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Elleste Duet Conti Tablets


Elleste DuetTM Conti Tablets

(estradiol and norethisterone acetate)

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, please ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Elleste Duet Conti Tablets are and what they are used for 2. Before you take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets 3. How to take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Elleste Duet Conti Tablets 6. Further information What Elleste Duet Conti Tablets Are And What They Are Used For

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets are a form of hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

They contain two hormones, estradiol hemihydrate and norethisterone acetate. Elleste Duet Conti Tablets are one of a group of medicines called combined estrogen-progestogen preparations. They are not an oral contraceptive.

Why has your doctor given you Elleste Duet Conti Tablets?

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets treat the symptoms of the menopause (change of life) in women who are at least one year past the menopause.

As you approach the menopause, your ovaries gradually produce fewer hormones. This may cause unpleasant symptoms such as hot flushes and sweating. Elleste Duet Conti Tablets replace hormones which you lose during the menopause and prevent or relieve any unpleasant symptoms. Your doctor will aim to give you the lowest dose required to treat your symptoms.

Other changes in your bones may also take place over a longer time. These changes can lead to an increased risk of your bones breaking or cracking. If you are at an increased risk of fractures due to osteoporosis (thinning of the bones) but are unable to take other treatments or if other therapies prove to be ineffective, Elleste Duet Conti Tablets may also be used for this purpose. Your doctor should discuss all the available options with you.

Before You Take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets may not be suitable for all women. Read the list below.

DO NOT take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets, if you have, or have ever had:

a blood clot in a vein in your leg or anywhere else (a "deep vein thrombosis"); a blood clot that has travelled to your lung or another part of the body (an "embolus"); narrowed or blocked arteries possibly leading to angina and heart disease; breast or womb cancer; unexplained vaginal bleeding; liver problems, for example, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); porphyria (a rare inherited blood disease); untreated endometrial hyperplasia (an overgrowth of the lining of the womb).

Also do not take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets if you:

are pregnant or you think you could be pregnant; are breast-feeding; or have ever had an allergic reaction to any of the ingredients in Elleste Duet Conti Tablets (see Section 6).

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets contain lactose. If you have been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before taking this medicinal product.

Safety of HRT

As well as benefits, HRT has some risks which you need to consider when you're deciding whether to take it, or whether to carry on taking it.

Take special care with Elleste Duet Conti Tablets

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets might have an effect on various processes in your body. HRT should only be started for symptoms that reduce your quality of life.

Medical check-ups

Before you start taking HRT, your doctor should ask about your own and your family's medical history. Your doctor may decide to examine your breasts and/or abdomen, and may do an internal examination - but only if these examinations are necessary for you, or if you have any special concerns.

Once you've started on HRT, you should:

see your doctor for regular check-ups (at least once a year). At these check-ups, your doctor may discuss with you the benefits and risks of continuing to take HRT; go for regular breast screening and cervical smear tests; regularly check your breasts for any changes such as dimpling of the skin, changes in the nipple, or any lumps you can see or feel. Effects on your heart or circulation

Heart disease:

HRT is not recommended for women who have heart disease, or have had heart disease recently.

If you have ever had heart disease, talk to your doctor to see if you should be taking HRT.

HRT will not help to prevent heart disease.

Studies with one type of HRT (containing conjugated estrogen plus the progestogen MPA) have shown that women may be slightly more likely to get heart disease during the first year of taking the medication. For other types of HRT, the risk is likely to be similar, although this is not yet certain.

If you get:

a pain in your chest that spreads to your arm or neck

See a doctor as soon as possible and do not take any more HRT until your doctor says you can. This pain could be a sign of heart disease.

Stroke:

Recent research suggests that HRT slightly increases the risk of having a stroke. Other things that can increase the risk of stroke include:

getting older high blood pressure smoking drinking too much alcohol an irregular heartbeat.

If you are worried about any of these things, or if you have had a stroke in the past, talk to your doctor to see if you should take HRT.

Compare

Looking at women in their 50s who are not taking HRT - on average, over a 5-year period, 3 in 1000 would be expected to have a stroke.

For women in their 50s who are taking HRT, the figure would be 4 in 1000.

Looking at women in their 60s who are not taking HRT - on average, over a 5-year period, 11 in 1000 would be expected to have a stroke.

For women in their 60s who are taking HRT, the figure would be 15 in 1000.

If you get:

unexplained migraine-type headaches, with or without disturbed vision

See a doctor as soon as possible and do not take any more HRT until your doctor says you can. These headaches may be an early warning sign of a stroke.

Blood clots:

HRT may increase the risk of blood clots in the veins (also called deep vein thrombosis, or DVT), especially during the first year of taking it.

These blood clots are not always serious, but if one travels to the lungs, it can cause chest pain, breathlessness, collapse or even death. This condition is called pulmonary embolism, or PE.

DVT and PE are examples of a condition called venous thromboembolism, or VTE.

You are more likely to get a blood clot if you:

are seriously overweight have had a blood clot before or have a close family member who has had blood clots have had one or more miscarriages have any blood clotting problem that needs treatment with a medicine such as warfarin are off your feet for a long time because of major surgery, injury or illness have a rare condition called systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

If any of these apply to you, talk to your doctor to see if you should take HRT.

Compare

Looking at women in their 50s who are not taking HRT - on average, over a 5-year period, 3 in 1000 would be expected to get a blood clot.

For women in their 50s who are taking HRT, the figure would be 7 in 1000.

Looking at women in their 60s who are not taking HRT - on average, over a 5-year period, 8 in 1000 would be expected to get a blood clot.

For women in their 60s who are taking HRT, the figure would be 17 in 1000.

The following may be signs of a blood clot if you get:

painful swellling in your leg sudden chest pain difficulty breathing

See a doctor as soon as possible and do not take any more HRT until your doctor says you can.

If you're going to have surgery, make sure your doctor knows about it. You may need to stop taking HRT about 4 to 6 weeks before the operation, to reduce the risk of a blood clot. Your doctor will tell you when you can start taking HRT again.

Effects on your risk of developing cancer

Breast cancer:

Women who have breast cancer, or have had breast cancer in the past, should not take HRT.

Taking HRT slightly increases the risk of breast cancer; as does having a later menopause. Your risk of breast cancer is higher if you:

have a close relative (mother, sister or grandmother) who has had breast cancer are seriously overweight.

The risk for a post-menopausal woman taking estrogen-only HRT for 5 years is about the same as for a woman of the same age who is still having periods over that time and not taking HRT. The risk for a woman who is taking estrogen plus progestogen HRT is higher than for estrogen-only HRT (but estrogen plus progestogen HRT is beneficial for the endometrium, see 'Endometrial cancer' below).

For all kinds of HRT, the extra risk of breast cancer increases the longer you take it, but returns to normal within about 5 years after stopping.

Compare

Looking at women in their 50s who are not taking HRT - on average, 32 in 1000 will be diagnosed with breast cancer by the time they reach the age of 65.

For women who start taking estrogen-only HRT at age 50 and take it for 5 years, the figure will be between 33 and 34 in 1000 (ie an extra 1-2 cases).

If they take estrogen-only HRT for 10 years, the figure will be 37 in 1000 (ie an extra 5 cases).

For women who start taking estrogen plus progestogen HRT at age 50 and take it for 5 years, the figure will be 38 in 1000 (ie an extra 6 cases).

If they take estrogen plus progestogen HRT for 10 years, the figure will be 51 in 1000 (ie an extra 19 cases).

If you notice any changes in your breasts such as:

dimpling of the skin changes in the nipple any lumps you can see or feel

Make an appointment to see your doctor as soon as possible.

Endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the womb):

Taking estrogen-only HRT for a long time can increase the risk of cancer of the lining of the womb (the endometrium). Taking progestogen as well as the estrogen helps to lower the extra risk.

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets also contain progestogen.

If you still have your womb, your doctor may prescribe a progestogen as well as estrogen. These may be prescribed separately, or as a combined HRT product.

If you have had your womb removed (a hysterectomy), your doctor will discuss with you whether you can safely take estrogen without a progestogen.

If you've had your womb removed because of endometriosis, any endometrium left in your body may be at risk. So your doctor may prescribe HRT that includes a progestogen as well as an estrogen.

Compare

Looking at women who still have a uterus and who are not taking HRT - on average 5 in 1000 will be diagnosed with endometrial cancer between the ages of 50-65.

For women who take estrogen-only HRT, the figure will be between 10 and 60 in 1000 (ie an extra 5 to 55 cases), depending on the dose and how long you take it.

The addition of a progestogen to estrogen-only HRT substantially reduces the risk of endometrial cancer.

If you get breakthrough bleeding or spotting, it's usually nothing to worry about, especially during the first few months of taking HRT.

Make an appointment to see your doctor if the bleeding or spotting:

carries on for more than the first few months starts after you've been on HRT for a while carries on even after you've stopped taking HRT

It could be that your endometrium has become thicker.

Ovarian cancer:

Ovarian cancer (cancer of the ovaries) is very rare, but it is serious. It can be difficult to diagnose, because there are often no obvious signs of the disease.

Some studies have indicated that taking estrogen-only HRT for more than 5 years may increase the risk of ovarian cancer. It is not yet known whether other kinds of HRT increase the risk in the same way.

While you are taking Elleste Duet Conti Tablets

Certain diseases sometimes get worse when you are taking hormone replacement therapy. Your doctor may need to check you more closely if you suffer from any of the following.

Migraine or severe headache Asthma Gallstones Epilepsy High blood pressure A personal or family history of blood clots. Diabetes (see below) Liver problems Heart or kidney problems Endometrial hyperplasia (overgrowth of the lining of your womb) Fibroids in your womb (see below) Endometriosis (where tissue from your womb is found outside the womb). A history of breast cancer in your family Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the skin and organs) Otosclerosis (an inherited form of deafness which sometimes gets worse during pregnancy). High levels of lipids in you blood (hypertriglyceridaemia)

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets may affect the results of certain laboratory tests, so tell the person taking the sample that you are taking Elleste Duet Conti Tablets.

If you have:

fibroids (lumps of fibrous and muscular tissue) in your womb, these may increase in size when you are taking Elleste Duet Conti Tablets. See your doctor if you have any pain or swelling in your abdomen. diabetes, you may need to change the amount of insulin you take. Check your blood glucose level more often until it is steady.

Do I need to use contraception while I am taking Elleste Duet Conti Tablets?

It is important to remember that Elleste Duet Conti Tablets are not an oral contraceptive (the pill).

If you are using the pill or another hormonal contraceptive, you will need to use another type of contraceptive. Please discuss this with your doctor.

Taking other medicines with Elleste Duet Conti Tablets

Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are using or have recently used any other medicines, including over-the-counter medicines.

In particular, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following because they may alter the effects of Elleste Duet Conti Tablets:

drugs that treat epilepsy, some anti-infectives (anti-virals or antibiotics) and sedatives. herbal medicines containing St. John's Wort: diabetic drugs, as this product may affect your blood glucose level. If you are being treated for diabetes please let your doctor or pharmacist know that you take Elleste Duet Conti.

If your doctor does not know that you are taking these other medicines, tell him or her before you start taking Elleste Duet Conti Tablets.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets are for use in post-menopausal women. They should not be taken by pregnant or breast-feeding women.

Driving or using machines

No effects on driving or using machinery have been observed for Elleste Duet Conti Tablets.

Important information about some of the ingredients of Elleste Duet Conti Tablets

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets contain lactose. If you have been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before taking this medicinal product.

How To Take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets If you are not taking any HRT

If you are not taking any HRT, you can start taking Elleste Duet Conti Tablets straightaway.

Take one tablet each day. You can take the tablets at a time of the day that suits you, but it is best to take them at about the same time each day. Swallow the tablets whole, with some water. All the tablets are the same. The days are marked on the strip to help you to remember to take one each day. Follow the direction of the arrows on the pack and take a tablet every day until the pack is empty. When you finish a foil strip, start a new strip the next day. Changing from another type of HRT

If you are changing from another type of HRT, and you usually have a monthly bleed, start taking Elleste Duet Conti Tablets on the first day of bleeding.

If you do not have a monthly bleed, start taking Elleste Duet Conti Tablets on any convenient day.

If your doctor gives you instructions on changing from another type of HRT you should follow these instructions. If you have any doubts you should contact your doctor.

Will I have periods?

You should not have monthly periods. In the first few months you may get some breakthrough bleeding or spotting. As you continue to take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets, some women will continue to have light spotting and some women will not bleed at all.

Tell your doctor if you:

still getting some bleeding after the first 3 to 4 months and this is a problem for you; don't bleed for a long time, but then start bleeding again. If you forget to take a tablet

Take the tablet as soon as you remember, and take the next one at the normal time.

If you have missed your tablet by more than 12 hours, dispose of this tablet safely and take the next one at the normal time. You may experience some breakthrough bleeding or spotting.

If you take more than you should

There should be no problems, but you may feel sick or actually be sick. If you are worried, contact your doctor. Take the usual tablet the following day.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, Elleste Duet Conti Tablets can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

Stop taking the tablets immediately and tell your doctor if: you become jaundiced (your skin or the whites of your eyes look yellow); you have itching all over your body; you have an unusual, severe or prolonged headache; your sight is affected in any way; you find it difficult to speak; any part of your body suddenly feels weak or numb; there is a chance that you could be or could become pregnant; or you develop any of the conditions listed under "Before you take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets".

During the first few months you may feel sick, have headaches, or your breasts may be painful or increase in size. These side effects should lessen as your body gets used to the medicine.

You may also get the following side effects:

Common: feeling sick, stomach cramps, headache, an increase in size of fibroids in the womb, breakthrough bleeding, changes in weight, oedema (swelling) of legs, breast tenderness and enlargement, mood changes, changes in sex drive.

Uncommon: indigestion, being sick, flatulence, gallstones and gallbladder disease, feeling dizzy, migraine, vaginal thrush, increase in blood pressure, leg cramps, breast cancer (please refer to the earlier section on breast cancer).

Rare: loss of hair from the scalp, increase in body and facial hair, itchiness, rashes, thromboembolic disease (please refer to the earlier section on the effects of HRT on the heart and circulation).

Very rare: heart disease (please refer to the earlier section on the effects of HRT on the heart and circulation), stroke, chloasma (brown patches on the skin), red swellings on the skin.

HRT will not prevent memory loss. In one study of women who started using combined HRT after the age of 65, a small increase in the risk of dementia was observed.

How To Store Elleste Duet Conti Tablets

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not store above 25°C. Store in the original package.

Do not take Elleste Duet Conti Tablets after the 'expiry date' shown on the box.

If your tablets are out of date, take them to your pharmacist who will dispose of them safely.

Further Information What Elleste Duet Conti Tablets contains Each tablet contains the active ingredients: 2 milligrams estradiol (as hemihydrate) and 1 milligram norethisterone acetate.
(The estradiol used to make Elleste Duet Conti Tablets does not come from animals). The tablets also contain: lactose monohydrate, maize starch, povidone, talc, magnesium stearate, macrogol 400, titanium dioxide (E171), black iron oxide (E172), and hypromellose (E464) (see also the warning at the end of section 2). What Elleste Duet Conti Tablets look like and contents of the pack

Elleste Duet Conti Tablets are grey film-coated tablets with an embossing.

They are supplied in three blister strips in each pack. Each strip contains 28 tablets.

Marketing Authorisation Holder Meda Pharmaceuticals Ltd Skyway House Parsonage Road Takeley Bishop's Stortford CM22 6PU UK Manufacturer Piramal Healthcare UK Ltd. Whalton Road Morpeth Northumberland NE61 3YA UK

This leaflet was last approved in October 2009.

If you have any comments on the way this leaflet is written, please write to

Meda Pharmaceuticals Ltd Skyway House Parsonage Road Takeley Bishop's Stortford CM22 6PU UK

20701188

5029/PIL8


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Elleste Duet 1mg (Meda Pharmaceuticals )


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Elleste Duet 1mg

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

One white tablet contains 1mg estradiol (as estradiol hemihydrate)

One green tablet contains 1mg estradiol (as estradiol hemihydrate) and 1mg norethisterone acetate.

For excipients, see 6.1

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Film coated tablets.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for estrogen deficiency symptoms in post- and peri-menopausal women. (See also Section 4.4)

The experience of treating women older than 65 years is limited.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

This product is a continuous sequential HRT. One white tablet to be taken daily for the first 16 days, followed by one pale green tablet for the next 12 days. A new cycle should then begin without any break. Therapy may start at any time in patients with established amenorrhoea or who are experiencing long intervals between spontaneous menses. In patients who are menstruating, it is advised that therapy starts on the first day of bleeding. Patients changing from another cyclical or continuous sequential preparation should complete the cycle and may then change to Elleste Duet 1mg without a break in therapy. Patients changing from a continuous combined preparation may start therapy at any time if amenorrhoea is established, or otherwise start on the first day of bleeding.

Elderly

There are no special dosage requirements in elderly patients.

Children

Not to be used in children.

Elleste Duet tablets are available in two strengths: Elleste Duet 1 mg (containing 1 mg estradiol and 1 mg norethisterone acetate) and Elleste Duet 2 mg (containing 2 mg estradiol and 1 mg norethisterone acetate). For initiation and continuation of treatment of post- and peri-menopausal symptoms, the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration (see also Section 4.4) should be used. Elleste Duet 2 mg is additionally indicated for prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women at high risk of future fractures and who are intolerant of, or contraindicated for, other medicinal products approved for the prevention of osteoporosis.

Missed Tablet: If a tablet is missed it should be taken within 12 hours of when normally taken; otherwise the tablet should be discarded, and the usual tablet should be taken the following day. If a tablet is missed there is an increased likelihood of breakthrough bleeding or spotting.

4.3 Contraindications

Known, past or suspected breast cancer;

Known or suspected estrogen-dependent malignant tumours (e.g. endometrial cancer);

Undiagnosed genital bleeding;

Untreated endometrial hyperplasia;

Previous idiopathic or current venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism);

Active or recent arterial thromboembolic disease (e.g. angina, myocardial infarction);

Acute liver disease, or a history of liver disease as long as liver function tests have failed to return to normal;

Known hypersensitivity to the active substances or to any of the excipients;

Porphyria.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

For the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, HRT should only be initiated for symptoms that adversely affect quality of life. In all cases a careful appraisal of the risks and benefits should be undertaken at least annually and HRT should only be continued as long as the benefit outweighs the risk.

Medical Examination/Follow Up

Before initiating or reinstituting HRT, a complete personal and family medical history should be taken. Physical (including pelvic and breast) examination should be guided by this and by the contraindications and warnings for use. During treatment, periodic check-ups are recommended of a frequency and nature adapted to the individual woman. Women should be advised what changes in their breasts should be reported to their doctor or nurse (see 'Breast cancer' below). Investigations, including mammography, should be carried out in accordance with currently accepted screening practices, modified to the clinical needs of the individual.

Conditions Which Need Supervision

If any of the following conditions are present, have occurred previously, and/or have been aggravated during pregnancy or previous hormone treatment, the patient should be closely supervised. It should be taken into account that these conditions may recur or be aggravated during treatment with Elleste Duet 1 mg, in particular:

- Leiomyoma (uterine fibroids) or endometriosis

- A history of, or risk factors for, thromboembolic disorders (see below)

- Risk factors for estrogen dependent tumours, e.g. 1st degree heredity for breast cancer

- Hypertension

- Liver disorders (e.g. liver adenoma)

- Diabetes mellitus with or without vascular involvement

- Cholelithiasis

- Migraine or (severe) headache

- Systemic lupus erythematosus

- A history of endometrial hyperplasia (see below)

- Epilepsy

- Asthma

- Otosclerosis

Reasons for Immediate Withdrawal of Therapy;

Therapy should be discontinued if a contra-indication is discovered and in the following situations:

- Jaundice or deterioration in liver function

- Significant increase in blood pressure

- New onset of migraine-type headache

- Pregnancy

Endometrial Hyperplasia

The risk of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma is increased when estrogens are administered alone for prolonged periods (see Section 4.8). The addition of a progestogen for at least 12 days per cycle in non-hysterectomised women greatly reduces this risk.

Break-through bleeding and spotting may occur during the first months of treatment. If break-through bleeding or spotting appears after some time on therapy, or continues after treatment has been discontinued, the reason should be investigated, which may include endometrial biopsy to exclude endometrial malignancy.

Breast Cancer

A randomised placebo-controlled trial, the Women's Health Initiative Study (WHI), and epidemiological studies, including the Million Women Study (MWS), have reported an increased risk of breast cancer in women taking estrogens, estrogen-progesterone combinations or tibolone for HRT for several years (see Section 4.8).

For all HRT, an excess risk becomes apparent within a few years of use and increases with duration of intake but returns to baseline within a few (at most five) years after stopping treatment.

In the MWS, the relative risk of breast cancer with conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) or estradiol (E2) was greater when a progestogen was added, either sequentially or continuously, and regardless of type of progestogen. There was no evidence of a difference in risk between the different routes of administration.

In the WHI study, the continuous combined conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate (CEE + MPA) product used was associated with breast cancers that were slightly larger in size and more frequently had local lymph node metastases compared to placebo.

HRT, especially estrogen-progestogen combined treatment, increases the density of mammographic images which may adversely affect the radiological detection of breast cancer.

Venous Thromboembolism

HRT is associated with a higher relative risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE), i.e. deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. One randomised controlled trial and epidemiological studies found a two- to threefold higher risk for users compared with non-users. For non-users it is estimated that the number of cases of VTE that will occur over a 5 year period is about 3 per 1000 women aged 50-59 years and 8 per 1000 women aged 60-69 years. It is estimated that in healthy women who use HRT for 5 years, the number of additional cases of VTE over a 5 year period will be between 2 and 6 (best estimate = 4) per 1000 women aged 50-59 years and between 5 and 15 (best estimate = 9) per 1000 women aged 60-69 years. The occurrence of such an event is more likely in the first year of HRT than later.

Generally recognised risk factors for VTE include a personal history or family history, severe obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). There is no consensus about the possible role of varicose veins in VTE.

Patients with a history of VTE or known thrombophilic states have an increased risk of VTE. HRT may add to this risk. Personal or strong family history of thromboembolism or recurrent spontaneous abortion should be investigated in order to exclude a thrombophilic predisposition. Until a thorough evaluation of thrombophilic factors has been made or anticoagulant treatment initiated, use of HRT in such patients should be viewed as contraindicated. Those women already on anticoagulant treatment require careful consideration of the benefit-risk of use of HRT.

The risk of VTE may be temporarily increased with prolonged immobilisation, major trauma or major surgery. As in all postoperative patients, scrupulous attention should be given to prophylactic measures to prevent VTE following surgery. Where prolonged immobilisation is liable to follow elective surgery, particularly abdominal or orthopaedic surgery to the lower limbs, consideration should be given to temporarily stopping HRT 4 to 6 weeks earlier, if possible. Treatment should not be restarted until the woman is completely mobilised.

If VTE develops after initiating therapy, the drug should be discontinued. Patients should be told to contact their doctors immediately when they are aware of a potential thromboembolic symptom (e.g., painful swelling of a leg, sudden pain in the chest, dyspnea).

Coronary Artery Disease

There is no evidence from randomised controlled trials of cardiovascular benefit with continuous combined conjugated estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Two large clinical trials (WHI and HERS i.e. Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study) showed a possible increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity in the first year of use and no overall benefit. For other HRT products there are only limited data from randomised controlled trials examining effects in cardiovascular morbidity or mortality. Therefore, it is uncertain whether these findings also extend to other HRT products.

Stroke

One large randomised clinical trial (WHI-trial) found, as a secondary outcome, an increased risk of ischaemic stroke in healthy women during treatment with continuous combined conjugated estrogens and MPA. For women who do not use HRT, it is estimated that the number of cases of stroke that will occur over a 5 year period is about 3 per 1000 women aged 50-59 years and 11 per 1000 women aged 60-69 years. It is estimated that for women who use conjugated estrogen and MPA for 5 years, the number of additional cases will be between 0 and 3 (best estimate = 1) per 1000 users aged 50-59 years and between 1 and 9 (best estimate = 4) per 1000 users aged 60-69 years. It is unknown whether the increased risk also extends to other HRT products.

Ovarian Cancer

Long-term (at least 5 to 10 years) use of estrogen-only HRT products in hysterectomised women has been associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer in some epidemiological studies. It is uncertain whether long-term use of combined HRT confers a different risk than estrogen-only products.

Other Conditions

Estrogens may cause fluid retention, and therefore patients with cardiac or renal dysfunction should be carefully observed. Patients with terminal renal insufficiency should be closely observed, since it is expected that the level of circulating active ingredients in Elleste Duet 1 mg is increased.

Women with pre-existing hypertriglyceridaemia should be followed closely during estrogen replacement or hormone replacement therapy, since rare cases of large increases of plasma triglycerides leading to pancreatitis have been reported with estrogen therapy in this condition.

Estrogens increase thyroid binding globulin (TBG), leading to increased circulating total thyroid hormone, as measured by protein-bound iodine (PBI), T4 levels (by column or by radio-immunoassay) or T3 levels (by radio-immunoassay). T3 resin uptake is decreased, reflecting the elevated TBG. Free T4 and free T3 concentrations are unaltered. Other binding proteins may be elevated in serum, i.e. corticoid binding globulin (CBG), sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) leading to increased circulating corticosteroids and sex steroids, respectively. Free or biological active hormone concentrations are unchanged. Other plasma proteins may be increased (angiotensinogen/renin substrate, alpha-1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin).

There is no conclusive evidence for improvement of cognitive function. There is some evidence from the WHI trial of increased risk of probable dementia in women who start using continuous combined CEE and MPA after the age of 65. It is unknown whether the findings apply to younger post-menopausal women or other HRT products.

There is an increased risk of gall bladder disease in women receiving post-menopausal estrogens.

In rare cases benign, and in even rarer cases malignant liver tumours leading in isolated cases to life-threatening intra-abdominal haemorrhage have been observed after the use of hormonal substances such as those contained in Elleste Duet 1mg. If severe upper abdominal complaints, enlarged liver or signs of intra-abdominal haemorrhage occur, a liver tumour should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

Patients with rare hereditary disorders of galactose intolerance, the Lapp lactase deficiency or glucose-galactose malabsorption should not take this medicine.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

The metabolism of estrogens and progestogens may be increased by concomitant use of substances known to induce drug-metabolising enzymes, specifically cytochrome P450 enzymes, such as anticonvulsants (e.g. phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine) and anti-infectives (e.g. rifampicin, rifabutin, nevirapine, efavirenz).

Ritonavir and nelfinavir, although known as strong inhibitors, by contrast exhibit inducing properties when used concomitantly with steroid hormones. Herbal preparations containing St John's Wort (Hypericum Perforatum) may induce the metabolism of estrogens and progestogens.

Clinically, an increased metabolism of estrogens and progestogens may lead to decreased effect and changes in the uterine bleeding profile.

The requirement for oral anti-diabetics or insulin can change as a result of the effect on glucose tolerance. Some laboratory tests can be influenced by estrogens such as tests for thyroid function (see Section 4.4) or glucose tolerance.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

Pregnancy:

Elleste Duet 1 mg is not indicated during pregnancy. If pregnancy occurs during medication with Elleste Duet 1 mg treatment should be withdrawn immediately.

Data on a limited number of exposed pregnancies indicate adverse effects of norethisterone on the foetus. At doses higher than normally used in OC and HRT formulations masculinisation of female foetuses was observed.

The results of most epidemiological studies to date relevant to inadvertant foetal exposure to combinations of estrogens + progestogens indicate no teratogenic or foetotoxic effect.

Lactation:

Elleste Duet 1 mg is not indicated during lactation.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

No adverse effects on the ability to drive or operate machines have been reported.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Undesirable effects observed with estrogens and progestogens are detailed in the following table. The effects are grouped according to system organ class.

Organ group

Common (>1/100)

Uncommon (>1/1,000, <1/100)

Rare

(>1/10,000, <1/1,000)

Reproductive system and breast disorders

Uterine bleeding, Breast tenderness, breast enlargement, increase in size of uterine fibroids

Vaginal candidiasis

 

 

Gastrointestinal disorders

Nausea, abdominal pain

Dyspepsia, vomiting, flatulence

 

 

Hepatobiliary disorders

 

 

Gallbladder disease, gallstones

 

 

Nervous System disorders

Headache

Dizziness, migraine

 

 

Skin

 

 

 

 

Alopecia, hirsutism, rash, itching

Cardiovascular disorders

 

 

Increase in blood pressure

Venous thromboembolism*

Thrombophlebitis

General disorders

Weight increase/decrease, oedema, change in mood including anxiety and depressive mood, change in libido

Leg cramps

 

 

*Venous thromboembolism i.e. deep leg or pelvic venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is more frequent among hormone replacement therapy users than among non-users. For further information, see section 4.3 Contraindications and 4.4 Special Warnings and precautions for use.

Breast Cancer

According to evidence from a large number of epidemiological studies and one randomised placebo-controlled trial, the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), the overall risk of breast cancer increases with increasing duration of HRT use in current or recent HRT users.

For estrogen-only HRT, estimates of relative risk (RR) from a reanalysis of original data from 51 epidemiological studies (in which>80% of HRT use was estrogen-only HRT) and from the epidemiological Million Women Study (MWS) are similar at 1.35 (95%CI 1.21 – 1.49) and 1.30 (95%CI 1.21 – 1.40), respectively.

For estrogen plus progestogen combined HRT, several epidemiological studies have reported an overall higher risk for breast cancer than with estrogens alone.

The MWS reported that, compared to never users, the use of various types of estrogen-progestogen combined HRT was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer (RR = 2.00, 95%CI: 1.88 – 2.12) than use of estrogens alone (RR = 1.30, 95%CI: 1.21 – 1.40) or use of tibolone (RR=1.45; 95%CI 1.25-1.68).

The WHI trial reported a risk estimate of 1.24 (95%CI 1.01 – 1.54) after 5.6 years of use of estrogen-progestogen combined HRT (CEE + MPA) in all users compared with placebo.

The absolute risks calculated from the MWS and the WHI trial are presented below:

The MWS has estimated, from the known average incidence of breast cancer in developed countries, that:

? For women not using HRT, about 32 in every 1000 are expected to have breast cancer diagnosed between the ages of 50 and 64 years.

? For 1000 current or recent users of HRT, the number of additional cases during the corresponding period will be

? For users of estrogen-only replacement therapy

 

• between 0 and 3 (best estimate = 1.5) for 5 years' use

• between 3 and 7 (best estimate = 5) for 10 years' use.

? For users of estrogen plus progestogen combined HRT,

 

• between 5 and 7 (best estimate = 6) for 5 years' use

• between 18 and 20 (best estimate = 19) for 10 years' use.

The WHI trial estimated that after 5.6 years of follow-up of women between the ages of 50 and 79 years, an additional 8 cases of invasive breast cancer would be due to estrogen-progestogen combined HRT (CEE + MPA) per 10,000 women years.

According to calculations from the trial data, it is estimated that:

? For 1000 women in the placebo group,

 

• about 16 cases of invasive breast cancer would be diagnosed in 5 years.

? For 1000 women who used estrogen + progestogen combined HRT (CEE + MPA), the number of additional cases would be

 

• between 0 and 9 (best estimate = 4) for 5 years' use.

The number of additional cases of breast cancer in women who use HRT is broadly similar for women who start HRT irrespective of age at start of use (between the ages of 45-65) (see Section 4.4).

Endometrial cancer

In women with an intact uterus, the risk of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer increases with increasing duration of use of unopposed estrogens. According to data from epidemiological studies, the best estimate of the risk is that for women not using HRT, about 5 in every 1000 are expected to have endometrial cancer diagnosed between the ages of 50 and 65. Depending on the duration of treatment and estrogen dose, the reported increase in endometrial cancer risk among unopposed estrogen users varies from 2-to 12-fold greater compared with non-users. Adding a progestogen to estrogen-only therapy greatly reduces, this increased risk.

Very rare cases of estrogen-dependent neoplasms benign and malignant (e.g. endometrial cancer), myocardial infarction, stroke, chloasma, erythema multiforme, erythema nodosum, vascular purpura, haemorrhagic eruption and probable dementia (see Section 4.4) have been reported in women using HRT.

4.9 Overdose

Overdosage may be manifested by nausea and vomiting. If overdosage is discovered within two or three hours and is so large that treatment seems desirable, gastric lavage can be considered. There are no specific antidotes for overdosage and further treatment should be symptomatic.

5. Pharmacological Properties

Pharmacotherapeutic group: Progestogens and estrogens, sequential preparations, norethisterone and estrogen.

ATC Code: G03FB05

5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Estradiol

The active ingredient, synthetic 17?-estradiol, is chemically and biologically identical to endogenous human estradiol. It substitutes for the loss of estrogen production in menopausal women, and alleviates menopausal symptoms.

Norethisterone acetate

As estrogens promote the growth of the endometrium, unopposed estrogens increase the risk of endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. The addition of a progestogen reduces but does not eliminate the estrogen-induced risk of endometrial hyperplasia in non-hysterectomised women.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

No pharmacokinetic parameters are available for Elleste Duet 1 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters for Elleste Duet 2 mg (2 mg estradiol + 1 mg norethisterone tablets) are provided in the table below. The data were obtained from an open label, two way crossover pharmacokinetic study in which treatment was admnistered for 7 days to achieve steady state (n=24). Pharmacokinetic data were collected over 24 hours.

 

Serum unconjuated estradiol

mean (SD)

Serum unconjugated estrone

mean (SD)

Norethisterone

mean (SD)

AUC0-24h

967.8 (0.5) pg.h/ml

8366 (1.7) pg.h/ml

43.2 (0.4) ng.h/ml

Cmax

61.6 (0.4) pg/ml

648.5 (1.5) pg/ml

11.8 (0.4) ng/ml

Cmin

19.3 (0.6) pg/ml

131.1 (2.5) pg/ml

0.5 (0.5) ng/ml

Tmax

3.4 (2.1) h

5.07 (1.8) h

0.9 (0.3) h

Estradiol

Readily and fully absorbed from the GI tract when given orally, peak levels are generally observed 3-6 hours after ingestion, but by 24 hours concentrations have returned to baseline.

Estradiol is converted to estrone and estriol primarily in the liver. These are excreted into the bile and undergo enterohepatic recirculation and further degradation before being excreted in the urine (90-95%) as biologically inactive glucuronide and sulphate conjugates or in the faeces (5-10%), mostly unconjugated.

Norethisterone acetate

Norethisterone acetate is absorbed from the GI tract and its effects last for at least 24 hours. Maximum blood concentrations are generally reached 1-4 hours after administration. Norethisterone acetate undergoes first pass effect, being transformed to norethisterone which is then metabolised and excreted mainly in the urine as glucuronide and sulphate conjugates.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Both estradiol and norethisterone acetate have been shown to induce adverse effects in preclinical reproductive toxicity studies. Chiefly, estradiol showed embryotoxic effects and induced anomalies in urogenital tract development, e.g. feministation of male foetuses in high doses. Norethisterone acetate showed embryotoxic effects and induced anomalies in urogenital tract development. In mice, additional anomalies in non-urogenital foetal development, including hydrocephalus and clubfoot, have been detected.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Tablet core:

Lactose monohydrate, maize starch, povidone 25, talc (purified) and magnesium stearate.

Film-coating material:

Estradiol only (white) tablets:

Hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (E464), titanium dioxide (E171) and macrogol 400

Estradiol and Norethisterone Acetate only (green) tablets:

Hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (E464), titanium dioxide (E171), macrogol 400, quinoline yellow (E104) and indigo carmine (E132).

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not applicable.

6.3 Shelf Life

3 years.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Do not store above 30°C. Store in the original package.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Aluminium foil and UPVC blister packed in a cardboard carton.

Pack sizes: 28 tablets and 84 (3 x 28) tablets.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

There are no special instructions for handling.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Meda Pharmaceuticals Ltd

249 West George Street

Glasgow

G2 4RB

Trading as:

Meda Pharmaceuticals Ltd

Skyway House

Parsonage Road

Takeley

Bishop's Stortford

CM22 6PU

UK

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 15142/0063

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

24th March 1997 / 27th August 2007

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

1st August 2009


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Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women


minoxidil
Dosage Form: topical solution
CVS Pharmacy, Inc. Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women Drug Facts Active ingredient

Minoxidil 2% w/v

Purpose

Hair regrowth treatment

Uses

to regrow hair on the scalp

Warnings

For external use only

Flammable: Keep away from fire or flame

Do not use if your degree of hair loss is different than that shown on the side of this carton, because this product may not work for you you have no family history of hair loss your hair loss is sudden and/or patchy your hair loss is associated with childbirth you do not know the reason for your hair loss you are under 18 years of age. Do not use on babies and children. your scalp is red, inflamed, infected, irritated, or painful you use other medicines on the scalp Ask a doctor before use if you have

heart disease

When using this product do not apply on other parts of the body avoid contact with the eyes. In case of accidental contact, rinse eyes with large amounts of cool tap water. some people have experienced changes in hair color and/or texture it takes time to regrow hair. You may need to use this product 2 times a day for at least 4 months before you see results. the amount of hair regrowth is different for each person. This product will not work for everyone. Stop use and ask a doctor if chest pain, rapid heartbeat, faintness, or dizziness occurs sudden, unexplained weight gain occurs your hands or feet swell scalp irritation or redness occurs unwanted facial hair growth occurs you do not see hair regrowth in 4 months May be harmful if used when pregnant or breast-feeding. Keep out of reach of children.

If swallowed, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

Directions apply one mL with dropper 2 times a day directly onto the scalp in the hair loss area using more or more often will not improve results continued use is necessary to increase and keep your hair regrowth, or hair loss will begin again Other information see hair loss pictures on side of this carton before use, read all information on carton and enclosed leaflet keep the carton. It contains important information. in clinical studies of mostly white women aged 18-45 years with mild to moderate degrees of hair loss, the following response to minoxidil topical solution 2% was reported: 19% of women reported moderate hair regrowth after using minoxidil topical solution 2% for 8 months (19% had moderate regrowth; 40% had minimal regrowth). This compares with 7% of women reporting moderate hair regrowth after using the placebo, the liquid without minoxidil in it, for 8 months (7% had moderate regrowth; 33% had minimal regrowth). store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F). Keep tightly closed. Inactive ingredients

alcohol, propylene glycol, purified water

Questions or comments?

1-800-719-9260

Principal Display Panel

Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women

Minoxidil Topical Solution USP 2%

Hair Regrowth Treatment

Clinically Proven to Help Regrow Hair

Revitalizes Hair Follicles

Unscented

Compare to Women’s Rogaine® active ingredient

# Month Supply

Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women Carton - Left Side

Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women Carton - Right Side


Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women 
minoxidil  solution Product Information Product Type HUMAN OTC DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 59779-856 Route of Administration TOPICAL DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength MINOXIDIL (MINOXIDIL) MINOXIDIL 2 g  in 100 mL Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength No Inactive Ingredients Found Product Characteristics Color      Score      Shape Size Flavor Imprint Code Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 59779-856-16 1 BOTTLE In 1 CARTON contains a BOTTLE 1 60 mL In 1 BOTTLE This package is contained within the CARTON (59779-856-16) 2 59779-856-30 3 BOTTLE In 1 CARTON contains a BOTTLE 2 60 mL In 1 BOTTLE This package is contained within the CARTON (59779-856-30) 3 59779-856-34 4 BOTTLE In 1 CARTON contains a BOTTLE 3 60 mL In 1 BOTTLE This package is contained within the CARTON (59779-856-34)
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date ANDA ANDA075357 09/08/2006
Labeler - CVS Pharmacy (062312574) Revised: 07/2009CVS Pharmacy
More Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women resources Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women Side Effects (in more detail)Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingHair Regrowth Treatment for Women Drug Interactions0 Reviews for Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women - Add your own review/rating Compare Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women with other medications Alopecia
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Careone Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men


Generic Name: minoxidil
Dosage Form: solution
American Sales Company Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men Drug Facts Active ingredient

Minoxidil 5% w/v

Purpose

Hair regrowth treatment for men

Uses

to regrow hair on the top of the scalp (vertex only, see pictures on side of carton)

Warnings

For external use only. For use by men only.

Flammable: Keep away from fire or flame

Do not use if you are a woman your amount of hair loss is different than that shown on the side of this carton or your hair loss is on the front of the scalp. Minoxidil topical solution 5% is not intended for frontal baldness or receding hairline. you have no family history of hair loss your hair loss is sudden and/or patchy you do not know the reason for your hair loss you are under 18 years of age. Do not use on babies and children. your scalp is red, inflamed, infected, irritated, or painful you use other medicines on the scalp Ask a doctor before use if you have

heart disease

When using this product do not apply on other parts of the body avoid contact with the eyes. In case of accidental contact, rinse eyes with large amounts of cool tap water. some people have experienced changes in hair color and/or texture it takes time to regrow hair. Results may occur at 2 months with twice a day usage. For some men, you may need to use this product for at least 4 months before you see results. the amount of hair regrowth is different for each person. This product will not work for all men. Stop use and ask a doctor if chest pain, rapid heartbeat, faintness, or dizziness occurs sudden, unexplained weight gain occurs your hands or feet swell scalp irritation or redness occurs unwanted facial hair growth occurs you do not see hair regrowth in 4 months May be harmful if used when pregnant or breast-feeding. Keep out of reach of children.

If swallowed, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

Directions apply one mL with dropper 2 times a day directly onto the scalp in the hair loss area using more or more often will not improve results continued use is necessary to increase and keep your hair regrowth, or hair loss will begin again Other information see hair loss pictures on side of this carton before use, read all information on carton and enclosed leaflet keep the carton. It contains important information. hair regrowth has not been shown to last longer than 48 weeks in large clinical trials with continuous treatment with minoxidil topical solution 5% for men in clinical studies with mostly white men aged 18-49 years with moderate degrees of hair loss, minoxidil topical solution 5% for men provided more hair regrowth than minoxidil topical solution 2% store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F). Keep tightly closed. Inactive ingredients

alcohol, propylene glycol, purified water

Questions or comments?

1-800-719-9260

Principal Display Panel

Compare to the active ingredient in Men’s Rogaine® Extra Strength

Extra Strength

Minoxidil Topical Solution USP, 5%

Hair Regrowth Treatment

For Men

Clinically Proven to Help Regrow Hair

Revitalizes Hair Follicles

Unscented

Not for Use by Women

# Month Supply

Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men Carton


CAREONE HAIR REGROWTH TREATMENT  EXTRA STRENGTH
minoxidil  solution Product Information Product Type HUMAN OTC DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 41520-798 Route of Administration TOPICAL DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength MINOXIDIL (MINOXIDIL) MINOXIDIL 3 g  in 60 mL Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength No Inactive Ingredients Found Product Characteristics Color YELLOW (Light Amber) Score      Shape Size Flavor Imprint Code Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 41520-798-16 1 BOTTLE In 1 CARTON contains a BOTTLE 1 60 mL In 1 BOTTLE This package is contained within the CARTON (41520-798-16) 2 41520-798-30 3 BOTTLE In 1 CARTON contains a BOTTLE 2 60 mL In 1 BOTTLE This package is contained within the CARTON (41520-798-30)
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date ANDA ANDA075598 12/15/2009
Labeler - American Sales Company (809183973) Revised: 06/2009American Sales Company
More Careone Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men resources Careone Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Careone Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men Drug Interactions Careone Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men Support Group 7 Reviews for Careone Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men - Add your own review/rating Compare Careone Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men with other medications Alopecia
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eflornithine topical


Generic Name: eflornithine topical (ee FLOOR nih theen)
Brand Names: Vaniqa

What is eflornithine topical?

Eflornithine interferes with a chemical in the hair follicles of the skin. This results in slower hair growth where eflornithine topical is applied.

Eflornithine topical is used to reduce unwanted facial hair in women. Eflornithine topical does not permanently remove hair or "cure" unwanted facial hair. Eflornithine topical will help you manage your condition and improve your appearance.

Eflornithine topical may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about eflornithine topical? Eflornithine topical is for external use only.

Continue to use eflornithine topical even if you do not see immediate results. Reduction in facial hair occurs gradually. Improvement may be seen as early as 4 to 8 weeks of treatment, however it may take longer in some individuals. If no improvement is seen after 6 months of use, treatment with eflornithine topical should be discontinued. Hair growth may return to pretreatment levels approximately 8 weeks after discontinuation of treatment with eflornithine topical.

Who should not use eflornithine topical? Do not use eflornithine topical if you have had an allergic reaction to it in the past. Eflornithine topical is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether eflornithine topical will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. It is also not known whether eflornithine passes into breast milk. Do not use eflornithine topical without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Eflornithine topical has not been approved for use by children younger than 12 years of age. How should I use eflornithine topical? Apply eflornithine topical exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Eflornithine topical does not permanently remove hair or "cure" unwanted facial hair. It is not a hair remover (depilatory). You will need to continue using your current hair removal techniques. Eflornithine topical will help you manage your condition and improve your appearance.

Eflornithine topical is for external use only.

Eflornithine topical is usually applied twice daily, at least eight hours apart, or as directed by your doctor.

Wash your hands before and after each application of eflornithine topical.

Remove any facial hair that is present using your current hair removal techniques. Wait at least 5 minutes after hair removal before applying eflornithine topical. Apply a thin layer of eflornithine topical to the affected areas of the face and nearby affected areas under the chin and rub it in thoroughly.

Cosmetics or sunscreen may be used after applying eflornithine topical, but you should wait a few minutes to allow the treatment to be absorbed before applying them.

Do not wash the treatment areas for at least 4 hours after application of eflornithine topical. Avoid getting this medication in your eyes, nose, or mouth. If this occurs, wash the area with water. If eflornithine topical gets in your eyes, rinse them thoroughly with water and contact your doctor.

Eflornithine topical may cause temporary redness, rash, burning, stinging, or tingling, especially if it is applied to broken or irritated skin. If irritation develops, reduce the application of eflornithine topical to once a day. If irritation continues, stop using eflornithine topical and contact your doctor.

Continue to use eflornithine topical even if you do not see immediate results. Reduction in facial hair occurs gradually. Improvement may be seen as early as 4 to 8 weeks of treatment, however it may take longer in some individuals. If no improvement is seen after 6 months of use, treatment with eflornithine topical should be discontinued. Hair growth may return to pretreatment levels approximately 8 weeks after discontinuation of treatment with eflornithine topical.

Store eflornithine topical at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the medication to freeze. What happens if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of eflornithine topical, skip the dose you missed and apply your next regularly scheduled dose as directed. Do not apply a double dose of this medication or try to "make up" a missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of eflornithine topical is not likely to occur. If the cream has been ingested, or if you suspect an overdose has occurred, contact your doctor, hospital emergency room, or poison control center for advice.

What should I avoid while using eflornithine topical? Avoid getting this medication in your eyes, nose, or mouth. If this occurs, wash the area with water. If eflornithine topical gets in your eyes, rinse thoroughly with water and contact your doctor. Eflornithine topical side effects

Eflornithine topical may cause temporary redness, rash, burning, stinging, or tingling, especially if it is applied to broken or irritated skin. If irritation develops, reduce the application of eflornithine topical to once a day. If irritation continues, stop using eflornithine topical and contact your doctor.

Hair bumps (folliculitis) may also occur. If these continue, contact your doctor.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Eflornithine topical Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Hirsutism:

Apply a thin layer of eflornithine topical cream to affected areas of the face and adjacent involved areas under the chin and rub in thoroughly. Do not wash treated area for at least 4 hours. Use twice a day, allowing at least 8 hours between applications or as directed by a physician.
Continue to use hair removal techniques as needed in conjunction with eflornithine. Apply eflornithine at least 5 minutes after hair removal. Cosmetics or sunscreens may be applied over treated areas after cream has dried.

What other drugs will affect eflornithine topical?

Before using eflornithine topical, talk to your doctor if you are taking any other prescription or over-the-counter medications, especially if you are using any other topical preparations. You may not be able to use eflornithine topical, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with eflornithine topical. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking or using any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More eflornithine topical resources Eflornithine topical Side Effects (in more detail) Eflornithine topical Dosage Eflornithine topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Eflornithine topical Support Group 8 Reviews for Eflornithine - Add your own review/rating Vaniqa Monograph (AHFS DI) Vaniqa Topical Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Vaniqa Cream MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vaniqa Consumer Overview Compare eflornithine topical with other medications Hirsutism Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about eflornithine topical written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: eflornithine side effects (in more detail)


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Reductil 10mg and 15mg


REDUCTIL 10mg & 15mg Capsules

(sibutramine)

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not give it to others. If any of the side effects get serious or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What REDUCTIL is and what it is used for 2. Before you take REDUCTIL 3. How to take REDUCTIL 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store REDUCTIL 6. Further information What Reductil Is And What It Is Used For

Reductil, which contains sibutramine is a medicine to help you lose weight if your doctor has determined you are obese, or over-weight with additional risk factors for obesity such as diabetes and/or elevated lipids. Your doctor may start you on Reductil if diet and exercise for three months didn’t help you lose enough weight. This medicine makes you feel full sooner so you eat less food. By eating less you should be able to lose and control your weight. This medicine is part of your weight loss plan you set up with your doctor.

This medicine should be used together with a low calorie diet and an increase in your physical activity. The combination will also help you lose weight. Your doctor will guide you with your weight loss program and will give you regular check-ups.

Before You Take Reductil Do Not Take REDUCTIL if you have obesity that is not related to overeating if your blood pressure is above 145/90 mmHg whether or not you take blood pressure medicines. if you have, or have had in the past, an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia. if you are allergic to sibutramine or any of the other ingredients of Reductil (please refer to Section 6 or the list of ingredients for this medicine) if you have a mental illness such as manic depression (bipolar disorder) if you are currently using or have used in the past 2 weeks MAOI medicines (to treat depression or Parkinson’s disease) or you have used other medicines to treat depression, psychosis or weight loss or tryptophan to treat sleep disorders. These medicines can affect the amount of the chemical called serotonin in your brain. This can be a problem if you also use Reductil at the same time. if you have Tourette’s syndrome if you have or have ever had heart problems, a raised heart rate, an uneven heart beat, heart failure, hardening of the arteries or strokes if you have an overactive thyroid gland if you have severe kidney disease, are on dialysis or have severe liver disease. if you are a male patient and you notice problems with your prostate. An enlarged prostate may make it hard to empty your bladder even if you feel an urge to urinate. if you have a certain kind of tumours on the adrenal glands (phaeochromocytoma) if you have an eye problem called narrow angle glaucoma. if you abuse drugs, medicines or alcohol or have done so in the past if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding. if you are under 18 or over 65 years old. Take Special Care with REDUCTIL

Your doctor will check your progress regularly, measuring your weight, blood pressure and pulse rate to be sure that this medicine is the right treatment for you.

Talk to your doctor: if your blood pressure or heart rate goes up or gets too high. It is very important to have your blood pressure checked if you have a sleeping problem called sleep apnoea. if you experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain and swollen ankles due to pulmonary hypertension. if you have epilepsy (seizures). if you have kidney or liver problems if you have a family history of tics. if you have depression. if you have a condition that makes you prone to bleeding or if you are taking any medicines that may thin your blood or may increase bleeding. if you have an eye problem called wide angle glaucoma (increase of pressure in your eyes) or if you are at risk because you have a relative who has had this condition.

Your doctor will decide if you should continue taking this medicine.

Important information about some of the ingredients of REDUCTIL

Reductil contains lactose. If you have been told by your doctor that you are have an intolerance to some sugars, tell your doctor taking this medicinal product.

Using Other Medicines

Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are using or have recently used any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription.

Several medicines can cause unwanted reactions if used with Reductil. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking this medicine. In particular tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines:

if you are currently using or have used in the past 2 weeks MAOI medicines (to treat depression or Parkinson’s disease) or you have used other medicines to treat depression, psychosis or weight loss or tryptophan to treat sleep disorders (see Do Not Take REDUCTIL). medicines to treat migraine headaches e.g. sumatriptan, ergot (dihydroergotamine) some kinds of strong pain-killers: for example, fentanyl and pethidine, pentazocine. certain medicines that can increase blood pressure, such as cold or allergy medications e.g. dextromethorphan, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine. cimetidine (a medicine used to treat ulcers) some medicines to treat infections including antibiotics, such as rifampicin, erythromycin, troleandomycin and clarithromycin, or antifungal medicines, such as itraconazole and ketoconazole. Talk to your doctor if you are using any medicine to treat an infection. some epilepsy (seizure) medicines: carbamazepine, phenobarbitone and phenytoin. some medicines called steroids and medicines that affect your body’s ability to fight disease: such as dexamethasone and cyclosporin. Taking REDUCTIL with Food and Drink It doesn’t matter if you have eaten or not when you take this medicine. This medicine should be swallowed whole with a full glass of water. Pregnancy and Breast-feeding

You shouldn’t use Reductil if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Take measures to avoid becoming pregnant while using this medicine. Do not breast-feed if you are taking this medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking any medicine.

Driving and Using Machines

If you find that this medicine affects your judgment, your thinking or your coordination, you should not drive or use tools or machinery.

How To Take Reductil

Always take this medicine exactly as your doctor has told you. If you are not sure, you should check with your doctor.

The starting dose is one 10mg capsule of Reductil every morning, swallowed whole with a glass of water. Do not chew or break open the capsule. It doesn’t matter if you have eaten or not when you take this medicine.

If you haven’t lost about four pounds (two kilograms) of weight during the first four weeks you take Reductil, your doctor may want to increase your dose of this medicine to one 15 mg capsule taken once a day. Reductil must be taken as prescribed by your doctor.

If you take more REDUCTIL than you should

If you took more Reductil than you should, immediately tell your doctor or pharmacist. Taking too much Reductil may make you feel dizzy. Your heart may beat faster and your blood pressure may increase. You may also get a headache.

If you forget to take REDUCTIL

If you do forget to take a dose, just skip it. Do not take a double dose to make up for the one you have missed. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about how to take this medicine.

If you stop taking REDUCTIL

If you stop taking this medicine, you might get a headache or want to eat more. If this happens, talk to your doctor.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, Reductil can cause side effects, although not everyone gets them. Most side effects occur during the first four weeks of treatment. Most of these are not serious, occur less often and became less marked over time or go away when this medicine is stopped.

The following side effects have been seen with Reductil. Some of these may become serious. You should talk to your doctor and/or pharmacist if you notice any of the following.

An increase in blood pressure or heart rate. An irregular heart beat such as a fluttering of the heart A rare but serious problem called serotonin syndrome. This is a combination of symptoms that can include feeling confused, sweating, shaking, nausea, hallucinations, sudden jerking of the muscles or a fast heart beat. This may occur when people take other medicines that affect a brain chemical called serotonin along with this medicine. If you get breathing problems, chest pains or swollen ankles. Unusual bleeding or unusual bruising, or if it takes you longer than usual to stop bleeding. If you get a rash or hives, trouble breathing, fainting and swelling of the face and throat. You may be having an allergic reaction which may need emergency treatment. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking this medicine and talk to your doctor right away.

Very common side effects (in more than 1 in 10 patients taking this medicine in clinical trials) include:

trouble sleeping, constipation, dry mouth

Common side effects (in less than 1 in 10 patients taking this medicine in clinical trials) include:

a fast heart beat, increased blood pressure, awareness of the heart beat (palpitations), nausea, headache, anxiety, a “pins-and-needles” feeling, dizziness, hot flushes or sweating. If you have haemorrhoids (piles), they could become worse.

Foods and drinks may taste different than they used to or you may have a different taste in your mouth.

Other side effects include (less common or with an unknown frequency): seizures, trouble remembering things, blurred vision, diarrhoea, vomiting, thinning hair, erectile dysfunction/abnormal orgasms, menstrual disorders, bleeding into the skin with joint pain, feeling agitated or depressed, bleeding in the stomach, kidney problems, inability to empty the bladder and increases in certain liver tests.

If any of the side effects gets serious or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How To Store Reductil

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not store above 25°C. Store in the original package in order to protect from moisture.

Do not use this medicine if you notice the capsules are damaged or don’t look right in some other way.

Do not use this medicine after the expiry date which is stated on the blister strip and the carton after EXP. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.

Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or with household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

Further Information What REDUCTIL Contains

The active substance is sibutramine, as sibutramine hydrochloride monohydrate.

Reductil Capsules also contain the following non active ingredients: Lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, colloidal anhydrous silica.

Capsule shell and markings contain: Indigo carmine (E132), titanium dioxide (E171), gelatin, sodium lauryl sulphate, dimethicone, propylene glycol, iron oxide black (E172), shellac glaze, lecithin (E322).

Reductil 10 mg capsules also contain quinilone yellow (E104).

What REDUCTIL looks like and contents of the pack

Reductil 10mg Capsules are immediate release hard gelatin capsules with a blue cap and yellow body

Reductil 15mg Capsules are immediate release hard gelatin capsules with a blue cap and white body

Reductil capsules are available in a PVC/PVDC blister strip calendar packs.

Calendar packs containing 28 capsules (4 weeks), 56 capsules (8 weeks) and 98 capsules (14 weeks) Hospital packs (calendar packs) containing 28 capsules and 280 (10 x 28) capsules Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer Abbott Laboratories Ltd. Queenborough Kent ME11 5EL United Kingdom

Reductil is made by

Abbott GmbH & Co. KG Knollstrasse 67061 Ludwigshafen Germany

This leaflet was last approved in November 2007


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Tri Rx


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Tri Rx (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Tri Rx resources Tri Rx Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Tri Rx Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Tri Rx - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Tri Rx with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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Vol-Tab Rx


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Vol-Tab Rx (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Vol-Tab Rx resources Vol-Tab Rx Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Vol-Tab Rx Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Vol-Tab Rx - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Vol-Tab Rx with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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Vitaphil Plus DHA


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Vitaphil Plus DHA (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Vitaphil Plus DHA resources Vitaphil Plus DHA Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Vitaphil Plus DHA Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Vitaphil Plus DHA - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Vitaphil Plus DHA with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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Vinate PN Care


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Vinate PN Care (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Vinate PN Care resources Vinate PN Care Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Vinate PN Care Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Vinate PN Care - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Vinate PN Care with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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Advance Care Plus


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Advance Care Plus (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Advance Care Plus resources Advance Care Plus Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingAdvance Care Plus Drug Interactions0 Reviews for Advance Care Plus - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Advance Care Plus with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
read more / Download


Foltabs 90 plus DHA


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Foltabs 90 plus DHA (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Foltabs 90 plus DHA resources Foltabs 90 plus DHA Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Foltabs 90 plus DHA Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Foltabs 90 plus DHA - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Foltabs 90 plus DHA with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
read more / Download


Vemavite PRX 2


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Vemavite PRX 2 (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Vemavite PRX 2 resources Vemavite PRX 2 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Vemavite PRX 2 Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Vemavite PRX 2 - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Vemavite PRX 2 with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
read more / Download


Kolnatal DHA


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Kolnatal DHA (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Kolnatal DHA resources Kolnatal DHA Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Kolnatal DHA Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Kolnatal DHA - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Kolnatal DHA with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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Femecal OB


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Femecal OB (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Femecal OB resources Femecal OB Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Femecal OB Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Femecal OB - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Femecal OB with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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Vinate GT


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Vinate GT (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Vinate GT resources Vinate GT Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Vinate GT Drug Interactions Vinate GT Support Group 0 Reviews for Vinate GT - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Vinate GT with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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Se-Care


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Se-Care (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Se-Care resources Se-Care Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Se-Care Drug Interactions Se-Care Support Group 0 Reviews for Se-Care - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Se-Care with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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CitraNatal DHA


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are CitraNatal DHA (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More CitraNatal DHA resources CitraNatal DHA Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding CitraNatal DHA Drug Interactions CitraNatal DHA Support Group 0 Reviews for CitraNatal DHA - Add your own review/rating Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare CitraNatal DHA with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
read more / Download


Tandem DHA


Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)
Brand Names: Advance Care Plus, Bright Beginnings, Cavan Folate, Cavan One, Cavan-Heme OB, Cenogen Ultra, CitraNatal Rx, Co Natal FA, Complete Natal DHA, Complete-RF, CompleteNate, Concept OB, Docosavit, Dualvit OB, Duet, Edge OB, Elite OB 400, Femecal OB, Folbecal, Folcaps Care One, Folivan-OB, Foltabs, Gesticare, Icar Prenatal, Icare Prenatal Rx, Inatal Advance, Infanate DHA, Kolnatal DHA, Lactocal-F, Marnatal-F, Maternity, Maxinate, Mission Prenatal, Multi-Nate 30, Multinatal Plus, Nata 29 Prenatal, Natachew, Natafort, Natelle, Neevo, Nestabs, Nexa Select with DHA, Novanatal, NovaStart, O-Cal Prenatal, OB Complete, OB Natal One, Ob-20, Obtrex DHA, OptiNate, Paire OB Plus DHA, PNV Select, PNV-Total, PR Natal 400, Pre-H-Cal, Precare, PreferaOB, Premesis Rx, PrenaCare, PrenaFirst, PrenaPlus, Prenatabs OBN, Prenatabs Rx, Prenatal 1 Plus 1, Prenatal Elite, Prenatal Multivitamins, Prenatal Plus, Prenatal S, Prenatal-U, Prenate Advanced Formula, Prenate DHA, Prenate Elite, Prenavite FC, PreNexa, PreQue 10, Previte Rx, PrimaCare, Pruet DHA, RE OB Plus DHA, Renate, RightStep, Rovin-NV, Se-Care, Se-Natal One, Se-Plete DHA, Se-Tan DHA, Select-OB, Seton ET, Strongstart, Stuart Prenatal with Beta Carotene, Tandem OB, Taron-BC, Tri Rx, TriAdvance, TriCare, Trimesis Rx, Trinate, Triveen-PRx RNF, UltimateCare Advance, Ultra-Natal, Vemavite PRX 2, VeNatal FA, Verotin-BY, Verotin-GR, Vinacal OR, Vinatal Forte, Vinate Advanced (New Formula), Vinate AZ, Vinate Care, Vinate Good Start, Vinate II (New Formula), Vinate III, Vinate One, Vitafol-OB, VitaNatal OB plus DHA, Vitaphil, Vitaphil Aide, Vitaphil Plus DHA, Vitaspire, Viva DHA, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, Vol-Tab Rx, Vynatal F.A., Zatean-CH, Zatean-PN

What are Tandem DHA (prenatal multivitamins)?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Prenatal vitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Prenatal vitamins are used to provide the additional vitamins needed during pregnancy. Minerals may also be contained in prenatal multivitamins.

Prenatal vitamins may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about prenatal vitamins?

There are many brands and forms of prenatal vitamin available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prenatal vitamins? Many vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking prenatal vitamins, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

You may need to continue taking prenatal vitamins if you breast-feed your baby. Ask your doctor about taking this medication while breast-feeding. How should I take prenatal vitamins?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of prenatal vitamins.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your prenatal vitamin with a full glass of water.

Swallow the regular tablet or capsule whole. Do not break, chew, crush, or open it.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in your mouth before swallowing. You may also allow the chewable tablet to dissolve in drinking water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Drink this mixture right away.

Use prenatal vitamins regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep prenatal vitamins in their original container. Storing vitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects and can also harm your unborn baby. Certain minerals contained in a prenatal multivitamin may also cause serious overdose symptoms or harm to the baby if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking prenatal vitamins? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take your prenatal vitamins. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the prenatal vitamin. Prenatal vitamins side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

When taken as directed, prenatal vitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

upset stomach;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect prenatal vitamins?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking a prenatal vitamin, tell your doctor if you also use:

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Gantanol, Gantrisin, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prenatal vitamins. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Tandem DHA resources Tandem DHA Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Tandem DHA Drug Interactions Tandem DHA Support Group 1 Review for Tandem DHA - Add your own review/rating Tandem DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Cal-Nate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CareNatal DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal 90 DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) CitraNatal Assure Prescribing Information (FDA) CitraNatal Harmony Prescribing Information (FDA) Concept DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Docosavit Prescribing Information (FDA) Duet DHA with Ferrazone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folbecal MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Folcal DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Folcaps Care One Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Gesticare DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Inatal Advance Prescribing Information (FDA) Inatal Ultra Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Multi-Nate DHA Extra Prescribing Information (FDA) MultiNatal Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Natelle One Prescribing Information (FDA) Neevo Caplets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Neevo DHA MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) OB Complete 400 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Paire OB Plus DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) PreNexa MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PreNexa Prescribing Information (FDA) PreferaOB Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenatal Plus Iron Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite Prescribing Information (FDA) Prenate Elite MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Prenate Elite tablets Prenate Essential Prescribing Information (FDA) PrimaCare Advantage MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) PrimaCare ONE capsules PrimaCare One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Renate DHA Prescribing Information (FDA) Se-Natal 19 Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Se-Natal 19 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tandem OB Prescribing Information (FDA) TriAdvance Prescribing Information (FDA) Triveen-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Triveen-PRx RNF Prescribing Information (FDA) UltimateCare ONE NF Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultra NatalCare MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Vinate AZ Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitafol-One MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zatean-CH Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Tandem DHA with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about prenatal vitamins.
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