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Laxido Orange, powder for oral solution, sugar-free


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Laxido Orange, powder for oral solution.

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Each sachet contains the following quantitative composition of active ingredients:

Macrogol 3350 13.125g

Sodium Chloride 350.7mg

Sodium Hydrogen Carbonate 178.5mg

Potassium Chloride 46.6mg

The content of electrolyte ions per sachet following reconstitution in 125ml of water is equivalent to:

Sodium 65mmol/l

Chloride 53mmol/l

Hydrogen Carbonate (Bicarbonate) 17mmol/l

Potassium 5.4mmol/l

For a full list of excipients, see section 6.1.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Powder for oral solution. Single-dose sachet containing a free flowing white powder.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

For the treatment of chronic constipation. Laxido Orange is also effective in resolving faecal impaction, defined as refractory constipation with faecal loading of the rectum and/or colon.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Laxido Orange is for oral use.

Chronic Constipation:

A course of treatment for chronic constipation with Laxido Orange does not normally exceed 2 weeks, although this can be repeated if required. As for all laxatives, prolonged use is not usually recommended. Extended use may be necessary in the care of patients with severe chronic or resistant constipation, secondary to multiple sclerosis or Parkinson's Disease, or induced by regular constipating medication in particular opioids and antimuscarinics.

Adults, adolescents and the elderly: 1-3 sachets daily in divided doses, according to individual response. For extended use, the dose can be adjusted down to 1 or 2 sachets daily.

Children below 12 years old: Not recommended.

Faecal Impaction:

A course of treatment for faecal impaction with Laxido Orange does not normally exceed 3 days.

Adults, adolescents and the elderly: 8 sachets daily, all of which should be consumed within a 6 hour period.

Children below 12 years old: Not recommended.

Patients with impaired cardiovascular function: For the treatment of faecal impaction the dose should be divided so that no more than 2 sachets are taken in any one hour.

Patients with renal insufficiency: No dosage change is necessary for the treatment of constipation or faecal impaction.

Administration:

Each sachet should be dissolved in 125 ml water. For use in faecal impaction, 8 sachets may be dissolved in 1 litre of water.

4.3 Contraindications

Laxido Orange is contraindicated in intestinal obstruction or perforation caused by functional or structural disorder of the gut wall, ileus and in patients with severe inflammatory conditions of the intestinal tract (e.g. ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and toxic megacolon).

Hypersensitivity to the active substances or any of the excipients.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

The faecal impaction diagnosis should be confirmed by appropriate physical or radiological examination of the rectum and abdomen.

Mild adverse drug reactions are possible as indicated in Section 4.8. If patients develop any symptoms indicating shifts of fluids/electrolytes (e.g. oedema, shortness of breath, increasing fatigue, dehydration, cardiac failure) Laxido Orange should be stopped immediately and electrolytes measured and any abnormality should be treated appropriately.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

There are no known interactions of Laxido Orange with other medicinal products. However, macrogol 3350 raises the solubility of medicinal products that are soluble in alcohol and mainly insoluble in water. It is a theoretical possibility that absorption of these drugs could be reduced transiently. Therefore, other medicines should not be taken orally for one hour before and for one hour after taking Laxido Orange.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

There is no experience with the use of Laxido Orange during pregnancy and lactation and it should not be used during pregnancy and lactation unless clearly necessary.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Laxido Orange has no influence on the ability to drive and use machines.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Immune System Disorders:

Allergic reactions are possible.

Gastro-intestinal Disorders:

Potential gastro-intestinal effects that may occur include abdominal distension and pain, borborygmi and nausea. Mild diarrhoea may also occur, but normally resolves after dose reduction.

4.9 Overdose

Severe distension or pain can be treated using nasogastric aspiration. Vomiting or diarrhoea may induce extensive fluid loss, possibly leading to electrolyte disturbances that should be treated appropriately.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Pharmacotherapeutic group: Osmotically acting laxatives.

ATC code: A06A D65

Macrogol 3350 induces a laxative effect through its osmotic action in the gut. This product also contains electrolytes to ensure that there is no overall gain or loss of water, potassium or sodium.

Clinical studies using the listed active substances for the treatment of chronic constipation have shown that the dose required to produce normally formed stools tends to decrease over time. For most patients, the maintenance dose will be one to two sachets per day (adjusted according to individual response).

Comparative studies in faecal impaction using active controls (e.g. enemas) have not been performed. However, results from a non-comparative study have shown that, from a population of 27 adult patients, the listed combination of active substances cleared faecal impaction in 12/27 (44%) patients after one day's treatment, increasing to 23/27 (85%) following two days' treatment and 24/27 (89%) recovered at the end of three days.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Macrogol 3350 is virtually unabsorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract and is excreted, unaltered, in faeces. Any macrogol 3350 that enters the systemic circulation is excreted in urine.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Preclinical studies provide evidence that macrogol 3350 has no significant systemic toxicity potential, although no tests of its effects on reproduction or genotoxicity have been conducted.

There are no long-term animal toxicity or carcinogenicity studies involving macrogol 3350, although there are toxicity studies using high levels of orally administered high-molecular weight macrogols that provide evidence of safety at the recommended therapeutic dose.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Acesulfame Potassium (E950)

Orange Flavour

(Orange flavour contains the following constituents: natural flavouring substances and preparations, maltodextrin and propylene glycol [E1520])

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not applicable.

6.3 Shelf Life

Sachet: Two years.

Reconstituted solution: Six hours.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Sachet: Store below 25°C.

Reconstituted solution: Store covered in a refrigerator (2°C to 8°C).

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

The sachet is composed of paper, low density polyethylene and aluminium.

Sachets are packed in cartons of 2, 8, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

No special requirements.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Galen Limited

Seagoe Industrial Estate

Craigavon

BT63 5UA

UK

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 21590/0087.

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

01 May 2008.

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

10 February 2010


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Osteogenesis Imperfecta Medications


Definition of Osteogenesis Imperfecta: Osteogenesis imperfecta is a condition causing extremely fragile bones. More...

Drugs associated with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Osteogenesis Imperfecta. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Medical Encyclopedia:

Osteogenesis imperfecta
Drug List: Fortical Miacalcin Miacalcin-Nasal
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Buscopan Cramps


Buscopan Cramps

10 mg tablets

hyoscine butylbromide

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking BUSCOPAN CRAMPS, because it contains important information for you to get the best results. Keep this leaflet. You may need to use it again Ask your pharmacist if you need more information or advice You must contact a doctor if your symptoms worsen or do not improve after two weeks If a side effect occurs and gets troublesome, or seems serious to you, or if you experience a side effect not listed in this leaflet, please tell your pharmacist or doctor In this leaflet: 1. What BUSCOPAN CRAMPS is and what it is used for 2. Before you take BUSCOPAN CRAMPS 3. How to take BUSCOPAN CRAMPS 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store BUSCOPAN CRAMPS 6. Further information What Buscopan Cramps Is And What It Is Used For BUSCOPAN CRAMPS is a tablet containing hyoscine butylbromide. It belongs to a group of medicines called antispasmodics. It is used to relieve stomach and bowel cramps which cause pain and discomfort associated with your digestive tract, and in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. It may also be recommended by your doctor for spasm of the bladder and urinary tubes (urinary tract). It works by relaxing the cramping muscles of your stomach and bowel, or urinary tract. What are abdominal cramps?

Abdominal cramps (or spasm) are due to the sudden, irregular tightening up of muscles in the wall of your stomach or bowel. While the precise cause is unknown, the muscles of the stomach and bowel appear to be very sensitive to things like:

Stress, eating and drinking habits Food allergies or intolerances Stimulants such as coffee Hormonal factors

Such things can trigger painful abdominal cramps or spasms if you have a sensitive digestive tract. You may also feel bloated, with excess wind and abdominal discomfort.

Before You Take Buscopan Cramps Do not take BUSCOPAN CRAMPS if: You are allergic to hyoscine butylbromide or any of the other ingredients of BUSCOPAN CRAMPS. (listed in Section 6) You are intolerant to or cannot digest some sugars (as the tablet coating contains a small amount of sucrose) You have glaucoma (an eye problem) You have megacolon (a very enlarged bowel) You have something called ‘myasthenia gravis’ (a very rare muscle weakness problem) You are pregnant, likely to get pregnant, or are breast-feeding

Do not take this medicine if any of the above applies to you. If you are not sure, talk to your pharmacist or doctor before taking this medicine.

Take special care with BUSCOPAN CRAMPS

Check with your pharmacist or doctor before taking your medicine if any of the following apply to you:

You are 40 years or over You have recently passed blood from the bowel You have severe constipation You are feeling sick or vomiting You have lost your appetite or lost weight You are looking pale and feeling tired You have difficulty or pain passing water (urine) You have a fever You have abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge You have recently travelled abroad (in case you have picked up a stomach bug) You have a very fast heart rate or other heart problems You have been treated by a doctor for a severe sweating problem

If you are not sure if any of the above applies to you, talk to your pharmacist or doctor before taking this medicine.

Taking other medicines

Please tell your pharmacist or doctor if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. This includes herbal medicines. This is because BUSCOPAN CRAMPS can affect the way some other medicines work. Also some other medicines can affect the way BUSCOPAN CRAMPS works.

In particular tell your pharmacist or doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

Antihistamines - used to treat hay fever and other allergies Tricyclic medicines - used to treat depression and some types of pain Butyrophenones or phenothiazines – used to treat severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. These are also known as ‘anti-psychotics’ Dopamine antagonists such as metoclopramide for feeling sick Beta 2 adrenergic medicines such as salbutamol inhalers for asthma Quinidine or disopyramide – used to control your heart beat Amantadine – used for Parkinson’s disease and flu Tiotropium or ipratropium – medicines inhaled to treat breathing problems

If you are not sure if any of the above applies to you, talk to your pharmacist or doctor before taking this medicine.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Do not take BUSCOPAN CRAMPS if you are pregnant, likely to get pregnant or are breast-feeding.

Driving and using machines

Some people may have temporary blurring of vision while taking this medicine. If this happens to you, wait until your vision returns to normal before driving or using any tools or machines.

How To Take Buscopan Cramps

Always take this medicine exactly as your pharmacist or doctor has told you. You should check with them if you are not sure. Talk to your pharmacist or doctor if you develop new symptoms or if your symptoms get worse or have not improved over two weeks.

Taking this medicine Swallow the tablet whole with water Do not crush or chew the tablet How much to take

For relief of painful spasm of the stomach, bowel or bladder and urinary tubes (urinary tract).

Adults, and children 12 years or over:

2 tablets four times a day

Children 6 to 12 years:

1 tablet three times a day

Not recommended for children under 6 years

For the relief of abdominal pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Adults, and children 12 years or over:

Start by taking 1 tablet three times a day You can increase your dose to a maximum of 2 tablets four times a day, if needed

Not recommended for children under 12 years

If you take more BUSCOPAN CRAMPS than you should

If you take more than you should, talk to a doctor or go to a hospital straight away. Take the medicine pack with you.

If you have any further questions on the use of this product, ask your pharmacist or doctor.

Buscopan Cramps Side Effects

Like all medicines, BUSCOPAN CRAMPS can cause side effects in some people. The following side effects may happen with this medicine:

Mild side effects that do not normally require medical treatment:

Uncommon – affects fewer than 1 in 100 people

Dry mouth Making less sweat than usual

If any of these side effects get troublesome or seem serious to you please tell your pharmacist or doctor.

If you get any of the side effects described below stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor straight away. You may need urgent medical treatment:

Uncommon – affects fewer than 1 in 100 people

Skin rash by itself Increased heart rate

Rare – affects fewer than 1 in 1,000 people

Allergic reactions (hypersensitivity) – the signs may include skin rash and itching, wheezing and shortness of breath Problems emptying the bladder

Isolated events – some side effects are so rare that it is not known how many people may be affected

Anaphylactic reaction and shock – this is a severe type of allergic reaction. The itchy rash may spread all over the body, as well as swelling. You may have difficulty in breathing and may lose consciousness If you experience a painful red eye with loss of vision after taking this medicine, stop taking it and tell your doctor straight away. You may have an eye problem called glaucoma and need urgent medical attention.

If you notice a side effect not listed in this leaflet, please tell your pharmacist or doctor.

How To Store Buscopan Cramps

Do not store above 25°C. Keep in the original packaging.

Keep out of the sight and reach of children.

Do not take BUSCOPAN CRAMPS after the expiry date which you will find printed on the packaging.

Further Information What BUSCOPAN CRAMPS contains

Each tablet contains 10 mg of the active ingredient hyoscine butylbromide. The other ingredients are: calcium hydrogen phosphate, maize starch, soluble starch, colloidal silica, tartaric acid, stearic acid, sucrose, talc, acacia, titanium dioxide, macrogol 6000, carnauba wax, white beeswax and povidone.

What BUSCOPAN CRAMPS looks like and contents of the pack

The tablets are white. BUSCOPAN CRAMPS is available in blister packs of 20 tablets.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer

The Marketing Authorisation is held by:

Boehringer Ingelheim Limited Consumer Healthcare Ellesfield Avenue Bracknell Berkshire RG12 8YS United Kingdom

and the tablets are manufactured by:

Delpharm Reims S.A.S 10 Rue Colonel Charbonneaux 51100 Reims France

This leaflet was revised in March 2009.

© Boehringer Ingelheim Limited 2009

310108-001


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McCune-Albright Syndrome Medications


Definition of McCune-Albright Syndrome: A genetic disease affecting the bones and pigmentation of the skin, and causing hormonal problems featuring premature sexual development.

Drugs associated with McCune-Albright Syndrome

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of McCune-Albright Syndrome. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about McCune-Albright Syndrome

Medical Encyclopedia:

McCune-Albright syndrome
Drug List: Arimidex Nolvadex Soltamox-Solution
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Mag-SR


Generic Name: magnesium chloride (mag NEE see um KLOE ride)
Brand Names: Mag 64, Mag-Delay, Mag-SR, Slow-Mag

What is Mag-SR (magnesium chloride)?

Magnesium is a mineral that occurs naturally in the body and is found in certain foods. Magnesium is important for many systems in the body especially the muscles, nerves, heart, and bones.

Magnesium chloride is used to treat or prevent magnesium deficiency (lack of natural magnesium in the body).

Magnesium chloride may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Mag-SR (magnesium chloride)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a stomach ulcer or disorder, or if you are dehydrated.

Before taking magnesium chloride, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or any type of allergy.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It is not known whether magnesium chloride could harm an unborn baby, or if it passes into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Avoid using antacids or laxatives without your doctor's advice. These medications may contain minerals and if you take certain products together you may get too much magnesium.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially antibiotics, ADHD medication, thyroid medication, or medication for osteoporosis or Paget's disease.

Magnesium chloride is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also includes a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Call your doctor at once if you have signs of too much magnesium in your blood, such as depression, feeling tired or irritable, muscle cramps, or severe or ongoing diarrhea. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Mag-SR (magnesium chloride)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

a stomach ulcer or disorder; or

if you are dehydrated.

Before taking magnesium chloride, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or any type of allergy.

It is not known whether magnesium chloride is harmful to an unborn baby. Your dose needs may be different during pregnancy. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether magnesium chloride passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are nursing. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Mag-SR (magnesium chloride)?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take this medication with a full glass of water. Magnesium chloride should be taken with food if it upsets your stomach or causes diarrhea. Follow your doctor's instructions. Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

It is important to use magnesium chloride regularly to get the most benefit. Try to take your dose(s) at the same time each day.

Magnesium chloride is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also includes a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat to help control your condition.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Store magnesium chloride at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include thirst, confusion, severe drowsiness, slow heart rate, urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking Mag-SR (magnesium chloride)?

Avoid using antacids or laxatives without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. These medications may contain minerals and if you take certain products together you may get too much magnesium.

If you are taking a tetracycline antibiotic, avoid taking it within 2 hours before or 3 hours after you take magnesium chloride. Tetracycline antibiotics include doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap, and others).

Mag-SR (magnesium chloride) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe dizziness, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have signs that you magnesium blood levels are too low, such as:

depression, feeling tired or irritable;

muscle cramps; or

severe or ongoing diarrhea.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild diarrhea;

nausea, stomach pain; or

upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Mag-SR (magnesium chloride)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);

sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kalexate, Kayexalate, Kionex);

an amphetamine such as ADHD medication (Adderall, Vyvanse, Dexedrine, and others);

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and others;

medication for osteoporosis or Paget's disease, such as alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva), etidronate (Didronel), pamidronate (Aredia), or risedronate (Actonel); or

thyroid replacement medication such as levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid, Unithroid).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with magnesium chloride. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Mag-SR resources Mag-SR Side Effects (in more detail) Mag-SR Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Mag-SR Drug Interactions Mag-SR Support Group 0 Reviews for Mag-SR - Add your own review/rating Mag-SR Sustained-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Magnesium Chloride Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Chloromag Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Mag-SR with other medications Heart Attack Hypomagnesemia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about magnesium chloride.

See also: Mag-SR side effects (in more detail)


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Mag 64


Generic Name: magnesium chloride (mag NEE see um KLOE ride)
Brand Names: Mag 64, Mag-Delay, Mag-SR, Slow-Mag

What is Mag 64 (magnesium chloride)?

Magnesium is a mineral that occurs naturally in the body and is found in certain foods. Magnesium is important for many systems in the body especially the muscles, nerves, heart, and bones.

Magnesium chloride is used to treat or prevent magnesium deficiency (lack of natural magnesium in the body).

Magnesium chloride may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Mag 64 (magnesium chloride)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a stomach ulcer or disorder, or if you are dehydrated.

Before taking magnesium chloride, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or any type of allergy.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It is not known whether magnesium chloride could harm an unborn baby, or if it passes into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Avoid using antacids or laxatives without your doctor's advice. These medications may contain minerals and if you take certain products together you may get too much magnesium.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially antibiotics, ADHD medication, thyroid medication, or medication for osteoporosis or Paget's disease.

Magnesium chloride is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also includes a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Call your doctor at once if you have signs of too much magnesium in your blood, such as depression, feeling tired or irritable, muscle cramps, or severe or ongoing diarrhea. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Mag 64 (magnesium chloride)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

a stomach ulcer or disorder; or

if you are dehydrated.

Before taking magnesium chloride, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or any type of allergy.

It is not known whether magnesium chloride is harmful to an unborn baby. Your dose needs may be different during pregnancy. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether magnesium chloride passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are nursing. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Mag 64 (magnesium chloride)?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take this medication with a full glass of water. Magnesium chloride should be taken with food if it upsets your stomach or causes diarrhea. Follow your doctor's instructions. Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

It is important to use magnesium chloride regularly to get the most benefit. Try to take your dose(s) at the same time each day.

Magnesium chloride is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also includes a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat to help control your condition.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Store magnesium chloride at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include thirst, confusion, severe drowsiness, slow heart rate, urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking Mag 64 (magnesium chloride)?

Avoid using antacids or laxatives without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. These medications may contain minerals and if you take certain products together you may get too much magnesium.

If you are taking a tetracycline antibiotic, avoid taking it within 2 hours before or 3 hours after you take magnesium chloride. Tetracycline antibiotics include doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap, and others).

Mag 64 (magnesium chloride) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe dizziness, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have signs that you magnesium blood levels are too low, such as:

depression, feeling tired or irritable;

muscle cramps; or

severe or ongoing diarrhea.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild diarrhea;

nausea, stomach pain; or

upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Mag 64 (magnesium chloride)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);

sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kalexate, Kayexalate, Kionex);

an amphetamine such as ADHD medication (Adderall, Vyvanse, Dexedrine, and others);

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and others;

medication for osteoporosis or Paget's disease, such as alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva), etidronate (Didronel), pamidronate (Aredia), or risedronate (Actonel); or

thyroid replacement medication such as levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid, Unithroid).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with magnesium chloride. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Mag 64 resources Mag 64 Side Effects (in more detail) Mag 64 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Mag 64 Drug Interactions Mag 64 Support Group 0 Reviews for Mag 64 - Add your own review/rating Magnesium Chloride Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Chloromag Prescribing Information (FDA) Mag-SR Sustained-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Mag 64 with other medications Heart Attack Hypomagnesemia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about magnesium chloride.

See also: Mag 64 side effects (in more detail)


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Mag-Delay


Generic Name: magnesium chloride (mag NEE see um KLOE ride)
Brand Names: Mag 64, Mag-Delay, Mag-SR, Slow-Mag

What is Mag-Delay (magnesium chloride)?

Magnesium is a mineral that occurs naturally in the body and is found in certain foods. Magnesium is important for many systems in the body especially the muscles, nerves, heart, and bones.

Magnesium chloride is used to treat or prevent magnesium deficiency (lack of natural magnesium in the body).

Magnesium chloride may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Mag-Delay (magnesium chloride)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a stomach ulcer or disorder, or if you are dehydrated.

Before taking magnesium chloride, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or any type of allergy.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It is not known whether magnesium chloride could harm an unborn baby, or if it passes into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Avoid using antacids or laxatives without your doctor's advice. These medications may contain minerals and if you take certain products together you may get too much magnesium.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially antibiotics, ADHD medication, thyroid medication, or medication for osteoporosis or Paget's disease.

Magnesium chloride is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also includes a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Call your doctor at once if you have signs of too much magnesium in your blood, such as depression, feeling tired or irritable, muscle cramps, or severe or ongoing diarrhea. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Mag-Delay (magnesium chloride)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

a stomach ulcer or disorder; or

if you are dehydrated.

Before taking magnesium chloride, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or any type of allergy.

It is not known whether magnesium chloride is harmful to an unborn baby. Your dose needs may be different during pregnancy. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether magnesium chloride passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are nursing. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Mag-Delay (magnesium chloride)?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take this medication with a full glass of water. Magnesium chloride should be taken with food if it upsets your stomach or causes diarrhea. Follow your doctor's instructions. Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

It is important to use magnesium chloride regularly to get the most benefit. Try to take your dose(s) at the same time each day.

Magnesium chloride is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also includes a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat to help control your condition.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Store magnesium chloride at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include thirst, confusion, severe drowsiness, slow heart rate, urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking Mag-Delay (magnesium chloride)?

Avoid using antacids or laxatives without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. These medications may contain minerals and if you take certain products together you may get too much magnesium.

If you are taking a tetracycline antibiotic, avoid taking it within 2 hours before or 3 hours after you take magnesium chloride. Tetracycline antibiotics include doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap, and others).

Mag-Delay (magnesium chloride) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe dizziness, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have signs that you magnesium blood levels are too low, such as:

depression, feeling tired or irritable;

muscle cramps; or

severe or ongoing diarrhea.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild diarrhea;

nausea, stomach pain; or

upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Mag-Delay (magnesium chloride)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);

sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kalexate, Kayexalate, Kionex);

an amphetamine such as ADHD medication (Adderall, Vyvanse, Dexedrine, and others);

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and others;

medication for osteoporosis or Paget's disease, such as alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva), etidronate (Didronel), pamidronate (Aredia), or risedronate (Actonel); or

thyroid replacement medication such as levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid, Unithroid).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with magnesium chloride. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Mag-Delay resources Mag-Delay Side Effects (in more detail)Mag-Delay Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingMag-Delay Drug InteractionsMag-Delay Support Group0 Reviews for Mag-Delay - Add your own review/rating Magnesium Chloride Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Chloromag Prescribing Information (FDA) Mag-SR Sustained-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Mag-Delay with other medications Heart AttackHypomagnesemia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about magnesium chloride.

See also: Mag-Delay side effects (in more detail)


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Macular Degeneration Medications


Definition of Macular Degeneration: Macular degeneration is a disorder that affects the macula (the central part of the retina of the eye) causing decreased visual acuity and possible loss of central vision.

Drugs associated with Macular Degeneration

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Macular Degeneration. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Macular Degeneration

Harvard Health Guide:

Symptoms and treatment for Macular Degeneration
Drug List: Avastin Eylea Lucentis Macugen Visudyne
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Furosemide Injection BP


Furosemide Injection

Important information about your medicine Your doctor or nurse will give you the injection If this injection causes you any problems talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you have any other medical conditions or have an allergy to any of the ingredients of this medicine Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you are taking any other medicines Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. In some circumstances this may not be possible and this leaflet will be kept in a safe place should you wish to read it. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again If you have any further questions, please ask your doctor or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you personally and you should not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. Where to find information in this leaflet 1. What Furosemide Injection is and what it is used for 2. Before you are given Furosemide Injection 3. How to use Furosemide Injection 4. Possible side effects 5. Storing Furosemide Injection 6. Further information What Furosemide Injection is and what it is used for

Furosemide Injection is a powerful, quick acting diuretic which causes the body to increase the production of urine. It is used to:

remove large amounts of fluid that has accumulated in the tissues and lungs (oedema) treat high blood pressure in emergencies increase the production of urine in kidney failure Before you are given Furosemide Injection You should NOT be given Furosemide Injection if you: Are sensitive or allergic to Furosemide Injection or any of the other ingredients in this injection. If you are allergic to a group of drugs called sulphonamides (e.g. Co-Trimoxazole) you may also be allergic to this injection. You are dehydrated, your blood volume is low (you may feel dizzy, faint or have pale skin) or you are unable to pass urine. You have low levels of potassium or sodium or an imbalance of chemicals in your blood. You have liver cirrhosis that is affecting your consciousness. You previously received certain medicines that have damaged your kidneys. Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given the injection if you have: You have hypotension (low blood pressure) You have (or potentially may have) diabetes You have gout You have (or have had) any problems with your liver or kidneys You have difficulty in passing water, for example because of a large prostate gland Using other medicines:

Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. This is especially important with the following medicines as they may interact with your Furosemide Injection:

medicines to help your heart beat (e.g. digoxin) medicines to help your heart beat regularly (e.g. amiodarone) medicines to lower your blood pressure particularly medicines known as ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor antagonists lithium medicines used to treat pain or inflammation (e.g. indometacin, ketorolac, acetylsalicylic acid) antibiotics cisplatin methotrexate ciclosporin medicines to treat epilepsy e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine corticosteroids chloral hydrate or triclofos medicines to relax your muscles Pregnancy or breast feeding:

Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given this injection if you are pregnant or breast feeding. The doctor will then decide if the injection is suitable for you.

Driving and using machines:

You should not drive or use machinery if you are affected by the administration of Furosemide Injection.

How to use Furosemide Injection

Your nurse or doctor will give you the injection.

Your doctor will decide the correct dosage for you and how and when the injection will be given.

Since the injection will be given to you by a doctor or nurse, it is unlikely that you will be given too much. If you think you have been given too much, you must tell the person giving you the injection.

During treatment with Furosemide Injection, your doctor may want you to have blood tests to show if the chemicals and fluids in your body are balanced.

If Furosemide injection is given to a premature infant then the doctor will monitor the infant’s kidneys to ensure that the Furosemide injection is not causing any problems.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Furosemide Injection can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

allergic reactions such as rash, itching, difficulty breathing or swelling of the face or lips feeling sick, diarrhoea blurred vision, headache skin rashes, including blistering and sensitivity/over reacting to sunlight muscle spasms or cramps caused by chemical imbalances in the blood and body fluids hearing problems (such as deafness or ringing in the ears) aching or swollen joints (gout) high blood sugar, sugar in the urine low blood pressure which may cause dizziness when standing up Inflammation of the pancreas, kidneys or blood vessels deposits of calcium in the kidneys changes in the blood which may cause increased bleeding or bruising, or make you more likely to catch infections increased levels of cholesterol or triglycerides in the blood. changes in the rhythm of your heart. greater difficulties for patients with existing problems in passing urine (e.g. enlarged prostate).

If you think this injection is causing you any problems, or you are at all worried, talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Storing Furosemide Injection

Your injection will be stored at less than 25°C and protected from light. The nurse or doctor will check that the injection is not past its expiry date before giving you the injection.

Further information What Furosemide Injection contains:

This injection contains the active ingredient furosemide. Each 1 ml of solution contains 10 mg furosemide in a sterile solution for injection.

This injection contains the following inactive ingredients: sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide and sterile water for injections.

This injection contains a maximum of 4 mg of sodium per ml. To be taken into consideration by patients on a controlled sodium diet.

What Furosemide Injection looks like and contents of the pack:

Furosemide Injection is supplied in 2 ml, 5 ml and 25 ml amber glass ampoules. The injection is supplied in cartons of 10 ampoules. Not all ampoule sizes may be marketed.

The marketing authorisation number of this medicine is: PL 01502/0032

Marketing Authorisation Holder: hameln pharmaceuticals ltd Gloucester United Kingdom Manufacturer: hameln pharmaceuticals gmbh Langes Feld 13 31789 Hameln Germany

For any information about this medicine, please contact the Marketing Authorisation Holder

This leaflet was last approved 19.08.2008

44174/20/09


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magnesium chloride


Generic Name: magnesium chloride (mag NEE see um KLOE ride)
Brand names: Mag 64, Mag-Delay, Mag-SR, Slow-Mag, Chloromag

What is magnesium chloride?

Magnesium is a mineral that occurs naturally in the body and is found in certain foods. Magnesium is important for many systems in the body especially the muscles, nerves, heart, and bones.

Magnesium chloride is used to treat or prevent magnesium deficiency (lack of natural magnesium in the body).

Magnesium chloride may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about magnesium chloride? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a stomach ulcer or disorder, or if you are dehydrated.

Before taking magnesium chloride, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or any type of allergy.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It is not known whether magnesium chloride could harm an unborn baby, or if it passes into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Avoid using antacids or laxatives without your doctor's advice. These medications may contain minerals and if you take certain products together you may get too much magnesium.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially antibiotics, ADHD medication, thyroid medication, or medication for osteoporosis or Paget's disease.

Magnesium chloride is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also includes a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Call your doctor at once if you have signs of too much magnesium in your blood, such as depression, feeling tired or irritable, muscle cramps, or severe or ongoing diarrhea. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking magnesium chloride? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

a stomach ulcer or disorder; or

if you are dehydrated.

Before taking magnesium chloride, tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or any type of allergy.

It is not known whether magnesium chloride is harmful to an unborn baby. Your dose needs may be different during pregnancy. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether magnesium chloride passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are nursing. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take magnesium chloride?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take this medication with a full glass of water. Magnesium chloride should be taken with food if it upsets your stomach or causes diarrhea. Follow your doctor's instructions. Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

It is important to use magnesium chloride regularly to get the most benefit. Try to take your dose(s) at the same time each day.

Magnesium chloride is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also includes a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat to help control your condition.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Store magnesium chloride at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

See also: Magnesium chloride dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include thirst, confusion, severe drowsiness, slow heart rate, urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking magnesium chloride?

Avoid using antacids or laxatives without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. These medications may contain minerals and if you take certain products together you may get too much magnesium.

If you are taking a tetracycline antibiotic, avoid taking it within 2 hours before or 3 hours after you take magnesium chloride. Tetracycline antibiotics include doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap, and others).

Magnesium chloride side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe dizziness, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have signs that you magnesium blood levels are too low, such as:

depression, feeling tired or irritable;

muscle cramps; or

severe or ongoing diarrhea.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild diarrhea;

nausea, stomach pain; or

upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Magnesium chloride Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Hypomagnesemia:

Mild hypomagnesemia:
If oral administration is tolerated, mild hypomagnesemia may be treated with Slow-Mag 1 tablet (535 mg magnesium chloride, 64 mg elemental magnesium) orally once a day.
Severe hypomagnesemia:
40 mEq (4 g magnesium chloride) in 5% dextrose or normal saline by IV infusion once over 3 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Myocardial Infarction:

10 mEq in 5% dextrose or normal saline by IV infusion once within the first 24 hours of infarction.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hypomagnesemia:

Neonatal:
Hypomagnesemia: IV: Magnesium chloride: 0.2 to 0.4 mEq/kg/dose every 8 to 12 hours for 2 to 3 doses
Daily maintenance magnesium: IV: Magnesium chloride: 0.25 to 0.5 mEq/kg/day
Children:
IM or IV: Magnesium chloride: 0.2 to 0.4 mEq/kg/dose every 4 to 6 hours for 3 to 4 doses; maximum single dose: 16 mEq
Oral: Note: Achieving optimal magnesium levels using oral therapy may be difficult due to the propensity for magnesium to cause diarrhea; IV replacement may be more appropriate particularly in situations of severe deficit: Magnesium chloride: 10 to 20 mg/kg elemental magnesium per dose up to 4 times/day
Daily maintenance magnesium: IV Magnesium chloride:
Infants and Children less than or equal to 45 kg: 0.25 to 0.5 mEq/kg/day
Adolescents greater than 45 kg and Adults: 0.2 to 0.5 mEq/kg/day or 3 to 10 mEq/1000 kcal/day (maximum: 8 to 20 mEq/day).

What other drugs will affect magnesium chloride?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);

sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kalexate, Kayexalate, Kionex);

an amphetamine such as ADHD medication (Adderall, Vyvanse, Dexedrine, and others);

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and others;

medication for osteoporosis or Paget's disease, such as alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva), etidronate (Didronel), pamidronate (Aredia), or risedronate (Actonel); or

thyroid replacement medication such as levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid, Unithroid).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with magnesium chloride. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More magnesium chloride resources Magnesium chloride Side Effects (in more detail) Magnesium chloride Dosage Magnesium chloride Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Magnesium chloride Drug Interactions Magnesium chloride Support Group 0 Reviews for Magnesium chloride - Add your own review/rating Magnesium Chloride Sustained-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Magnesium Chloride Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Chloromag Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare magnesium chloride with other medications Heart Attack Hypomagnesemia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about magnesium chloride.

See also: magnesium chloride side effects (in more detail)


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Skeletal muscle relaxant combinations


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Skeletal muscle relaxant combinations are products, which have a muscle relaxant and drugs such as pain relief medicines, in one pill. Skeletal muscle relaxants are centrally acting agents that work by reducing the tone of skeletal muscle causing muscle to relax.

They are used to treat musculoskeletal pain and spasms.

See also

Medical conditions associated with skeletal muscle relaxant combinations:

Anxiety Muscle Pain Muscle Spasm Pain Drug List: Norgesic-Forte Soma-Compound Norgesic Soma-Compound-With-Codeine Robaxisal Equagesic Micrainin Orphengesic Orphengesic-Forte
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Behcet's Disease Medications


Definition of Behcet's Disease:

Behcet's disease is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder. The cause of Behcet's disease is unknown, although there have been reports of a virus found in some individuals with the disease. Behcet's disease generally begins when individuals are in their 20s or 30s, although it can happen at any age. It tends to occur more often in men than in women. Symptoms of Behcet's disease include recurrent ulcers in the mouth (resembling canker sores) and on the genitals, and eye inflammation. The disorder may also cause various types of skin lesions, arthritis, bowel inflammation, meningitis (inflammation of the membranes of the brain and spinal cord), and cranial nerve palsies. Behcet's is a multi-system disease; it may involve all organs and affect the central nervous system, causing memory loss and impaired speech, balance, and movement.

The effects of the disease may include blindness, stroke, swelling of the spinal cord, and intestinal complications. The disease is common in Japan, Turkey and Israel, and less common in the United States.

Drugs associated with Behcet's Disease

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Behcet's Disease. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Behcet's Disease

Harvard Health Guide:

Symptoms and treatment for Behcet's Disease
Drug List:/tags/enbrel/
Remicade
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Inotropic agents


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Inotropic agents affect the contraction of the heart muscle. Positive inotropes stimulate and increase the strength of heart muscle contraction causing the heart rate to increase. Negative inotropic agents weaken the force of muscular contractions.

Inotropic state depends on the amount of calcium in the cytoplasm of the heart muscle wall, as contractility of the heart depends on control of intracellular calcium i.e. control of calcium entry into the cell membrane and calcium storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The main factors controlling calcium entry are activity of voltage gated calcium channels and sodium ions, which affects calcium/sodium ion exchange.

Positive inotropes usually increase the level of intracellular calcium and negative inotropes decrease it.

See also

Medical conditions associated with inotropic agents:

Atrial Fibrillation Heart Failure Nonobstructive Oliguria Shock Drug List: Lanoxicaps Lanoxin Digitek Dobutrex Primacor Primacor-I-V
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Methylxanthines


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Methylxanthines act as bronchodilators by relaxing bronchial smooth muscle and helps the constricted airways to dilate. The exact mechanism of action with regards to methylxanthine causing bronchodilatation is not well understood but it appears that methylxanthines inhibit the enzyme phosphodiesterase, which degrades cyclic AMP, so methylxanthines tend to increase the concentration of cyclic AMP.

Methylxanthines are bronchodilators used in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

See also

Medical conditions associated with methylxanthines:

Apnea of Prematurity Asthma Asthma, acute Asthma, Maintenance Bronchitis COPD Drug List: Theo-24-Sustained-Release-Capsules Uniphyl-Sustained-Release-Tablets Theo-Dur Choledyl Choledyl-Sa Dilor Dilor-400 Dylix-Elixir Elixophyllin-Elixir Lufyllin Lufyllin-400 Neothylline Phyllocontin Quibron-T Quibron-T-Sr Theo-Time Theocap-Sustained-Release-Capsules Theochron-Sustained-Release-Tablets Theolair-Tablets Truphylline Truxophyllin
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Metolazone


Pronunciation: meh-TOLE-uh-ZONE
Generic Name: Metolazone
Brand Name: Zaroxolyn
Metolazone is used for:

Treating high blood pressure. It may be used with other high blood pressure medicines. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Metolazone is a quinazoline diuretic with actions similar to thiazide type diuretics (eg, hydrochlorothiazide). It works by causing the kidneys to eliminate certain chemicals, which in turn allow large amounts of water to be eliminated.

Do NOT use Metolazone if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Metolazone you are unable to urinate you have precoma or are in a coma caused by severe liver disease

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Metolazone:

Some medical conditions may interact with Metolazone. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have lupus, kidney or liver disease, low blood sodium or potassium levels, or gout

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Metolazone. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen, naproxen) because they may decrease Metolazone's effectiveness Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril), diazoxide, ketanserin, loop diuretics (eg, furosemide), NSAIDs (eg, ibuprofen, naproxen) because side effects, such as kidney problems, may occur ACE inhibitors (eg, enalapril), allopurinol, amantadine, antineoplastic agents (eg, cyclophosphamide), diazoxide, digitalis glycosides (eg, digoxin), ketanserin, lithium, loop diuretics (eg, furosemide), or nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (eg, vecuronium) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Metolazone

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Metolazone may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Metolazone:

Use Metolazone as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Metolazone by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Metolazone may increase the amount of urine or cause you to urinate more often when you first start taking it. To keep this from disturbing your sleep, try to take your dose before 6 pm. If you miss a dose of Metolazone, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Metolazone.

Important safety information: Metolazone may cause drowsiness, dizziness, blurred vision, or lightheadedness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Metolazone with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Metolazone may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting; alcohol, hot weather, exercise, or fever may increase these effects. To prevent them, sit up or stand slowly, especially in the morning. Sit or lie down at the first sign of any of these effects. Metolazone may cause you to become sunburned more easily. Avoid the sun, sunlamps, or tanning booths until you know how you react to Metolazone. Use a sunscreen or wear protective clothing if you must be outside for more than a short time. Do not change brands of Metolazone without talking to your doctor. Products made by other companies may not work as well for you. Check with your doctor before you use a salt substitute or a product that has potassium in it. Lab tests, including liver function, kidney function, and complete blood cell counts, may be performed while you use Metolazone. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Metolazone should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Metolazone while you are pregnant. Metolazone is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Metolazone. Possible side effects of Metolazone:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Abnormal skin sensations; constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; feeling of a whirling motion; headache; impotence; joint pain; lightheadedness; loss of appetite; nausea; purple patches under the skin; skin sensitivity to sunlight; stomach bloating; stomach pain.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chest pain/discomfort; depression; drowsiness; dry mouth; fainting; gout attacks; lightheadedness when rising from a seated position; muscle pain or cramps; rapid or irregular heartbeat; restlessness; unusual thirst; unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Metolazone side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1- 800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; excessive urination followed by a decrease in amount of urine; fainting; irregular or weak heartbeat; lightheadedness when rising from a seated position; muscle cramps.

Proper storage of Metolazone:

Store Metolazone at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Metolazone out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Metolazone, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Metolazone is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Metolazone. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Metolazone resources Metolazone Side Effects (in more detail) Metolazone Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Metolazone Drug Interactions Metolazone Support Group 1 Review for Metolazone - Add your own review/rating Metolazone Prescribing Information (FDA) Metolazone Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Metolazone Monograph (AHFS DI) metolazone Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information metolazone Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Mykrox Prescribing Information (FDA) Zaroxolyn Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Metolazone with other medications Edema High Blood Pressure
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Deseril Tablets 1mg


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Deseril® tablets 1mg

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Methysergide maleate BP 1.33 mg.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

White, biconvex, sugar-coated tablet, branded DSL on one side.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Prophylactic treatment of migraine with or without aura, and cluster headache and other vascular headaches in patients who, despite attempts at control, experience headaches of such severity or regularity that social or economic life is seriously disrupted. (Note: Deseril is not recommended for treatment of the acute attack).

Diarrhoea caused by carcinoid disease.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Prophylactic treatment of headache: 1 or 2 tablets three times a day with meals. Treatment should start with one tablet at bedtime and dosage should then be increased gradually over about two weeks until effective levels are reached. The minimum effective dose should be used, often that which will prevent 75% of attacks rather than all headaches.

From the outset, patients should understand that regular clinical supervision and periodic withdrawal of treatment are essential so that adverse effects can be recognised and minimised (see Section 4.4 Special warnings and precautions for use).

Carcinoid Syndrome: High doses are usually necessary. In most reported cases, dosage ranged between 12 and 20 tablets daily.

Children: Not recommended.

Elderly: No evidence exists that elderly patients require different dosage from younger patients.

4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to methysergide or any of the excipients of Deseril, pregnancy, lactation, peripheral vascular disorders, progressive arteriosclerosis, inadequately controlled hypertension, coronary heart disease, valvular heart disease, phlebitis or cellulitis of the lower extremities, impaired kidney or liver function, temporal arteritis, hemiplegic or basilar migraine, history of drug – induced fibrotic disorders (e.g. retroperitoneal fibrosis), pulmonary fibrosis, collagen diseases, obstructive diseases of the urinary tract, cachectic or septic conditions.

Concomitant treatment with macrolide antibiotics, HIV-protease or reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, azole antifungals (see section 4.5 Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction).

Concomitant treatment with vasoconstrictive agents (including ergot alkaloids), sumatriptan and other 5HT1-receptor agonists (see section 4.5 Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction).

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Continuous Deseril administration should not exceed six months without a drug-free interval of at least one month for re-assessment; dosage should be reduced gradually over two to three weeks to avoid rebound headaches. In patients undergoing treatment with Deseril the dose of ergotamine required to control acute attacks may have to be reduced.

Regular clinical supervision of patients treated with Deseril is essential. Particular attention should be paid to complaints of urinary dysfunction, pain in the loin, flank or chest, and pain, coldness or numbness in the limbs. Patients should be regularly examined for the presence of cardiac murmurs, vascular bruits, pleural or pericardial friction rubs and abdominal or flank masses or tenderness. Caution is also advised during drug administration to patients with a past history of peptic ulceration.

At the first signs of impaired peripheral circulation, prompt withdrawal of the drug is recommended.

In carcinoid syndrome the risk of adverse reactions due to the higher dosage must be weighed against the therapeutic benefit.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Concomitant use of Deseril and vasoconstrictors or vasopressors, including ergot alkaloids, sumatriptan and other 5-HT1-receptor agonists, and nicotine (e.g. heavy smoking) must be avoided since this may result in enhanced vasoconstriction (see section 4.3 Contra-indications). Methysergide should not be administered within six hours of therapy with 5-HT1 receptor agonists. In addition, use of 5-HT1 receptor agonists should be avoided for at least 24 hours after the last methysergide dose.

The concomitant use of cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) inhibitors such as macrolide antibiotics (e.g. troleandomycin, erythromycin, clarithromycin), HIV protease or reverse transcriptase inhibitors (e.g. ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, delavirdine), azole antifungals (e.g. ketoconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole) or cimetidine and Deseril must be avoided (see 4.3 Contra-indications), since this can result in an elevated exposure to methysergide and ergot toxicity (vasospasm and ischemia of the extremities and other tissues). Ergot alkaloids have also been shown to be inhibitors of CYP3A. No pharmacokinetic interactions involving other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes are known.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

Deseril is contra-indicated during pregnancy. It is likely that methysergide is excreted in breast milk. Deseril is therefore contra-indicated for nursing mothers.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Patients should be warned of the potential hazards of driving or operating machinery if they experience side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness or disturbances in vision.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

General: The most commonly reported side-effects are nausea, heartburn, abdominal discomfort, vomiting, dizziness, lassitude and drowsiness. These side-effects can often be minimised by taking Deseril with food. Tissue oedema, insomnia, vertigo, leg cramps and weight gain have occurred, and skin eruptions or loss of scalp hair have occasionally been reported. Mental and behavioural disturbances have occurred in isolated instances.

Fibrosis: Continuous long-term Deseril administration has been associated with the development of fibrosis particularly of the pleura and retroperitoneum but, in rare cases also of the pericardium and the cardiac valves.

Retroperitoneal fibrosis: May present with symptoms of urinary tract obstruction such as general malaise, backache, persistent loin or flank pain, oliguria, dysuria, increased blood nitrogen and vascular insufficiency of the lower limbs. Deseril must be withdrawn if retroperitoneal fibrosis develops; drug withdrawal is often associated with clinical improvement over a few days to several weeks.

Fibrosis in other areas: Fibrotic processes involving lungs, pleura, heart valves and major vessels have been reported. Fibrosis of the pericardium and cardiac valves is very rare when the drug was given for less than 6 months. Pleuro-pulmonary fibrosis may present with chest pain, dyspnoea or pleural friction rub and pleural effusion. Cardiac valve fibrosis may be noticed by cardiac murmurs, which may lead to impaired cardiac function. Appearance of these symptoms demands immediate withdrawal of Deseril. These fibrotic manifestations are often reversible although less readily so than retroperitoneal fibrosis.

Vascular: Vascular reactions, (affecting both large and small arteries) including arterial spasm, have been seen in some patients. The following have all been described; arterial spasm in a limb causing coldness, numbness, pain or intermittent claudication with or without paraesthesia and diminished or absent pulse; renal artery spasm giving rise to transitory hypertension; mesenteric artery spasm causing abdominal pain; retinal artery spasm causing reversible loss of vision; coronary artery spasm causing angina. Arterial spasm is rapidly reversible following drug withdrawal. There have been isolated reports of myocardial infarction particularly in patients not adhering to the contraindications of coronary heart disease or the use of other vasoconstrictive drugs.

4.9 Overdose

Experience with cases of overdoses with Deseril is limited. Symptoms: headache, agitation, hyperactivity, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, mydriasis, tachycardia, cyanosis, peripheral vasospasm with diminished pulses and coldness of extremities.

Treatment: Treatment is essentially symptomatic and supportive. Administration of activated charcoal is recommended; in case of very recent intake, gastric lavage may be considered. For controlling hyperactivity, conventional sedative measures may be used. In the event of severe vasospastic reactions, i.v. administration of a peripheral vasodilator such as nitroprusside, phentolamine, local administration of warmth to the affected area and nursing care to prevent tissue damage are recommended. In the case of coronary constriction, appropriate treatment should be initiated.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Deseril is effective in the prevention of migraine chiefly on account of its marked 5–HT receptor antagonism, probably by inhibition of 5-HT2B receptors (inhibition of pain-facilitating and permeability-increasing actions of 5-HT).

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Methysergide is rapidly and well absorbed. The parent drug is metabolised in the liver mainly to methylergometrine. Unchanged parent drug and metabolites are excreted predominantly via the kidney; the elimination is biphasic, with a half-life of 2.7 hours for the ?-phase and 10 hours for the ?-phase. Protein binding is moderate (66%).

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

There are no findings of relevance to the prescriber which are additional to those already included in other sections of the SmPC.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Maleic acid, gelatin, stearic acid, talc, maize starch, lactose. The coating constituents are gum acacia, sugar, talc, titanium dioxide, silica, carnauba wax and printing ink (consisting of Shellac, black iron oxide, ethanol and isopropanol).

6.2 Incompatibilities

None.

6.3 Shelf Life

5 years.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

None.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Aluminium/PVdC blister strips of 60 tablets.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

None.

Administrative Data 7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Alliance Pharmaceuticals Ltd

Avonbridge House

Bath Road

Chippenham

Wiltshire

SN15 2BB

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL16853/0006

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

25 June 1998

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

December 2006

11. Legal status

POM

Alliance, Alliance Pharmaceuticals and associated devices are registered Trademarks of Alliance Pharmaceuticals Ltd.


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Diurexan 20mg Tablets


Diurexan 20 mg tablets

Xipamide

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. In this leaflet: 1. What Diurexan is for 2. Before you take Diurexan 3. How to take Diurexan 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Diurexan 6. Further information What Diurexan is for

Diurexan belongs to the group of medicines known as diuretics. Diuretics are often referred to as water tablets.

Diurexan removes excess water from the body by increasing how often you urinate. It is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) and too much fluid in the body (oedema), often caused by heart failure or problems with your liver or kidneys.

Before you use Diurexan Do not take Diurexan if: You are allergic to Xipamide You are allergic to any of the other ingredients of Diurexan (listed in section 6) You have low levels of salts in your blood sometimes caused by severe vomiting or diarrhoea You have liver disease that is causing you to become unconscious You have severe kidney disease You have untreated Addison’s disease – a condition in which your adrenal glands do not produce sufficient levels of natural steroid in the blood You are less than 4 months’ pregnant.

If any of the above applies to you, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Check with your doctor before taking Diurexan if: You have gout or have too much uric acid in your urine You have diabetes You have kidney or liver disease You have an enlarged prostate gland or trouble urinating You suffer with coronary or cerebral arteriosclerosis (narrowing of the arteries in the heart or brain) Your body produces too much aldosterone, a hormone which controls salt and water balance (hyperaldosteronism) You have diarrhoea You are malnourished (a severe lack of food) You are being sick You are over 65 years of age. Tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: Medicines for high blood pressure Medicines called cardiac glycosides such as digoxin for heart problems Insulin or tablets for diabetes Lithium.

Taking these Diurexan at the same time as these medicines may lead to your doctor adjusting the dose you require.

Also tell your doctor if you are taking:

Steroids used to treat many conditions including asthma, arthritis, eczema and dermatitis ACTH which is mainly used to test if your pituitary gland is working properly Carbenoxolone used to treat stomach ulcers and inflammation of the oesophagus Amphotericin used to treat fungal and bacterial infections Laxatives.

These medicines may cause the level of potassium in your blood to fall when used at the same time as Diurexan.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

If you are pregnant, trying to become pregnant or breastfeeding ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking Diurexan.

How to take Diurexan

Always take Diurexan exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.

Important:

Your doctor will choose the dose that is right for you. Your dose will be shown clearly on the label that your pharmacist puts on your medicine. If it does not, or you are not sure, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

For high blood pressure:

The usual dose is one tablet per day, taken early in the morning.

For excessive fluid retention:

The usual starting dose is two tablets per day, taken early in the morning.

Once your doctor has seen how the medicine is working, they may change your dose. They may reduce it to one tablet per day. If the medicine is not having much effect, your doctor may increase your dose to 3 or 4 tablets per day.

Medical check-ups

Taking Diurexan for a long time can cause you to lose potassium from your blood. Your doctor will check for this and may prescribe you extra potassium especially if you are elderly or getting little potassium in your diet.

If you take more Diurexan than you should

If you accidentally take too much Diurexan immediately go to the nearest hospital casaulty department or your doctor. An overdose may cause the loss of too much fluid from your body.

This can cause hypotension, making you feel faint and change the make-up of your blood.

You may have your stomach washed out and an infusion into your vein to replace lost fluids.

If you forget to take Diurexan

Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed dose. Simply take your dose as planned.

If you have any further questions on the use of this product, ask your doctor or pharmacist

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Diurexan can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

These may include:

Slight dizziness Effects on your stomach or intestine such as stomach pain, constipation and diarrhoea Low potassium and sodium levels in blood (hypokalaemia and hyponatraemia respectively) which may cause headaches, muscle cramps and weakness.

If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How to store Diurexan

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not use Diurexan after the expiry date which is stated on the carton. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.

Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Return any medicine you no longer need to your pharmacist.

Further information What Diurexan contains

The active substance is xipamide. Each tablet contains 20 mg of xipamide.

The other ingredients are maize starch, mannitol, cellulose powder, colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate and purified water.

What Diurexan looks like

Diurexan tablets are white and round with a notch on one side and an "A" on the other. They are about 6 mm in diameter. They come in blister strips strips of 14 tablets with 10 blister strips in a box.

Marketing Authorisation Holder is: Meda Pharmaceuticals Ltd Skyway House Parsonage Road Takeley Bishop’s Stortford CM22 6PU United Kingdom Manufacturer is: Sidefarma, S.A. Rua da Guin?, n? 26 2689-514 Prior Velho PORTUGAL

This leaflet was last updated on September 2008

If this leaflet is difficult to see or read and you would like it in a different format, please contact

Meda Pharmaceuticals Skyway House Parsonage Road Takeley Bishop’s Stortford CM22 6PU United Kingdom
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Naglazyme


Generic Name: galsulfase (gal SUL fase)
Brand Names: Naglazyme

What is galsulfase?

Galsulfase is used to treat some of the symptoms of a genetic condition called Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome. Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is also called mucopolysaccharidosis (MYOO-koe-pol-ee-SAK-a-rye-DOE-sis).

Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is a metabolic disorder in which the body lacks the enzyme needed to break down certain sugars and proteins. These substances can build up in the body, causing enlarged organs, abnormal bone structure, changes in facial features, breathing problems, heart problems, vision or hearing loss, and changes in mental or physical abilities.

Galsulfase may improve walking and stair-climbing ability in people with this condition. However, this medication is not a cure for Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome.

Galsulfase may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about galsulfase? Galsulfase may improve walking and stair-climbing ability in people with Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome. However, galsulfase is not a cure for this condition. Some people receiving a galsulfase injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you have a headache, fever or chills, skin rash, itching, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, pain in your chest, trouble breathing, or if you feel like you might pass out when galsulfase is injected.

Your name may need to be listed on a patient registry while you are using this medication. The purpose of this registry is to track the progression of this disorder and the effects that galsulfase has on long-term treatment of Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving galsulfase? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to galsulfase or mouse proteins.

Before receiving galsulfase, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

sleep apnea (breathing stops during sleep);

a fever; or

flu symptoms, or a common cold.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use galsulfase.

Your name may need to be listed on a patient registry while you are using this medication. The purpose of this registry is to track the progression of this disorder and the effects that galsulfase has on long-term treatment of Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether galsulfase passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not receive this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is galsulfase given?

Galsulfase is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. You will most likely receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting. Galsulfase is usually given once per week.

The medicine must be given slowly through an IV infusion, and can take up to 4 hours to complete.

Your doctor may also prescribe other medications to help prevent an allergic reaction to galsulfase. Take all of your medications as directed.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your doctor will need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor if you miss an appointment for your galsulfase injection.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have received too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of a galsulfase overdose are not known.

What should I avoid while receiving galsulfase?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while you are receiving galsulfase.

Galsulfase side effects Some people receiving a galsulfase injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you have a headache, fever or chills, skin rash, itching, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, pain in your chest, trouble breathing, or if you feel like you might pass out when galsulfase is injected. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache;

joint pain;

eye redness;

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea;

runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, cough, ear pain; or

pain, redness, swelling, or other irritation where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect galsulfase?

There may be other drugs that can interact with galsulfase. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Naglazyme resources Naglazyme Side Effects (in more detail)Naglazyme Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingNaglazyme Support Group0 Reviews for Naglazyme - Add your own review/rating Naglazyme Prescribing Information (FDA) Naglazyme Consumer Overview Naglazyme Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Naglazyme MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Galsulfase Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Naglazyme with other medications Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about galsulfase.

See also: Naglazyme side effects (in more detail)


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Anadrol-50


Generic Name: oxymetholone (OKS ee METH oh lone)
Brand Names: Anadrol-50

What is Anadrol-50 (oxymetholone)?

Oxymetholone is an anabolic steroid, which is a man-made form of a hormone similar to testosterone.

Oxymetholone is used to treat certain types of anemia (lack of red blood cells), including aplastic anemia, myelofibrosis, or hypoplastic anemia caused by chemotherapy.

Oxymetholone may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Anadrol-50 (oxymetholone)? This medication can cause birth defects. Do not use if you are pregnant. Use effective birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. You should not use this medication if you are allergic to oxymetholone, or if you have prostate cancer, male breast cancer, female breast cancer with high levels of calcium in the blood, severe liver or kidney disease, or if you are pregnant.

Before using oxymetholone, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease, heart disease, congestive heart failure, high cholesterol or triglycerides, coronary artery disease, or an enlarged prostate.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as swelling, rapid weight gain, increased or ongoing erection of the penis, changes in skin color, urination problems, or signs of liver damage (nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Women receiving oxymetholone may develop male characteristics, which could be irreversible if treatment is continued. Call your doctor as soon as possible if you notice increased acne, changes in menstrual periods, a deepened voice, male pattern baldness or hair growth, an enlarged clitoris, or changes in your sex drive.

To be sure oxymetholone is helping your condition and is not causing harmful effects on your liver, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

It may take up to 6 months of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. Tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 3 months of treatment. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking Anadrol-50 (oxymetholone)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to oxymetholone, or if you have:

prostate cancer;

male breast cancer;

female breast cancer with high levels of calcium in the blood;

severe liver disease;

severe kidney disease; or

if you are pregnant.

If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication. Before using oxymetholone, tell your doctor if you have:

liver disease;

kidney disease;

heart disease, congestive heart failure;

high cholesterol or triglycerides;

coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis); or

an enlarged prostate.

FDA pregnancy category X. This medication can cause birth defects. Do not use oxymetholone if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Use effective birth control while you are using this medication. It is not known whether oxymetholone passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Children being treated with oxymetholone may need x-ray examinations every 6 months to make sure the medication is not causing harmful effects on bone growth. Oxymetholone will not enhance athletic performance and should not be used for that purpose or shared with another person. How should I take Anadrol-50 (oxymetholone)?

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

To be sure oxymetholone is helping your condition and is not causing harmful effects on your liver, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using oxymetholone.

It may take up to 6 months of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 3 months of treatment.

Once your condition is under control, you may be able to stop taking oxymetholone. However, some people must continue to use at least a small amount of the medicine to keep their red blood cells from getting too low. You may need to take oxymetholone for the rest of your life. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Anemia is often treated with a combination of different drugs, including antibiotics and vitamin or mineral supplements. To best treat your condition, use all of your medications as directed by your doctor. Be sure to read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each of your medications. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without advice from your doctor.

Store oxymetholone at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep track of how many pills have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Anabolic steroids are drugs of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

See also: Anadrol-50 dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have received too much of this medicine.

An overdose of oxymetholone is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while taking Anadrol-50 (oxymetholone)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while you are using oxymetholone.

Anadrol-50 (oxymetholone) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

swelling, rapid weight gain;

increased or ongoing erection of the penis;

changes in skin color;

urination problems; or

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Women receiving oxymetholone may develop male characteristics, which could be irreversible if treatment is continued. Call your doctor as soon as possible if you notice any of these side effects:

acne;

changes in your menstrual periods;

hoarse or deepened voice;

male-pattern hair growth (such as on the chin or chest);

male pattern baldness;

enlarged clitoris; or

increase or decrease in sex drive.

Less serious side effects may include:

breast swelling in men;

feeling restless or excited;

sleep problems (insomnia); or

diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Anadrol-50 (oxymetholone)?

The following drugs can interact with oxymetholone. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin); or

insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with oxymetholone. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Anadrol-50 resources Anadrol-50 Side Effects (in more detail) Anadrol-50 Dosage Anadrol-50 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Anadrol-50 Drug Interactions Anadrol-50 Support Group 0 Reviews for Anadrol-50 - Add your own review/rating Anadrol-50 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Oxymetholone Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Anadrol-50 with other medications Anemia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about oxymetholone.

See also: Anadrol-50 side effects (in more detail)


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Fortical


Generic Name: calcitonin nasal (kal si TOE nin)
Brand Names: Fortical, Miacalcin Nasal

What is calcitonin nasal?

Calcitonin is a man-made form of a hormone that occurs naturally in the thyroid gland.

Calcitonin nasal is used to treat osteoporosis in women who have been in menopause for at least 5 years.

Calcitonin nasal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about calcitonin nasal? To make sure you are not allergic to this medication, your doctor may perform an allergy skin test before your first dose of calcitonin nasal.

Before using calcitonin nasal, tell your doctor if you have any nasal or sinus problems such as nasal deformities, a chronic infection, or nasal pain.

Avoid using any other nasal sprays or medicines at the same time you use calcitonin nasal unless your doctor has told you to.

Call your doctor at once if you have any type of severe irritation of your nose, or if you feel light-headed or faint.

Less serious nasal irritation is more likely to occur, such as minor bleeding, redness, itching, tenderness, dryness, crusting, scabs, or nasal congestion.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful side effects to the inside of your nose, your doctor may want to check your nasal passages often. Visit your doctor regularly.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using calcitonin nasal? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to salmon calcitonin.

To make sure you can safely use calcitonin nasal, tell your doctor if you have any nasal or sinus problems such as nasal deformities, a chronic infection, or nasal pain.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether calcitonin nasal will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether calcitonin nasal passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use calcitonin nasal?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

To make sure you are not allergic to this medication, your doctor may perform an allergy skin test before your first dose of calcitonin nasal.

This medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Store unopened calcitonin nasal in the refrigerator but do not allow it to freeze. Once you put the bottle and pump assembly together, you may keep the medicine at room temperature, away from light and heat. Keep the bottle upright while stored. Throw away any unused medicine after 35 days.

Before your first use of the assembled bottle and pump, you must prime the spray. Allow the medicine to reach room temperature before priming.

To prime calcitonin nasal, spray the medicine into the air and away from your face, until a fine mist appears. You will need to prime the pump only before your first use of the newly assembled bottle.

Calcitonin nasal is usually given as one spray per day into only one of your nostrils. Use the other nostril the next day and continue alternating back and forth for each daily dose.

Before each use, gently blow your nose to clear your nostrils.

Hold the nasal spray upright with your first and second fingers on each side of the pump and your thumb on the bottom of the bottle.

Gently insert the sprayer tip into the nostril but not far into your nose. Bend your head forward to aim the spray toward the back of your nose. Pump the spray unit firmly to spray the medicine into your nostril. You do not need to sniff or inhale deeply.

Calcitonin nasal spray delivers a fine mist into the nose. Even if you do not feel the spray while using it, the medication is still being absorbed by your nasal passages.

Avoid blowing your nose for several minutes after using this medication.

Each bottle contains 30 doses of calcitonin nasal. Throw away the medicine after 30 uses, even if there is still medicine left in the bottle.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful side effects to the inside of your nose, your doctor may want to check your nasal passages often. Visit your doctor regularly.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

An overdose of calcitonin nasal is not likely to produce life-threatening side effects.

What should I avoid while using calcitonin nasal?

Avoid using any other nasal sprays or nasal medications at the same time you use calcitonin nasal unless your doctor has told you to.

Calcitonin nasal side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

feeling light-headed, fainting; or

severe nasal irritation.

Less serious side effects may include:

bleeding from your nose;

runny or stuffy nose;

dryness, itching, tenderness, or general discomfort of your nose;

crusting, scabs, or sores inside your nose;

redness in or around your nose;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;

headache;

back pain; or

nausea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect calcitonin nasal?

There may be other drugs that can interact with calcitonin nasal. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Fortical resources Fortical Side Effects (in more detail) Fortical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Fortical Drug Interactions Fortical Support Group 1 Review for Fortical - Add your own review/rating Compare Fortical with other medications Hypercalcemia Osteogenesis Imperfecta Osteoporosis Paget's Disease Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about calcitonin nasal.

See also: Fortical side effects (in more detail)


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