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Pnu-Imune 23


Generic Name: pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV adult, 23-valent) (new moe CAW cull pah lee SAH cah ride)
Brand Names: Pneumovax 23, Pnu-Imune 23

What is pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious disease caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) exposes the individual to a small dose of the bacteria (or a protein from the bacteria) and causes the body to develop immunity to the disease.

Pneumococcal infection can cause ear infection, sinus infection, pneumonia, blood infection (bacteremia), and meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain). About 1 out of every 20 people who get pneumococcal pneumonia dies from it, as do about 2 out of every 10 who get bacteremia, and 3 out of 10 who get meningitis. Pneumococcal disease kills more people in the United States every year than all other vaccine-preventable diseases combined.

PPV (adult, 23-valent) is recommended for: all adults 65 years of age and older; anyone over 2 years of age who has long-term health problems such as sickle cell disease; heart disease; lung disease; alcoholism; diabetes; cirrhosis; or leaks of cerebrospinal fluid; anyone over 2 years of age who has a condition that lowers the body's resistance to infection such as: Hodgkin's disease, lymphoma, leukemia, kidney failure, multiple myeloma, nephrotic syndrome, damaged spleen or no spleen, or organ transplant; anyone over 2 years of age who is taking any drug or treatment that lowers the body's resistance to infection such as long-term steroids, radiation therapy, and certain cancer drugs; and all Alaskan natives and certain Native American populations.

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine can help prevent the disease. Many more people would get the disease if vaccination did not occur.

What is the most important information I should know about pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. Those who are moderately or severely ill or have a fever should usually wait until they recover before getting pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine? Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction after receiving a dose of PPV should not get another dose.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. Those who are moderately or severely ill or have a fever should usually wait until they recover before getting pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

Before receiving PPV, talk to your doctor if you:

are over the age of 65 years and if the first dose was given when you were younger than 65 and 5 or more years have passed since that dose;

have HIV or AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system;

are taking a medication that affects the immune system (e.g. steroids, anti-rejection medications);

have had an organ or bone marrow transplant;

have cancer;

are receiving cancer treatment with x-rays, radiation, or medication;

have a damaged spleen or no spleen;

have sickle-cell disease; or

have kidney failure or nephrotic syndrome.

A second dose of the vaccine may be recommended in some cases.

Talk to your doctor before receiving pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. How is pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine administered?

Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will administer the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine as an injection.

Most people need only one dose of PPV.

A second dose may be recommended for some individuals. Your healthcare provider will determine if a second dose is needed and when it should be given.

Otherwise healthy children who often get ear infection, sinus infection, or other upper respiratory diseases do not need to get PPV because of these conditions.

Your doctor may recommend reducing fever or pain that may occur by taking an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, Tempra, others) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Your healthcare provider can tell you the appropriate dosages of these medications.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since only one dose of the vaccine is usually given, missing a dose should not occur. If a second dose is recommended and it is missed or delayed, contact your doctor.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid before or after getting pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity before or after receiving pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine side effects

Getting pneumococcal disease is much riskier than getting pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. However, a vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

Seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately if any of the following rare but serious side effects from pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine are experienced:

a serious allergic reaction including swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; hives; paleness; weakness; dizziness; or a fast heart beat within a few minutes to a few hours after the shot; or

high fever; or

behavior changes.

About half of those who get PPV have very mild side effects, such as redness or pain where the shot is given. Less and 1% develop fever, muscle aches, or more severe local reactions.

Your doctor may recommend reducing fever or pain that may occur by taking an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, Tempra, others) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Your healthcare provider can tell you the appropriate dosages of these medications.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Contact your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

Talk to your doctor before receiving pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine if you are taking any of the following medications that may affect the immune system:

an oral or injectable steroid medication such as betamethasone (Celestone), cortisone (Cortone), dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexone), hydrocortisone (Cortef, Hydrocortone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred), prednisone (Orasone, Deltasone, others), or triamcinolone (Aristocort);

an inhaled or nasal steroid such as beclomethasone (Qvar, Beclovent, Beconase, Vanceril, Vancenase), budesonide (Pulmicort, Rhinocort), flunisolide (Aerobid, Nasalide, Nasarel), fluticasone (Flovent, Flonase), mometasone (Nasonex), or triamcinolone (Azmacort, Nasacort);

treatment for cancer with chemotherapy (medication), radiation, or x-rays;

azathioprine (Imuran);

basiliximab (Simulect);

cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf);

etanercept (Enbrel);

leflunomide (Arava);

muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone);

mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept);

sirolimus (Rapamune); or

tacrolimus (Prograf).

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine can be given at the same time as other vaccinations.

Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist may have additional information or suggest additional resources regarding pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.
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Engerix-B


Generic Name: hepatitis B adult vaccine (HEP a TYE tis)
Brand Names: Engerix-B, Recombivax HB Adult, Recombivax HB Dialysis Formulation

What is hepatitis B vaccine?

Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by virus.

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver that is spread through blood or bodily fluids, sexual contact or sharing IV drug needles with an infected person, or during childbirth when a baby is born to a mother who is infected. Hepatitis causes inflammation of the liver, vomiting, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Hepatitis can lead to liver cancer, cirrhosis, or death.

The hepatitis B vaccine is used to help prevent this disease.

This vaccine works by exposing you to a small amount of the virus, which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

Vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for all adults and children who are at risk of getting hepatitis B. Risk factors include: having more than one sex partner in 6 months; being a homosexual male; having sexual contact with infected people; having cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis C; using intravenous (IV) drugs; being on dialysis or receiving blood transfusions; working in healthcare or public safety and being exposed to infected blood or body fluids; being in the military or traveling to high-risk areas; and living with a person who has chronic hepatitis B infection.

Like any vaccine, the hepatitis B vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine? Hepatitis B vaccine will not protect against infection with hepatitis A, C, and E, or other viruses that affect the liver. It may also not protect against hepatitis B if you are already infected with the virus, even if you do not yet show symptoms.

Vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for all adults and children who are at risk of getting hepatitis B. Risk factors include: having more than one sex partner in 6 months; being a homosexual male; having sexual contact with infected people; having cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis C; using intravenous (IV) drugs; being on dialysis or receiving blood transfusions; working in healthcare or public safety and being exposed to infected blood or body fluids; being in the military or traveling to high-risk areas; and living with a person who has chronic hepatitis B infection.

The hepatitis B vaccine is given in a series of shots. The booster shots are sometimes given 1 month and 6 months after the first shot. If you have a high risk of hepatitis B infection, you may be given an additional booster 2 months after the first shot.

Your individual booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by your local health department.

Be sure to receive all recommended doses of this vaccine. You may not be fully protected if you do not receive the full series.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with hepatitis B is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine? Hepatitis B vaccine will not protect against infection with hepatitis A, C, and E, or other viruses that affect the liver. It may also not protect against hepatitis B if you are already infected with the virus, even if you do not yet show symptoms. You should not receive this vaccine if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any vaccine containing hepatitis B, or if you are allergic to baker's yeast. You also should not receive this vaccine if you have received cancer chemotherapy or radiation treatment in the past 3 months.

If you have any of these other conditions, your vaccine may need to be postponed or not given at all:

multiple sclerosis;

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia or easy bruising;

a history of seizures;

a neurologic disorder or disease affecting the brain (or if this was a reaction to a previous vaccine);

an allergy to latex rubber;

a weak immune system caused by disease, bone marrow transplant, or by using certain medicines or receiving cancer treatments; or

if you are taking a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this vaccine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while receiving the series of hepatitis B vaccines. It is not known whether hepatitis B vaccine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not receive this vaccine without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is this vaccine given?

The vaccine is injected into a muscle. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

The hepatitis B vaccine is given in a series of shots. The booster shots are sometimes given 1 month and 6 months after the first shot. If you have a high risk of hepatitis B infection, you may be given an additional booster 2 months after the first shot.

Your individual booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by your local health department.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

It is especially important to prevent fever from occurring if you have a seizure disorder such as epilepsy. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor if you will miss a booster dose or if you get behind schedule. The next dose should be given as soon as possible. There is no need to start over.

Be sure to receive all recommended doses of this vaccine. You may not be fully protected if you do not receive the full series.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid before or after receiving this vaccine?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

This vaccine side effects You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot. Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with hepatitis B is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;

irritability;

fast or pounding heartbeats; or

easy bruising or bleeding.

Less serious side effects include:

redness, pain, swelling, or a lump where the shot was given;

headache, dizziness;

low fever;

joint pain, body aches;

tired feeling; or

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

What other drugs will affect hepatitis B vaccine? Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you have received drugs or treatments in the past 2 weeks that can weaken the immune system, including:

an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;

medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), efalizumab (Raptiva), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or

medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

There may be other drugs that can affect this vaccine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Engerix-B resources Engerix-B Side Effects (in more detail) Engerix-B Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Engerix-B Drug Interactions Engerix-B Support Group 0 Reviews for Engerix-B - Add your own review/rating Engerix-B Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Engerix-B MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Engerix-B Consumer Overview Compare Engerix-B with other medications Hepatitis B Prevention Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about this vaccine. Additional information is available from your local health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

See also: Engerix-B side effects (in more detail)


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Pneumovax 23


Generic Name: pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent (NOO moe KOK al POL ee SAK a rides, 23-VAY lent)
Brand Names: Pneumovax 23

What is pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain and these conditions can be fatal.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV) is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. PPSV contains 23 of the most common types of pneumococcal bacteria.

PPSV works by exposing you to a small dose of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes your body to develop immunity to the disease. PPSV will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

PPSV is for use only in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. For children younger than 2 years old, another vaccine called Prevnar (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV] 7-valent) is used, usually given between the ages of 2 months and 15 months.

Like any vaccine, PPSV may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine?

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine? You should not receive this vaccine if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine.

Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia, or easy bruising.

The timing and number of PPSV doses you receive will depend on whether you have any of these other conditions:

cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma;

HIV or AIDS;

sickle cell disease;

a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome;

a history of organ or bone marrow transplant;

if you are receiving chemotherapy;

if you have been using steroid medication for a long period of time;

if you are scheduled to have your spleen removed (splenectomy); or

if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Vaccines may be harmful to an unborn baby and generally should not be given to a pregnant woman. However, not vaccinating the mother could be more harmful to the baby if the mother becomes infected with a disease that this vaccine could prevent. Your doctor will decide whether you should receive this vaccine, especially if you have a high risk of infection with pneumococcal disease. It is not known whether PPSV passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is this vaccine given?

PPSV is given as an injection (shot) under the skin or into a muscle of your arm or thigh. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

PPSV is usually given as a routine vaccination in adults who are 65 years and older.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 2 and 64 years old who have:

heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes;

a cerebrospinal fluid leak, or a cochlear implant (an electronic hearing device);

alcoholism or liver disease (including cirrhosis);

sickle cell disease or a disorder of the spleen;

a weak immune system caused by HIV, AIDS, cancer, kidney failure, organ transplantation, or a damaged spleen; or

a weak immune system caused by taking steroids or receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 19 and 64 years old who smoke or have asthma.

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

If your doctor has prescribed an antibiotic (such as penicillin) to help prevent infection with pneumococcal bacteria, do not stop using the antibiotic after you receive the PPSV. Take the antibiotic for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

Most people receive only one PPSV shot during their lifetime. However, people in certain age groups or with certain disease conditions that put them at risk of infection may need to receive more than one vaccine. Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since PPSV is usually given only one time, you will most likely not be on a dosing schedule. If you are receiving a repeat PPSV shot, be sure to tell your doctor if it has been less than 5 years since you last received a pneumococcal vaccine.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is not likely to occur.

What should I avoid' before or after receiving this vaccine ? PPSV should not be given within 4 weeks before or after you receive a herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax). This vaccine side effects You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

high fever (103 degrees or higher);

easy bruising or bleeding;

swollen glands with skin rash or itching, joint pain, and general ill feeling;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, confusion or weakness;

numbness or tingly feeling in your feet and spreading upward, severe lower back pain;

changes in behavior, problems with vision, speech, swallowing, or bladder and bowel functions; or

slow heart rate, trouble breathing, feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

low fever (102 degrees or less), chills, tired feeling;

swelling, pain, tenderness, or redness anywhere on your body;

headache, nausea, vomiting;

joint or muscle pain;

swelling or stiffness in the arm or leg the vaccine was injected into;

mild skin rash; or

mild soreness, warmth, redness, swelling, or a hard lump where the shot was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

What other drugs will affect pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)? Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you have recently received drugs or treatments that can weaken the immune system, including:

an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;

medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or

medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with PPSV. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Pneumovax 23 resources Pneumovax 23 Side Effects (in more detail) Pneumovax 23 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pneumovax 23 Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Pneumovax 23 - Add your own review/rating Pneumovax 23 Prescribing Information (FDA) Pneumovax 23 Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Pneumovax 23 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Pneumovax 23 with other medications Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist may have additional information about pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine. You may also find additional information from your local health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

See also: Pneumovax 23 side effects (in more detail)


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pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent


Generic Name: pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent (NOO moe KOK al POL ee SAK a rides, 23-VAY lent)
Brand Names: Pneumovax 23

What is pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain and these conditions can be fatal.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV) is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. PPSV contains 23 of the most common types of pneumococcal bacteria.

PPSV works by exposing you to a small dose of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes your body to develop immunity to the disease. PPSV will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

PPSV is for use only in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. For children younger than 2 years old, another vaccine called Prevnar (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV] 7-valent) is used, usually given between the ages of 2 months and 15 months.

Like any vaccine, PPSV may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine?

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine? You should not receive this vaccine if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine.

Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia, or easy bruising.

The timing and number of PPSV doses you receive will depend on whether you have any of these other conditions:

cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma;

HIV or AIDS;

sickle cell disease;

a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome;

a history of organ or bone marrow transplant;

if you are receiving chemotherapy;

if you have been using steroid medication for a long period of time;

if you are scheduled to have your spleen removed (splenectomy); or

if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Vaccines may be harmful to an unborn baby and generally should not be given to a pregnant woman. However, not vaccinating the mother could be more harmful to the baby if the mother becomes infected with a disease that this vaccine could prevent. Your doctor will decide whether you should receive this vaccine, especially if you have a high risk of infection with pneumococcal disease. It is not known whether PPSV passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is this vaccine given?

PPSV is given as an injection (shot) under the skin or into a muscle of your arm or thigh. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

PPSV is usually given as a routine vaccination in adults who are 65 years and older.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 2 and 64 years old who have:

heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes;

a cerebrospinal fluid leak, or a cochlear implant (an electronic hearing device);

alcoholism or liver disease (including cirrhosis);

sickle cell disease or a disorder of the spleen;

a weak immune system caused by HIV, AIDS, cancer, kidney failure, organ transplantation, or a damaged spleen; or

a weak immune system caused by taking steroids or receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 19 and 64 years old who smoke or have asthma.

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

If your doctor has prescribed an antibiotic (such as penicillin) to help prevent infection with pneumococcal bacteria, do not stop using the antibiotic after you receive the PPSV. Take the antibiotic for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

Most people receive only one PPSV shot during their lifetime. However, people in certain age groups or with certain disease conditions that put them at risk of infection may need to receive more than one vaccine. Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since PPSV is usually given only one time, you will most likely not be on a dosing schedule. If you are receiving a repeat PPSV shot, be sure to tell your doctor if it has been less than 5 years since you last received a pneumococcal vaccine.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is not likely to occur.

What should I avoid' before or after receiving this vaccine ? PPSV should not be given within 4 weeks before or after you receive a herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax). This vaccine side effects You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

high fever (103 degrees or higher);

easy bruising or bleeding;

swollen glands with skin rash or itching, joint pain, and general ill feeling;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, confusion or weakness;

numbness or tingly feeling in your feet and spreading upward, severe lower back pain;

changes in behavior, problems with vision, speech, swallowing, or bladder and bowel functions; or

slow heart rate, trouble breathing, feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

low fever (102 degrees or less), chills, tired feeling;

swelling, pain, tenderness, or redness anywhere on your body;

headache, nausea, vomiting;

joint or muscle pain;

swelling or stiffness in the arm or leg the vaccine was injected into;

mild skin rash; or

mild soreness, warmth, redness, swelling, or a hard lump where the shot was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis:

0.5 mL dose injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly (preferably in the deltoid muscle or lateral mid-thigh).

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis:

>= 2 years: 0.5 mL dose injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly (preferably in the deltoid muscle or lateral mid-thigh).

What other drugs will affect pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)? Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you have recently received drugs or treatments that can weaken the immune system, including:

an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;

medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or

medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with PPSV. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent resources Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Dosage Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Drug Interactions Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Support Group 0 Reviews for Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent - Add your own review/rating Compare pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent with other medications Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist may have additional information about pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine. You may also find additional information from your local health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent


Generic Name: pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent (NOO moe KOK al POL ee SAK a rides, 23-VAY lent)
Brand Names: Pneumovax 23

What is pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain and these conditions can be fatal.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV) is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. PPSV contains 23 of the most common types of pneumococcal bacteria.

PPSV works by exposing you to a small dose of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes your body to develop immunity to the disease. PPSV will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

PPSV is for use only in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. For children younger than 2 years old, another vaccine called Prevnar (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV] 7-valent) is used, usually given between the ages of 2 months and 15 months.

Like any vaccine, PPSV may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine?

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine? You should not receive this vaccine if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine.

Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia, or easy bruising.

The timing and number of PPSV doses you receive will depend on whether you have any of these other conditions:

cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma;

HIV or AIDS;

sickle cell disease;

a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome;

a history of organ or bone marrow transplant;

if you are receiving chemotherapy;

if you have been using steroid medication for a long period of time;

if you are scheduled to have your spleen removed (splenectomy); or

if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Vaccines may be harmful to an unborn baby and generally should not be given to a pregnant woman. However, not vaccinating the mother could be more harmful to the baby if the mother becomes infected with a disease that this vaccine could prevent. Your doctor will decide whether you should receive this vaccine, especially if you have a high risk of infection with pneumococcal disease. It is not known whether PPSV passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is this vaccine given?

PPSV is given as an injection (shot) under the skin or into a muscle of your arm or thigh. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

PPSV is usually given as a routine vaccination in adults who are 65 years and older.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 2 and 64 years old who have:

heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes;

a cerebrospinal fluid leak, or a cochlear implant (an electronic hearing device);

alcoholism or liver disease (including cirrhosis);

sickle cell disease or a disorder of the spleen;

a weak immune system caused by HIV, AIDS, cancer, kidney failure, organ transplantation, or a damaged spleen; or

a weak immune system caused by taking steroids or receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 19 and 64 years old who smoke or have asthma.

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

If your doctor has prescribed an antibiotic (such as penicillin) to help prevent infection with pneumococcal bacteria, do not stop using the antibiotic after you receive the PPSV. Take the antibiotic for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

Most people receive only one PPSV shot during their lifetime. However, people in certain age groups or with certain disease conditions that put them at risk of infection may need to receive more than one vaccine. Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since PPSV is usually given only one time, you will most likely not be on a dosing schedule. If you are receiving a repeat PPSV shot, be sure to tell your doctor if it has been less than 5 years since you last received a pneumococcal vaccine.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is not likely to occur.

What should I avoid' before or after receiving this vaccine ? PPSV should not be given within 4 weeks before or after you receive a herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax). This vaccine side effects You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

high fever (103 degrees or higher);

easy bruising or bleeding;

swollen glands with skin rash or itching, joint pain, and general ill feeling;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, confusion or weakness;

numbness or tingly feeling in your feet and spreading upward, severe lower back pain;

changes in behavior, problems with vision, speech, swallowing, or bladder and bowel functions; or

slow heart rate, trouble breathing, feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

low fever (102 degrees or less), chills, tired feeling;

swelling, pain, tenderness, or redness anywhere on your body;

headache, nausea, vomiting;

joint or muscle pain;

swelling or stiffness in the arm or leg the vaccine was injected into;

mild skin rash; or

mild soreness, warmth, redness, swelling, or a hard lump where the shot was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis:

0.5 mL dose injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly (preferably in the deltoid muscle or lateral mid-thigh).

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis:

>= 2 years: 0.5 mL dose injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly (preferably in the deltoid muscle or lateral mid-thigh).

What other drugs will affect pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)? Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you have recently received drugs or treatments that can weaken the immune system, including:

an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;

medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or

medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with PPSV. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent resources Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Dosage Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Drug Interactions Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Support Group 0 Reviews for Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent - Add your own review/rating Compare pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent with other medications Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist may have additional information about pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine. You may also find additional information from your local health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Senokot Tablets


Senokot Tablets

Senokot is a reliably effective laxative made with natural senna treated especially to yield a constant amount of active ingredient in each dose, to give predictable constipation relief.

Directions for use:

Adults and children over 12: Take 2-4 tablets at night.

Children over 6: Take 1-2 tablets in the morning.

Children 6 and under: Not recommended.

New users should start with the lowest dose and increase if necessary by one half of initial dose each day. Once regularity has been regained doses should be reduced and can usually be stopped.

Senokot usually acts within 8-12 hours. Dose can be repeated on a daily basis until bowel action is restored, but if there is no bowel movement within three days of use, consult your doctor.

Ingredients:

Each tablet contains standardised senna equivalent to 7.5mg total sennosides in a base containing lactose, calcium phosphate, maize starch and magnesium stearate.

For safe use:

Keep out of reach of children.

If laxatives are needed every day, or if abdominal pain persists, please consult your doctor.

Consult your doctor or pharmacist if:

you have sharp or persistant stomach pain your abdomen is tender to the touch or hurts when you move you accidentally take too many tablets

To open pull tab. If tab is missing do not use. Replace cap firmly after use. Store dry below 30°C. Do not use after expiry date.

You may experience temporary mild stomach pains if changing dosage.

Consult your doctor if you notice any other side effects.

Manufacturer and MA Holder: Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare (UK) Limited Dansom Lane Hull HU8 7DS UK Distributor: Britannia Pharmaceuticals Limited 41-51 Brighton Road Redhill Surrey RH1 6YS Export Distributor: Reckitt & Colman (Overseas) Limited Hull HU8 7DS

Product Licence Number: PL 0063/5000

Date of preparation: July 2005


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trimethobenzamide Intramuscular


trye-meth-oh-BENZ-a-mide

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Arrestin Benzacot Stemetic Ticon Tigan Tribenzagan

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution

Therapeutic Class: Antiemetic

Pharmacologic Class: Anticholinergic

Uses For trimethobenzamide

Trimethobenzamide is used to treat nausea and vomiting .

trimethobenzamide is available only with your doctor's prescription .

Before Using trimethobenzamide

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For trimethobenzamide, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to trimethobenzamide or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

No information is available on the relationship of age to the effects of intramuscular trimethobenzamide in the pediatric population. However, because of this medication's toxicity, use in children is contraindicated. Intramuscular trimethobenzamide should never be used in children .

Geriatric

No information is available on whether the risk of trimethobenzamide-induced adverse effects is increased in the elderly. However, because of this medication's toxicity, it should be used with caution, after less toxic alternatives have been considered and/or found ineffective. Recommended doses should not be exceeded, and the patient should be carefully monitored during therapy .

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving trimethobenzamide, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using trimethobenzamide with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Metoclopramide Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of trimethobenzamide. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Dehydration or Electrolyte imbalance (high or low levels of minerals in the blood) or High fever or Intestinal infection, severe—May cause side effects to become worse . Proper Use of trimethobenzamide

Trimethobenzamide is only used to relieve or prevent nausea and vomiting. A nurse or other trained health professional will give you trimethobenzamide. trimethobenzamide is given as a shot into one of your muscles .

Your doctor may only give you a few doses of trimethobenzamide until your condition improves, and then may switch you to an oral medicine that works the same way. If you have any concerns about this, talk to your doctor .

Precautions While Using trimethobenzamide

Trimethobenzamide will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicines for hay fever, other allergies, or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicines; prescription pain medicines or narcotics; barbiturates; medicine for seizures; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your doctor before taking any of these medicines while you are using trimethobenzamide .

trimethobenzamide may cause some people to become dizzy, lightheaded, drowsy, or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to trimethobenzamide before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or not alert .

trimethobenzamide Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Body spasm, with head and heels bent backward and body bowed forward convulsions (seizures) depression shakiness or tremors skin rash sore throat or fever unusual tiredness vomiting (severe or continuing) yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Drowsiness Less common Blurred vision diarrhea dizziness headache muscle cramps

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: trimethobenzamide Intramuscular side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More trimethobenzamide Intramuscular resources Trimethobenzamide Intramuscular Side Effects (in more detail) Trimethobenzamide Intramuscular Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Trimethobenzamide Intramuscular Drug Interactions Trimethobenzamide Intramuscular Support Group 3 Reviews for Trimethobenzamide Intramuscular - Add your own review/rating Compare trimethobenzamide Intramuscular with other medications Nausea/Vomiting
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japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular


jap-a-NEEZ en-sef-a-LYTE-is VYE-rus VAX-een, in-AK-ti-vay-ted ad-SORBD

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Ixiaro

Available Dosage Forms:

Suspension

Therapeutic Class: Vaccine

Uses For japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed

Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed (IXIARO®) is used to prevent infection caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus. It works by causing your body to produce its own protection (antibodies) against the virus.

Japanese encephalitis is caused by the bite of a mosquito that lives in certain parts of Asia. It is a serious infection that can cause flu-like symptoms (e.g., fever, chills, tiredness, headache, nausea, and vomiting), confusion, agitation, brain damage, and possibly death. This vaccine does not protect against encephalitis caused by other viruses.

This vaccine is only available from your doctor or other authorized health care professional.

Before Using japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed

In deciding to use a vaccine, the risks of taking the vaccine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this vaccine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed in children and teenagers younger than 17 years of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed in the elderly.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this vaccine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bleeding problems or Hypersensitivity to protamine sulfate, history of or Thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet count)—May cause side effects to become worse. High fever (more than 100°F) or Infection—The symptoms of the condition may be confused with the possible side effects of the vaccine. Immune deficiency or Immune system problem—May not work properly in patients with these conditions and may cause side effects to become worse. Proper Use of japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this vaccine. This vaccine is given as a shot into the muscle of your upper arm.

This vaccine is given in 2 doses. Dose 2 is scheduled 28 days after Dose 1. It is very important that you receive both doses of the vaccine at least 7 days before you plan to travel out of the country. If you miss the second shot, call your doctor to make another appointment as soon as possible.

If you have received the second dose of the vaccine series more than 1 year ago, consult first with your doctor. A booster dose may be given before you plan to travel out of the country.

japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed comes with a patient information sheet. It is very important that you read and understand this information. Be sure to ask your doctor about anything you do not understand.

Precautions While Using japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed

It is very important that you return to your doctor at the right time for the second dose. Be sure to tell your doctor about any side effects that occur after you receive this vaccine.

Since the vaccine may not protect everyone completely, it is very important that you use precautions to reduce your chance of mosquito bites. These include using insect repellents and mosquito nets, wearing protective clothing, and staying indoors during twilight and after dark.

japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Chills cough diarrhea fever general feeling of discomfort or illness headache joint pain loss of appetite muscle aches and pains nausea runny nose shivering sore throat sweating trouble sleeping unusual tiredness or weakness vomiting Less common Body aches or pain difficulty with breathing ear congestion loss of voice nasal congestion sneezing Incidence not known Burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings numbness or tingling of the hands, feet, or face

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Difficulty with moving joint pain muscle cramps or stiffness swollen joints Less common Back pain pain, itching, redness, or swelling where the shot was given rash stuffy nose

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular resources Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular Drug Interactions Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular Support Group 0 Reviews for Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular - Add your own review/rating Compare japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular with other medications Japanese Encephalitis Virus Prophylaxis
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Stemetic


Generic Name: trimethobenzamide (Intramuscular route)

trye-meth-oh-BENZ-a-mide

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Arrestin Benzacot Stemetic Ticon Tigan Tribenzagan

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution

Therapeutic Class: Antiemetic

Pharmacologic Class: Anticholinergic

Uses For Stemetic

Trimethobenzamide is used to treat nausea and vomiting .

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription .

Before Using Stemetic

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

No information is available on the relationship of age to the effects of intramuscular trimethobenzamide in the pediatric population. However, because of this medication's toxicity, use in children is contraindicated. Intramuscular trimethobenzamide should never be used in children .

Geriatric

No information is available on whether the risk of trimethobenzamide-induced adverse effects is increased in the elderly. However, because of this medication's toxicity, it should be used with caution, after less toxic alternatives have been considered and/or found ineffective. Recommended doses should not be exceeded, and the patient should be carefully monitored during therapy .

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Metoclopramide Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Dehydration or Electrolyte imbalance (high or low levels of minerals in the blood) or High fever or Intestinal infection, severe—May cause side effects to become worse . Proper Use of trimethobenzamide

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain trimethobenzamide. It may not be specific to Stemetic. Please read with care.

Trimethobenzamide is only used to relieve or prevent nausea and vomiting. A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine. This medicine is given as a shot into one of your muscles .

Your doctor may only give you a few doses of this medicine until your condition improves, and then may switch you to an oral medicine that works the same way. If you have any concerns about this, talk to your doctor .

Precautions While Using Stemetic

Trimethobenzamide will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicines for hay fever, other allergies, or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicines; prescription pain medicines or narcotics; barbiturates; medicine for seizures; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your doctor before taking any of these medicines while you are using trimethobenzamide .

This medicine may cause some people to become dizzy, lightheaded, drowsy, or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or not alert .

Stemetic Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Body spasm, with head and heels bent backward and body bowed forward convulsions (seizures) depression shakiness or tremors skin rash sore throat or fever unusual tiredness vomiting (severe or continuing) yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Drowsiness Less common Blurred vision diarrhea dizziness headache muscle cramps

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Stemetic side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Stemetic resources Stemetic Side Effects (in more detail)Stemetic Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesStemetic Drug InteractionsStemetic Support Group3 Reviews for Stemetic - Add your own review/rating Compare Stemetic with other medications Nausea/Vomiting
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influenza virus vaccine, h5n1 Intramuscular


in-floo-EN-za AY VYE-rus VAX-een, H5N1, in-AK-ti-vay-ted

Available Dosage Forms:

Suspension

Therapeutic Class: Vaccine

Uses For influenza virus vaccine, h5n1

Influenza virus vaccine, H5N1 is used to prevent an infection caused by the H5N1 influenza virus subtype. The vaccine works by causing your body to produce its own protection (antibodies) against the disease . It is also known as avian influenza vaccine or avian flu shot.

This vaccine is only available from public health officials, and will be used to prevent a major outbreak of avian flu .

Before Using influenza virus vaccine, h5n1

In deciding to use a vaccine, the risks of taking the vaccine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this vaccine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to influenza virus vaccine, h5n1 or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of influenza virus vaccine, H5N1 in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established .

Geriatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of influenza virus vaccine, H5N1 have not been performed in the geriatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established .

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this vaccine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Allergy to chicken or egg products, history of—Use with caution. This vaccine contains small amounts of chicken and egg proteins . Guillain Barr? syndrome, history of—Use with caution. This vaccine may cause a recurrence of the symptoms of the condition . Immune system problems (e.g., cancer, HIV)—This vaccine may not work as well if you have weak immune system . Proper Use of influenza virus vaccine, h5n1

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this vaccine. This vaccine is given as a shot into one of your muscles .

You will need two doses of this vaccine for it to work properly. Make sure you follow your doctor's instructions on when you should come back for the second dose. The second dose is usually given 28 days after the first dose .

Dosing

The dose of influenza virus vaccine, h5n1 will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of influenza virus vaccine, h5n1. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

Precautions While Using influenza virus vaccine, h5n1

It is very important that you return to your doctor's office at the right time for the second dose. Be sure to notify your doctor of any side effects that occur after you receive this vaccine .

This vaccine will not treat flu symptoms if you already have the virus .

influenza virus vaccine, h5n1 Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Fever Less common Body aches or pain chills cough difficulty in breathing ear congestion headache loss of voice nasal congestion runny nose sneezing sore throat unusual tiredness or weakness

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Nausea pain, redness, swelling, or tenderness at injection site Less common Diarrhea

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.


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levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive


Generic Name: levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive (LEE voe nor jes trel)
Brand Names: Next Choice, Plan B, Plan B One-Step

What is levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive?

Levonorgestrel is a female hormone that prevents ovulation (the release of an egg from an ovary). This medication also causes changes in your cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus and harder for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus.

Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive is used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or failure of other forms of birth control (such as condom breakage, or missing 2 or more birth control pills).

Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive? Do not use this medication if you are already pregnant. Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive will not terminate a pregnancy that has already begun (the fertilized egg has attached to the uterus). Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive is not intended for use as a routine form of birth control and should not be used in this manner. Talk with your doctor about the many forms of birth control available. Do not give this medication to anyone younger than 17 years old. Contact a doctor for medical advice. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive? Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive is not intended for use as a routine form of birth control and should not be used in this manner. Talk with your doctor about the many forms of birth control available. Do not use this medication if you are already pregnant. Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive will not terminate a pregnancy that has already begun (the fertilized egg has attached to the uterus).

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have diabetes. You may not be able to use levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive, or you may need special tests during treatment.

Levonorgestrel can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not give this medication to anyone younger than 17 years old. Contact a doctor for medical advice. How should I take levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

The first dose of levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive must be taken as soon as possible after unprotected sex (no later than 72 hours afterward). The second dose must be taken 12 hours after the first dose. The timing of these doses is very important for this medication to be effective.

Call your doctor right away if you vomit within 1 hour after taking either dose of levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive. Do not take another dose until you talk with your doctor.

You should be examined by your doctor within 3 weeks after taking levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive. The doctor will need to confirm that you are not pregnant and that this medication has not caused any harmful effects.

If your period is late by 1 week or longer after the expected date, you may be pregnant. Get a pregnancy test and contact your doctor if you are pregnant. Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive will not terminate a pregnancy that has already begun (the fertilized egg has attached to the uterus).

Store levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Missing a dose of this medication increases your risk of being pregnant.

Contact your doctor if you miss a dose of levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive. The timing of these doses is very important for this medication to be effective.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea and vomiting.

What should I avoid while taking levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive?

Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive will not protect you from sexually transmitted diseases--including HIV and AIDS. Using a condom is the only way to protect yourself from these diseases. Avoid having unprotected sex.

Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your lower stomach or side. This could be a sign of a tubal pregnancy (a pregnancy that implants in the fallopian tube instead of the uterus). A tubal pregnancy is a medical emergency.

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea, diarrhea, or stomach pain;

dizziness, tired feeling;

breast pain or tenderness;

changes in your menstrual periods; or

headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Contraception:

Contraception:
One 52 mg intrauterine system inserted within seven days of the onset of menstruation or immediately after first-trimester abortion. One system is effective for 5 years.
The 52 mg intrauterine system is also indicated for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding in women who choose to use intrauterine contraception as their method of contraception.
Emergency contraception after unprotected intercourse or after contraceptive failure:
one 0.75 mg tablet orally within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse followed by 0.75 mg orally 12 hours after the first dose.
or
one 1.5 mg tablet orally as soon as possible within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse.
Efficacy is better if the tablet(s) is taken as soon as possible after unprotected intercourse.

What other drugs will affect levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane);

a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or

seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), or carbamazepine (Tegretol).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can affect levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive resources Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive Side Effects (in more detail) Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive Dosage Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive Drug Interactions Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive Support Group 482 Reviews for Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive - Add your own review/rating Compare levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive with other medications Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Birth Control Emergency Contraception Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive.

See also: levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive side effects (in more detail)


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Triveen-CF NAC


Pronunciation: meth-ill-FOE-late/meth-ill-koe-BAL-a-min/a-se-teel-SIS-teen
Generic Name: L-Methylfolate/Methylcobalamin/N-Acetylcysteine
Brand Name: Examples include Cerefolin with NAC and Triveen-CF NAC
Triveen-CF NAC is used for:

Supplying nutritional requirements of certain patients with neurovascular oxidative stress or high blood levels of homocysteine. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Triveen-CF NAC is a nutritional supplement. It works by providing the body with folate, vitamin B12, and a form of antioxidant, which helps to reduce or eliminate oxidative stress and lower homocysteine levels.

Do NOT use Triveen-CF NAC if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Triveen-CF NAC you are very ill

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Triveen-CF NAC:

Some medical conditions may interact with Triveen-CF NAC. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have anemia, liver problems, kidney stones, or a history of ulcers

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Triveen-CF NAC. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Antibiotics (eg, penicillin, cephalexin, ciprofloxacin), cholestyramine, colchicine, colestipol, metformin, nitrous oxide, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen), para-aminosalicylic acid, potassium chloride, or sulfasalazine because they may decrease the effectiveness of Triveen-CF NAC Fluorouracil or nitrates (eg, nitroglycerin) because their side effects may be increased Barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital), carbamazepine, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), primidone, pyrimethamine, or valproic acid because their effectiveness may be decreased by Triveen-CF NAC

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Triveen-CF NAC may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Triveen-CF NAC:

Use Triveen-CF NAC as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Triveen-CF NAC may be taken with or without food. If you miss a dose of Triveen-CF NAC, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Triveen-CF NAC.

Important safety information: Diabetes patients - Triveen-CF NAC may cause incorrect test results with some ketone tests. Check with your doctor before you adjust the dose of your diabetes medicine or change your diet. Triveen-CF NAC is not recommended for use in CHILDREN younger than 12 years of age. Safety and effectiveness in this age group have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant while taking Triveen-CF NAC, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Triveen-CF NAC during pregnancy. Triveen-CF NAC is excreted in breast milk. Do not breastfeed while you are taking Triveen-CF NAC. Possible side effects of Triveen-CF NAC:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Bloated feeling; headache; itching; mild diarrhea; mild fever; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); lower back or side pain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Triveen-CF NAC:

Store Triveen-CF NAC at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, light, and moisture. Keep Triveen-CF NAC out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Triveen-CF NAC, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Triveen-CF NAC is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Triveen-CF NAC. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Triveen-CF NAC resources Triveen-CF NAC Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Triveen-CF NAC Drug Interactions Triveen-CF NAC Support Group 4 Reviews for Triveen-CF NAC - Add your own review/rating Compare Triveen-CF NAC with other medications Dietary Supplementation Hyperhomocysteinemia
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Arcalyst


Generic Name: rilonacept (Subcutaneous route)

ril-ON-a-sept

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Arcalyst

Available Dosage Forms:

Powder for Solution

Therapeutic Class: Immunological Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Interleukin-1 Inhibitor

Uses For Arcalyst

Rilonacept is used to treat cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), including familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS). Rilonacept can help lessen the signs and symptoms of CAPS, such as rash, joint pain, fever, and tiredness .

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription .

Before Using Arcalyst

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of rilonacept in children below 12 years of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established .

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatrics-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of rilonacept in the elderly. However, specific side effects may be especially likely to occur in elderly patients, who are usually more sensitive than younger adults to the effects of rilonacept .

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Adalimumab Adenovirus Vaccine Type 4, Live Adenovirus Vaccine Type 7, Live Anakinra Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin Vaccine, Live Etanercept Infliximab Influenza Virus Vaccine, Live Measles Virus Vaccine, Live Mumps Virus Vaccine, Live Poliovirus Vaccine, Live Rotavirus Vaccine, Live Rubella Virus Vaccine, Live Smallpox Vaccine Typhoid Vaccine Varicella Virus Vaccine Yellow Fever Vaccine Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Asthma or Diabetes or Immune system problems—Patients with these conditions will have an increased risk of infection . Serious infections (e.g., HIV, hepatitis B or C, tuberculosis)—Rilonacept may decrease the body's ability to fight infection . Proper Use of Arcalyst

This medicine is given as a shot under your skin. Rilonacept may sometimes be given at home to patients who do not need to be in the hospital. If you are using this medicine at home, your doctor will teach you how to prepare and inject the medicine. Be sure that you understand exactly how the medicine is prepared and injected .

This medicine comes with a patient instructions. Read and follow the instructions in the insert carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions .

Use a new needle and syringe each time you inject your medicine .

You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas. This will help prevent skin problems from the injections. Do not inject into skin areas that are bruised, red, tender, or hard .

This powder medicine must be mixed with the liquid provided in your dose kit. Mix the medicine only when you are ready to use it. Do not use if it is cloudy or has specks floating in it .

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form (vial): For cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes: Adults—At first, 320 milligrams (mg) given as two, 2-milliliter (mL) doses of 160 mg injected under the skin on the same day at two different sites. Your dose will be adjusted to 160 mg once a week, given as a single, 2 mL injection. Children and teenagers 12 to 17 years of age—At first, 4.4 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight up to 320 mg given as one or two, 2-milliliter (mL) doses injected under the skin. Your dose will be adjusted to 2.2 mg per kg of body weight up to 160 mg once a week, given as a single, 2 mL injection. Children below 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor . Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Once the powder medicine has been mixed with the liquid, this mixture may be stored at room temperature, away from direct light. You must use this mixture within 3 hours. Throw away any leftover mixture .

Throw away used needles in a hard, closed container that the needles cannot poke through. Keep this container away from children and pets .

Precautions While Using Arcalyst

It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects (e.g., increased amount of cholesterol or fats in the blood) .

Your body's ability to fight infection may be reduced while you are being treated with rilonacept. It is very important that you call your doctor at the first signs of any infection (such as fever or chills; cough or hoarseness; lower back or side pain; or painful or difficult urination) .

While you are being treated with rilonacept, do not have any immunizations (vaccinations) without your doctor's approval. Rilonacept may lower your body's resistance and there is a chance you might get the infection the immunization is meant to prevent. Tell your doctor about any vaccinations you have received in the past. Ask your doctor whether you should receive any vaccinations, including pneumonia and flu shots, before receiving rilonacept .

You will need to have a skin test for tuberculosis before you start using this medicine. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your home has ever had a positive reaction to a tuberculosis test .

Using this medicine may increase your risk of certain types of cancer. Talk with your doctor about this risk .

Rilonacept may cause a serious allergic reaction. Check with your doctor right away if you have a rash; itching; swelling of the face, tongue, and throat; trouble with breathing; or chest pain after you get the injection .

Do not take adalimumab (Humira®), anakinra (Kineret®), etanercept (Enbrel®), or infliximab (Remicade®) while you are being treated with this medicine, unless your doctor says it is okay .

Arcalyst Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Bleeding, blistering, burning, coldness, discoloration of skin, feeling of pressure, hives, infection, inflammation, itching, lumps, numbness, pain, rash, redness, scarring, soreness, stinging, swelling, tenderness, tingling, ulceration, or warmth at site body aches or pain chills cough difficulty in breathing ear congestion fever headache loss of voice nasal congestion runny nose sneezing sore throat unusual tiredness or weakness Incidence not known Bloody or black, tarry stools constipation cough producing mucus lower back or side pain pain or tenderness around eyes and cheekbones painful or difficult urination severe stomach pain shortness of breath or troubled breathing tenderness tightness of chest or wheezing vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings Less common Stomach discomfort

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Arcalyst side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Arcalyst resources Arcalyst Side Effects (in more detail) Arcalyst Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Arcalyst Drug Interactions Arcalyst Support Group 1 Review for Arcalyst - Add your own review/rating Arcalyst Prescribing Information (FDA) Arcalyst Consumer Overview Arcalyst Monograph (AHFS DI) Arcalyst MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Rilonacept Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Arcalyst with other medications Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome Muckle Wells Syndrome
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HepaGam B


Generic Name: hepatitis b immune globulin (Intramuscular route)

hep-a-TYE-tis B i-MUNE-GLOB-ue-lin

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Bayhep B HepaGam B HyperHEP B Nabi-HB Nabi-HB NovaPlus

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Uses For HepaGam B

Hepatitis B Immune Globulin (Human) is used to prevent hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B Immune Globulin (Human) may be used for the following patients:

Sexual partners of persons with hepatitis B. Persons who may be exposed to the virus by means of blood, blood products, or human bites, such as health care workers, employees in medical facilities, patients and staff of live-in facilities and day-care programs for the developmentally disabled, morticians and embalmers, police and fire department personnel, and military personnel. Those who have household exposure to persons with acute hepatitis B and babies less than 12 months old whose caregiver tests positive for hepatitis B. Babies born to mothers who test positive for hepatitis B.

This medicine is available only from your doctor or other authorized health care professional.

Once a medicine has been approved for marketing for a certain use, experience may show that it is also useful for other medical problems. Although this use is not included in product labeling, hepatitis B immune globulin (human) is used to prevent infection by the hepatitis B virus in patients who have had liver transplants.

Before Using HepaGam B

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Although there is no specific information comparing use of hepatitis B immune globulin (human) in children with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than it does in adults.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults or if they cause different side effects or problems in older people. There is no specific information comparing use of hepatitis B immune globulin in the elderly with use in other age groups.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bleeding problems— Because hepatitis B immune globulin (human) is given as a shot into a muscle, it may cause more bleeding Immune system problems—Hepatitis B immune globulin (human) may cause severe allergic reactions Proper Use of hepatitis b immune globulin

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain hepatitis b immune globulin. It may not be specific to HepaGam B. Please read with care.

Hepatitis B immune globulin (human) is given as a shot into the muscle of the upper arm, upper thigh, or outer area of the buttocks.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injectable dosage form: For prevention of hepatitis B following nonsexual exposure: Adults—Dose is based on weight and will be determined by your doctor. If you have never been vaccinated with hepatitis B virus vaccine, your doctor may start the vaccination series. If you have been vaccinated, you may need a booster. Infants with mothers who test positive for hepatitis B—Dose is usually 0.5 milliliters (mL) injected into a muscle in the thigh. For prevention of hepatitis B following sexual exposure: Adults—Dose is based on weight and will be determined by your doctor. Your doctor may start the hepatitis B virus vaccination series if the exposure has been within the last 14 days or if sexual contact is likely to continue. For prevention of hepatitis B following household exposure: Infants less than 12 months of age—Dose is usually 0.5 mL injected into a muscle in the thigh. HepaGam B Side Effects

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Back pain general feeling of discomfort headache muscle aches or pain nausea pain at the injection site Less common Abdominal or stomach cramping burning, heat, and redness at the injection site chills diarrhea feeling as if you are going to vomit joint pain lightheadedness skin rash unusual tiredness or weakness

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: HepaGam B side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More HepaGam B resources HepaGam B Side Effects (in more detail) HepaGam B Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding HepaGam B Drug Interactions HepaGam B Support Group 0 Reviews for HepaGam B - Add your own review/rating HepaGam B Prescribing Information (FDA) HepaGam B Consumer Overview BayHep B MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hepatitis B Immune Globulin Monograph (AHFS DI) Nabi-HB Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare HepaGam B with other medications Exposure to Hepatitis B Virus
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Nabi-HB NovaPlus


Generic Name: hepatitis b immune globulin (Intramuscular route)

hep-a-TYE-tis B i-MUNE-GLOB-ue-lin

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Bayhep B HepaGam B HyperHEP B Nabi-HB Nabi-HB NovaPlus

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Uses For Nabi-HB NovaPlus

Hepatitis B Immune Globulin (Human) is used to prevent hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B Immune Globulin (Human) may be used for the following patients:

Sexual partners of persons with hepatitis B. Persons who may be exposed to the virus by means of blood, blood products, or human bites, such as health care workers, employees in medical facilities, patients and staff of live-in facilities and day-care programs for the developmentally disabled, morticians and embalmers, police and fire department personnel, and military personnel. Those who have household exposure to persons with acute hepatitis B and babies less than 12 months old whose caregiver tests positive for hepatitis B. Babies born to mothers who test positive for hepatitis B.

This medicine is available only from your doctor or other authorized health care professional.

Once a medicine has been approved for marketing for a certain use, experience may show that it is also useful for other medical problems. Although this use is not included in product labeling, hepatitis B immune globulin (human) is used to prevent infection by the hepatitis B virus in patients who have had liver transplants.

Before Using Nabi-HB NovaPlus

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Although there is no specific information comparing use of hepatitis B immune globulin (human) in children with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than it does in adults.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults or if they cause different side effects or problems in older people. There is no specific information comparing use of hepatitis B immune globulin in the elderly with use in other age groups.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bleeding problems— Because hepatitis B immune globulin (human) is given as a shot into a muscle, it may cause more bleeding Immune system problems—Hepatitis B immune globulin (human) may cause severe allergic reactions Proper Use of hepatitis b immune globulin

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain hepatitis b immune globulin. It may not be specific to Nabi-HB NovaPlus. Please read with care.

Hepatitis B immune globulin (human) is given as a shot into the muscle of the upper arm, upper thigh, or outer area of the buttocks.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injectable dosage form: For prevention of hepatitis B following nonsexual exposure: Adults—Dose is based on weight and will be determined by your doctor. If you have never been vaccinated with hepatitis B virus vaccine, your doctor may start the vaccination series. If you have been vaccinated, you may need a booster. Infants with mothers who test positive for hepatitis B—Dose is usually 0.5 milliliters (mL) injected into a muscle in the thigh. For prevention of hepatitis B following sexual exposure: Adults—Dose is based on weight and will be determined by your doctor. Your doctor may start the hepatitis B virus vaccination series if the exposure has been within the last 14 days or if sexual contact is likely to continue. For prevention of hepatitis B following household exposure: Infants less than 12 months of age—Dose is usually 0.5 mL injected into a muscle in the thigh. Nabi-HB NovaPlus Side Effects

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Back pain general feeling of discomfort headache muscle aches or pain nausea pain at the injection site Less common Abdominal or stomach cramping burning, heat, and redness at the injection site chills diarrhea feeling as if you are going to vomit joint pain lightheadedness skin rash unusual tiredness or weakness

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Nabi-HB NovaPlus side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Nabi-HB NovaPlus resources Nabi-HB NovaPlus Side Effects (in more detail) Nabi-HB NovaPlus Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Nabi-HB NovaPlus Drug Interactions Nabi-HB NovaPlus Support Group 0 Reviews for Nabi-HB NovaPlus - Add your own review/rating BayHep B MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) HepaGam B Consumer Overview HepaGam B Prescribing Information (FDA) Hepatitis B Immune Globulin Monograph (AHFS DI) Nabi-HB Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Nabi-HB NovaPlus with other medications Exposure to Hepatitis B Virus
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chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane


Generic Name: chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane (kon DROI tin, gloo KOSE a meen, and METH il sul FON il METH ane)
Brand names: Glucosamine & Chondroitin with MSM, Glucosamine Chondroitin MSM Complex, Osteo Bi-Flex Advanced, Osteo Bi-Flex Plus MSM, Glucosamine & Chondroitin with MSM

What is chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane?

Chondroitin is a naturally occurring substance formed of sugar chains. Chondroitin is believed to help the body maintain fluid and flexibility in the joints.

Glucosamine is a naturally occurring substance that is believed to help develop and renew cartilage (the hard connective tissue mainly located on bones near joints in the body), and keep it lubricated for better joint movement and flexibility.

Methylsulfonylmethane is a naturally occurring form of sulfur that helps support muscles and tendons in the body.

The combination of chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane is used to aid in maintaining healthy joints. It is also used as a nutritional supplement in people with osteoarthritis or other inflammatory joint disorders.

Not all uses for chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane have been approved by the FDA. Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

What is the most important information I should know about chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane? Not all uses for this product have been approved by the FDA. Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Before using this product, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane if you have diabetes, a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia, if you have allergies to certain drugs, if you are overweight, or if you are on a low-salt diet.

Do not take chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane without the medical advice if you are using insulin, or a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven). Avoid taking chitosan (usually marketed as a weight-loss product) while you are taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane. Chitosan can make it harder for your body to absorb chondroitin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane? You should not use this product if you are allergic to it.

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have:

diabetes;

a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia;

if you have allergies to certain drugs;

if you are overweight; or

if you are on a low-salt diet.

It is not known whether chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane will harm an unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this product. It is not known whether chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this product without telling your healthcare provider if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

It may take up several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after a few weeks of treatment.

Glucosamine may increase the glucose (sugar) levels in your blood. If you have diabetes, you may need to check your blood sugar more often while taking this medication. You may also need to adjust your insulin dosage. Do not change your dose or medication schedule without advice from your doctor.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane may be only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane? Avoid taking chitosan (usually marketed as a weight-loss product) while you are taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane. Chitosan can make it harder for your body to absorb chondroitin. Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, upset stomach;

heartburn; or

diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

insulin; or

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane. Tell your healthcare provider about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane resources Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane Drug Interactions Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane Support Group 1 Review for Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane - Add your own review/rating Compare chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane with other medications Dietary Supplementation Osteoarthritis Where can I get more information? Consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any herbal/health supplement. Whether you are treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure all your healthcare providers know about all of your medical conditions and treatments.
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follitropin beta Subcutaneous


fol-i-TROE-pin BAY-ta

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Follistim Follistim AQ Gonal-f RFF

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Powder for Solution Kit

Therapeutic Class: Human Follicle Stimulating Hormone Combination

Pharmacologic Class: Human Follicle Stimulating Hormone

Uses For follitropin beta

Follitropin beta injection is used to treat infertility in both men and women. follitropin beta is a man-made hormone called follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). FSH is produced in the body by the pituitary gland. FSH helps to develop eggs in the ovaries of women and sperm in the testes of men. Follitropin beta replaces natural FSH in the body.

Follitropin beta will help develop eggs in women who have not been able to become pregnant because of problems with ovulation. Some women will use follitropin beta while enrolled in a fertility program called Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART). ART uses procedures such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or embryo transfer (ET). Follitropin beta is used together with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in these procedures.

Follistim® AQ Cartridge is also used in women with healthy ovaries who are undergoing reproductive procedures such as IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycle. follitropin beta is used together with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in these procedures.

Follitropin beta is used together with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to increase sperm production in men.

follitropin beta is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using follitropin beta

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For follitropin beta, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to follitropin beta or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of follitropin beta injection in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of follitropin beta injection have not been performed in the geriatric population.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters X Studies in animals or pregnant women have demonstrated positive evidence of fetal abnormalities. This drug should not be used in women who are or may become pregnant because the risk clearly outweighs any possible benefit. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of follitropin beta. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Adrenal gland problems, uncontrolled or Allergy to certain antibiotics (e.g., neomycin, streptomycin), or history of or Cysts in the ovaries or enlarged ovaries or High levels of FSH in the blood or Pituitary gland problems, uncontrolled or Thyroid gland problems, uncontrolled or Tumor in the brain (hypothalamus area or pituitary gland) or Tumor in the breast or Tumor in the ovary or uterus or Tumor in the testis or Vaginal bleeding of unknown cause, heavy or irregular—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Blood clots (thrombosis), or history of or Blood vessel problems or Lung or breathing problems or Ovarian torsion (twisting of the ovary), history of or Stomach surgery, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of follitropin beta

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you follitropin beta. follitropin beta is given as a shot under the skin (for men and women) or into a muscle (for women only).

Follitropin beta is used with another hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). At the proper time, your doctor or nurse will give you follitropin beta.

follitropin beta comes with patient instructions. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

follitropin beta is available in two forms: a cartridge and a vial. Ask your doctor which dosage form is right for you.

You might be taught how to give your medicine at home. If you are using follitropin beta at home:

Wash your hands with soap and water and use a clean work area to prepare your injection. Make sure you understand and carefully follow your doctor's instructions on how to give yourself an injection, including the proper use of a needle and syringe, or a cartridge and pen. Do not mix follitropin beta with other medicines in the same cartridge, vial, or syringe. Check the solution in the cartridge or vial. It should be clear and colorless. If it is cloudy, discolored, or contains large flecks (particles), do not use it. Do not inject more or less of the medicine than your doctor ordered. You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas. This will prevent skin problems. Use a new needle and syringe each time you inject your medicine. It is very important that you keep track of each dose you inject. Your doctor or nurse will help you with this.

If you are using the Follistim® AQ cartridge:

follitropin beta should only be used with the Follistim® pen. Do not use follitropin beta if you are blind or have vision problems, unless another person with good vision who is trained in the proper use of the cartridge injects your medicine. Do not re-use the BD Micro-Fine™ pen needle. Dosing

The dose of follitropin beta will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of follitropin beta. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form: For the treatment of infertility in men: Adults—450 international units (IU) per week injected under the skin, divided and given as either 225 IU two times per week or 150 IU three times per week. Children—Use is not recommended. For the treatment of infertility in women: Adults— Follistim® AQ injection: At first, 75 international units (IU) once a day injected under the skin or into a muscle. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 300 IU per day. Follistim® AQ cartridge: At first, 50 IU once a day injected under the skin for at least the first 7 days. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 250 IU per day. Children—Use is not recommended. For use with assisted reproductive technology procedures: Follistim® AQ injection: Adults—150 to 225 international units (IU) once a day injected under the skin or into a muscle. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 600 IU per day. Children—Use is not recommended. For women with healthy ovaries undergoing reproductive procedures (such as IVF or ICSI): Follistim® AQ cartridge: Adults—At first, 200 international units (IU) once a day injected under the skin for at least the first 7 days of treatment. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 500 IU per day. Children—Use is not recommended. Missed Dose

Call your doctor or pharmacist for instructions.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

You may store Follistim® AQ cartridge or injection in a refrigerator or at room temperature. If you store the medicine at room temperature, it will only be good for a maximum of 3 months unless the expiration date is less than 3 months. If the Follistim® AQ cartridge has been pierced by a needle, you may store it up to 28 days. Keep the cartridge away from light.

Throw away used needles and syringes in a hard, closed container that the needles cannot poke through. Keep this container away from children and pets.

Ask your pharmacist, doctor, or nurse about the best way to dispose of any leftover medicine, glass containers (vials), cartridges, and other supplies. You should not use any leftover medicine in the glass container (vial) or cartridge.

Precautions While Using follitropin beta

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits while you are using follitropin beta, to make sure that the medicine is working properly and to check for unwanted effects. Blood and urine tests will be needed to make sure that the medicine is working properly.

Call your doctor right away if you think you have become pregnant while you are using follitropin beta. You may have a higher risk of an ectopic pregnancy if you get pregnant while undergoing IVF or ICSI procedures. An ectopic pregnancy can be a serious and life-threatening condition. It can also cause problems that may make it harder for you to become pregnant in the future.

follitropin beta may increase your risk of having a blood clot, heart attack, or stroke. This is more likely in people who already have heart disease. Contact your doctor right away if you have chest pain, tightness in the chest, a fast or irregular heartbeat, unusual flushing or warmth of the skin, increased coughing, trouble with breathing, a sudden difficulty with breathing at night, or abnormal swelling in your ankles or legs. These could be symptoms of serious heart problems or blood clots.

For women who are using follitropin beta:

If your doctor has asked you to record your basal body temperature (BBT) each day, make sure that you understand how to do this. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions. follitropin beta may increase your risk of having a problem with the ovaries called ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). OHSS is a serious problem that can be life-threatening. Stop using follitropin beta and call your doctor right away if you have severe pain in the lower stomach area, nausea, vomiting, weight gain, diarrhea, decreased urine output, or trouble with breathing. follitropin beta may cause more than one egg to be released from your ovary at the same time. This means you may become pregnant with more than one baby. Talk with your doctor about this possibility before you start using follitropin beta. follitropin beta Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Abdominal or stomach pain that is severe bloating diarrhea severe nausea or vomiting stomach or pelvic discomfort, aching, or heaviness weight gain that is rapid Less common Heavy non-menstrual vaginal bleeding redness, pain, or swelling at the injection site unusual tiredness or weakness Incidence not known Difficulty with breathing pain in the chest, groin, or legs, especially the calves severe, sudden headache slurred speech sudden loss of coordination sudden, severe weakness or numbness in the arm or leg sudden, unexplained shortness of breath vision changes

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Blemishes on the skin headache pimples Less common Body aches or pain chills difficulty having a bowel movement (stool) dizziness dry skin fast or racing heart fever hair loss hives quick or shallow breathing rash swelling of the breasts or breast soreness in both females and males Incidence not known Breast tenderness normal menstrual bleeding occurring earlier, possibly lasting longer than expected

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: follitropin beta Subcutaneous side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More follitropin beta Subcutaneous resources Follitropin beta Subcutaneous Side Effects (in more detail) Follitropin beta Subcutaneous Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Follitropin beta Subcutaneous Drug Interactions Follitropin beta Subcutaneous Support Group 2 Reviews for Follitropin beta Subcutaneous - Add your own review/rating Compare follitropin beta Subcutaneous with other medications Follicle Stimulation Hypogonadism, Male Ovulation Induction
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Fragmin


Generic Name: dalteparin (Subcutaneous route)

dal-te-PAR-in

Subcutaneous route(Solution)

Epidural or spinal hematomas, which may result in long-term or permanent paralysis, may occur in patients who are anticoagulated with low molecular weight heparins or heparinoids and are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. Factors that can increase the risk of developing these hematomas include: use of indwelling epidural catheters, concomitant use of drugs affecting hemostasis such as NSAIDs, platelet inhibitors, or other anticoagulants, or history of traumatic or repeated epidural or spinal puncture, spinal deformity, or spinal surgery. Monitor patients frequently for neurological impairment. If neurological compromise is noted, urgent treatment is necessary. Consider risks/benefits before neuraxial intervention in patients anticoagulated or to be anticoagulated for thromboprophylaxis .

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Fragmin

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Injectable

Therapeutic Class: Anticoagulant

Pharmacologic Class: Low Molecular Weight Heparin

Uses For Fragmin

Dalteparin is used to prevent deep venous thrombosis, a condition in which harmful blood clots form in the blood vessels of the legs. These blood clots can travel to the lungs and can become lodged in the blood vessels of the lungs, causing a condition called pulmonary embolism. This medicine prevents blood clots from forming in blood vessels of patients with unstable angina or heart attack. Dalteparin is used for several days after abdominal surgery, while you are unable to walk. It is during this time that blood clots are most likely to form. Dalteparin also may be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Fragmin

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of dalteparin in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of dalteparin in the elderly. However, elderly patients may require an adjustment in the dose, especially those who are at risk of bleeding or those who have kidney disease.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Abciximab Aceclofenac Acemetacin Acenocoumarol Alclofenac Alteplase, Recombinant Anistreplase Antithrombin, Recombinant Apazone Argatroban Benoxaprofen Bivalirudin Bromfenac Bufexamac Carprofen Citalopram Clometacin Clonixin Clopidogrel Dabigatran Etexilate Danaparoid Dexketoprofen Diclofenac Diflunisal Dipyridamole Dipyrone Drotrecogin Alfa Droxicam Enoxaparin Eptifibatide Escitalopram Etodolac Etofenamate Felbinac Fenbufen Fenoprofen Fentiazac Floctafenine Flufenamic Acid Fluoxetine Flurbiprofen Fluvoxamine Fondaparinux Heparin Ibuprofen Indomethacin Indoprofen Isoxicam Ketoprofen Ketorolac Lepirudin Lornoxicam Meclofenamate Mefenamic Acid Meloxicam Nabumetone Naproxen Niflumic Acid Nimesulide Oxaprozin Oxyphenbutazone Paroxetine Phenindione Phenprocoumon Phenylbutazone Pirazolac Piroxicam Pirprofen Propyphenazone Proquazone Reteplase, Recombinant Rivaroxaban Sertraline Streptokinase Sulindac Suprofen Tenecteplase Tenidap Tenoxicam Tiaprofenic Acid Ticlopidine Tinzaparin Tirofiban Tolmetin Urokinase Warfarin Zomepirac

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Aspirin Benorilate Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate Mesalamine Olsalazine Salicylamide Salicylic Acid Salsalate Sodium Salicylate Sodium Thiosalicylate Trolamine Salicylate Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bleeding, active or Regional anesthesia or Thrombocytopenia (low platelet count in the blood), heparin-induced, or history of—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Bleeding problems or Catheter insertion in your spine or Eye problems caused by diabetes or high blood pressure or Heart infection or Hypertension (high blood pressure), severe and uncontrolled or Kidney disease or Liver disease or Stomach or intestinal ulcer or bleeding, active or recent or Stroke or Surgery (e.g., surgery of the eye, brain, or spine), recent or history of or Thrombocytopenia—Use with caution. The risk of bleeding may be increased. Proper Use of Fragmin

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine. This medicine is given as a shot under your skin (usually in the abdomen, buttocks, or thighs).

If you are using dalteparin at home, your doctor will teach you how to inject yourself with the medicine. Be sure to follow the directions carefully. Check with your doctor if you have any problems using the medicine.

You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas. This will help prevent skin problems from the injections.

If the medicine in the vial (glass container) or prefilled syringe has changed color, or if you see particles in it, do not use it.

Put used syringes in a puncture-resistant, disposable container, or dispose of them as directed by your doctor.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form: For prevention of deep venous thrombosis (leg clots) and pulmonary embolism (lung clots): Adults—The dose will be determined by your doctor, based on your condition. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For prevention of blood clots after unstable angina (chest pain) or non–Q-wave myocardial infarction (a type of heart attack): Adults—120 International Units (IU) per kilogram (kg) of body weight injected under the skin (but not more than 10,000 IU) given every 12 hours for 5 to 8 days. Unless your doctor recommends otherwise, aspirin should be given 75 to 165 milligrams (mg) daily. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

If you were given a bottle of medicine to use with your syringes, you must use the medicine within 14 days after the first shot. Throw away the unused medicine in the bottle after 14 days.

Throw away used needles in a hard, closed container that the needles cannot poke through. Keep this container away from children and pets.

Precautions While Using Fragmin

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to see if the medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Be sure to keep all appointments.

Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests.

This medicine may increase your chance of bleeding or bruising. This risk is higher if you have a catheter in your back for pain medicine or anesthetics. This is sometimes called an "epidural". Check with your doctor right away if you notice any unusual bleeding or bruising; black, tarry stools; blood in the urine or stools; or pinpoint red spots on your skin. Avoid picking your nose. If you need to blow your nose, blow it gently.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor right away if you start having pain in chest, groin, or legs, especially the calves; difficulty with breathing; severe, sudden headache; slurred speech; sudden, unexplained shortness of breath; sudden loss of coordination; sudden, severe weakness or numbness in arm or leg; or vision changes. These may be symptoms of thromboembolism.

Be careful when using a regular toothbrush, dental floss, or toothpick. Your medical doctor, dentist, or nurse may recommend other ways to clean your teeth and gums. Check with your medical doctor before having any dental work done.

Be careful not to cut yourself when you are using sharp objects, such as a safety razor or fingernail or toenail cutters. Avoid contact sports or other situations where bruising or injury could occur.

This medicine contains benzyl alcohol which may cause serious reactions to newborn or premature infants. Discuss this with your doctor if you are concerned.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Fragmin Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Deep, dark purple bruise, pain, or swelling at the place of injection Less common Bleeding of gums coughing up blood difficulty with breathing or swallowing dizziness headache increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding nosebleeds paralysis prolonged bleeding from cuts red or black, tarry stools red or dark brown urine shortness of breath unexplained pain, swelling, or discomfort, especially in the chest, abdomen or stomach, joints, or muscles unusual bruising vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds weakness Rare Back pain bleeding from mucous membranes bluish or black discoloration, flushing, or redness of the skin burning, pricking, tickling, or tingling sensation coughing feeling faint fever leg weakness numbness problems with bowel or bladder function skin rash (which may consist of pinpoint, purple-red spots), hives, or itching sloughing of the skin at place of injection swelling of the eyelids, face, or lips tightness in the chest or wheezing

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Fragmin side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Fragmin resources Fragmin Side Effects (in more detail) Fragmin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Fragmin Drug Interactions Fragmin Support Group 1 Review for Fragmin - Add your own review/rating Fragmin Prescribing Information (FDA) Fragmin Monograph (AHFS DI) Fragmin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Fragmin Consumer Overview Compare Fragmin with other medications Angina Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Abdominal Surgery Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Orthopedic Surgery Deep Vein Thrombosis, Prophylaxis Heart Attack Venous Thromboembolism
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Chloraseptic Sore Throat Spray


phenol
Dosage Form: oral spray
Chloraseptic Sore Throat Grape Spray

Drug Facts

Active ingredient

Phenol 0.5%

Purpose

Oral Anesthetic/Analgesic

Uses

For the temporary relief of occasional minor irritation, pain, sore mouth and sore throat.

Warnings

Sore Throat Warning: Severe or persistent sore throat or sore throat accompanied by high fever, headache, nausea, and vomiting may be serious. Consult doctor promptly. Do not use more than 2 days or administer to children under 3 years of age unless directed by a doctor.


When using this product

do not exceed recommended dosage.

Stop use and ask a doctor or dentist if sore mouth symptoms do not improve in 7 days
irritation, pain or redness persists or worsens
swelling, rash or fever develops

If pregnant or breast-feeding, ask a health care professional before use.

Keep out of reach of children.

In case of overdose or accidental poisoning, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

Directions

Adults and children 3 years of age and older:

Apply to the affected area (one spray).
Allow to remain in place for at least 15 seconds, then spit out.
Use every 2 hours or as directed by a doctor or dentist. Children under 12 years of age should be supervised in the use of this product. Children under 3 years of age: consult a doctor or dentist. Other information Store at room temperature.
Tamper Evident: Do not use if imprinted shrink band is broken or missing.
Check expiration date before using. Inactive ingredients

FD&C Blue #1, FD&C Red #40, flavor, glycerin, purified water, sodium saccharin, sodium chloride

Questions?

1-800-552-7932 www.chloraseptic.com

PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL

Kids Chloraseptic® Phenol/Oral Anesthetic
SORE THROAT
Real Relief, Real Fast®
GRAPE | 6 fl oz (177 mL)


CHLORASEPTIC SORE THROAT 
phenol  spray Product Information Product Type HUMAN OTC DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 67172-935 Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength PHENOL (PHENOL) PHENOL 3.5 mg  in 0.7 mL Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength FD&C BLUE NO. 1   FD&C RED NO. 40   WATER   GLYCERIN   SODIUM CHLORIDE   Product Characteristics Color PURPLE Score      Shape Size Flavor GRAPE Imprint Code Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 67172-935-51 177 mL In 1 BOTTLE, SPRAY None
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date OTC MONOGRAPH FINAL part348 09/01/2010
Labeler - Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc. (159655021) Establishment Name Address ID/FEI Operations Accupac, Inc. 071609663 MANUFACTURE Revised: 10/2010Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc.
More Chloraseptic Sore Throat Spray resources Chloraseptic Sore Throat Spray Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding 1 Review for Chloraseptic Sore Throat - Add your own review/rating Compare Chloraseptic Sore Throat Spray with other medications Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis
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gonadorelin injectable


Generic Name: gonadorelin (injectable) (gon ah doe REH lin)
Brand names: Factrel, Lutrepulse

What is gonadorelin?

Gonadorelin is a man-made protein that is like a hormone in the body called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). GnRH causes the pituitary gland to release other hormones including luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). LH and FSH are important for proper development in children and fertility in adults.

Gonadorelin is used to test how well the hypothalamus and pituitary glands are working.

Gonadorelin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about gonadorelin?

Before using gonadorelin, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or if you take any medications, including herbal products. You may not be able to take gonadorelin, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking gonadorelin?

Before using gonadorelin, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or if you take any medications, including herbal products. You may not be able to take gonadorelin, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring.

Gonadorelin is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take gonadorelin without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether gonadorelin passes into breast milk. Do not take gonadorelin without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take gonadorelin?

Gonadorelin is administered by a healthcare professional as a subcutaneous (under the skin) or intravenous (into a vein) injection.

Blood samples will be drawn before and after administration of gonadorelin to measure hormone levels in the body.

Your healthcare provider will store gonadorelin as directed by the manufacturer. If you are storing gonadorelin at home, your healthcare provider will provide storage instructions.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Missing a dose of gonadorelin should not occur as it is used for testing purposes only.

What happens if I overdose? An overdose of gonadorelin is unlikely to threaten life. Notify your doctor immediately or call an emergency room or poison control center for advice if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a gonadorelin overdose are not known.

What should I avoid while taking gonadorelin?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity during treatment with gonadorelin unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Gonadorelin side effects If you experience a rare allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives) to gonadorelin, seek emergency medical attention.

Other less serious side effects may also occur. Notify your doctor if you experience

headache;

flushing;

nausea or abdominal discomfort;

dizziness or lightheadedness;

pain, swelling, or itching at the injection site; or

skin rash.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

Gonadorelin Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Gonadotropin Deficiency:

0.1 mg injected once subcutaneously or intravenously as a single dose.

Usual Adult Dose for Amenorrhea:

5 mcg every 90 minutes (range of 1 to 20 mcg) delivered intravenously by a pump over 1 minute, every ninety minutes for 21 days.

What other drugs will affect gonadorelin?

Other medicines that affect hormone levels in the body may affect test results following treatment with gonadorelin. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products during treatment with gonadorelin.

More gonadorelin resources Gonadorelin Side Effects (in more detail)Gonadorelin Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingGonadorelin Drug InteractionsGonadorelin Support Group0 Reviews for Gonadorelin - Add your own review/rating Compare gonadorelin with other medications AmenorrheaGonadotropin Deficiency Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about gonadorelin written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Gonadorelin is available with a prescription under the brand name Factrel. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

See also: gonadorelin side effects (in more detail)


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