirin Zestril Zorprin-Controlled-Release-Tablets
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Nitro TD Patch-A transdermal


Generic Name: nitroglycerin (transdermal) (NYE troe GLIS er in)
Brand Names: Minitran, Nitrek, Nitro TD Patch-A, Nitro-Dur

What is Nitro TD Patch-A (nitroglycerin (transdermal))?

Nitroglycerin is in a group of drugs called nitrates. Nitroglycerin dilates (widens) blood vessels, making it easier for blood to flow through them and easier for the heart to pump.

Nitroglycerin transdermal is used to prevent attacks of chest pain (angina).

Nitroglycerin transdermal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Nitro TD Patch-A (nitroglycerin (transdermal))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to nitroglycerin, isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur), or isosorbide dinitrate (BiDil, Isordil).

Before using nitroglycerin transdermal, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure, low blood pressure, glaucoma, anemia, or a history of heart attack, stroke, or head injury.

Do not use this medication to treat an angina attack that has already begun. It will not work fast enough.

Nitroglycerin transdermal can cause severe headaches, especially when you first start using it. Do not stop using the skin patches, and ask your doctor before using any headache pain medication.

Nitroglycerin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as worsening chest pain, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, vomiting, sweating, blurred vision and dry mouth, or fainting. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of nitroglycerin. The nitroglycerin transdermal patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the patch before undergoing such a test. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Nitro TD Patch-A (nitroglycerin (transdermal))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to nitroglycerin, isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur), or isosorbide dinitrate (BiDil, Isordil). Do not use nitroglycerin transdermal if you are allergic to any type of adhesive on a bandage or other transdermal skin patch.

To make sure you can safely use nitroglycerin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

congestive heart failure;

a history of heart attack, stroke, or head injury;

low blood pressure;

glaucoma; or

anemia (lack of red blood cells).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether nitroglycerin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether nitroglycerin transdermal passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Nitro TD Patch-A (nitroglycerin (transdermal))?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Do not use nitroglycerin transdermal to treat an angina attack that has already begun. It will not work fast enough. Your doctor may prescribe an oral form of nitroglycerin (tablet, capsule, spray) to treat an angina attack. Talk with your doctor if any of your medications do not seem to work as well in treating or preventing angina attacks.

The nitroglycerin transdermal skin patch is usually worn for 12 to 14 hours and then removed. A new patch is put on after a "patch-free" period of 10 to 12 hours. Your doctor may want you to wear the patch for longer or shorter periods of time. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully.

Apply the skin patch to a clean, dry, hairless area of the body, below your neck and above your knees or elbows. To remove any hair from these skin areas, clip the hair short but do not shave it.

Press the patch onto the skin and press it down firmly with your fingers. Make sure it is well sealed around the edges.

Wash your hands after applying a nitroglycerin transdermal skin patch.

If the patch falls off, try sticking it back on. If you replace the patch with a new one, leave it on only for the rest of your wearing time. Do not change your patch removal schedule.

After removing a skin patch fold it in half, sticky side in, and throw it away in a place where children or pets cannot get to it. Keep both used and unused nitroglycerin skin patches out of the reach of children or pets. Do not stop using this medication without your doctor's advice, even if you feel better. You may have increased angina attacks if you stop using the medication suddenly.

If you need to have any type of surgery or dental work, tell the surgeon or dentist ahead of time that you are using nitroglycerin transdermal.

The nitroglycerin transdermal patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the patch before undergoing such a test.

Tell any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you that you are using nitroglycerin transdermal. If you need emergency heart resuscitation, your family or caregivers should tell emergency medical personnel if you are wearing a nitroglycerin skin patch. The patch should be removed before any electrical equipment (such as a defribrillator) is used on you.

Store at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Keep each skin patch in its sealed pouch until you are ready to use it. What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply a patch as soon as you remember, and keep it on for the rest of your wearing time without changing your patch removal schedule. If you miss a dose and it is almost time to apply your next patch, wait until then to apply the patch and skip the missed dose.

Do not use extra patches to make up a missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include a severe throbbing headache, confusion, fever, fast or pounding heartbeats, dizziness, vision problems, nausea, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, trouble breathing, cold or clammy skin, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or blue-colored skin, lips, or nails.

What should I avoid while using Nitro TD Patch-A (nitroglycerin (transdermal))?

Avoid using nitroglycerin transdermal on irritated or broken skin.

Nitroglycerin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of nitroglycerin. Nitro TD Patch-A (nitroglycerin (transdermal)) side effects

Nitroglycerin transdermal can cause severe headaches, especially when you first start using it. These headaches may gradually become less severe as you continue to use nitroglycerin transdermal. Do not stop using the medication. Ask your doctor before using any headache pain medication.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

worsening chest pain, slow heart rate;

feeling like you might pass out;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

fast or pounding heartbeats; or

blurred vision and dry mouth.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild skin rash or itching;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;

nausea, vomiting, upset stomach; or

feeling nervous, weak, or dizzy.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Nitro TD Patch-A (nitroglycerin (transdermal))?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

blood pressure medication or diuretics (water pills);

cold or allergy medicines, diet pills, or over-the-counter pain medicine such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve);

an erectile dysfunction medication such as sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), or vardenafil (Levitra);

migraine headache medication such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Cafergot, Migergot), dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal), or methylergonovine (Methergine);

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Dutoprol, Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others; or

heart or blood pressure medicine such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with nitroglycerin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Nitro TD Patch-A resources Nitro TD Patch-A Side Effects (in more detail) Nitro TD Patch-A Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Nitro TD Patch-A Drug Interactions Nitro TD Patch-A Support Group 0 Reviews for Nitro TD-A - Add your own review/rating Compare Nitro TD Patch-A with other medications Angina Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis Heart Attack Heart Failure High Blood Pressure Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about nitroglycerin transdermal.

See also: Nitro TD-A side effects (in more detail)


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Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules


Pronunciation: NYE-troe-GLIS-er-in
Generic Name: Nitroglycerin
Brand Name: Nitro-Time
Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules are used for:

Preventing chronic chest pain caused by heart disease. It also may be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules are a nitrate. It works by relaxing (widening) blood vessels. Chest pain occurs when the heart needs more oxygen than it can get. Relaxing blood vessels allows blood to flow more easily. This reduces the heart's workload and the amount of oxygen needed by the heart.

Do NOT use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules you have increased pressure in or severe injury to the head you have severe anemia you are taking a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (eg, sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules:

Some medical conditions may interact with Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you drink alcoholic beverages if you have a history of other heart problems (eg, heart failure, enlarged heart, heart attack), overactive thyroid, stroke or other bleeding in the brain, or recent head injury if you have anemia, low blood pressure, dehydration, or low blood volume

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Beta-blockers (eg, propranolol), calcium channel blockers (eg, diltiazem), diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide), medicines for high blood pressure, phenothiazines (eg, thioridazine), or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (eg, sildenafil) because the risk of low blood pressure and dizziness on standing may be increased Salicylates (eg, aspirin) because they may increase the risk of Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules's side effects Alteplase because the effectiveness of Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules may be decreased

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules:

Use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules by mouth with or without food. Swallow Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules lasts for about 12 hours. Do not take more of Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules than prescribed. It is important to have a "nitrate-free" period of time for 10 to 12 hours each day for Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules to continue to work well and to decrease the risk of physical dependence. If you miss a dose of Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules.

Important safety information: Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or blurred vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Check with your doctor before you drink alcohol while you are taking Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. Drinking alcohol may increase the risk of low blood pressure with Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. Sit down while taking Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules to avoid falling caused by lightheadedness or dizziness. Contact your doctor right away if you develop slow heartbeat or new or worsening chest pain after you take Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules may give you daily headaches. This should become less noticeable with time. Other dosage forms of Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules (eg, sublingual, or under the tongue, tablets) may not work as well while you are taking Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules takes about 1 to 2 hours to start working and should not be used for a sudden chest pain attack. Lab tests, including heart function, blood pressure, and blood electrolyte levels, may be performed while you use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules are not recommended for use in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules while you are pregnant. It is not known if Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules are found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

When used for long periods of time without a break, Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules may not work as well. This is known as TOLERANCE. Increasing the dose is not effective in managing tolerance to Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. Tolerance to other nitrates or nitrites may also occur. Be sure to have a "nitrate-free" period of time each day to help prevent this tolerance. Talk with your doctor if Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules stops working well. Do not take more than prescribed.

Some people who use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules for a long time without a break may develop a physical need to continue taking it. This is known as physical DEPENDENCE. If you use Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules without a break and then suddenly stop using it, you may get WITHDRAWAL symptoms. These may include chest pain, heart attack, or possibly sudden death. Be sure to have a "nitrate-free" period of time each day; this may help prevent dependence and withdrawal problems.

Possible side effects of Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting when sitting up or standing; flushing of face and neck; headache; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blurred vision; dry mouth; fainting; flushing; heavy sweating; irregular heartbeat; new or worsening chest pain; pale skin; pounding in the chest; rapid heartbeat; severe dizziness or headache; severe or persistent nausea or vomiting; shortness of breath; slow heartbeat; swelling of the hands, ankles, or feet; unusual weakness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Nitro-Time side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include cold or blue skin; confusion; diarrhea; excessive sweating; fainting; fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat; persistent throbbing headache; seizures; trouble breathing; vision problems.

Proper storage of Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules:

Store Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules are to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Nitro-Time resources Nitro-Time Side Effects (in more detail) Nitro-Time Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Nitro-Time Drug Interactions Nitro-Time Support Group 0 Reviews for Nitro-Time - Add your own review/rating Compare Nitro-Time with other medications Angina Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis Heart Attack Heart Failure High Blood Pressure
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Minitran


Generic Name: nitroglycerin (Transdermal route)

nye-troe-GLIS-er-in

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Minitran Nitrek Nitro-Bid Nitro-Dur

In Canada

Nitrodur 0.2 Nitro-Dur 0.2 Nitro-Dur 0.3 Nitrodur 0.4 Nitro-Dur 0.4 Nitrodur 0.6 Nitro-Dur 0.6 Nitro-Dur 0.8 Transderm-Nitro Trinipatch 0.2 Trinipatch 0.4 Trinipatch 0.6

Available Dosage Forms:

Ointment Patch, Extended Release

Therapeutic Class: Antianginal

Chemical Class: Nitrate

Uses For Minitran

Nitroglycerin transdermal is used to prevent angina (chest pain) caused by coronary artery disease. It does not work fast enough to relieve the pain of an angina attack that has already started.

Nitroglycerin transdermal belongs to the group of medicines called nitrates. It works by relaxing the blood vessels and increasing the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart while reducing its work load. When used regularly on a long-term basis, this helps prevent angina attacks from occurring.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Minitran

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of nitroglycerin transdermal in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of nitroglycerin transdermal in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving nitroglycerin transdermal.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Sildenafil Tadalafil Vardenafil

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Alteplase, Recombinant

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Acetylcysteine Aspirin Dihydroergotamine Pancuronium Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Cardioversion (medical heart procedure) or Defibrillation (medical heart procedure)—Use with caution. The patch should be removed before having these procedures. Congestive heart failure or Heart attack, recent or Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a heart disease) or Hypotension (low blood pressure) or Hypovolemia (low amount of blood)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of nitroglycerin

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain nitroglycerin. It may not be specific to Minitran. Please read with care.

Use this medicine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not use more of it, do not use it more often, and do not use it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. It will only work if applied correctly.

This form of nitrate is used to reduce the number of angina attacks over a long time. It will not relieve an attack that has already started because it works too slowly. The ointment and patch forms release medicine gradually to provide an effect for 7 to 10 hours. Check with your doctor if you also need a fast-acting medicine to relieve the pain of an angina attack.

You should use this medicine first thing in the morning and follow the same schedule each day. This medicine works best if you have a "drug-free" period of time every day when you do not use it. Your doctor will schedule your doses during the day to allow for a drug-free time. Follow the schedule of dosing carefully so the medicine will work properly.

This medicine comes with a patient information leaflet. Read and follow the instructions in the leaflet carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

For patients using the ointment:

Before applying a new dose of ointment, remove any ointment remaining on the skin from a previous dose. This will allow the fresh ointment to release the nitroglycerin properly. This medicine comes with papers to help measure the dose. Use them to measure the length of ointment squeezed from the tube and to apply the ointment to the skin. Do not rub or massage the ointment into the skin. Spread it in a thin, even layer, and cover an area of skin that is the same size each time it is applied. Apply the ointment to skin with little or no hair that is free of scars, cuts, or irritation. Apply each dose of ointment to a different area of skin to prevent irritation. If your doctor has ordered an airtight covering or dressing (such as plastic kitchen wrap) be placed over this medicine, make sure you know how to apply it. Airtight dressings will increase the amount of medicine absorbed through the skin and may cause more side effects. Use them only as directed and check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

For patients using the patch system:

Wash your hands with soap and water before and after applying a patch. Do not touch your eyes until after you have washed your hands. Do not try to trim or cut the adhesive patch to adjust the dosage. Check with your doctor if you think the medicine is not working as it should. Apply the patch to a clean, dry skin area with little or no hair that is free of scars, cuts, or irritation. Always remove a previous patch before applying a new one. Apply a new patch if the first one becomes loose or falls off. Apply each patch to a different area to prevent skin irritation. Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For angina prevention: For transdermal dosage form (ointment): Adults—At first, 7.5 milligrams (mg), one-half inch of ointment, two times a day. Apply the first dose in the morning right after you wake up, and the second dose 6 hours later. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For transdermal dosage form (skin patch): Adults—Apply one patch once a day in the morning. Leave the patch in place for a total of 12 to 14 hours. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

If you forget to wear or change a patch, put one on as soon as you can. If it is almost time to put on your next patch, wait until then to apply a new patch and skip the one you missed. Do not apply extra patches to make up for a missed dose.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

After removing a used patch, fold it in half with the sticky sides together. Make sure to dispose of it out of the reach of children and pets.

Precautions While Using Minitran

If you will be taking this medicine for a long time, it is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Do not take sildenafil (Viagra®), tadalafil (Cialis®), or vardenafil (Levitra®) while you are using this medicine. Using these medicines together may cause blurred vision, dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. If you are taking these medicines and you experience an angina attack, you must go to the hospital right away.

This medicine may cause headaches. These headaches are a sign that the medicine is working. Do not stop using the medicine or change the time you use it in order to avoid the headaches. If you have severe pain, talk with your doctor.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or faintness may occur, especially when you get up quickly from a lying or sitting position. Getting up slowly may help.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting is also more likely to occur if you drink alcohol, stand for long periods of time, exercise, or if the weather is hot. While you are taking this medicine, be careful to limit the amount of alcohol you drink. Also, use extra care during exercise or hot weather or if you must stand for long periods of time.

Do not stop using this medicine without checking with your doctor first. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are using before stopping it completely.

Tell the doctor in charge that you are using this medicine before having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Skin burns may occur at the site where the patch is worn during this procedure. Ask your doctor if the patch should be removed before having an MRI scan. You might need to put on a new patch after the procedure.

Minitran Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Lightheadedness Less common Arm, back, or jaw pain blurred vision chest pain or discomfort chest tightness or heaviness confusion dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly fainting fast or irregular heartbeat nausea shortness of breath sweating unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Bluish-colored lips, fingernails, or palms dark urine difficulty with breathing fever headache pale skin rapid heart rate sore throat unusual bleeding or bruising Incidence not known Blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of the skin cough difficulty with swallowing hives itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue skin rash wheezing

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose Blurred or loss of vision bulging soft spot on the head of an infant change in consciousness change in the ability to see colors, especially blue or yellow cold, clammy skin disturbed color perception double vision feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings halos around lights headache, severe and throbbing loss of consciousness night blindness overbright appearance of lights paralysis sensation of spinning tunnel vision

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Rare Burning, itching, redness, skin rash, swelling, or soreness at the application site

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Minitran side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Minitran resources Minitran Side Effects (in more detail) Minitran Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Minitran Drug Interactions Minitran Support Group 0 Reviews for Minitran - Add your own review/rating Minitran Patch MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Minitran Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitroglycerin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Nitroglycerin Monograph (AHFS DI) Nitroglycerin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitro-Bid Ointment MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitro-Bid Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Dur Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitro-Time Prescribing Information (FDA) NitroMist Prescribing Information (FDA) NitroMist Consumer Overview NitroMist Aerosol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) NitroQuick MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitrogard MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitrolingual Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitrostat Prescribing Information (FDA) Rectiv Consumer Overview Compare Minitran with other medications Angina Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis Heart Attack Heart Failure High Blood Pressure
read more / Download


Nitrodur 0.6


Generic Name: nitroglycerin (Transdermal route)

nye-troe-GLIS-er-in

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Minitran Nitrek Nitro-Bid Nitro-Dur

In Canada

Nitrodur 0.2 Nitro-Dur 0.2 Nitro-Dur 0.3 Nitrodur 0.4 Nitro-Dur 0.4 Nitrodur 0.6 Nitro-Dur 0.6 Nitro-Dur 0.8 Transderm-Nitro Trinipatch 0.2 Trinipatch 0.4 Trinipatch 0.6

Available Dosage Forms:

Ointment Patch, Extended Release

Therapeutic Class: Antianginal

Chemical Class: Nitrate

Uses For Nitrodur 0.6

Nitroglycerin transdermal is used to prevent angina (chest pain) caused by coronary artery disease. It does not work fast enough to relieve the pain of an angina attack that has already started.

Nitroglycerin transdermal belongs to the group of medicines called nitrates. It works by relaxing the blood vessels and increasing the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart while reducing its work load. When used regularly on a long-term basis, this helps prevent angina attacks from occurring.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Nitrodur 0.6

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of nitroglycerin transdermal in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of nitroglycerin transdermal in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving nitroglycerin transdermal.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Sildenafil Tadalafil Vardenafil

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Alteplase, Recombinant

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Acetylcysteine Aspirin Dihydroergotamine Pancuronium Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Cardioversion (medical heart procedure) or Defibrillation (medical heart procedure)—Use with caution. The patch should be removed before having these procedures. Congestive heart failure or Heart attack, recent or Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a heart disease) or Hypotension (low blood pressure) or Hypovolemia (low amount of blood)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of nitroglycerin

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain nitroglycerin. It may not be specific to Nitrodur 0.6. Please read with care.

Use this medicine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not use more of it, do not use it more often, and do not use it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. It will only work if applied correctly.

This form of nitrate is used to reduce the number of angina attacks over a long time. It will not relieve an attack that has already started because it works too slowly. The ointment and patch forms release medicine gradually to provide an effect for 7 to 10 hours. Check with your doctor if you also need a fast-acting medicine to relieve the pain of an angina attack.

You should use this medicine first thing in the morning and follow the same schedule each day. This medicine works best if you have a "drug-free" period of time every day when you do not use it. Your doctor will schedule your doses during the day to allow for a drug-free time. Follow the schedule of dosing carefully so the medicine will work properly.

This medicine comes with a patient information leaflet. Read and follow the instructions in the leaflet carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

For patients using the ointment:

Before applying a new dose of ointment, remove any ointment remaining on the skin from a previous dose. This will allow the fresh ointment to release the nitroglycerin properly. This medicine comes with papers to help measure the dose. Use them to measure the length of ointment squeezed from the tube and to apply the ointment to the skin. Do not rub or massage the ointment into the skin. Spread it in a thin, even layer, and cover an area of skin that is the same size each time it is applied. Apply the ointment to skin with little or no hair that is free of scars, cuts, or irritation. Apply each dose of ointment to a different area of skin to prevent irritation. If your doctor has ordered an airtight covering or dressing (such as plastic kitchen wrap) be placed over this medicine, make sure you know how to apply it. Airtight dressings will increase the amount of medicine absorbed through the skin and may cause more side effects. Use them only as directed and check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

For patients using the patch system:

Wash your hands with soap and water before and after applying a patch. Do not touch your eyes until after you have washed your hands. Do not try to trim or cut the adhesive patch to adjust the dosage. Check with your doctor if you think the medicine is not working as it should. Apply the patch to a clean, dry skin area with little or no hair that is free of scars, cuts, or irritation. Always remove a previous patch before applying a new one. Apply a new patch if the first one becomes loose or falls off. Apply each patch to a different area to prevent skin irritation. Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For angina prevention: For transdermal dosage form (ointment): Adults—At first, 7.5 milligrams (mg), one-half inch of ointment, two times a day. Apply the first dose in the morning right after you wake up, and the second dose 6 hours later. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For transdermal dosage form (skin patch): Adults—Apply one patch once a day in the morning. Leave the patch in place for a total of 12 to 14 hours. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

If you forget to wear or change a patch, put one on as soon as you can. If it is almost time to put on your next patch, wait until then to apply a new patch and skip the one you missed. Do not apply extra patches to make up for a missed dose.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

After removing a used patch, fold it in half with the sticky sides together. Make sure to dispose of it out of the reach of children and pets.

Precautions While Using Nitrodur 0.6

If you will be taking this medicine for a long time, it is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Do not take sildenafil (Viagra®), tadalafil (Cialis®), or vardenafil (Levitra®) while you are using this medicine. Using these medicines together may cause blurred vision, dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. If you are taking these medicines and you experience an angina attack, you must go to the hospital right away.

This medicine may cause headaches. These headaches are a sign that the medicine is working. Do not stop using the medicine or change the time you use it in order to avoid the headaches. If you have severe pain, talk with your doctor.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or faintness may occur, especially when you get up quickly from a lying or sitting position. Getting up slowly may help.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting is also more likely to occur if you drink alcohol, stand for long periods of time, exercise, or if the weather is hot. While you are taking this medicine, be careful to limit the amount of alcohol you drink. Also, use extra care during exercise or hot weather or if you must stand for long periods of time.

Do not stop using this medicine without checking with your doctor first. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are using before stopping it completely.

Tell the doctor in charge that you are using this medicine before having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Skin burns may occur at the site where the patch is worn during this procedure. Ask your doctor if the patch should be removed before having an MRI scan. You might need to put on a new patch after the procedure.

Nitrodur 0.6 Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Lightheadedness Less common Arm, back, or jaw pain blurred vision chest pain or discomfort chest tightness or heaviness confusion dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly fainting fast or irregular heartbeat nausea shortness of breath sweating unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Bluish-colored lips, fingernails, or palms dark urine difficulty with breathing fever headache pale skin rapid heart rate sore throat unusual bleeding or bruising Incidence not known Blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of the skin cough difficulty with swallowing hives itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue skin rash wheezing

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose Blurred or loss of vision bulging soft spot on the head of an infant change in consciousness change in the ability to see colors, especially blue or yellow cold, clammy skin disturbed color perception double vision feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings halos around lights headache, severe and throbbing loss of consciousness night blindness overbright appearance of lights paralysis sensation of spinning tunnel vision

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Rare Burning, itching, redness, skin rash, swelling, or soreness at the application site

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Nitrodur 0.6 side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Nitrodur 0.6 resources Nitrodur 0.6 Side Effects (in more detail)Nitrodur 0.6 Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingNitrodur 0.6 Drug InteractionsNitrodur 0.6 Support Group0 Reviews for Nitrodur 0.6 - Add your own review/rating Compare Nitrodur 0.6 with other medications AnginaAngina Pectoris ProphylaxisHeart AttackHeart FailureHigh Blood Pressure
read more / Download


Trinipatch 0.2


Generic Name: nitroglycerin (Transdermal route)

nye-troe-GLIS-er-in

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Minitran Nitrek Nitro-Bid Nitro-Dur

In Canada

Nitrodur 0.2 Nitro-Dur 0.2 Nitro-Dur 0.3 Nitrodur 0.4 Nitro-Dur 0.4 Nitrodur 0.6 Nitro-Dur 0.6 Nitro-Dur 0.8 Transderm-Nitro Trinipatch 0.2 Trinipatch 0.4 Trinipatch 0.6

Available Dosage Forms:

Ointment Patch, Extended Release

Therapeutic Class: Antianginal

Chemical Class: Nitrate

Uses For Trinipatch 0.2

Nitroglycerin transdermal is used to prevent angina (chest pain) caused by coronary artery disease. It does not work fast enough to relieve the pain of an angina attack that has already started.

Nitroglycerin transdermal belongs to the group of medicines called nitrates. It works by relaxing the blood vessels and increasing the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart while reducing its work load. When used regularly on a long-term basis, this helps prevent angina attacks from occurring.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Trinipatch 0.2

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of nitroglycerin transdermal in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of nitroglycerin transdermal in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving nitroglycerin transdermal.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Sildenafil Tadalafil Vardenafil

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Alteplase, Recombinant

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Acetylcysteine Aspirin Dihydroergotamine Pancuronium Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Cardioversion (medical heart procedure) or Defibrillation (medical heart procedure)—Use with caution. The patch should be removed before having these procedures. Congestive heart failure or Heart attack, recent or Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a heart disease) or Hypotension (low blood pressure) or Hypovolemia (low amount of blood)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of nitroglycerin

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain nitroglycerin. It may not be specific to Trinipatch 0.2. Please read with care.

Use this medicine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not use more of it, do not use it more often, and do not use it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. It will only work if applied correctly.

This form of nitrate is used to reduce the number of angina attacks over a long time. It will not relieve an attack that has already started because it works too slowly. The ointment and patch forms release medicine gradually to provide an effect for 7 to 10 hours. Check with your doctor if you also need a fast-acting medicine to relieve the pain of an angina attack.

You should use this medicine first thing in the morning and follow the same schedule each day. This medicine works best if you have a "drug-free" period of time every day when you do not use it. Your doctor will schedule your doses during the day to allow for a drug-free time. Follow the schedule of dosing carefully so the medicine will work properly.

This medicine comes with a patient information leaflet. Read and follow the instructions in the leaflet carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

For patients using the ointment:

Before applying a new dose of ointment, remove any ointment remaining on the skin from a previous dose. This will allow the fresh ointment to release the nitroglycerin properly. This medicine comes with papers to help measure the dose. Use them to measure the length of ointment squeezed from the tube and to apply the ointment to the skin. Do not rub or massage the ointment into the skin. Spread it in a thin, even layer, and cover an area of skin that is the same size each time it is applied. Apply the ointment to skin with little or no hair that is free of scars, cuts, or irritation. Apply each dose of ointment to a different area of skin to prevent irritation. If your doctor has ordered an airtight covering or dressing (such as plastic kitchen wrap) be placed over this medicine, make sure you know how to apply it. Airtight dressings will increase the amount of medicine absorbed through the skin and may cause more side effects. Use them only as directed and check with your doctor if you have any questions about this.

For patients using the patch system:

Wash your hands with soap and water before and after applying a patch. Do not touch your eyes until after you have washed your hands. Do not try to trim or cut the adhesive patch to adjust the dosage. Check with your doctor if you think the medicine is not working as it should. Apply the patch to a clean, dry skin area with little or no hair that is free of scars, cuts, or irritation. Always remove a previous patch before applying a new one. Apply a new patch if the first one becomes loose or falls off. Apply each patch to a different area to prevent skin irritation. Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For angina prevention: For transdermal dosage form (ointment): Adults—At first, 7.5 milligrams (mg), one-half inch of ointment, two times a day. Apply the first dose in the morning right after you wake up, and the second dose 6 hours later. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For transdermal dosage form (skin patch): Adults—Apply one patch once a day in the morning. Leave the patch in place for a total of 12 to 14 hours. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

If you forget to wear or change a patch, put one on as soon as you can. If it is almost time to put on your next patch, wait until then to apply a new patch and skip the one you missed. Do not apply extra patches to make up for a missed dose.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

After removing a used patch, fold it in half with the sticky sides together. Make sure to dispose of it out of the reach of children and pets.

Precautions While Using Trinipatch 0.2

If you will be taking this medicine for a long time, it is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Do not take sildenafil (Viagra®), tadalafil (Cialis®), or vardenafil (Levitra®) while you are using this medicine. Using these medicines together may cause blurred vision, dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. If you are taking these medicines and you experience an angina attack, you must go to the hospital right away.

This medicine may cause headaches. These headaches are a sign that the medicine is working. Do not stop using the medicine or change the time you use it in order to avoid the headaches. If you have severe pain, talk with your doctor.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or faintness may occur, especially when you get up quickly from a lying or sitting position. Getting up slowly may help.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting is also more likely to occur if you drink alcohol, stand for long periods of time, exercise, or if the weather is hot. While you are taking this medicine, be careful to limit the amount of alcohol you drink. Also, use extra care during exercise or hot weather or if you must stand for long periods of time.

Do not stop using this medicine without checking with your doctor first. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are using before stopping it completely.

Tell the doctor in charge that you are using this medicine before having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Skin burns may occur at the site where the patch is worn during this procedure. Ask your doctor if the patch should be removed before having an MRI scan. You might need to put on a new patch after the procedure.

Trinipatch 0.2 Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Lightheadedness Less common Arm, back, or jaw pain blurred vision chest pain or discomfort chest tightness or heaviness confusion dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly fainting fast or irregular heartbeat nausea shortness of breath sweating unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Bluish-colored lips, fingernails, or palms dark urine difficulty with breathing fever headache pale skin rapid heart rate sore throat unusual bleeding or bruising Incidence not known Blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of the skin cough difficulty with swallowing hives itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue skin rash wheezing

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose Blurred or loss of vision bulging soft spot on the head of an infant change in consciousness change in the ability to see colors, especially blue or yellow cold, clammy skin disturbed color perception double vision feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings halos around lights headache, severe and throbbing loss of consciousness night blindness overbright appearance of lights paralysis sensation of spinning tunnel vision

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Rare Burning, itching, redness, skin rash, swelling, or soreness at the application site

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Trinipatch 0.2 side effects (in more detail)

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More Trinipatch 0.2 resources Trinipatch 0.2 Side Effects (in more detail) Trinipatch 0.2 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Trinipatch 0.2 Drug Interactions Trinipatch 0.2 Support Group 6 Reviews for Trinipatch 0.2 - Add your own review/rating Compare Trinipatch 0.2 with other medications Anal Fissure and Fistula Angina Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis Heart Attack Heart Failure High Blood Pressure Raynaud's Syndrome
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Nitrek transdermal


Generic Name: nitroglycerin (transdermal) (NYE troe GLIS er in)
Brand Names: Minitran, Nitrek, Nitro TD Patch-A, Nitro-Dur

What is Nitrek (nitroglycerin (transdermal))?

Nitroglycerin is in a group of drugs called nitrates. Nitroglycerin dilates (widens) blood vessels, making it easier for blood to flow through them and easier for the heart to pump.

Nitroglycerin transdermal is used to prevent attacks of chest pain (angina).

Nitroglycerin transdermal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Nitrek (nitroglycerin (transdermal))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to nitroglycerin, isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur), or isosorbide dinitrate (BiDil, Isordil).

Before using nitroglycerin transdermal, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure, low blood pressure, glaucoma, anemia, or a history of heart attack, stroke, or head injury.

Do not use this medication to treat an angina attack that has already begun. It will not work fast enough.

Nitroglycerin transdermal can cause severe headaches, especially when you first start using it. Do not stop using the skin patches, and ask your doctor before using any headache pain medication.

Nitroglycerin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as worsening chest pain, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, vomiting, sweating, blurred vision and dry mouth, or fainting. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of nitroglycerin. The nitroglycerin transdermal patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the patch before undergoing such a test. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Nitrek (nitroglycerin (transdermal))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to nitroglycerin, isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur), or isosorbide dinitrate (BiDil, Isordil). Do not use nitroglycerin transdermal if you are allergic to any type of adhesive on a bandage or other transdermal skin patch.

To make sure you can safely use nitroglycerin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

congestive heart failure;

a history of heart attack, stroke, or head injury;

low blood pressure;

glaucoma; or

anemia (lack of red blood cells).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether nitroglycerin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether nitroglycerin transdermal passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Nitrek (nitroglycerin (transdermal))?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Do not use nitroglycerin transdermal to treat an angina attack that has already begun. It will not work fast enough. Your doctor may prescribe an oral form of nitroglycerin (tablet, capsule, spray) to treat an angina attack. Talk with your doctor if any of your medications do not seem to work as well in treating or preventing angina attacks.

The nitroglycerin transdermal skin patch is usually worn for 12 to 14 hours and then removed. A new patch is put on after a "patch-free" period of 10 to 12 hours. Your doctor may want you to wear the patch for longer or shorter periods of time. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully.

Apply the skin patch to a clean, dry, hairless area of the body, below your neck and above your knees or elbows. To remove any hair from these skin areas, clip the hair short but do not shave it.

Press the patch onto the skin and press it down firmly with your fingers. Make sure it is well sealed around the edges.

Wash your hands after applying a nitroglycerin transdermal skin patch.

If the patch falls off, try sticking it back on. If you replace the patch with a new one, leave it on only for the rest of your wearing time. Do not change your patch removal schedule.

After removing a skin patch fold it in half, sticky side in, and throw it away in a place where children or pets cannot get to it. Keep both used and unused nitroglycerin skin patches out of the reach of children or pets. Do not stop using this medication without your doctor's advice, even if you feel better. You may have increased angina attacks if you stop using the medication suddenly.

If you need to have any type of surgery or dental work, tell the surgeon or dentist ahead of time that you are using nitroglycerin transdermal.

The nitroglycerin transdermal patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the patch before undergoing such a test.

Tell any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you that you are using nitroglycerin transdermal. If you need emergency heart resuscitation, your family or caregivers should tell emergency medical personnel if you are wearing a nitroglycerin skin patch. The patch should be removed before any electrical equipment (such as a defribrillator) is used on you.

Store at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Keep each skin patch in its sealed pouch until you are ready to use it. What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply a patch as soon as you remember, and keep it on for the rest of your wearing time without changing your patch removal schedule. If you miss a dose and it is almost time to apply your next patch, wait until then to apply the patch and skip the missed dose.

Do not use extra patches to make up a missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include a severe throbbing headache, confusion, fever, fast or pounding heartbeats, dizziness, vision problems, nausea, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, trouble breathing, cold or clammy skin, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or blue-colored skin, lips, or nails.

What should I avoid while using Nitrek (nitroglycerin (transdermal))?

Avoid using nitroglycerin transdermal on irritated or broken skin.

Nitroglycerin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of nitroglycerin. Nitrek (nitroglycerin (transdermal)) side effects

Nitroglycerin transdermal can cause severe headaches, especially when you first start using it. These headaches may gradually become less severe as you continue to use nitroglycerin transdermal. Do not stop using the medication. Ask your doctor before using any headache pain medication.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

worsening chest pain, slow heart rate;

feeling like you might pass out;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

fast or pounding heartbeats; or

blurred vision and dry mouth.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild skin rash or itching;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;

nausea, vomiting, upset stomach; or

feeling nervous, weak, or dizzy.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Nitrek (nitroglycerin (transdermal))?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

blood pressure medication or diuretics (water pills);

cold or allergy medicines, diet pills, or over-the-counter pain medicine such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve);

an erectile dysfunction medication such as sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), or vardenafil (Levitra);

migraine headache medication such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Cafergot, Migergot), dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal), or methylergonovine (Methergine);

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Dutoprol, Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others; or

heart or blood pressure medicine such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with nitroglycerin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Nitrek resources Nitrek Side Effects (in more detail) Nitrek Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Nitrek Drug Interactions Nitrek Support Group 0 Reviews for Nitrek - Add your own review/rating Compare Nitrek with other medications Angina Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis Heart Attack Heart Failure High Blood Pressure Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about nitroglycerin transdermal.

See also: Nitrek side effects (in more detail)


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Nitrogard


Generic Name: Nitroglycerin (nye-troe-GLIH-suh-rin)
Brand Name: Nitrogard
Nitrogard is used for:

Preventing chest pain caused by heart disease. It may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Nitrogard is a nitrate. It works by widening blood vessels in the body, which allows more blood to flow more easily through them and reduces the work the heart has to do to pump blood. This reduces the oxygen need of the heart, and helps prevent chest pain.

Do NOT use Nitrogard if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Nitrogard you suspect you are having a heart attack you have increased pressure inside the head you have severe anemia you are currently taking a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (eg, sildenafil), a medicine used frequently for sexual dysfunction

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Nitrogard:

Some medical conditions may interact with Nitrogard. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you drink alcoholic beverages if you have a history of heart failure, overactive thyroid, recent head trauma, recent heart attack, recent stroke, head injury, or low blood pressure

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Nitrogard. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Beta-blockers (eg, propranolol), calcium channel blockers (eg, diltiazem), phenothiazines (eg, thioridazine), or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (eg, sildenafil) because side effects such as severely low blood pressure may occur Alteplase or heparin because the effectiveness of these medicines may be decreased Salicylates (eg, aspirin) because the effectiveness of nitroglycerin may be altered. Control of blood pressure may be impaired and your doctor may need to adjust your dose.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Nitrogard may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Nitrogard:

Use Nitrogard as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Do not crush, chew, or swallow the tablet, or place it under the tongue. Place tablet(s) under the upper lip or between the gum and cheek and allow it to dissolve slowly over a 3 to 5 hour period or as directed by your health care provider. If you wear dentures, place the tablet between the cheek and gum above the denture plate. Touching the tablets with the tongue or drinking hot liquids will help the tablets dissolve faster. If you accidentally swallow a tablet, replace it with another one, unless otherwise advised by your doctor. If you miss a dose of Nitrogard and you are taking it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If several hours have passed or if it is nearing time for the next dose, do not double the dose to catch up, unless advised by your health care provider. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Nitrogard.

Important safety information: Nitrogard may cause dizziness or blurred vision. Use caution while driving or performing other tasks requiring alertness, coordination, or physical dexterity. Nitrogard may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. Alcohol, hot weather, exercise, and fever can increase these effects. To prevent them, sit up or stand slowly, especially in the morning. Also, sit or lie down at the first sign of dizziness, lightheadedness, or weakness. To avoid tooth and gum decay, vary location sites and brush your teeth after the tablet has completely dissolved. Do not fall asleep with a tablet in your mouth. LAB TESTS, including blood electrolytes and blood pressure, may be performed to monitor your progress or to check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Nitrogard is not recommended for use in CHILDREN. Safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Nitrogard during pregnancy. It is unknown if Nitrogard is excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Nitrogard, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Nitrogard:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Burning or tingling in the mouth; dizziness; flushing; headache; heavy sweating; lightheadedness; nausea; pale skin; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blurred vision; fainting; increased chest pain; pounding in the chest; slow heartbeat.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions or need medical advice about side effects, contact your doctor or health care provider. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088) or at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

See also: Nitrogard side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center (http://www.aapcc.org/DNN/), or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include: changes in vision; confusion and difficulty breathing; excessive sweating; fast heartbeat; flushing; low blood pressure; pounding in the chest.

Proper storage of Nitrogard:

Store between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in bathroom. Keep Nitrogard out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Nitrogard, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Nitrogard is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Nitrogard. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Nitrogard resources Nitrogard Side Effects (in more detail) Nitrogard Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Nitrogard Drug Interactions Nitrogard Support Group 0 Reviews for Nitrogard - Add your own review/rating Nitroglycerin Monograph (AHFS DI) Nitroglycerin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Minitran Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Minitran Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Bid Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Nitro-Bid Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Dur Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Time Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Time Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information NitroMist Prescribing Information (FDA) NitroMist Consumer Overview Nitrolingual Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitrostat Prescribing Information (FDA) Rectiv Consumer Overview Rectiv Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Nitrogard with other medications Angina Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis Heart Attack Heart Failure High Blood Pressure
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Hypoestrogenism Medications


Drugs associated with Hypoestrogenism

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Hypoestrogenism. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.


Drug List: Activella Alora Cenestin Climara Clinagen-La-40 Combipatch-Patch-Bi-Weekly Delestrogen Dep-Gynogen Depo-Estradiol Enjuvia Estrace Estrace-Cream Estraderm-Patch Estradiol-Patch Estragyn-La-5 Estratab Estring-Local Gynodiol Gynogen-La-20 Menaval-20 Menest Mimvey Ogen Ogen-0-625 Ogen-1-25 Ogen-2-5 Ortho-Est Premarin Premarin-Injection Vagifem-Local Vivelle-Patch Vivelle-Dot
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Qutenza Patch


Pronunciation: kap-SAY-sin
Generic Name: Capsaicin
Brand Name: Qutenza
Qutenza Patch is used for:

Treating a certain type of nerve pain caused by the shingles (postherpetic neuralgia). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Qutenza Patch is a TRVP1 channel agonist. It works by decreasing certain pain receptors on some nerve endings.

Do NOT use Qutenza Patch if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Qutenza Patch

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Qutenza Patch:

Some medical conditions may interact with Qutenza Patch. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have broken or damaged skin at the application site if you have a history of high blood pressure, other heart problems, or recent heart attack or stroke

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Qutenza Patch. However, no specific interactions with Qutenza Patch are known at this time.

Ask your health care provider if Qutenza Patch may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Qutenza Patch:

Use Qutenza Patch as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Qutenza Patch is usually applied at your doctor's office, hospital, or clinic. If you will be using Qutenza Patch at home, a health care provider will teach you how to use it. Be sure you understand how to use Qutenza Patch. Follow the procedures you are taught when you use it. Contact your health care provider if you have any questions. Do not remove the patch from the sealed pouch until right before use. You may receive other medicine to treat pain that occurs during and after your treatment with Qutenza Patch. Discuss any questions or concerns with your doctor. Do not touch the patch while it is on your skin. Burning or stinging may occur. If you miss a dose of Qutenza Patch, contact your doctor right away.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Qutenza Patch.

Important safety information: Do not use Qutenza Patch on the face or scalp. Do not get it in the eyes, nose, mouth, or genital area. If you get Qutenza Patch in any of these areas, rinse right away with cool water. Do not inhale any of Qutenza Patch. It may cause shortness of breath, coughing, or sneezing. Tell your health care provider if any of these symptoms occur. Do not get Qutenza Patch on skin that is not being treated. Tell your health care provider if Qutenza Patch comes into contact with skin that is not being treated. The treated area may be sensitive to heat (eg, hot showers or baths, direct sunlight, strong exercise) for a few days after Qutenza Patch is applied. Lab tests, including blood pressure, may be performed while you use Qutenza Patch. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Qutenza Patch should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Qutenza Patch while you are pregnant. It is not known if Qutenza Patch is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed on the day of treatment after you have received your treatment with Qutenza Patch. Possible side effects of Qutenza Patch:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Mild pain, redness, burning, or itching at the application site; mild sore throat; nausea.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blisters or swelling at the application site; severe or persistent dizziness or headache; severe or persistent pain, redness, burning, or itching at the application site; shortness of breath, coughing, or sneezing.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Qutenza side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Qutenza Patch:

Store Qutenza Patch between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Qutenza Patch out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Qutenza Patch, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Qutenza Patch is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Qutenza Patch. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Qutenza resources Qutenza Side Effects (in more detail) Qutenza Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Qutenza Drug Interactions Qutenza Support Group 1 Review for Qutenza - Add your own review/rating Compare Qutenza with other medications Osteoarthritis Pain Peripheral Neuropathy Persisting Pain, Shingles
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Capoten


Generic Name: captopril (KAP toe pril)
Brand Names: Capoten

What is captopril?

Captopril is an ACE inhibitor. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme.

Captopril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, kidney problems caused by diabetes, and to improve survival after a heart attack.

Captopril may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about captopril? Do not use captopril if you are pregnant. Captopril can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester. Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of captopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking captopril, unless your doctor has told you to.

Conditions that may cause very low blood pressure include: vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, heart disease, dialysis, a low salt diet, or taking diuretics (water pills). Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink while taking captopril. Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking captopril? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to captopril or to any other ACE inhibitor, such as benazepril (Lotensin), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik).

To make sure you can safely take captopril, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

liver disease;

heart disease or congestive heart failure;

diabetes; or

a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren's syndrome, lupus, scleroderma, or rheumatoid arthritis.

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use captopril if you are pregnant. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Captopril can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester. Use effective birth control while taking captopril. Captopril can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using captopril. How should I take captopril?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Captopril is usually taken 1 hour before meals. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Conditions that may cause very low blood pressure include: vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, heart disease, dialysis, a low salt diet, or taking diuretics (water pills). Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink while taking captopril. Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using captopril. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

See also: Capoten dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include feeling extremely dizzy or light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking captopril? Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of captopril. Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking captopril, unless your doctor has told you to. Captopril side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe stomach pain; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

feeling light-headed, fainting;

urinating more or less than usual, or not at all;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

pale skin, feeling light-headed or short of breath, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating;

easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;

fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeats;

chest pain; or

swelling, rapid weight gain.

Less serious side effects may include:

cough;

loss of taste sensation, loss of appetite;

dizziness, drowsiness, headache;

sleep problems (insomnia);

dry mouth, sores inside your mouth or on your lips;

nausea, diarrhea, constipation; or

mild skin itching or rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect captopril?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

gold injections to treat arthritis;

lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith);

a potassium supplement such as K-Dur, Klor-Con;

salt substitutes that contain potassium;

drugs that can dilate blood vessels, such as alprostadil (Caverject, Edex), nitroglycerin (Nitro Dur, Nitrolingual, Nitrostat, Transderm Nitro, and others), nitroprusside (Nitropress), nesiritide (Natrecor), minoxidil (Loniten), or isosorbide dinitrate (Imdur, Isordil);

aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others; or

a diuretic (water pill).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with captopril. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Capoten resources Capoten Side Effects (in more detail)Capoten DosageCapoten Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesCapoten Drug InteractionsCapoten Support Group0 Reviews for Capoten - Add your own review/rating Capoten Prescribing Information (FDA) Capoten Monograph (AHFS DI) Capoten Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Capoten Consumer Overview Capoten MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Captopril Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Capoten with other medications CystinuriaDiabetic Kidney DiseaseHeart FailureHigh Blood PressureHypertensive EmergencyLeft Ventricular Dysfunction Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about captopril.

See also: Capoten side effects (in more detail)


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Scopolamine Patch


Pronunciation: skoe-POL-a-meen
Generic Name: Scopolamine
Brand Name: Transderm Scop
Scopolamine Patch is used for:

Preventing nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness and recovery from anesthesia and surgery. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Scopolamine Patch is an anticholinergic agent. It works by blocking transmission of impulses at nerve sites in the gastrointestinal tract and the vomiting center.

Do NOT use Scopolamine Patch if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Scopolamine Patch you have narrow-angle glaucoma, difficulty swallowing, stomach or bowel problems (eg, blockage, muscle weakness, ulcerative colitis), bleeding, acid reflux disease, myasthenia gravis, or a blockage of the urinary tract

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Scopolamine Patch:

Some medical conditions may interact with Scopolamine Patch. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have nerve problems, prostate problems, difficulty urinating, irregular heartbeat, heart failure, hernia, glaucoma, or a predisposition to glaucoma if you will be having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Scopolamine Patch. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Beta-adrenergic blockers (eg, propranolol) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Scopolamine Patch Phenothiazines (eg, chlorpromazine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Scopolamine Patch

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Scopolamine Patch may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Scopolamine Patch:

Use Scopolamine Patch as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Wear only 1 patch at a time. Apply the patch to a hairless area of skin behind 1 ear. Do not apply the patch to irritated skin. Wash your hands thoroughly after applying the patch. If the patch becomes loose, remove it and apply and new patch behind the other ear. Remove the patch after 3 days. After removing the used patch, fold it in half with the sticky sides together. Discard the patch out of the reach of children and away from pets. If you miss a dose of Scopolamine Patch, use it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Scopolamine Patch.

Important safety information: Scopolamine Patch may cause drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Scopolamine Patch with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Limit alcohol intake while you are taking Scopolamine Patch. Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol or use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Scopolamine Patch; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. Do not become overheated in hot weather or while you are being active; heatstroke may occur. Scopolamine Patch may make your eyes more sensitive to sunlight. It may help to wear sunglasses. Do not get Scopolamine Patch in your eyes or mouth. Skin burns may occur if this patch is worn during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. If you will be having an MRI, tell your doctor that you use Scopolamine Patch. You will need to remove the patch before having the MRI. Scopolamine Patch should not be used in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Scopolamine Patch while you are pregnant. It is not known if Scopolamine Patch is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Scopolamine Patch. Possible side effects of Scopolamine Patch:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Blurred vision; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); difficulty urinating; pain and reddening of the eyes, accompanied by dilated pupils; skin irritation.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include confusion; disorientation; dizziness; hallucinations; memory disturbances; restlessness.

Proper storage of Scopolamine Patch:

Store Scopolamine Patch at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Scopolamine Patch out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Scopolamine Patch, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Scopolamine Patch is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Scopolamine Patch. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Scopolamine resources Scopolamine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Scopolamine Drug Interactions Scopolamine Support Group 32 Reviews for Scopolamine - Add your own review/rating Compare Scopolamine with other medications Motion Sickness Nausea/Vomiting Parkinsonian Tremor
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tadalafil


Generic Name: tadalafil (ta DAL a fil)
Brand Names: Adcirca, Cialis

What is tadalafil?

Tadalafil relaxes muscles and increases blood flow to particular areas of the body.

Tadalafil under the name of Cialis is used to treat erectile dysfunction (impotence) and symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy (enlarged prostate). Another brand of sildenafil is Adcirca, which is used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension and improve exercise capacity in men and women.

Tadalafil may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about tadalafil? Do not take tadalafil if you are allergic to it, or if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems, including nitroglycerin (Nitro Dur, Nitrolingual, Nitrostat, Transderm Nitro, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate, Isordil, Isochron), isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket), or recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking tadalafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a sudden and serious decrease in blood pressure. If you become dizzy or nauseated during sexual activity, or if you have pain, numbness, or tingling in your chest, arms, neck, or jaw, stop and call your doctor right away. You could be having a serious side effect of tadalafil. Do not take tadalafil more than once a day. Allow 24 hours to pass between doses. Contact your doctor or seek emergency medical attention if your erection is painful or lasts longer than 4 hours. A prolonged erection (priapism) can damage the penis.

Tadalafil can decrease blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye, causing sudden vision loss. This has occurred in a small number of people taking tadalafil, most of whom also had heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. It is not clear whether tadalafil is the actual cause of vision loss.

Stop using tadalafil and get emergency medical help if you have sudden vision loss. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking tadalafil? You should not take tadalafil if you are allergic to it.

Tadalafil should not be used together with nitrate medication, such as nitroglycerin (Nitro Dur, Nitrolingual, Nitrostat, Transderm Nitro, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate, Isordil, Isochron), isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket), or recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking tadalafil with a nitrate medicine for chest pain or heart problems can cause a sudden and serious decrease in blood pressure.

To make sure you can safely take tadalafil, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart disease or heart rhythm problems;

a recent heart attack (within the past 90 days);

a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a stroke, or congestive heart failure;

angina (chest pain), high or low blood pressure;

liver disease;

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia;

a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia;

a stomach ulcer;

retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye);

a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or

if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons.

Tadalafil can decrease blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye, causing sudden vision loss. This has occurred in a small number of people taking tadalafil, most of whom also had heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old.

It is not clear whether tadalafil is the actual cause of vision loss. Stop using tadalafil and get emergency medical help if you have sudden vision loss. FDA pregnancy category B. Tadalafil is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment with Adcirca. It is not known whether tadalafil passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Adcirca without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take tadalafil?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Tadalafil can be taken with or without food.

Do not break or split a Cialis tablet. Swallow it whole.

Cialis is usually taken only once per day. Follow your doctor's instructions. For erectile dysfunction, take the medicine just before sexual activity but not more than once per day.

Cialis can help achieve an erection when sexual stimulation occurs. An erection will not occur just by taking a pill. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Adcirca is usually taken once per day. Follow your doctor's instructions. Do not take Cialis for erectile dysfunction if you are taking Adcirca for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Do not take tadalafil more than once a day. Allow 24 hours to pass between doses. If you take the medication daily, take it at the same time each day. Contact your doctor or seek emergency medical attention if your erection is painful or lasts longer than 4 hours. A prolonged erection (priapism) can damage the penis. Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Tadalafil dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

If tadalafil is used as needed, you are not likely to be on a dosing schedule.

If you take tadalafil every day and you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include chest pain, nausea, irregular heartbeat, and feeling light-headed or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking tadalafil? Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of tadalafil.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with tadalafil and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor.

Avoid using other medicines to treat erectile dysfunction, such as sildenafil (Viagra) or vardenafil (Levitra) while you are taking tadalafil. Tadalafil side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. If you become dizzy or nauseated during sexual activity, or if you have pain, numbness, or tingling in your chest, arms, neck, or jaw, stop and call your doctor right away. You could be having a serious side effect of tadalafil. Stop using tadalafil and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

changes in vision or sudden vision loss;

ringing in your ears, or sudden hearing loss;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

irregular heartbeat;

shortness of breath, swelling in your hands or feet;

seizure (convulsions);

feeling light-headed, fainting; or

penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer.

Less serious side effects may include:

redness or warmth in your face, neck, or chest;

cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, or sore throat;

headache;

memory problems;

diarrhea, upset stomach; or

muscle pain, back pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Tadalafil Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Erectile Dysfunction:

Erectile dysfunction:
10 mg orally taken prior to anticipated sexual activity. The maximum recommended dosing frequency is once per day in most patients.
Alternatively, 2.5 mg orally once daily, without regard to timing of sexual activity. May increase to 5 mg orally once daily based on efficacy and tolerability.
Erectile dysfunction and benign prostatic hyperplasia together:
5 mg orally taken at approximately the same time every day.

Usual Adult Dose for Pulmonary Hypertension:

40 mg orally once daily, with or without food. Dividing the dose (40 mg) over the course of the day is not recommended.

Usual Adult Dose for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia:

Benign prostatic hyperplasia and benign prostatic hyperplasia with erectile dysfunction:
5 mg orally taken at approximately the same time every day.

What other drugs will affect tadalafil?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, Rifater, Rifamate), or rifapentine (Priftin);

an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, Pediazole), or telithromycin (Ketek);

antifungal medication such as itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), miconazole (Oravig), or voriconazole (Vfend);

an antidepressant such as nefazodone;

a barbiturate such as phenobarbital (Solfoton);

drugs to treat high blood pressure or a prostate disorder, such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), terazosin (Hytrin), tamsulosin (Flomax);

heart or blood pressure medication such as diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac), nicardipine (Cardene), quinidine (Quin-G), or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); or

HIV or AIDS medications such as darunavir (Prezista), efavirenz (Sustiva), etravirine (Intelence), nevirapine (Viramune), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra), and others; or

seizure medications such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol), phenytoin (Dilantin), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with tadalafil. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More tadalafil resources Tadalafil Side Effects (in more detail) Tadalafil Dosage Tadalafil Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Tadalafil Drug Interactions Tadalafil Support Group 103 Reviews for Tadalafil - Add your own review/rating tadalafil Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Tadalafil MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tadalafil Monograph (AHFS DI) Tadalafil Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Adcirca Prescribing Information (FDA) Adcirca Consumer Overview Adcirca MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Cialis Prescribing Information (FDA) Cialis Consumer Overview Compare tadalafil with other medications Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Erectile Dysfunction Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about tadalafil.

See also: tadalafil side effects (in more detail)


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NitroMist


Generic Name: nitroglycerin (Oral route, Sublingual route)

nye-troe-GLIS-er-in

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Nitrocot Nitrolingual NitroMist Nitroquick Nitrostat Nitrotab Nitro-Time

In Canada

Gen-Nitro Nitrolingual Pumpspray

Available Dosage Forms:

Spray Tablet, Extended Release Tablet Capsule, Extended Release

Therapeutic Class: Antianginal

Chemical Class: Nitrate

Uses For NitroMist

Nitroglycerin is used to prevent angina (chest pain) caused by coronary artery disease. This medicine is also used to relieve an angina attack that is already occurring.

Nitroglycerin belongs to the group of medicines called nitrates. It works by relaxing the blood vessels and increasing the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart while reducing its work load. When used regularly on a long-term basis, or just before exercise or a stressful event, this helps prevent angina attacks from occurring.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using NitroMist

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of nitroglycerin in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of nitroglycerin in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving nitroglycerin.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Sildenafil Tadalafil Vardenafil

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Alteplase, Recombinant

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Acetylcysteine Aspirin Dihydroergotamine Pancuronium Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Anemia, severe or Head injury, severe with increased pressure in the head or Heart attack, acute (already occurring)—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Congestive heart failure or Heart attack, recent or Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a heart disease) or Hypotension (low blood pressure) or Hypovolemia (low amount of blood)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of nitroglycerin

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain nitroglycerin. It may not be specific to NitroMist. Please read with care.

Take this medicine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

Nitroglycerin is available as two types of products that are used for different reasons. The extended-release capsules are used every day on a specific schedule to prevent angina attacks. The oral spray and sublingual tablets work quickly to stop an angina attack that has already started or they can be used to prevent angina if you plan to exercise or expect a stressful event.

When you begin to feel an attack of angina starting (chest pains, tightness or squeezing in the chest), sit down. Then place a sublingual tablet in your mouth or under your tongue. If you use the oral spray, you should spray it on or under the tongue. You may become dizzy, lightheaded, or faint soon after using a tablet or spray, so it is safer to sit rather than stand while the medicine is working. If you become dizzy or faint while sitting, take several deep breaths and bend forward with your head between your knees. Remain calm and you should feel better in a few minutes.

Nitroglycerin sublingual tablets should not be chewed, crushed, or swallowed. They work much faster when absorbed through the lining of the mouth. Place the tablet under the tongue or between the cheek and gum, and let it dissolve. Do not eat, drink, smoke, or use chewing tobacco while a tablet is dissolving.

Nitroglycerin sublingual tablets usually give relief in 1 to 5 minutes. However, if the pain is not relieved, you may use a second tablet 5 minutes after you take the first tablet. If the pain continues for another 5 minutes, a third tablet may be used. If you still have chest pain after a total of 3 tablets, contact your doctor or go to a hospital emergency room right away. Do not drive yourself and call 911 if necessary.

You may administer 1 or 2 sprays of Nitroglycerin oral spray at the onset of chest pain. If the pain continues after 5 minutes, a third spray may be used. You must wait 5 minutes after the first 1 or 2 sprays before using a third spray. If you still have chest pain after a total of 3 sprays, contact your doctor or go to a hospital emergency room right away. Do not drive yourself and call 911 if necessary. Do not use more than 3 sprays in a 15-minute period.

Swallow the extended-release capsule whole. Do not split, crush, or chew it.

You should take the extended-release capsule first thing in the morning and follow the same schedule each day. This medicine works best if you have a "drug-free" period of time every day when you do not take it. Your doctor will schedule your doses during the day to allow for a drug-free time. Follow the schedule of dosing carefully so the medicine will work properly.

This medicine comes with a patient information insert. Read and follow the instructions in the insert carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

To use the oral spray:

Remove the plastic cap. Do not shake the container. If this is a new bottle or container, prime the pump before use by releasing a test spray. This must be done 5 or 10 times into the air away from your face and other people. If this is an old bottle and you have not used it for more than 6 weeks, you must prime it again with 1 or 2 test sprays. Hold the container upright with your forefinger on top of the grooved button. Open your mouth and bring the container as close to it as possible. Press the button firmly with the forefinger to release the spray 1 or 2 times onto or under the tongue. Do not inhale or breathe in the spray. Release the button and close your mouth, but do not swallow right away. Do not spit out the spray or rinse your mouth for at least 5 to 10 minutes. If you need a third spray, you must wait 5 minutes after the second spray. Use exactly the same steps you used for the first spray. No more than 3 sprays should be given within 15 minutes. Replace the cover after using the medicine. Always place the spray bottle in an upright position if not in use. Also, check the fluid level of Nitromist® container regularly. If the fluid reaches the top or middle of the hole on the side of container, this is an indicator that you must get a refill. Do not use the spray near heat, an open flame, or while smoking. Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For angina prevention or treatment: For oral dosage form (extended-release capsules): Adults—2.5 to 6.5 milligrams (mg) three to four times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For sublingual dosage form (spray): Adults—One or two sprays on or under the tongue at the first sign of an chest pain. Sprays may be repeated every 5 minutes as needed. You must wait 5 minutes before administering a third spray if 2 sprays are used initially. Do not use more than 3 sprays in 15 minutes. To prevent angina from exercise or stress, use 1 or 2 sprays 5 to 10 minutes before the activity. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For sublingual dosage form (tablets): Adults—One tablet placed under the tongue or between the cheek and gum at the first sign of an angina attack. One tablet may be used every 5 minutes as needed, for up to 15 minutes. Do not take more than 3 tablets in 15 minutes. To prevent angina from exercise or stress, use 1 tablet 5 to 10 minutes before the activity. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Store the extended-release capsules in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light.

Sublingual tablets should be kept in the original glass bottle. Screw the cap on tightly after each use and store the bottle at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light.

Store the oral spray at room temperature, away from heat and direct light. Do not freeze. Do not keep this medicine inside a car where it could be exposed to extreme heat or cold. Do not forcefully open the container or throw it into a fire, even if it is empty.

Precautions While Using NitroMist

If you will be taking this medicine for a long time, it is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Do not take sildenafil (Viagra®), tadalafil (Cialis®), or vardenafil (Levitra®) while you are using this medicine. Using these medicines together may cause blurred vision, dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. If you are taking these medicines and you have an angina attack, you must go to the hospital right away.

This medicine may cause headaches. These headaches are a sign that the medicine is working. Do not stop using the medicine or change the time you use it in order to avoid the headaches. If you have severe pain, talk with your doctor.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur, especially when you get up quickly from a lying or sitting position. Getting up slowly may help. Also, lying down for a while may relieve dizziness or lightheadedness.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting is also more likely to occur if you drink alcohol, stand for long periods of time, exercise, or if the weather is hot. While you are taking this medicine, be careful to limit the amount of alcohol you drink. Also, use extra care during exercise or hot weather or if you must stand for long periods of time.

Do not stop using this medicine without checking first with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are using before stopping it completely.

Blurred vision or dryness of the mouth may occur while using this medicine. Check with your doctor if this concerns you.

Serious skin reactions can occur with this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you have cracks in the skin; feeling of warmth; loss of heat from the body; rash; red, swollen skin; redness of the face, neck, arms and occasionally, upper chest; or scaly skin while you are using this medicine.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

NitroMist Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common Bloating or swelling of the face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings difficult or labored breathing feeling faint, dizzy, or lightheadedness feeling of warmth or heat flushing or redness of the skin, especially on the face and neck headache rapid weight gain shortness of breath sweating tightness in the chest tingling of the hands or feet unusual weight gain or loss wheezing Rare Bluish-colored lips, fingernails, or palms dark urine fever pale skin rapid heart rate sore throat unusual bleeding or bruising unusual tiredness or weakness Incidence not known Arm, back, or jaw pain blurred vision chest pain or discomfort chest tightness or heaviness confusion cough cracks in the skin difficulty with swallowing dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position fainting fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings feeling of warmth hives increased sweating itching loss of heat from the body nausea or vomiting puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue rash red, swollen skin redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest scaly skin sensation of spinning skin rash weakness

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose Blurred or loss of vision bulging soft spot on the head of an infant change in consciousness change in the ability to see colors, especially blue or yellow cold, clammy skin disturbed color perception double vision flushed skin halos around lights headache, severe and throbbing increased sweating loss of appetite loss of consciousness night blindness overbright appearance of lights paralysis slow or irregular heartbeat tunnel vision

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common Abdominal or stomach pain body aches or pain congestion hoarseness lack or loss of strength runny nose sneezing stuffy nose tender, swollen glands in the neck voice changes

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: NitroMist side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More NitroMist resources NitroMist Side Effects (in more detail) NitroMist Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding NitroMist Drug Interactions NitroMist Support Group 0 Reviews for NitroMist - Add your own review/rating NitroMist Aerosol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) NitroMist Prescribing Information (FDA) NitroMist Consumer Overview Nitroglycerin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Nitroglycerin Monograph (AHFS DI) Nitroglycerin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Minitran Patch MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Minitran Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Bid Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Bid Ointment MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitro-Dur Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Time Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitro-Time Controlled-Release Capsules MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) NitroQuick MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitrogard MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nitrolingual Prescribing Information (FDA) Nitrostat Prescribing Information (FDA) Rectiv Consumer Overview Compare NitroMist with other medications Angina Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis Heart Attack Heart Failure High Blood Pressure
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Minitran 5, Minitran 10, Minitran 15


Minitran

Glyceril trinitrate

What You Need To Know About Minitran Patches

Please read this carefully before you start to use your medication. This leaflet only provides a summary of the information available on your medicine. If you have any questions or are not sure about anything, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Your medication is called a Minitran patch

It consists of a clear patch containing glyceryl trinitrate which is applied to the skin. The clear film consists of low density polyethylene and silicone-coated polyester. The patch also contains the following ingredients: isooctyl acrylate/acrylamide copolymer, ethyl oleate, glyceryl monolaurate. There are three strengths available ; your doctor will have chosen the strength which best suits your condition.

A Minitran 5 patch contains 18mg of glyceryl trinitrate. The average amount delivered in 24 hours is 5mg.

A Minitran 10 patch contains 36mg of glyceryl trinitrate. The average amount delivered in 24 hours is 10mg.

A Minitran 15 patch contains 54mg of glyceryl trinitrate. The average amount delivered in 24 hours is 15mg.

Each pack (all strengths) contains 30 patches.

Who produces your medication

Name and address of manufacturer:

3M Sant? Zone industrielle Avenue du 11 Novembre F-45312 Pithiviers Cedex France 3M Health Care, Derby Road Loughborough Leicestershire LE11 5SF United Kingdom

Batch numbers Fxxxxxx are batch released at 3M Sant?, Batch numbers Uxxxxxx are batch released at 3M Health Care.

Name and address of product licence holder:

Meda Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Skyway House Parsonage Road Takeley Bishop's Stortford CM22 6PU UK What your medication is prescribed for

Glyceryl trinitrate is one of a group of medicines called vasodilators which widen blood vessels and improve blood flow to the tissues and muscle (including heart muscle). When you apply a patch to your skin the glyceryl trinitrate passes slowly through your skin and into your blood stream.

Minitran patches may be used to help prevent attacks of angina (chest pain). They reduce the need for under-the-tongue glyceryl trinitrate tablets or spray.

Minitran 5 patches may also be used to improve blood flow to the site of an intravenous cannula. In patients receiving injections or infusions via their arm or leg veins, they help to keep the veins open.

Important points to note before using Minitran patches

If medication for erectile dysfunction, such as sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis) or vardenafil (Levitra), is being used by patients taking nitrate preparations such as Minitran a severe and possibly dangerous fall in blood pressure may occur. This would result in collapse, unconsciousness, and could be fatal. You should not take Viagra, Cialis or Levitra whilst using Minitran.

If you are pregnant, think you might be pregnant or are trying to become pregnant, or are taking other medications, please tell your doctor before using Minitran patch.

You should not use these patches if you are known to be allergic to glyceryl trinitrate, or other medicines containing nitrates.

These patches should not be used by patients with glaucoma, low blood pressure, severe anaemia, aortic or mitral stenosis (heart valve disease), pericarditis (inflammation of the lining of the heart) or raised intracranial pressure (high pressure within the skull).

Please tell your doctor if you suffer from any heart or lung conditions.

Minitran patches may be used to help prevent angina attacks. If you do have an attack of chest pain you should use under-the-tongue glyceryl trinitrate tablets or a similar medication as instructed by your doctor.

Glyceryl trinitrate may lower your blood pressure and make you feel dizzy or light-headed, particularly when changing position suddenly. You should be especially careful if you are driving, operating machinery or drinking alcohol.

Minitran patches are not recommended for use in children.

If you see any other doctor or dentist, please tell them that you are using Minitran patch.

What to do if you are taking other medicines

Please tell your doctor if you are receiving any of the following medicines:

vasodilators (medicines used, for example, for angina (e.g. nitrates) or to reduce blood pressure (e.g. hydralazine, minoxidil). calcium antagonists or beta-blockers (medicines used, for example, for angina, heart arrhythmia's (irregular heart beat) or to reduce blood pressure). ACE inhibitors (medicines used, for example, for heart failure or to reduce blood pressure). neuroleptics (medicines for psychiatric illness). diuretics (water tablets). anti-hypertensives (medicines for reducing blood pressure). tricyclic anti-depressants. dihydroergotamine. aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

Your doctor or pharmacist will advise you about these medicines.

Use of Minitran patches during pregnancy and breast feeding

Glyceryl trinitrate should not normally be used if you are pregnant or if you are breast feeding, unless your doctor tells you to.

When to apply Minitran patches

For angina patients.

The usual starting dose is one Minitran 5 patch each day. Your doctor will have chosen the strength which best suits your condition and will advise you on how long to wear the patch each day. Your patch may be worn for either 24 hours or for only part of each day. A new patch must be applied at approximately the same time each day. Please follow your doctor's instructions.

If you forget to use a new patch, apply it as soon as you remember.

If you are not sure when to use your patch please ask your doctor or pharmacist.

For patients with an intravenous cannula.

Usually your doctor or nurse will apply one Minitran 5 patch next to your intravenous cannula. The patch will be left on for 24 hours and then changed. It will be removed once your intravenous treatment is stopped.

Minitran patches should not be used by children.

Where to apply Minitran patches

For angina patients.

You can apply the patch to the chest, shoulders or upper arm. You should apply the patch to a hairless area of the skin to ensure that good contact is made.

Do not apply the patch to broken skin such as cuts or grazes.

Use a different area of skin every time you apply a patch. It is best to let a few days pass before putting another patch on the same area of skin.

The skin should be clean and dry before applying a patch. This is to make sure that the patch sticks properly.

Do not use dusting powder or any greasy substance e.g. ointments or creams on the skin before applying a patch.

A Minitran patch sticks well to the skin during showering, bathing and swimming.

For patients with an intravenous cannula.

Your doctor or nurse will apply the patch next to your intravenous cannula.

How to apply a Minitran patch 1. Start at notched corner. Tear pouch along dotted line. Remove patch from pouch. 2. Bend patch so that the oval patterned liner notch pops up ; remove tab and discard liner. 3. Apply sticky side of patch to upper arm or chest. Remove and discard oval patterned liner. 4. Press patch firmly in place.

In the unlikely event of a patch not sticking or falling off, simply apply a new patch on a different area of the skin.

Do not re-apply a patch once it has been removed from the skin.

What to do in case of accidental swallowing or application of too many patches

Please contact your nearest hospital casualty department, or tell your doctor, immediately.

What might happen when you are using Minitran patches

Like most medicines, glyceryl trinitrate may cause some side-effects.

When you first use Minitran patches you may notice some side-effects. These include headache, hypotension (low blood pressure), tachycardia (fast heart rate), fainting, palpitations (fast heart beat), hot flushes and dizziness.

Sometimes your skin may become red and/or itchy where you have used the patch. This will usually disappear after you have removed the patch. Please make sure that you use a different area of skin every time you apply a patch.

Other side-effects which may occur include feeling or being sick.

As with other skin preparations, use of Minitran patches over a long period of time may result in your skin becoming sensitive to this product. If this happens to you, please consult your doctor.

If you notice any other side-effects, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

If any side-effects continue for more than a few days, please tell your doctor.

Storing your medication

Keep Minitran patches in a safe place where children cannot reach them.

Store the patches below 25?C in a dry place and out of direct sunlight.

Do not use this product after the expiry date printed on the original container.

If your doctor decides to stop treatment, return any unused patches to your pharmacist.

Date of update of leaflet : December 2009

REMEMBER: This medication is only for YOU. Never give it to others. It may harm them even if their symptoms seem to be the same as yours.

The information provides a summary of the information available on Minitran patches.

Further information is available from your doctor or pharmacist.

Minitran is a trademark of MEDA AB.

The Triangle Logo on the packaging is a trademark of 3M and is used under license.

562l97M2110UK00


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Slo-Niacin nicotinic acid


Generic Name: niacin (nicotinic acid) (NYE a sin (NIK oh TIN ik AS id))
Brand Names: B-3-50, B3-500-Gr, Niacin SR, Niacor, Niaspan ER, Slo-Niacin

What is niacin?

Niacin, also called nicotinic acid, is a B vitamin (vitamin B3). It occurs naturally in plants and animals, and is also added to many foods as a vitamin supplement. Niacin is also present in many multiple vitamins and nutritional supplements.

Niacin is used to treat and prevent a lack of natural niacin in the body, and to lower cholesterol and triglycerides (types of fat) in the blood. It is also used to lower the risk of heart attack in people with high cholesterol who have already had a heart attack. Niacin is sometimes used to treat coronary artery disease (also called atherosclerosis).

Niacin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about niacin? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to niacin, or if you have severe liver disease, a stomach ulcer, or active bleeding.

Niacin can cause certain side effects, such as flushing (warmth, itching, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin). These effects can be made worse if you drink alcohol or hot beverages shortly after you take niacin. These effects should disappear over time as you keep taking the medication.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Avoid taking colestipol (Colestid) or cholestyramine (Locholest, Prevalite, Questran) at the same time you take niacin. If you take either of these other medications, take them at least 4 to 6 hours before or after you take niacin.

Niacin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking niacin ? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to niacin, or if you have severe liver disease, a stomach ulcer, or active bleeding.

Before taking niacin, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

liver or kidney disease;

heart disease or uncontrolled angina (chest pain);

a stomach ulcer;

diabetes;

gout; or

a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use niacin, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category C. Niacin may be harmful to an unborn baby when the medication is taken at doses to treat high cholesterol or other conditions. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Niacin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take niacin ?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Niacin is sometimes taken at bedtime with a low-fat snack. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Niacin can cause certain side effects, such as flushing (warmth, itching, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin). These effects can be made worse if you drink alcohol or hot beverages shortly after you take niacin. These effects should disappear over time as you keep taking the medication.

Take niacin with a full glass of cold or cool water. Taking the medication with a hot drink may increase your risk of side effects such as flushing. Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. Swallow the pill whole. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or opening the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Niacin extended-release tablets and capsules contain higher strengths of the medicine than the regular niacin tablets. Take only the dose that is correct for the type of niacin tablet or capsule you are using.

Niacin can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests (urine tests). Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using niacin.

If you stop taking niacin for any length of time, talk with your doctor before starting the medication again. You may need to restart the medication at a lower dose.

Niacin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Store niacin at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Be sure to take the missed dose with food if you normally take your niacin dose with a meal or snack.

If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, dizziness, itching, vomiting, upset stomach, and flushing.

What should I avoid while taking niacin ?

Avoid drinking hot beverages shortly after taking niacin. Hot drinks can worsen niacin's flushing effect (warmth, itching, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin).

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking niacin. Alcohol may increase your risk of liver damage, and can also worsen the flushing effects of niacin.

Avoid taking colestipol (Colestid) or cholestyramine (Locholest, Prevalite, Questran) at the same time you take niacin. If you take either of these other medications, take them at least 4 to 6 hours before or after you take niacin.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Niacin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

feeling light-headed, fainting;

fast, pounding, or uneven heart beats;

feeling short of breath;

swelling;

jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes); or

muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness with fever or flu symptoms and dark colored urine.

If you are diabetic, tell your doctor about any changes in your blood sugar levels.

Less serious side effects of niacin include:

mild dizziness;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;

itching, dry skin;

sweating or chills;

nausea, diarrhea, belching, gas;

muscle pain, leg cramps; or

sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect niacin ?

Tell your doctor about all other cholesterol-lowering drugs you are taking with niacin, especially atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), or simvastatin (Zocor).

Before taking niacin, tell your doctor if you are also using any of the following drugs:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

multivitamins or mineral supplements that contain niacin;

blood pressure or heart medications such as amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), nisoldipine (Sular), or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); or

heart medications such as doxazosin (Cardura), isosorbide (Dilatrate, Imdur, Isordil, Monoket, Sorbitrate), nitroglycerin (Nitro-Bid, Nitro-Dur, Nitrostat), prazosin (Minipress), or terazosin (Hytrin).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with niacin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Slo-Niacin resources Slo-Niacin Side Effects (in more detail) Slo-Niacin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Slo-Niacin Drug Interactions Slo-Niacin Support Group 1 Review for Slo-Niacin - Add your own review/rating Compare Slo-Niacin with other medications High Cholesterol Hyperlipoproteinemia Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IV, Elevated VLDL Hyperlipoproteinemia Type V, Elevated Chylomicrons VLDL Niacin Deficiency Pellagra Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about niacin.

See also: Slo-Niacin side effects (in more detail)


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Exelon Patch


Pronunciation: RIV-a-STIG-meen
Generic Name: Rivastigmine
Brand Name: Exelon
Exelon Patch is used for:

Treating mild to moderate dementia (eg, impairment of memory or judgement, abstract thinking, changes in personality) in patients with Alzheimer or Parkinson disease.

Exelon Patch is a cholinesterase inhibitor. It works by increasing the amount of a certain substance (acetylcholine) in the brain, which may help reduce symptoms of dementia.

Do NOT use Exelon Patch if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Exelon Patch or to carbamate derivatives (eg, meprobamate) you are taking another form of rivastigmine (eg, capsules, solution) or another cholinesterase inhibitor (eg, donepezil)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Exelon Patch:

Some medical conditions may interact with Exelon Patch. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of kidney or liver problems, certain heart problems (eg, slow or irregular heartbeat, sick sinus syndrome), seizures (eg, epilepsy), stomach or bowel problems (eg, an ulcer), lung or breathing problems (eg, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]), or a urinary blockage (trouble urinating) if you have tremors if you have dementia or other decreased mental ability that is not caused by Alzheimer or Parkinson disease if you are scheduled to have surgery or other medical procedures with general anesthesia if you weigh less than 110 pounds (50 kg)

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Exelon Patch. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen) because the risk of stomach or bowel bleeding may be increased Cholinergic agents (eg, bethanechol) or another cholinesterase inhibitor (eg, donepezil) because they may increase the risk of Exelon Patch's side effects Anticholinergics (eg, scopolamine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Exelon Patch

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Exelon Patch may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Exelon Patch:

Use Exelon Patch as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Exelon Patch. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Do not cut or tear the patch. Do not apply a patch if the pouch seal is broken or if the patch has been damaged. Apply the patch to the upper or lower back, upper arm, or chest. Use a new application site with each new patch. Do not use the same site within 14 days. Apply to dry, intact skin. Do not apply to an area of skin that is hairy, oily, irritated, broken, scarred, or calloused. Do not apply to an area where cream, lotion, or powder has recently been applied. Do not place the patch under tight clothing. Do not remove the patch from the sealed pouch until you are ready to apply it. To apply the patch, remove the protective liner from one side of the patch. Place the sticky side of the patch to the application site, then remove the second side of the protective liner. Press the patch down firmly until the edges stick well. If you have questions about how to apply the patch, check with your doctor or pharmacist. After 24 hours, remove the used patch. Do not touch the sticky side. Fold the patch in half with the sticky sides together. Discard patch out of the reach of children and away from pets. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after applying or removing a patch. Do not touch your eyes before you have washed your hands. You may wear the patch while bathing, swimming, or showering. Make sure the patch does not come loose during these activities. Avoid exposing the application site to direct heat (eg, heating pads or electric blankets, heat lamps, saunas, hot tubs, heated water beds, prolonged direct sunlight) for long periods of time. Wear only one patch at a time. Be sure that you remove your old patch before you apply a new one. Change the patch at about the same time each day. Do not use bandages or tape to hold down loose patches. Do not reapply patches that have fallen off. Continue to use Exelon Patch even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If your patch falls off or if you miss a dose of Exelon Patch, apply a new patch to a new site, then return to your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply 2 patches at once. Contact your doctor if you miss applying the patch for 3 or more days. Your doctor may need to restart your medicine at a lower dose to avoid side effects.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Exelon Patch.

Important safety information: Exelon Patch may cause dizziness or drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Exelon Patch with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Exelon Patch is for external use only. Do not get it in your mouth. Do NOT use more than the recommended dose without checking with your doctor. When you begin taking Exelon Patch, your doctor will increase your dose slowly over several months. This may help to decrease the risk of certain side effects (eg, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite). Carefully follow the dosing schedule prescribed by your doctor. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Exelon Patch before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Exelon Patch should not be used in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Exelon Patch while you are pregnant. It is not known if Exelon Patch is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while you are using Exelon Patch. Possible side effects of Exelon Patch:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; dizziness; headache; loss of appetite; nausea; stomach upset or pain; tiredness; trouble sleeping; vomiting; weakness; weight loss.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); anxiety; bloody or black, tarry stools; chest pain; confusion; decreased coordination; decreased, increased, or painful urination; fainting; fever; new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, depression); new or worsening tremor or uncontrolled muscle movements; new or worsening trouble walking; seizures; severe or persistent diarrhea, nausea, stomach pain, or vomiting; severe or persistent dizziness, tiredness, or weakness; severe or persistent loss of appetite or weight loss; slow or irregular heartbeat; trouble speaking or swallowing; twitching of the face or tongue; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Exelon side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include fainting; increased saliva production; loss of consciousness; muscle weakness; seizures; severe dizziness; severe nausea or vomiting; severely increased sweating; slow heartbeat; slow or shallow breathing.

Proper storage of Exelon Patch:

Store Exelon Patch at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Exelon Patch out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Exelon Patch, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Exelon Patch is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Exelon Patch. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Exelon resources Exelon Side Effects (in more detail) Exelon Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Exelon Drug Interactions Exelon Support Group 4 Reviews for Exelon - Add your own review/rating Compare Exelon with other medications Alzheimer's Disease Parkinson's Disease
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estradiol and norethindrone


Generic Name: estradiol and norethindrone (ess tra DYE ole and nor ETH in drone)
Brand Names: Activella

What are estradiol and norethindrone?

Estradiol is a form of estrogen. Estrogen is a female sex hormone that is involved in the development and maintenance of the female reproductive system.

Norethindrone is a form of progesterone. Progesterone is a female hormone important for the regulation of ovulation and menstruation.

Together, estradiol and norethindrone are used to treat the symptoms of menopause such as feelings of warmth in the face, neck and chest, or sudden intense spells of heat and sweating ("hot flashes" or "hot flushes"); to treat vulvar and vaginal changes (itching, burning, dryness in or around the vagina, difficulty or burning with urination) caused by menopause; and to replace estrogen in conditions such as hypogonadism, removal of the ovaries, or primary ovarian failure that result in a lack of estrogen. Estradiol and norethindrone is also used to prevent thinning of the bones (osteoporosis).

Estradiol and norethindrone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about estradiol and norethindrone?

Estradiol increases the risk of developing endometrial hyperplasia, a condition that may lead to cancer of the lining of the uterus. Using a progestin, such as norethindrone, with estradiol lowers the risk of developing this condition. Visit your doctor regularly and report any unusual vaginal bleeding right away.

Have yearly physical exams and examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis while taking estradiol and norethindrone.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking estradiol and norethindrone? Do not take estradiol and norethindrone without first talking to your doctor if you have

a circulation, bleeding, or blood-clotting disorder;

undiagnosed, abnormal vaginal bleeding;

any type of breast, uterine, or hormone-dependent cancer; or

liver disease.

Taking estradiol and norethindrone may be dangerous in some cases if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Before taking estradiol and norethindrone, tell your doctor if you have

high blood pressure, angina, or heart disease;

high levels of cholesterol or triglycerides in your blood;

kidney disease;

asthma;

epilepsy;

migraines;

depression;

diabetes;

gallbladder disease;

uterine fibroids; or

had a hysterectomy (uterus removed).

You may not be able to take estradiol and norethindrone, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Estradiol and norethindrone is in the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that estradiol and norethindrone is known to cause birth defects in an unborn baby. Do not take estradiol and norethindrone if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. Estradiol and norethindrone may decrease milk flow and have other effects on milk composition. Do not take estradiol and norethindrone without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take estradiol and norethindrone?

Take estradiol and norethindrone exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a glass of water.

Try to take each dose at the same time every day.

Have yearly physical exams and examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis while taking estradiol and norethindrone.

Store ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone tablets at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and direct light.

See also: Estradiol and norethindrone dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Contact an emergency room or poison control center for advice if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a estradiol and norethindrone overdose may include nausea, vomiting, and withdrawal bleeding may occur in females.

What should I avoid while using estradiol and norethindrone?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while taking estradiol and norethindrone unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Estradiol and norethindrone side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking estradiol and norethindrone and seek emergency medical attention or notify your doctor immediately:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

shortness of breath or pain in the chest;

a painful, red, swollen leg;

abnormal vaginal bleeding;

pain, swelling, or tenderness in the abdomen;

severe headache or vomiting, dizziness, faintness or changes in vision or speech;

yellowing of the skin or eyes; or

a lump in a breast.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take estradiol and norethindrone and talk to your doctor if you experience

nausea and vomiting;

tenderness or enlargement of the breasts;

weakness;

swelling of the hands or feet;

spotty darkening of the skin, particularly on the face;

difficulty in wearing contact lenses;

vaginal irritation or discomfort; or

changes in menstrual cycle, painful menstruation, or break-through bleeding.

Estradiol increases the risk of developing endometrial hyperplasia, a condition that may lead to cancer of the lining of the uterus. Using a progestin, such as norethindrone, with estradiol lowers the risk of developing this condition. Visit your doctor regularly and report any unusual vaginal bleeding right away.

It is unclear to what extent estrogen and progesterone treatments may affect the risk of breast cancer.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Estradiol and norethindrone Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Atrophic Urethritis:

One (1 mg estradiol/0.5 mg norethindrone or 0.5 estradiol/ 0.1 mg norethindrone) tablet orally once a day.
-or-
One (0.05 mg-0.14 mg) patch applied twice weekly. If a greater progestin dose is desired, a single (0.05 mg-0.25 mg) patch may be applied twice weekly.
Alternatively, either patch may be applied as a continuation to an initial 14-day application of an estradiol-only transdermal patch within a 28-day cycle.
The patch should not be applied to, or near, the breasts. The application site should be smooth, clean, dry, fold-free, without damage or irritation, and be rotated with an interval of at least one week allowed to pass between applications to the same site.
If a patch dislodges, it may be reapplied to another area of the lower abdomen, or a new patch may be applied, in which case, the original treatment schedule resumes. However, only one patch should be worn at any given time during the three to four day dosing interval.

Usual Adult Dose for Atrophic Vaginitis:

One (1 mg estradiol/0.5 mg norethindrone or 0.5 estradiol/ 0.1 mg norethindrone) tablet orally once a day.
-or-
One (0.05 mg-0.14 mg) patch applied twice weekly. If a greater progestin dose is desired, a single (0.05 mg-0.25 mg) patch may be applied twice weekly.
Alternatively, either patch may be applied as a continuation to an initial 14-day application of an estradiol-only transdermal patch within a 28-day cycle.
The patch should not be applied to, or near, the breasts. The application site should be smooth, clean, dry, fold-free, without damage or irritation, and be rotated with an interval of at least one week allowed to pass between applications to the same site.
If a patch dislodges, it may be reapplied to another area of the lower abdomen, or a new patch may be applied, in which case, the original treatment schedule resumes. However, only one patch should be worn at any given time during the three to four day dosing interval.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypoestrogenism:

One (1 mg estradiol/0.5 mg norethindrone or 0.5 estradiol/ 0.1 mg norethindrone) tablet orally once a day.
-or-
One (0.05 mg-0.14 mg) patch applied twice weekly. If a greater progestin dose is desired, a single (0.05 mg-0.25 mg) patch may be applied twice weekly.
Alternatively, either patch may be applied as a continuation to an initial 14-day application of an estradiol-only transdermal patch within a 28-day cycle.
The patch should not be applied to, or near, the breasts. The application site should be smooth, clean, dry, fold-free, without damage or irritation, and be rotated with an interval of at least one week allowed to pass between applications to the same site.
If a patch dislodges, it may be reapplied to another area of the lower abdomen, or a new patch may be applied, in which case, the original treatment schedule resumes. However, only one patch should be worn at any given time during the three to four day dosing interval.

Usual Adult Dose for Postmenopausal Symptoms:

One (1 mg estradiol/0.5 mg norethindrone or 0.5 estradiol/ 0.1 mg norethindrone) tablet orally once a day.
-or-
One (0.05 mg-0.14 mg) patch applied twice weekly. If a greater progestin dose is desired, a single (0.05 mg-0.25 mg) patch may be applied twice weekly.
Alternatively, either patch may be applied as a continuation to an initial 14-day application of an estradiol-only transdermal patch within a 28-day cycle.
The patch should not be applied to, or near, the breasts. The application site should be smooth, clean, dry, fold-free, without damage or irritation, and be rotated with an interval of at least one week allowed to pass between applications to the same site.
If a patch dislodges, it may be reapplied to another area of the lower abdomen, or a new patch may be applied, in which case, the original treatment schedule resumes. However, only one patch should be worn at any given time during the three to four day dosing interval.

What other drugs will affect estradiol and norethindrone?

Before taking estradiol and norethindrone, tell your doctor if you are taking an anticoagulant (blood thinner) such as warfarin (Coumadin). You may not be able to take estradiol and norethindrone, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with estradiol and norethindrone. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More estradiol and norethindrone resources Estradiol and norethindrone Dosage Estradiol and norethindrone Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Estradiol and norethindrone Drug Interactions Estradiol and norethindrone Support Group 4 Reviews for Estradiol and norethindrone - Add your own review/rating Compare estradiol and norethindrone with other medications Atrophic Urethritis Atrophic Vaginitis Hypoestrogenism Postmenopausal Symptoms Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about estradiol and norethindrone written for health professionals that you may read.
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labetalol


Generic Name: labetalol (la BAY ta lol)
Brand Names: Normodyne, Trandate

What is labetalol?

Labetalol is in a group of drugs called beta-blockers. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

Labetalol is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure).

Labetalol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about labetalol? Do not stop taking labetalol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using labetalol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Labetalol can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using labetalol before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

Labetalol may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Labetalol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking labetalol? You should not take labetalol if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD;

certain serious heart conditions such as"AV block" or slow heart rhythm; or

conditions that cause very low blood pressure.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a labetalol dose adjustment or special tests:

bronchitis, emphysema, sleep apnea, or other breathing problem;

congestive heart failure;

liver or kidney disease;

diabetes; or

pheochromocytoma (tumor of the adrenal gland).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether labetalol will harm an unborn baby. Labetalol may cause heart or lung problems in a newborn if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Labetalol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take labetalol?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Do not skip doses or stop taking labetalol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using labetalol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Labetalol can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using labetalol before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

Taking labetalol can make it harder for you to tell when your blood sugar is low. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar regularly.

This medication can cause false results with certain lab tests of the urine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using labetalol.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Labetalol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Labetalol dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if your next dose is less than 8 hours away. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include slow heart rate, extreme dizziness, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking labetalol? Labetalol may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of labetalol. Labetalol side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

slow or uneven heartbeats;

feeling like you might pass out;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling or rapid weight gain; or

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

tingly feeling in your scalp;

dizziness, spinning sensation;

mild nausea, upset stomach;

tired feeling;

stuffy nose; or

difficulty having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Labetalol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Oral:
Initial dose: 100 mg orally twice a day whether used alone or added to a diuretic regimen.
Maintenance dose: 200 to 400 mg orally twice a day.
Parenteral:
Repeated IV Injection: Initial dose: 20 mg (0.25 mg/kg) by slow IV injection over a 2 minute period.
Additional injections of 40 to 80 mg can be given at 10 minute intervals until a desired supine blood pressure is achieved or a total of 300 mg of labetalol has been injected.
The maximum effect usually occurs within 5 minutes of each injection.
Slow continuous IV Infusion: Add 40 mL of labetalol Injection to 160 mL of a commonly used IV fluid such that the resultant 200 mL of solution contains 200 mg of labetalol, 1 mg/mL. The diluted solution should be administered at a rate of 2 mL/min to deliver 2 mg/min.
Alternatively, add 40 mL of labetalol Injection to 250 mL of a commonly used IV fluid. The resultant solution will contain 200 mg of labetalol, approximately 2 mg/3 mL. The diluted solution should be administered at a rate of 3 mL/min to deliver approximately 2 mg/min.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertensive Emergency:

Oral:
Initial dose: 100 mg orally twice a day whether used alone or added to a diuretic regimen.
Maintenance dose: 200 to 400 mg orally twice a day.
Parenteral:
Repeated IV Injection: Initial dose: 20 mg (0.25 mg/kg) by slow IV injection over a 2 minute period.
Additional injections of 40 to 80 mg can be given at 10 minute intervals until a desired supine blood pressure is achieved or a total of 300 mg of labetalol has been injected.
The maximum effect usually occurs within 5 minutes of each injection.
Slow continuous IV Infusion: Add 40 mL of labetalol Injection to 160 mL of a commonly used IV fluid such that the resultant 200 mL of solution contains 200 mg of labetalol, 1 mg/mL. The diluted solution should be administered at a rate of 2 mL/min to deliver 2 mg/min.
Alternatively, add 40 mL of labetalol Injection to 250 mL of a commonly used IV fluid. The resultant solution will contain 200 mg of labetalol, approximately 2 mg/3 mL. The diluted solution should be administered at a rate of 3 mL/min to deliver approximately 2 mg/min.

Usual Adult Dose for Pheochromocytoma:

Oral:
Initial dose: 100 mg orally twice a day whether used alone or added to a diuretic regimen.
Maintenance dose: 200 to 400 mg orally twice a day.
Parenteral:
Repeated IV Injection: Initial dose: 20 mg (0.25 mg/kg) by slow IV injection over a 2 minute period.
Additional injections of 40 to 80 mg can be given at 10 minute intervals until a desired supine blood pressure is achieved or a total of 300 mg of labetalol has been injected.
The maximum effect usually occurs within 5 minutes of each injection.
Slow continuous IV Infusion: Add 40 mL of labetalol Injection to 160 mL of a commonly used IV fluid such that the resultant 200 mL of solution contains 200 mg of labetalol, 1 mg/mL. The diluted solution should be administered at a rate of 2 mL/min to deliver 2 mg/min.
Alternatively, add 40 mL of labetalol Injection to 250 mL of a commonly used IV fluid. The resultant solution will contain 200 mg of labetalol, approximately 2 mg/3 mL. The diluted solution should be administered at a rate of 3 mL/min to deliver approximately 2 mg/min.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 50 mg to 100 mg orally twice a day.
May be titrated upwards in increments of 50 mg to 100 mg twice daily as required for control of blood pressure.
Maintenance dose: 100 to 200 mg orally twice a day.

What other drugs will affect labetalol?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

cimetidine (Tagamet);

digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);

a diuretic (water pill);

insulin or oral diabetes medication;

nitroglycerin (Nitro-Dur, Nitrolingual, Nitrostat, Transderm-Nitro, and others);

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip, Limbitrol), doxepin (Sinequan), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others;

heart or blood pressure medication such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others; or

medicine for asthma or other breathing disorders, such as albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil), metaproterenol (Alupent), pirbuterol (Maxair), terbutaline (Brethaire, Brethine, Bricanyl), and theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Theochron, Uniphyl).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with labetalol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More labetalol resources Labetalol Side Effects (in more detail) Labetalol Dosage Labetalol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Labetalol Drug Interactions Labetalol Support Group 2 Reviews for Labetalol - Add your own review/rating labetalol Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Labetalol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Labetalol Prescribing Information (FDA) Labetalol Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Trandate Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare labetalol with other medications High Blood Pressure Hypertensive Emergency Mitral Valve Prolapse Pheochromocytoma Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about labetalol.

See also: labetalol side effects (in more detail)


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Catapres-TTS-2 transdermal


Generic Name: clonidine (transdermal) (KLOE ni deen)
Brand Names: Catapres-TTS-1, Catapres-TTS-2, Catapres-TTS-3

What is Catapres-TTS-2 (clonidine (transdermal))?

Clonidine lowers blood pressure by decreasing the levels of certain chemicals in your blood. This allows your blood vessels to relax and your heart to beat more slowly and easily.

Clonidine transdermal is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). It is sometimes used together with other blood pressure medications.

Clonidine transdermal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Catapres-TTS-2 (clonidine (transdermal))?

Before using clonidine transdermal, tell your doctor if you have heart disease or severe coronary artery disease, a heart rhythm disorder, a history of heart attack or stroke, or kidney disease. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products.

Clonidine skin patches come with optional "cover" patches. The cover patch is placed over the clonidine patch to help it stick to your skin. The cover patch does not contain any active medicine. It should be worn only over a clonidine patch.

Clonidine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms.

The clonidine transdermal patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the clonidine patch before undergoing such a test.

Tell any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you that you are using clonidine transdermal. If you need emergency heart resuscitation, your family or caregivers should tell emergency medical personnel if you are wearing a clonidine skin patch. The patch should be removed before any electrical equipment (such as a defribrillator) is used on you.

Do not stop using clonidine transdermal suddenly, or you could have unpleasant or life-threatening withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using clonidine transdermal. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Catapres-TTS-2 (clonidine (transdermal))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to clonidine.

To make sure you can safely take clonidine transdermal, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart disease or severe coronary artery disease;

a heart rhythm disorder;

a history of heart attack or stroke;

kidney disease; or

if you have ever had an allergic reaction to clonidine transdermal.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether clonidine transdermal is harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clonidine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Catapres-TTS-2 (clonidine (transdermal))?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

This medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Before applying a skin patch, wash your hands with soap and water and dry them thoroughly. Also wash and dry the skin area where you plan to apply the patch. Rinse and wipe dry with a clean tissue.

Apply the skin patch to a flat, hairless area of the chest, back, side, or outer side of your upper arm. To remove any hair from these areas, clip the hair short but do not shave it. Press the patch firmly with the palm making sure it sticks firmly, especially around the edges.

You will wear the patch for 7 days and then remove it and put on a new one. Apply the new patch to a different skin area on your arm or torso. Do not apply patches to the same skin area 2 weeks in a row. Do not wear more than 1 patch at a time unless your doctor has told you to.

Clonidine skin patches come with optional "cover" patches. The cover patch is placed over the clonidine patch to help it stick to your skin. The clonidine patch is square and the cover patch is round. The cover patch does not contain any active medicine. It should be worn only over a clonidine patch.

You may use a cover patch if the clonidine patch becomes loose or falls off before you have worn it for 7 days. Apply the cover patch over the clonidine patch. Keep both patches on for the rest of your 7-day wearing time.

After removing a skin patch fold it in half, sticky side in, and throw it away where children and pets cannot get to it.

The clonidine transdermal patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the clonidine patch before undergoing such a test.

Tell any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you that you are using clonidine transdermal. If you need emergency heart resuscitation, your family or caregivers should tell emergency medical personnel if you are wearing a clonidine skin patch. The patch should be removed before any electrical equipment (such as a defribrillator) is used on you.

Do not stop using clonidine transdermal suddenly, or you could have unpleasant or life-threatening withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using clonidine transdermal.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep each skin patch in the foil pouch until you are ready to use it. What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply a skin patch as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra patches to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath) followed by low blood pressure (feeling light-headed, fainting), drowsiness, cold feeling, slow heart rate, shallow breathing, weakness, fainting, or pinpoint pupils.

What should I avoid while using Catapres-TTS-2 (clonidine (transdermal))?

Avoid using lotions, oils, or other skin products on the area where you will apply the skin patch. The patch may not stick properly to the skin.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of clonidine transdermal. Clonidine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Catapres-TTS-2 (clonidine (transdermal)) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fast or pounding heartbeats;

a very slow heart rate (fewer than 60 beats per minute);

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling, rapid weight gain;

confusion, hallucinations;

fever, pale skin;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

numbness or cold feeling in your hands or feet;

feeling like you might pass out; or

severe skin irritation, redness, swelling, burning, or blistering where the patch is worn.

Less serious side effects may include:

feeling dizzy, drowsy, tired, or nervous;

dry mouth;

dry or burning eyes, blurred vision;

headache, muscle or joint pain;

nausea, vomiting, constipation, loss of appetite;

sleep problems (insomnia);

urinating more at night;

mild skin rash or itching;

decreased sex drive, impotence; or

skin rash, discoloration, or mild irritation where the patch is worn.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Catapres-TTS-2 (clonidine (transdermal))? Before using clonidine transdermal, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by clonidine.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

oral clonidine (tablets);

digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip, Limbitrol), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others;

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Dutoprol, Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others;

heart or blood pressure medicine such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta, Amturnide), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others; or

any other drugs to treat high blood pressure or heart problems.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with clonidine transdermal. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Catapres-TTS-2 resources Catapres-TTS-2 Side Effects (in more detail) Catapres-TTS-2 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Catapres-TTS-2 Drug Interactions Catapres-TTS-2 Support Group 4 Reviews for Catapres-TTS-2 - Add your own review/rating Compare Catapres-TTS-2 with other medications Alcohol Withdrawal Anxiety Benzodiazepine Withdrawal Bipolar Disorder High Blood Pressure Migraine Prevention Opiate Withdrawal Perimenopausal Symptoms Smoking Cessation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clonidine transdermal.

See also: Catapres-TTS-2 side effects (in more detail)


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