mepron atovaquone
 

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Mepron


Generic Name: atovaquone (a TOE va kwone)
Brand Names: Mepron

What is Mepron (atovaquone)?

Atovaquone is a medication that interferes with the reproduction of protozoa (single-cell organisms) that can cause disease in the body.

Atovaquone is used to treat or prevent pneumonia caused by a fungal infection called Pneumocystitis carinii (also called Pneumocystis jiroveci).

Atovaquone may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Mepron (atovaquone)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to atovaquone.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, or a stomach or intestinal disorder.

Also tell your doctor if you use other medications such as rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane), a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin), or a seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), divalproex (Depakote), phenytoin (Dilantin), or valproic acid (Depakene).

Take atovaquone with a meal for best results. Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as easy bruising or bleeding, fever, flu symptoms, white patches in your mouth or throat, worsening cough, wheezing, trouble breathing, a severe red or peeling skin rash, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Mepron (atovaquone)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to atovaquone.

If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication. Before you take atovaquone, tell your doctor if you have:

liver disease; or

a stomach or intestinal disorder.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether atovaquone is harmful to an unborn baby. Before you take atovaquone, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether atovaquone passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Mepron (atovaquone)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take atovaquone with a meal for best results. Shake the liquid medicine bottle well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

If you are taking a pre-measured atovaquone dose from a foil pouch, tear open the pouch along the perforated line and take all of the medicine in the pouch. You may drink it directly from the pouch or pour it into a spoon or cup before taking.

Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Store atovaquone at cool room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the medicine to freeze. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of an atovaquone overdose are not known.

What should I avoid while taking Mepron (atovaquone)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while you are using this medication.

Mepron (atovaquone) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

fever, flu symptoms;

white patches in your mouth or throat;

worsening cough;

bronchospasm (wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing);

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

nausea, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, vomiting, stomach pain or upset,

diarrhea, constipation;

headache;

weakness, dizziness;

muscle pain;

mild skin rash;

sweating; or

sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Mepron (atovaquone)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you are using, especially:

carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol);

clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo);

rifabutin (Mycobutin); or

rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with atovaquone. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Mepron resources Mepron Side Effects (in more detail) Mepron Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Mepron Drug Interactions Mepron Support Group 1 Review for Mepron - Add your own review/rating Mepron Monograph (AHFS DI) Mepron Prescribing Information (FDA) Mepron MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Mepron Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Atovaquone Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Atovaquone and Proguanil Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Mepron with other medications Babesiosis Malaria Pneumocystis Pneumonia Pneumocystis Pneumonia Prophylaxis Toxoplasmosis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about atovaquone.

See also: Mepron side effects (in more detail)


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atovaquone


a-TOE-va-kwone

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Mepron

Available Dosage Forms:

Tablet Suspension

Therapeutic Class: Antiprotozoal

Chemical Class: Ubiquinone

Uses For atovaquone

Atovaquone is used to treat and to prevent Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), a very serious kind of pneumonia. This particular kind of pneumonia occurs commonly in patients whose immune systems are not working normally, such as cancer patients, transplant patients, and patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

atovaquone is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using atovaquone

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For atovaquone, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to atovaquone or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of atovaquone in children 1 month to 13 years of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established .

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatrics-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of atovaquone in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems which may require an adjustment of dosage in patients receiving atovaquone .

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking atovaquone, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using atovaquone with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Rifampin

Using atovaquone with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Indinavir Rifabutin Tetracycline Warfarin Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of atovaquone. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Liver disease, severe or Stomach or intestinal disorders—Atovaquone may not work properly in patients with these conditions . Proper Use of atovaquone

Make certain your doctor knows if you are on any special diet. atovaquone must be taken with balanced meals so that it can work properly.

It is important that you take atovaquone with a balanced meal. This is to make sure the medicine is fully absorbed into the body and will work properly.

Atovaquone tablets may be crushed if necessary to make it easier to swallow.

Because atovaquone tablets and oral suspension do not produce the same amount of medicine in the blood, the tablets and the suspension cannot be switched and used in place of each other.

For patients taking the oral liquid form of atovaquone:

Shake the bottle gently before using atovaquone. atovaquone is to be taken by mouth. Use a specially marked measuring spoon or other device to measure each dose accurately. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Do not use after the expiration date on the label since the medicine may not work properly after that date. Check with your pharmacist if you have any questions about this .

To help clear up your infection completely, keep taking your medicine for the full time of treatment, even if you begin to feel better after a few days. If you stop taking atovaquone too soon, your symptoms may return.

Atovaquone works best when there is a constant amount in the blood. To help keep the amount constant, do not miss any doses.

Dosing

The dose of atovaquone will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of atovaquone. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP): For oral dosage form (suspension): Adults and teenagers—1,500 milligrams (mg) or 10 milliliters (mL) once a day with a meal. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor . For treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP): For oral dosage form (suspension): Adults and teenagers—750 milligrams (mg) or 5 milliliters (mL) taken with a meal two times a day for 21 days. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor . For oral dosage form (tablets): Adults and teenagers—750 milligrams (mg) taken with a meal three times a day for 21 days. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of atovaquone, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions While Using atovaquone

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that atovaquone is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects .

If your symptoms do not improve within a few days, or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

atovaquone Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Cough or hoarseness difficult or labored breathing fever or chills lower back or side pain painful or difficult urination shortness of breath tightness in chest wheezing Incidence not known Black, tarry stools bleeding gums bloating blood in urine or stools bluish-colored lips, fingernails, or palms constipation dark urine dizziness or lightheadedness fast heartbeat headache indigestion large, hive-like swelling on face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs light-colored stools loss of appetite nausea noisy breathing pains in stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back pale skin pinpoint red spots on skin rapid heart rate sore throat unusual bleeding or bruising unusual tiredness or weakness vomiting yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Abdominal or stomach pain diarrhea lack or loss of strength runny nose skin rash sleeplessness sneezing sore mouth or tongue stuffy nose sweating trouble in sleeping unable to sleep white patches in mouth, tongue, or throat Incidence not known Blistering, peeling, or loosening of skin eye irritation or redness itching joint or muscle pain red skin lesions, often with a purple center skin rash

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: atovaquone side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More atovaquone resources Atovaquone Side Effects (in more detail)Atovaquone Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingAtovaquone Drug InteractionsAtovaquone Support Group1 Review for Atovaquone - Add your own review/rating atovaquone Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Atovaquone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Atovaquone Monograph (AHFS DI) Atovaquone Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Atovaquone and Proguanil Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Mepron Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare atovaquone with other medications BabesiosisMalariaPneumocystis PneumoniaPneumocystis Pneumonia ProphylaxisToxoplasmosis
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Miscellaneous antibiotics


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Antibiotics are drugs that can either kill an infectious bacteria or inhibit its growth. Different antibiotics work by different mechanisms and are used to treat infections caused by bacteria that are sensitive to that particular antibiotic.

See also

Medical conditions associated with miscellaneous antibiotics:

Acne Amebiasis Anthrax Aspiration Pneumonia Babesiosis Bacteremia Bacterial Infection Bacterial Skin Infection Bacterial Vaginitis Bone infection Bronchitis Brucellosis Cholera Clostridial Infection Crohn's Disease Crohn's Disease, Acute Crohn's Disease, Maintenance Cystic Fibrosis Deep Neck Infection Dental Abscess Diarrhea Diverticulitis Dracunculiasis Endocarditis Epiglottitis Febrile Neutropenia Giardiasis Glanders Gonococcal Infection Gonococcal Infection, Disseminated Gonococcal Infection, Uncomplicated Gram Negative Infection Granuloma Inguinale Helicobacter Pylori Infection Hepatic Encephalopathy Infection Prophylaxis Intraabdominal Infection Irritable Bowel Syndrome Joint Infection Kidney Infections Leishmaniasis Malaria Melioidosis Meningitis Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection Nocardiosis Nosocomial Pneumonia Ornithosis Otitis Media Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Peritonitis Plague Pneumocystis Pneumonia Pneumocystis Pneumonia Prophylaxis Pneumonia Pneumonia with Cystic Fibrosis Prevention of Bladder infection Prostatitis Pseudomembranous Colitis Psittacosis Rabbit Fever Rickettsial Infection Shigellosis Sinusitis Skin and Structure Infection Skin Infection Surgical Prophylaxis Toxoplasmosis Toxoplasmosis, Prophylaxis Traveler's Diarrhea Trichomoniasis Trypanosomiasis Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Urinary Tract Infection Drug List: Sulfatrim-Suspension Zyvox Xifaxan Septra Chloromycetin-Oral-Intravenous-Injection Smz-Tmp-Ds Septra-Ds Flagyl Bactrim-Ds Flagyl-Er-Extended-Release-Tablets Bactrim Metro Azactam Baci-Im-Injection Cayston Chloromycetin-Sodium-Succinate Co-Trimoxazole Coly-Mycin-M Cotrim Cubicin Eryzole Flagyl-375 Flagyl-I-V Mepron Nebupent-Solution Neutrexin Pediazole Pentam Pentam-300 Sulfatrim-Pediatric Sulfimycin Synercid Trobicin
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azithromycin


Generic Name: azithromycin (a ZITH roe MYE sin)
Brand names: Azithromycin 3 Day Dose Pack, Azithromycin 5 Day Dose Pack, Zithromax, Zithromax TRI-PAK, Zithromax Z-Pak, Zmax, Zithromax IV

What is azithromycin?

Azithromycin is in a group of drugs called macrolide antibiotics. Azithromycin fights bacteria in the body.

Azithromycin is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria, such as respiratory infections, skin infections, ear infections, and sexually transmitted diseases.

Azithromycin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about azithromycin? You should not use this medication if you have ever had jaundice or liver problems caused by taking azithromycin. You should not use azithromycin if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as erythromycin (E-Mycin, Ery-Tab, E.E.S.), clarithromycin (Biaxin), telithromycin (Ketek), or troleandomycin (Tao).

There are many other medicines that can interact with azithromycin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Azithromycin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Do not take antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium within 2 hours before or after you take azithromycin. This includes Rolaids, Maalox, Mylanta, Milk of Magnesia, Pepcid Complete, and others. These antacids can make azithromycin less effective when taken at the same time.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking azithromycin? You should not use this medication if you have ever had jaundice or liver problems caused by taking azithromycin. You should not use azithromycin if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as erythromycin (E-Mycin, Ery-Tab, E.E.S.), clarithromycin (Biaxin), telithromycin (Ketek), or troleandomycin (Tao).

To make sure you can safely take azithromycin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease;

kidney disease;

myasthenia gravis;

a heart rhythm disorder; or

a history of Long QT syndrome.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether azithromycin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not take this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take azithromycin?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. The dose and length of treatment with azithromycin may not be the same for every type of infection.

To use the oral suspension single dose packet: Open the packet and pour the medicine into 2 ounces of water. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. Do not save for later use. Throw away any mixed oral suspension that has not been used within 12 hours.

To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Azithromycin may be taken with or without food. Take the medicine with food if it upsets your stomach. Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Azithromycin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu. Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Throw away any unused liquid medicine after 10 days. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach discomfort.

What should I avoid while taking azithromycin? Do not take antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium within 2 hours before or after you take azithromycin. This includes Rolaids, Maalox, Mylanta, Milk of Magnesia, Pepcid Complete, and others. These antacids can make azithromycin less effective when taken at the same time.

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking azithromycin and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Azithromycin can make you sunburn more easily. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors. Azithromycin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using azithromycin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

chest pain, uneven heartbeats;

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation;

stomach pain or upset;

dizziness, tired feeling, or headache;

nervous feeling, sleep problems (insomnia);

vaginal itching or discharge;

mild itching or skin rash;

ringing in your ears, problems with hearing; or

decreased sense of taste or smell.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Azithromycin Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Otitis Media:

Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5

Usual Adult Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection:

Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis:

Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia:

Community acquired:
Oral:
Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5 for mild infections
Extended release suspension: 2 g orally once for mild to moderate infections
IV: 500 mg IV once a day for at least 2 days followed by 500 mg (immediate release formulation) orally once a day to complete a 7- to 10-day course of therapy
The IV dose should be reconstituted and diluted according to the manufacturer's recommendations, and administered as an infusion over not less than 60 minutes.

Usual Adult Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis:

Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5
Recommended as an alternative (second line therapy) in patients who cannot use first line therapy

Usual Adult Dose for Sinusitis:

Acute bacterial sinusitis:
Immediate release: 500 mg orally once a day for 3 days
Extended release suspension: 2 g orally once for mild to moderate infections

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection:

Uncomplicated:
Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5

Usual Adult Dose for Gonococcal Infection -- Uncomplicated:

Immediate release: 2 g orally once

Usual Adult Dose for Chancroid:

Immediate release: 1 g orally once

Usual Adult Dose for Nongonococcal Urethritis:

Immediate release: 1 g orally once

Usual Adult Dose for Cervicitis:

Immediate release: 1 g orally once

Usual Adult Dose for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

500 mg IV once a day for at least 2 days followed by 250 mg (immediate release formulation) orally once a day to complete a 7-day course of therapy
The IV dose should be reconstituted and diluted according to the manufacturer's recommendations, and administered as an infusion over not less than 60 minutes.

Usual Adult Dose for Granuloma Inguinale:

Immediate release: 1 g orally once a week for at least 3 weeks and until all lesions have completely healed
This regimen is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an alternative to doxycyline.

Usual Adult Dose for Legionella Pneumonia:

500 mg IV once a day for at least 2 days followed by 500 mg (immediate release formulation) orally once a day to complete a 7- to 10-day course of therapy
The IV dose should be reconstituted and diluted according to the manufacturer's recommendations, and administered as an infusion over not less than 60 minutes.

Usual Adult Dose for Mycoplasma Pneumonia:

Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5
Severe infection: 500 mg IV once a day can be administered for at least 2 days followed by 500 mg (immediate release formulation) orally once a day to complete a 7- to 10-day course of therapy
The IV dose should be reconstituted and diluted according to the manufacturer's recommendations, and administered as an infusion over not less than 60 minutes.

Usual Adult Dose for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Acute:

Acute bacterial exacerbations (mild to moderate):
Immediate release: 500 mg orally once daily for 3 days
or
500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5

Usual Adult Dose for Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare -- Prophylaxis:

Patients with advanced HIV infection:
Immediate release: 1200 mg orally once a week alone or with rifabutin

Usual Adult Dose for Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare -- Treatment:

Patients with advanced HIV infection:
Immediate release: 500 mg orally once a day plus ethambutol, with or without rifabutin

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Infection:

Pertussis:
Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease -- Erythema Chronicum Migrans:

Immediate release: 500 mg orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis:

Immediate release: 500 mg orally once 30 to 60 minutes prior to the procedure

Usual Adult Dose for Toxoplasmosis:

Immediate release: 1200 to 1500 mg orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Typhoid Fever:

Immediate release: 1000 mg orally on the first day followed by 500 mg orally once a day for 6 days
Alternatively, a dosage of 1000 mg orally once a day for 5 days may also be used.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumonia:

Community acquired:
6 months or older:
Immediate release: 10 mg/kg (maximum: 500 mg/dose) orally as a single dose on the first day followed by 5 mg/kg (maximum: 250 mg/dose) orally once a day on days 2 thru 5
or
30 mg/kg orally once
or
10 mg/kg orally once a day for 3 days
Extended release suspension:
Less than 34 kg: 60 mg/kg orally once for mild to moderate infections
34 kg or more: 2 g orally once for mild to moderate infections

Usual Pediatric Dose for Sinusitis:

Acute bacterial sinusitis:
6 months or older:
Immediate release: 10 mg/kg orally once a day for 3 days
16 years or older:
Immediate release: 500 mg orally once a day for 3 days
Extended release suspension: 2 g orally once for mild to moderate infections

Usual Pediatric Dose for Otitis Media:

Acute:
6 months or older:
Immediate release: 30 mg/kg (maximum: 1500 mg/dose) orally once
or
10 mg/kg (maximum: 500 mg/dose) orally once a day for 3 days
or
10 mg/kg (maximum: 500 mg/dose) orally as a single dose on the first day followed by 5 mg/kg (maximum: 250 mg/dose) orally once a day on days 2 thru 5

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis:

2 years or older:
Immediate release: 12 mg/kg (maximum: 500 mg/dose) orally once a day for 5 days
Recommended as an alternative (second line therapy) in patients who cannot use first line therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection:

Uncomplicated:
16 years or older:
Immediate release: 500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Infection:

Pertussis:
Immediate release:
Neonates: 10 mg/kg orally once a day for 5 days.
Less than 6 months: 10 mg/kg orally once a day for 5 days.
6 months or older: 10 mg/kg (maximum: 500 mg/dose) orally as a single dose on the first day followed by 5 mg/kg (maximum: 250 mg/dose) orally once a day on days 2 thru 5.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection:

Immediate release:
6 months or older: 10 mg/kg (maximum: 500 mg/dose) orally as a single dose on the first day followed by 5 mg/kg (maximum: 250 mg/dose) orally once a day on days 2 thru 5

Usual Pediatric Dose for Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare -- Prophylaxis:

Unlabeled use:
Primary prevention:
Children: 20 mg/kg (maximum: 1200 mg/dose) once a week (preferred) or 5 mg/kg (maximum: 250 mg/dose) orally once a day.
Secondary prevention:
Children: 5 mg/kg (maximum: 250 mg/dose) orally once a day plus ethambutol, with or without rifabutin.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare -- Treatment:

Unlabeled use:
Children: 10-12 mg/kg/day (maximum dose: 500 mg/day) orally once daily.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Typhoid Fever:

6 months or older:
Immediate release: 10 mg/kg orally once a day for 7 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Chancroid:

Immediate release: 20 mg/kg (maximum: 1 g/dose) orally once

Usual Pediatric Dose for Nongonococcal Urethritis:

Uncomplicated:
Immediate release:
Less than 8 years and less than 45 kg: 20 mg/kg (maximum: 1 g/dose) orally once.
8 years or older and 45 kg or more: 1 g orally once.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cervicitis:

Uncomplicated:
Immediate release:
Less than 8 years and less than 45 kg: 20 mg/kg (maximum: 1 g/dose) orally once.
8 years or older and 45 kg or more: 1 g orally once.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gonococcal Infection -- Uncomplicated:

16 years or older:
Immediate release: 2 g orally once

Usual Pediatric Dose for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Acute:

Acute bacterial exacerbations (mild to moderate):
16 years or older:
Immediate release: 500 mg orally once a day for 3 days
or
500 mg orally on the first day followed by 250 mg orally once a day on days 2 through 5

Usual Pediatric Dose for Babesiosis:

Immediate release: 12 mg/kg (maximum: 600 mg/dose) orally once a day for 7 to 10 days plus oral atovaquone

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis:

Immediate release: 15 mg/kg (maximum: 500 mg) orally once 30 to 60 minutes prior to procedure

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cystic Fibrosis:

Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection:
Children 6 years or older and adolescents:
25 to less than 40 kg: 250 mg orally on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays
40 kg or more: 500 mg orally on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays
If side effects are intolerable, the dose should be decreased to twice a week, or if necessary, once a week.

What other drugs will affect azithromycin?

Many drugs can interact with azithromycin. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);

carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol);

cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune);

phenytoin (Dilantin);

pimozide (Orap);

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Theochron);

triazolam (Halcion);

warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

another antibiotic, especially clarithromycin (Biaxin) or erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S, Ery-Tab);

a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), felodipine (Plendil), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others;

cholesterol-lowering medicines such as lovastatin (Mevacor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), or simvastatin (Zocor);

ergot medicine such as methysergide (Sansert), ergotamine (Ergostat, Medihaler, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), dihydroergotamine mesylate (D.H.E., Migranal Nasal Spray);

HIV medicines such as nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase); or

alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), midazolam (Versed), or triazolam (Halcion).

This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with azithromycin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you. More azithromycin resources Azithromycin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Azithromycin Drug Interactions Azithromycin Support Group 105 Reviews for Azithromycin - Add your own review/rating azithromycin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Azithromycin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Azithromycin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Azithromycin Monograph (AHFS DI) Zithromax Prescribing Information (FDA) Zithromax Consumer Overview Zmax Prescribing Information (FDA) Zmax Extended-Release Oral Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare azithromycin with other medications Babesiosis Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention Bacterial Infection Bartonellosis Bronchitis Cervicitis Chancroid COPD, Acute Cystic Fibrosis Gonococcal Infection, Uncomplicated Granuloma Inguinale Legionella Pneumonia Lyme Disease, Erythema Chronicum Migrans Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Prophylaxis Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Treatment Mycoplasma Pneumonia Nongonococcal Urethritis Otitis Media Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Pharyngitis Pneumonia Sinusitis Skin Infection Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis Toxoplasmosis Typhoid Fever Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about azithromycin.
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