blood thinner generic name that starts with f
 

Pills
 

ED Pills

ED Drugs
 

Limbrel 500


Generic Name: bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate (BYE oh FLAV oh noids and ZINK GLYE sin ate)
Brand Names: Limbrel250, Limbrel500

What is Limbrel 500 (bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate)?

Bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate is a medical food. It works by reducing swelling and providing pain relief.

Bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate is used in the dietary management of osteoarthritis symptoms, such as swelling, stiffness, and joint discomfort.

Bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Limbrel 500 (bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate)? You should not use bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate if you are allergic to any type of flavonoid or foods such as colored fruits and vegetables, dark chocolate, tea (especially green tea), red wine, or Brazil nuts.

Before taking bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Also tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Do not give this medication to anyone under 18 years old without medical advice.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

You must remain under the care of a doctor while you are using bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate. Visit your doctor regularly.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Limbrel 500 (bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate)? You should not use bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate if you are allergic to any type of flavonoid or foods such as colored fruits and vegetables, dark chocolate, tea (especially green tea), red wine, or Brazil nuts.

Before taking bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

It is not known whether bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not give this medication to anyone under 18 years old without medical advice. How should I take Limbrel 500 (bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate)?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

You must remain under the care of a doctor while you are using bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate. Visit your doctor regularly.

Bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate is usually taken once every 12 hours. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate works best if you take it with a meal or within 1 hour before or after a meal. However, you may take bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate with or without food. Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking Limbrel 500 (bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Limbrel 500 (bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

confusion, headache, anxiety, feeling restless;

fever, cough, rapid heart rate, feeling short of breath;

blue lips or fingernails, weak or shallow breathing;

feeling like you might pass out;

bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;

skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea;

diarrhea; or

gas.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Limbrel 500 (bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

There may be other drugs that can interact with bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Limbrel 500 resources Limbrel 500 Drug Interactions Limbrel 500 Support Group 0 Reviews for Limbrel 500 - Add your own review/rating Compare Limbrel 500 with other medications Osteoarthritis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about bioflavonoids and zinc glycinate.
read more / Download


Generlac


Generic Name: lactulose (LAK too lose)
Brand Names: Enulose, Generlac, Kristalose

What is Generlac (lactulose)?

Lactulose is a type of sugar. It is broken down in the large intestine into mild acids that draw water into the colon, which helps soften the stools.

Lactulose is used to treat chronic constipation.

Lactulose may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Generlac (lactulose)? You should not use this medication if you are on a special diet low in galactose (milk sugar).

Before taking lactulose, tell your doctor if you have diabetes or if you need to have any type of intestinal test using a scope (such as a colonoscopy).

It may take up to 48 hours before you have a bowel movement after taking lactulose.

Stop using lactulose and call your doctor at once if you have severe or ongoing diarrhea.

The liquid form of lactulose may become slightly darken in color, but this is a harmless effect. However, do not use the medicine if it becomes very dark, or if it gets thicker or thinner in texture.

If you use lactulose over a long period of time, your doctor may want you to have occasional blood tests. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Generlac (lactulose)? You should not use this medication if you are on a special diet low in galactose (milk sugar).

Before taking lactulose, tell your doctor if you have:

diabetes; or

if you need to have any type of intestinal test using a scope (such as a colonoscopy).

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take lactulose.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether lactulose passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Generlac (lactulose)?

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The liquid form of lactulose may become slightly darken in color, but this is a harmless effect. However, do not use the medicine if it becomes very dark, or if it gets thicker or thinner in texture.

Lactulose powder should be mixed with at least 4 ounces of water. You may also use fruit juice or milk to make the medication better.

It may take up to 48 hours before you have a bowel movement after taking lactulose.

If you use lactulose over a long period of time, your doctor may want you to have occasional blood tests. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Store lactulose at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include diarrhea, stomach pain, hot and dry skin, confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, and muscle weakness or limp feeling.

What should I avoid while taking Generlac (lactulose)?

Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb lactulose.

Generlac (lactulose) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using lactulose and call your doctor at once if you have severe or ongoing diarrhea.

Less serious side effects may include:

bloating, gas;

stomach pain;

diarrhea; or

nausea, vomiting.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Generlac (lactulose)?

There may be other drugs that can interact with lactulose. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Generlac resources Generlac Side Effects (in more detail) Generlac Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Generlac Drug Interactions Generlac Support Group 0 Reviews for Generlac - Add your own review/rating Generlac Prescribing Information (FDA) Generlac Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Lactulose Prescribing Information (FDA) Lactulose Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Lactulose Monograph (AHFS DI) Constulose Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Constulose Prescribing Information (FDA) Enulose Prescribing Information (FDA) Kristalose Crystals MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Generlac with other medications Constipation, Acute Constipation, Chronic Hepatic Encephalopathy Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about lactulose.

See also: Generlac side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Acular LS


Generic Name: ketorolac ophthalmic (KEE toe ROLE ak)
Brand Names: Acular, Acular LS, Acular PF, Acuvail

What is Acular LS (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Ketorolac is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ketorolac works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Ketorolac ophthalmic (for the eye) is used to relieve eye itching caused by seasonal allergies.

Ketorolac ophthalmic is also used to reduce swelling, pain, and burning or stinging after cataract surgery or corneal refractive surgery.

Ketorolac ophthalmic may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Acular LS (ketorolac ophthalmic)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ketorolac or other NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).

Before using ketorolac ophthalmic, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any medications, or if you have a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder, diabetes, arthritis, glaucoma, dry eye syndrome, or if you have had other recent eye surgeries.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Using the medication for longer than prescribed may increase the risk of serious side effects on your eyes.

While you are using this medication, do not wear any contact lens that has not been approved by your doctor. Do not use any other eye medications unless your doctor has prescribed them. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before I use Acular LS (ketorolac ophthalmic)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ketorolac or other NSAIDs.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder;

diabetes;

arthritis;

glaucoma;

dry eye syndrome; or

if you have had other recent eye surgeries.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ketorolac ophthalmic is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether ketorolac ophthalmic passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use ketorolac ophthalmic without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Acular LS (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Ketorolac ophthalmic is usually given 24 hours before cataract surgery, and continued for up to 14 days after surgery. Using the medication for longer than prescribed may increase the risk of serious side effects on your eyes.

Wash your hands before using the eye drops.

To apply the eye drops:

Tilt your head back slightly and pull down your lower eyelid to create a small pocket. Hold the dropper above the eye with the dropper tip down. Look up and away from the dropper as you squeeze out a drop, then close your eye.

Gently press your finger to the inside corner of the eye (near your nose) for about 1 minute to keep the liquid from draining into your tear duct.

Use the eye drops only in the eye you are having surgery on.

Do not allow the dropper tip to touch any surface, including the eyes or hands. If the dropper becomes contaminated it could cause an infection in your eye, which can lead to vision loss or serious damage to the eye.

Do not use the eye drops if the liquid has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Store the drops at room temperature away from heat and moisture. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use. What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to use the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ketorolac is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while using Acular LS (ketorolac ophthalmic)? While using this medication, do not wear any contact lens that has not been approved by your doctor.

Do not use any other eye medications unless your doctor has prescribed them.

Acular LS (ketorolac ophthalmic) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe burning, stinging, or itching of your eyes;

eye pain, redness, or watering;

vision changes, increased sensitivity to light;

white patches on your eyes; or

crusting or drainage from your eyes.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild burning, stinging, or itching of your eyes;

swollen or puffy eyelids; or

headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Acular LS (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ketorolac ophthalmic. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Acular LS resources Acular LS Side Effects (in more detail)Acular LS Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingAcular LS Drug InteractionsAcular LS Support Group1 Review for Acular LS - Add your own review/rating Acular LS Prescribing Information (FDA) Acular LS Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acular LS Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Acular Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acular Prescribing Information (FDA) Acular eent Monograph (AHFS DI) Acular PF Prescribing Information (FDA) Acular PF Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acuvail Prescribing Information (FDA) Acuvail Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acuvail Consumer Overview Compare Acular LS with other medications Corneal Refractive SurgeryPostoperative Ocular InflammationSeasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about ketorolac ophthalmic.

See also: Acular LS side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Acular


Generic Name: ketorolac ophthalmic (KEE toe ROLE ak)
Brand Names: Acular, Acular LS, Acular PF, Acuvail

What is Acular (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Ketorolac is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ketorolac works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Ketorolac ophthalmic (for the eye) is used to relieve eye itching caused by seasonal allergies.

Ketorolac ophthalmic is also used to reduce swelling, pain, and burning or stinging after cataract surgery or corneal refractive surgery.

Ketorolac ophthalmic may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Acular (ketorolac ophthalmic)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ketorolac or other NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).

Before using ketorolac ophthalmic, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any medications, or if you have a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder, diabetes, arthritis, glaucoma, dry eye syndrome, or if you have had other recent eye surgeries.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Using the medication for longer than prescribed may increase the risk of serious side effects on your eyes.

While you are using this medication, do not wear any contact lens that has not been approved by your doctor. Do not use any other eye medications unless your doctor has prescribed them. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before I use Acular (ketorolac ophthalmic)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ketorolac or other NSAIDs.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder;

diabetes;

arthritis;

glaucoma;

dry eye syndrome; or

if you have had other recent eye surgeries.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ketorolac ophthalmic is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether ketorolac ophthalmic passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use ketorolac ophthalmic without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Acular (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Ketorolac ophthalmic is usually given 24 hours before cataract surgery, and continued for up to 14 days after surgery. Using the medication for longer than prescribed may increase the risk of serious side effects on your eyes.

Wash your hands before using the eye drops.

To apply the eye drops:

Tilt your head back slightly and pull down your lower eyelid to create a small pocket. Hold the dropper above the eye with the dropper tip down. Look up and away from the dropper as you squeeze out a drop, then close your eye.

Gently press your finger to the inside corner of the eye (near your nose) for about 1 minute to keep the liquid from draining into your tear duct.

Use the eye drops only in the eye you are having surgery on.

Do not allow the dropper tip to touch any surface, including the eyes or hands. If the dropper becomes contaminated it could cause an infection in your eye, which can lead to vision loss or serious damage to the eye.

Do not use the eye drops if the liquid has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Store the drops at room temperature away from heat and moisture. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use. What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to use the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ketorolac is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while using Acular (ketorolac ophthalmic)? While using this medication, do not wear any contact lens that has not been approved by your doctor.

Do not use any other eye medications unless your doctor has prescribed them.

Acular (ketorolac ophthalmic) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe burning, stinging, or itching of your eyes;

eye pain, redness, or watering;

vision changes, increased sensitivity to light;

white patches on your eyes; or

crusting or drainage from your eyes.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild burning, stinging, or itching of your eyes;

swollen or puffy eyelids; or

headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Acular (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ketorolac ophthalmic. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Acular resources Acular Side Effects (in more detail) Acular Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Acular Drug Interactions Acular Support Group 0 Reviews for Acular - Add your own review/rating Acular Prescribing Information (FDA) Acular eent Monograph (AHFS DI) Acular Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Acular Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acular LS Prescribing Information (FDA) Acular LS Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acular PF Prescribing Information (FDA) Acular PF Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acuvail Prescribing Information (FDA) Acuvail Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acuvail Consumer Overview Compare Acular with other medications Corneal Refractive Surgery Postoperative Ocular Inflammation Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about ketorolac ophthalmic.

See also: Acular side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Acular PF


Generic Name: ketorolac ophthalmic (KEE toe ROLE ak)
Brand Names: Acular, Acular LS, Acular PF, Acuvail

What is Acular PF (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Ketorolac is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ketorolac works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Ketorolac ophthalmic (for the eye) is used to relieve eye itching caused by seasonal allergies.

Ketorolac ophthalmic is also used to reduce swelling, pain, and burning or stinging after cataract surgery or corneal refractive surgery.

Ketorolac ophthalmic may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Acular PF (ketorolac ophthalmic)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ketorolac or other NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).

Before using ketorolac ophthalmic, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any medications, or if you have a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder, diabetes, arthritis, glaucoma, dry eye syndrome, or if you have had other recent eye surgeries.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Using the medication for longer than prescribed may increase the risk of serious side effects on your eyes.

While you are using this medication, do not wear any contact lens that has not been approved by your doctor. Do not use any other eye medications unless your doctor has prescribed them. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before I use Acular PF (ketorolac ophthalmic)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ketorolac or other NSAIDs.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder;

diabetes;

arthritis;

glaucoma;

dry eye syndrome; or

if you have had other recent eye surgeries.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ketorolac ophthalmic is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether ketorolac ophthalmic passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use ketorolac ophthalmic without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Acular PF (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Ketorolac ophthalmic is usually given 24 hours before cataract surgery, and continued for up to 14 days after surgery. Using the medication for longer than prescribed may increase the risk of serious side effects on your eyes.

Wash your hands before using the eye drops.

To apply the eye drops:

Tilt your head back slightly and pull down your lower eyelid to create a small pocket. Hold the dropper above the eye with the dropper tip down. Look up and away from the dropper as you squeeze out a drop, then close your eye.

Gently press your finger to the inside corner of the eye (near your nose) for about 1 minute to keep the liquid from draining into your tear duct.

Use the eye drops only in the eye you are having surgery on.

Do not allow the dropper tip to touch any surface, including the eyes or hands. If the dropper becomes contaminated it could cause an infection in your eye, which can lead to vision loss or serious damage to the eye.

Do not use the eye drops if the liquid has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Store the drops at room temperature away from heat and moisture. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use. What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to use the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of ketorolac is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while using Acular PF (ketorolac ophthalmic)? While using this medication, do not wear any contact lens that has not been approved by your doctor.

Do not use any other eye medications unless your doctor has prescribed them.

Acular PF (ketorolac ophthalmic) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe burning, stinging, or itching of your eyes;

eye pain, redness, or watering;

vision changes, increased sensitivity to light;

white patches on your eyes; or

crusting or drainage from your eyes.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild burning, stinging, or itching of your eyes;

swollen or puffy eyelids; or

headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Acular PF (ketorolac ophthalmic)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ketorolac ophthalmic. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Acular PF resources Acular PF Side Effects (in more detail) Acular PF Dosage Acular PF Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Acular PF Drug Interactions Acular PF Support Group 0 Reviews for Acular PF - Add your own review/rating Acular PF Prescribing Information (FDA) Acular PF Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acular PF Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Acular Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acular Prescribing Information (FDA) Acular eent Monograph (AHFS DI) Acular LS Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acular LS Prescribing Information (FDA) Acuvail Prescribing Information (FDA) Acuvail Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Acuvail Consumer Overview Compare Acular PF with other medications Corneal Refractive Surgery Postoperative Ocular Inflammation Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about ketorolac ophthalmic.

See also: Acular PF side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane


Generic Name: chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane (kon DROI tin, gloo KOSE a meen, and METH il sul FON il METH ane)
Brand names: Glucosamine & Chondroitin with MSM, Glucosamine Chondroitin MSM Complex, Osteo Bi-Flex Advanced, Osteo Bi-Flex Plus MSM, Glucosamine & Chondroitin with MSM

What is chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane?

Chondroitin is a naturally occurring substance formed of sugar chains. Chondroitin is believed to help the body maintain fluid and flexibility in the joints.

Glucosamine is a naturally occurring substance that is believed to help develop and renew cartilage (the hard connective tissue mainly located on bones near joints in the body), and keep it lubricated for better joint movement and flexibility.

Methylsulfonylmethane is a naturally occurring form of sulfur that helps support muscles and tendons in the body.

The combination of chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane is used to aid in maintaining healthy joints. It is also used as a nutritional supplement in people with osteoarthritis or other inflammatory joint disorders.

Not all uses for chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane have been approved by the FDA. Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

What is the most important information I should know about chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane? Not all uses for this product have been approved by the FDA. Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Before using this product, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane if you have diabetes, a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia, if you have allergies to certain drugs, if you are overweight, or if you are on a low-salt diet.

Do not take chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane without the medical advice if you are using insulin, or a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven). Avoid taking chitosan (usually marketed as a weight-loss product) while you are taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane. Chitosan can make it harder for your body to absorb chondroitin. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane? You should not use this product if you are allergic to it.

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have:

diabetes;

a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia;

if you have allergies to certain drugs;

if you are overweight; or

if you are on a low-salt diet.

It is not known whether chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane will harm an unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this product. It is not known whether chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this product without telling your healthcare provider if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

It may take up several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after a few weeks of treatment.

Glucosamine may increase the glucose (sugar) levels in your blood. If you have diabetes, you may need to check your blood sugar more often while taking this medication. You may also need to adjust your insulin dosage. Do not change your dose or medication schedule without advice from your doctor.

Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane may be only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane? Avoid taking chitosan (usually marketed as a weight-loss product) while you are taking chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane. Chitosan can make it harder for your body to absorb chondroitin. Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, upset stomach;

heartburn; or

diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

insulin; or

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane. Tell your healthcare provider about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane resources Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane Drug Interactions Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane Support Group 1 Review for Chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane - Add your own review/rating Compare chondroitin, glucosamine, and methylsulfonylmethane with other medications Dietary Supplementation Osteoarthritis Where can I get more information? Consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any herbal/health supplement. Whether you are treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure all your healthcare providers know about all of your medical conditions and treatments.
read more / Download


lactulose


Generic Name: lactulose (LAK too lose)
Brand names: Enulose, Generlac, Kristalose, ...show all 11 brand names.Chronulac, Cephulac, Constilac, Cholac, Duphalac, Constulose, Evalose, Heptalac

What is lactulose?

Lactulose is a type of sugar. It is broken down in the large intestine into mild acids that draw water into the colon, which helps soften the stools.

Lactulose is used to treat chronic constipation.

Lactulose may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about lactulose? You should not use this medication if you are on a special diet low in galactose (milk sugar).

Before taking lactulose, tell your doctor if you have diabetes or if you need to have any type of intestinal test using a scope (such as a colonoscopy).

It may take up to 48 hours before you have a bowel movement after taking lactulose.

Stop using lactulose and call your doctor at once if you have severe or ongoing diarrhea.

The liquid form of lactulose may become slightly darken in color, but this is a harmless effect. However, do not use the medicine if it becomes very dark, or if it gets thicker or thinner in texture.

If you use lactulose over a long period of time, your doctor may want you to have occasional blood tests. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lactulose? You should not use this medication if you are on a special diet low in galactose (milk sugar).

Before taking lactulose, tell your doctor if you have:

diabetes; or

if you need to have any type of intestinal test using a scope (such as a colonoscopy).

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take lactulose.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether lactulose passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take lactulose?

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The liquid form of lactulose may become slightly darken in color, but this is a harmless effect. However, do not use the medicine if it becomes very dark, or if it gets thicker or thinner in texture.

Lactulose powder should be mixed with at least 4 ounces of water. You may also use fruit juice or milk to make the medication better.

It may take up to 48 hours before you have a bowel movement after taking lactulose.

If you use lactulose over a long period of time, your doctor may want you to have occasional blood tests. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Store lactulose at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include diarrhea, stomach pain, hot and dry skin, confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, and muscle weakness or limp feeling.

What should I avoid while taking lactulose?

Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb lactulose.

Lactulose side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using lactulose and call your doctor at once if you have severe or ongoing diarrhea.

Less serious side effects may include:

bloating, gas;

stomach pain;

diarrhea; or

nausea, vomiting.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Lactulose Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Constipation -- Chronic:

15 mL orally once a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Constipation -- Acute:

Initial dose: 15 mL orally once a day. Therapy should be continued until normal bowel function resumes.

Usual Adult Dose for Hepatic Encephalopathy:

Initial dose: 30 mL orally 3 times a day or
300 mL in 700 mL water or normal saline as an enema retained for 30 to 60 minutes every 4 to 6 hours.
Maintenance dose: 30 to 45 mL orally 3 times a day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hepatic Encephalopathy:

Infants: 1.7 to 6.7 g/day (2.5 to 10 mL) orally daily divided in 3 to 4 doses. Adjust dosage to produce 2 to 3 soft stools per day.
Children: 26.7 to 60 g/day (40 to 90 mL) orally daily divided in 3 to 4 doses. Adjust dosage to produce 2 to 3 soft stools per day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Constipation -- Chronic:

Children: 0.7 to 2 g/kg/day (1 to 3 mL/kg/day) orally in divided doses daily; generally recommended not to exceed the adult maximum of 40 g/day (60 mL/day).

What other drugs will affect lactulose?

There may be other drugs that can interact with lactulose. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More lactulose resources Lactulose Side Effects (in more detail)Lactulose Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingLactulose Drug InteractionsLactulose Support Group9 Reviews for Lactulose - Add your own review/rating Lactulose Prescribing Information (FDA) Lactulose Monograph (AHFS DI) Lactulose Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Lactulose Crystals MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Constulose Prescribing Information (FDA) Constulose Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Enulose Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Enulose Prescribing Information (FDA) Generlac Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare lactulose with other medications Constipation, AcuteConstipation, ChronicHepatic Encephalopathy Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about lactulose.

See also: lactulose side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Metalyse 8,000 units


Metalyse

8,000 units powder and solvent for solution for injection

Tenecteplase

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start receiving this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet:

1. What METALYSE is and what it is used for
2. Before you receive METALYSE
3. How is METALYSE administered
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store METALYSE
6. Further information

What Metalyse Is And What It Is Used For

METALYSE is a powder and solvent for solution for injection. This means that each pack contains:

one vial of 8,000 units METALYSE powder and one pre-filled syringe containing 8 ml water for injections.

Before use, the solvent (water for injections) is added to the powder to form a solution that is given by injection.

METALYSE belongs to a group of medicines called thrombolytic agents. These medicines help to dissolve blood clots. Tenecteplase is a recombinant fibrin-specific plasminogen activator.

METALYSE is used to treat myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) within 6 hours after the onset of symptoms and helps to dissolve the blood clots that have formed in the blood vessels of the heart. This helps to prevent the damage caused by heart attacks and has been shown to save lives.

Before You Receive Metalyse

METALYSE will not be prescribed and given by your doctor

if you have previously had a sudden life-threatening allergic reaction (severe hypersensitivity) to the active ingredient tenecteplase, to gentamicin (a trace residue from the manufacturing process) or any of the other ingredients of METALYSE. If treatment with Metalyse is nevertheless considered to be necessary, facilities for reanimation should be immediately available in case of need; if you have, or have recently had, an illness that increases your risk of bleeding (haemorrhage), including: a bleeding disorder or tendency to bleed (haemorrhage) stroke (cerebrovascular event) very high, uncontrolled blood pressure a head injury severe liver disease a stomach ulcer (peptic ulcer) varicose veins in the gullet (oesophageal varices) abnormality of the blood vessels (e.g. an aneurysm) certain tumours inflammation of the lining around the heart (pericarditis); inflammation or infection of the heart valves (endocarditis); if you are taking tablets/capsules used to “thin” the blood, such as warfarin or coumarin (anti-coagulants); if you have an inflamed pancreas (pancreatitis); if you have recently had major surgery including surgery to your brain or spine; if you have been given cardiopulmonary resuscitation (chest compressions) for more than 2 minutes duration, in the last two weeks. Your doctor will take special care with METALYSE if you have had any allergic reaction other than a sudden life-threatening allergic reaction (severe hypersensitive) to the active substance tenecteplase, to gentamicin (a trace residue from the manufacturing process), or to any of the other ingredients of Metalyse (see section 6: “Further information”); if you have high blood pressure; if you have problems with circulation of blood in the brain (cerebrovascular disease); if you have had gastrointestinal (gut) or genitourinary bleeding within the last ten days (this may cause blood in stools or urine); if you have a heart valve abnormality (e.g. mitral stenosis) with an abnormal heart rhythm (e.g. atrial fibrillation); if you have had an intramuscular injection in the last two days; if you are aged over 75 years; if you weigh less than 60 kg. Taking other medicines

Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Ask your doctor for advice before you are given METALYSE.

How Is Metalyse Administered

The doctor calculates your dose of METALYSE according to your bodyweight, based on the following scheme:

Bodyweight less than 60kg 6,000 units

Bodyweight 60 to 70kg 7,000 units

Bodyweight 70 to 80kg 8,000 units

Bodyweight 80 to 90kg 9,000 units

Bodyweight above 90kg 10,000 units

Your doctor will give you medication to prevent blood clotting in addition to METALYSE, as soon as possible after your chest pain starts.

METALYSE is given by a single injection into a vein by a doctor who is experienced in the use of this type of drug.

Your doctor will give METALYSE as soon as possible after your chest pain starts as a single dose.

Repetition is not recommended.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, METALYSE can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Evaluation of side effects is based on the following frequencies:

very common: affects more than 1 user in 10

common: affects 1 to 10 users in 100

uncommon: affects 1 to 10 users in 1,000

rare: affects 1 to 10 users in 10,000

very rare: affects less than 1 user in 10,000

not known: frequency cannot be estimated from the available data

The side effects described below have been experienced by people given METALYSE:

Very Common:

bleeding

Common:

bleeding at the injection or puncture site nosebleeds genitourinary bleeding (you may notice blood in your urine) bruising gastro-intestinal bleeding (e.g. bleeding from the stomach or bowel)

Uncommon:

irregular heart beat (reperfusion arrhythmias), sometimes leading to cardiac arrest internal bleeding in the abdomen (retroperitoneal bleeding) bleeding in the brain (cerebral haemorrhage). Death or permanent disability may occur following bleeding in the brain or other serious bleeding events bleeding in the eyes (eye haemorrhage)

Rare:

low blood pressure (hypotension) bleeding in the lungs (pulmonary haemorrhage) hypersensitivity (anaphylactoid reactions) e.g. rash, hives (urticaria), swelling of the throat bleeding into the area surrounding the heart (haemopericardium) blood clot in the lung (pulmonary embolism) and in the vessels of other organ systems (thrombotic embolisation)

Not known :

fat embolism (clots consisting of fat) nausea vomiting body temperature increased (fever) blood transfusions as consequence of bleedings

As with other thrombolytic agents, the following events have been reported as sequelae of myocardial infarction and/or thrombolytic administration:

Very common:

Low blood pressure (hypotension) Irregular heart beat Chest pain (angina pectoris)

Common:

Further heart attack (recurrent ischaemia) Heart failure Shock due to heart failure Inflammation of the lining around the heart Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary oedema)

Uncommon:

Heart arrest Problem with the heart valve or heart lining (mitral valve incompetence, pericardial effusion) Blood clot in the veins (venous thrombosis) Fluid between the heart lining and the heart (cardiac tamponade) Rupture of the heart muscle (myocardial rupture)

Rare:

Blood clot in the lung (pulmonary embolism)

These cardiovascular events can be life-threatening and may lead to death.

In case of bleeding in the brain events related to the nervous system have been reported e.g. drowsiness (somnolence), speech disorders, palsy of parts of the body (hemiparesis) and fits (convulsions).

Tell your doctor immediately if you think you are experiencing any of these side effects.

If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How To Store Metalyse

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not store above 30°C.

Keep the container in the outer carton in order to protect from light.

Once METALYSE has been reconstituted it may be stored for 24 hours at 2-8°C and 8 hours at 30°C. However, for microbiological reasons your doctor will normally use the reconstituted solution for injection immediately.

Do not use METALYSE after the expiry date which is stated on the label/carton.

Further Information What METALYSE contains The active substance is tenecteplase. One vial contains 8,000 units of tenecteplase. One pre-filled syringe contains 8 ml of water for injections. The other ingredients are L-arginine, phosphoric acid and polysorbate 20. The METALYSE solvent is water for injections. Gentamicin is contained as trace residue from the manufacturing process. What METALYSE looks like and contents of the pack

The folding box contains one vial with a lyophilised powder, one ready for use syringe with a solvent, one vial adapter and one needle.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer

Marketing Authorisation Holder

Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbH Binger Strasse 173 D-55216 Ingelheim am Rhein Germany

Manufacturer

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG Birkendorfer Strasse 65 D-88397 Biberach/Riss Germany

For any information about this medicinal product, please contact the local representative of the Marketing Authorisation Holder:

United Kingdom Boehringer Ingelheim Ltd. Tel:+44 1344 424 600

This leaflet was last approved in 06/2010

Detailed information on this medicine is available on the European Medicines Agency (EMA) web site: http://www.ema.europa.eu

74366-01


read more / Download


tenecteplase


Generic Name: tenecteplase (ten EK te plase)
Brand Names: TNKase

What is tenecteplase?

Tenecteplase is in a group of drugs called tissue plasminogen activators (TPAs). It works by causing the body to over-produce a substance called plasmin to dissolve unwanted blood clots.

Tenecteplase is used to prevent death from a heart attack (acute myocardial infarction).

Tenecteplase may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about tenecteplase? You should not receive this medication if you have internal bleeding, brain cancer or aneurysm, a history of stroke, a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, or if you have had brain or spinal cord injury or surgery within the past 2 months.

Before you are treated with tenecteplase, tell your doctor if you have a blood vessel disorder of the eye, severe liver or kidney disease, high blood pressure, an infection of the lining of your heart (also called bacterial endocarditis), a recent history of stomach or urinary bleeding, if you have recently had a baby, or if you have recently had a serious injury or major surgery.

Also tell your doctor if you take a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin), or other medications to treat or prevent blood clots.

Tell your caregivers at once if you have a serious side effect such as blood in your urine or stools, nosebleed, coughing up blood, bleeding from a skin wound or the IV needle, fast or slow heart rate, or feeling like you might pass out.

Tenecteplase may cause rare but serious side effects such as: purple discoloration of your legs or toes, sudden numbness or weakness, problems with vision or speech, chest pain or heavy feeling, urinating less than usual or not at all, muscle pain or tenderness, dark colored urine, unusual sensations in your back, numbness or tingling in your legs or feet, muscle weakness or loss of use, or loss of bowel or bladder control.

Tenecteplase can cause you to have unusual results with blood tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you have recently received tenecteplase.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before I receive tenecteplase? You should not receive this medication if you have:

internal bleeding;

a history of stroke;

brain cancer;

brain aneurysm;

a bleeding or blood clotting disorder (such as hemophilia); or

if you have had brain or spinal cord injury or surgery within the past 2 months.

If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely receive this medication. Before you receive tenecteplase, tell your doctor if you have:

a blood vessel disorder of the eye;

severe liver or kidney disease;

high blood pressure;

an infection of the lining of your heart (also called bacterial endocarditis);

a recent history of bleeding in your stomach, intestines, or urinary tract;

if you have recently had a baby; or

if you have recently had a serious injury or major surgery.

FDA pregnancy category C. Tenecteplase may be harmful to an unborn baby. Before you receive this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether tenecteplase passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Before you receive this medication , tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is tenecteplase given?

Tenecteplase is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. You will receive this injection in a hospital or emergency setting. It is usually given as soon as possible after the first signs of heart attack occur.

Tenecteplase can cause you to have unusual results with blood tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you have recently received tenecteplase.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Tenecteplase is usually given as a single dose, so you are not likely to be on a dosing schedule.

What happens if I overdose?

Since tenecteplase is given by a healthcare professional, you are not likely to receive an overdose. Symptoms of a tenecteplase overdose are not known.

What should I after receiving tenecteplase?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity after you receive tenecteplase.

Tenecteplase side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your caregivers at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

blood in your urine or stools;

nosebleed, coughing up blood;

bleeding from a recent injury or surgery incision;

bleeding around the IV needle;

fast, slow, or uneven heart rate; or

feeling like you might pass out.

Rare but serious side effects may include:

purple discoloration of your legs or toes;

severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate;

sudden numbness, weakness, headache, confusion, or problems with vision, speech, or balance;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath, urinating less than usual or not at all;

drowsiness, confusion, mood changes, increased thirst, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting;

muscle pain or tenderness with fever or flu symptoms and dark colored urine;

pain or unusual sensations in your back;

numbness, weakness, or tingly feeling in your legs or feet;

muscle weakness or loss of use; or

loss of bowel or bladder control.

Less serious side effects may include mild nausea or dizziness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Tenecteplase Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Myocardial Infarction:

less than 60 kg: 30 mg IV bolus administered over 5 seconds.
60 to less than 70 kg: 35 mg IV bolus administered over 5 seconds
70 to less than 80 kg: 40 mg IV bolus administered over 5 seconds
80 to less than 90 kg: 45 mg IV bolus administered over 5 seconds
90 kg or greater: 50 mg IV bolus administered over 5 seconds

What other drugs will affect tenecteplase?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you have recently used or received, especially:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

abciximab (ReoPro);

alteplase (Activase);

anistreplase (Eminase);

dipyridamole (Persantine);

eptifibatide (Integrilin);

heparin;

streptokinase (Kabikinase, Streptase);

tirofiban (Aggrastat); or

urokinase (Abbokinase).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with tenecteplase. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More tenecteplase resources Tenecteplase Side Effects (in more detail) Tenecteplase Dosage Tenecteplase Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Tenecteplase Drug Interactions Tenecteplase Support Group 0 Reviews for Tenecteplase - Add your own review/rating tenecteplase Intravenous Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Tenecteplase Monograph (AHFS DI) TNKase Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare tenecteplase with other medications Heart Attack Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about tenecteplase.

See also: tenecteplase side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray


Pronunciation: dye-METH-i-kone
Generic Name: Dimethicone
Brand Name: Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray
Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray is used for:

Temporarily protecting and relieving minor skin irritations (eg, diaper rash). It also helps to seal out wetness. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by the patient's doctor.

This product is a skin protectant. It works by relieving skin irritation and reducing redness.

Do NOT use Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray if: the patient is allergic to any ingredient in Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if this applies to the patient.

Before using Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray:

Tell the patient's health care provider if the patient has any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply:

if the patient is pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or is breast-feeding if the patient is taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if the patient has allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray. However, no specific interactions with Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray are known at this time.

Ask the patient's health care provider if Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray may interact with other medicines that the patient takes. Check with the patient's health care provider before the patients starts, stops, or changes the dose of any medicine.

How to use Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray:

Use Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray as directed by the patient's doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Cleanse the diaper area and gently pat dry. Spray Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray onto the affected area as directed by the patient's doctor or on the package label. Wash your hands immediately after using Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray. Apply during each diaper change, especially at bedtime or any time that exposure to a wet diaper may be prolonged. If you miss a dose of Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray, use it as soon as you remember. Continue to use it as directed by the patient's doctor or on the package label.

Ask the patient's health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray.

Important safety information: Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray is for external use only. Do not get it in the eyes, nose, or mouth. If you get it in any of these areas, rinse right away with cool water. Do not use Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray on animal bites, deep wounds, infections, lacerations, or serious burns. If symptoms do not get better within 7 days, if they get worse, or if they clear up and then come back, check with the patient's doctor. Talk with the patient's doctor before you use any other medicines on the treated area. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If the patient becomes pregnant, contact her doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray while the patient is pregnant. It is not known if Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray is found in breast milk. If the patient is or will be breast-feeding while she uses Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray, check with her doctor. Discuss any possible risks to her baby. Possible side effects of Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor side effects. No COMMON side effects have been reported with Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); new or worsening skin irritation.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact the patient's health care provider. Call the patient's doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Little Bottoms Daily Care side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray may be harmful if swallowed.

Proper storage of Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray:

Store Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Do not freeze. Keep Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray, please talk with the patient's doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If the patient's symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with the patient's doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Little Bottoms Daily Care Spray. If you have questions about the medicine the patient is taking or would like more information, check with the patient's doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Little Bottoms Daily Care resources Little Bottoms Daily Care Side Effects (in more detail) Little Bottoms Daily Care Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding 0 Reviews for Little Bottoms Daily Care - Add your own review/rating Compare Little Bottoms Daily Care with other medications Dry Skin
read more / Download


AVC


Pronunciation: sul-fa-NILL-a-mide
Generic Name: Sulfanilamide
Brand Name: AVC
AVC is used for:

Treating certain vaginal infections.

AVC is a sulfonamide antibiotic. It works by blocking the growth of certain bacteria.

Do NOT use AVC if: you are allergic to any ingredient in AVC or to sulfonamides (eg, sulfamethoxazole) you have urinary blockage or anemia caused by decreased levels of folate in your blood you are pregnant and at full term

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using AVC:

Some medical conditions may interact with AVC. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have anemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, blood problems (eg, porphyria), liver or kidney problems, or strep throat

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with AVC. However, no specific interactions with AVC are known at this time.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if AVC may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use AVC:

Use AVC as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Your doctor may instruct you to douche before using AVC. Follow your doctor's instructions for douching. Do not douche while using AVC without first checking with your doctor. To clear up your infection completely, continue using AVC for the full course of treatment even if you feel better in a few days. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of AVC, use it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use AVC.

Important safety information: Diabetes patients - AVC may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely and ask your doctor before adjusting the dose of your diabetes medicine. AVC may darken with age. This will not decrease its effectiveness during its labeled shelf life. Do not use AVC after the expiration date on the container. Do not stop using AVC if your period starts or if you have sex. A sanitary napkin may be used to protect your underclothing. Do not use tampons. Use AVC with extreme caution in CHILDREN. Safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: It is unknown if AVC can cause harm to the fetus. If you become pregnant while taking AVC, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using AVC during pregnancy. Use vaginal applicators or inserters with caution after the seventh month of pregnancy. AVC is excreted in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking AVC. Possible side effects of AVC:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. When used in small doses, no COMMON side effects have been reported with this product. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; increased discomfort; unusual itching or burning.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: AVC side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. AVC may be harmful if swallowed.

Proper storage of AVC:

Store AVC at room temperature, below 86 degrees F (30 degrees C). Store away from heat, cold, moisture, and light. Keep AVC out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about AVC, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. AVC is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about AVC. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More AVC resources AVC Side Effects (in more detail) AVC Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding 0 Reviews for AVC - Add your own review/rating AVC Prescribing Information (FDA) AVC Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Compare AVC with other medications Vaginal Yeast Infection
read more / Download


Vioxx


Generic Name: rofecoxib (oral) (row feh COCK sib)
Brand Names: Vioxx

What is rofecoxib?

Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was withdrawn from the U.S. market in 2004.

Rofecoxib is in a class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rofecoxib works by reducing substances that cause inflammation, pain, and fever in the body.

Rofecoxib is used to reduce pain, inflammation, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and certain forms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis; to manage acute pain in adults; to treat migraines; and to treat menstrual pain.

Rofecoxib may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about rofecoxib?

Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was withdrawn from the U.S. market in 2004.

The manufacturer of rofecoxib (Vioxx) has announced a voluntary withdrawal of the drug from the U.S. and worldwide market. This withdrawal is due to safety concerns of an increased risk of cardiovascular events (including heart attack and stroke) in patients taking rofecoxib.

Notify your doctor immediately if you develop abdominal pain, tenderness, or discomfort; nausea; blood in your vomit; bloody, black, or tarry stools; unexplained weight gain; swelling or water retention; fatigue or lethargy; a skin rash; itching; yellowing of your skin or eyes;"flu-like" symptoms; or unusual bruising or bleeding. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking rofecoxib?

The manufacturer of rofecoxib (Vioxx) has announced a voluntary withdrawal of the drug from the U.S. and worldwide market. This withdrawal is due to safety concerns of an increased risk of cardiovascular events (including heart attack and stroke) in patients taking rofecoxib.

Do not take rofecoxib without first talking to your doctor if you have experienced asthma, hives, or an allergic reaction after taking aspirin or another NSAID such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Anaprox), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), fenoprofen (Nalfon), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketorolac (Toradol), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), tolmetin (Tolectin), celecoxib (Celebrex), valdecoxib (Bextra), or meloxicam (Mobic). You may experience a similar reaction to rofecoxib.

Before taking rofecoxib, tell your doctor if you

smoke;

drink alcohol;

have ever had an ulcer or bleeding in your stomach;

have liver disease; have kidney disease;

have asthma;

have congestive heart failure;

have fluid retention;

have heart disease;

have high blood pressure;

have a coagulation (bleeding) disorder or are taking an anticoagulant (blood thinner) such as warfarin (Coumadin); or

are taking a steroid medicine such as prednisone (Deltasone and others), methylprednisolone (Medrol and others), prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred, and others), and others.

You may not be able to take rofecoxib, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions, or are taking any of the medicines, listed above.

Rofecoxib is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether it will harm an unborn baby. Rofecoxib should not be taken late in pregnancy (the third trimester) because it may affect the formation of the baby's heart. Do not take rofecoxib without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether rofecoxib passes into breast milk. Do not take rofecoxib without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding. If you are over the age of 65 years, you may be more likely to experience side effects from rofecoxib. You may require a lower dosage or special monitoring during treatment. How should I take rofecoxib?

Take rofecoxib exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Shake the rofecoxib suspension well before measuring a dose. Use a dose-measuring cup or spoon, not a regular table spoon, to measure the liquid form of rofecoxib to ensure that you measure the correct amount of medicine. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Rofecoxib can be taken with or without food or milk.

Store rofecoxib at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only the next regularly scheduled dose as directed. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless your doctor directs otherwise.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a rofecoxib overdose are not known.

What should I avoid while taking rofecoxib?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity during treatment with rofecoxib, unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Rofecoxib side effects

Notify your doctor immediately if you develop abdominal pain, tenderness, or discomfort; nausea; blood in your vomit; bloody, black, or tarry stools; unexplained weight gain; swelling or water retention; fatigue or lethargy; a skin rash; itching; yellowing of your skin or eyes;"flu-like" symptoms; or unusual bruising or bleeding. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects.

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking rofecoxib and seek medical treatment or contact your doctor immediately:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

abdominal pain, tenderness, or discomfort;

bloody, black, or tarry stools;

nausea or heartburn;

blood in your vomit;

unexplained weight gain;

swelling or water retention;

unusual fatigue or lethargy;

a skin rash or itching;

yellowing of your skin or eyes;

"flu-like" symptoms; or

unusual bruising or bleeding.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take rofecoxib and talk to your doctor if you experience

dizziness;

mild fatigue or weakness; or

diarrhea.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect rofecoxib?

Before taking rofecoxib, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

aspirin or an aspirin-like medication such as salsalate (Disalcid), choline salicylate-magnesium salicylate (Trilisate, Tricosal, others), and magnesium salicylate (Doan's, Bayer Select Backache Formula, others);

an over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or pain medicine that contains aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen;

a diuretic (water pill) such as furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril, others), chlorothiazide (Diuril, others), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), and others;

an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitor) such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), quinapril (Accupril), and others;

a steroid medicine such as prednisone (Deltasone and others), methylprednisolone (Medrol and others), prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred, and others), and others;

an anticoagulant (blood thinner) such as warfarin (Coumadin);

methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Folex);

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theobid, and others);

lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid, others); or

rifampin (Rimactane, Rifadin, Rifater).

You may not be able to take an rofecoxib, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with rofecoxib. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products.

More Vioxx resources Vioxx Side Effects (in more detail) Vioxx Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Vioxx Drug Interactions Vioxx Support Group 28 Reviews for Vioxx - Add your own review/rating Vioxx Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Vioxx Consumer Overview Compare Vioxx with other medications Migraine Osteoarthritis Pain Period Pain Rheumatoid Arthritis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about rofecoxib written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was withdrawn from the U.S. market in 2004.

See also: Vioxx side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Wycillin


Generic Name: procaine penicillin (PRO kane PEN i SIL in)
Brand Names: Wycillin

What is procaine penicillin ?

Procaine penicillin is an antibiotic that fights bacteria in your body.

Procaine penicillin is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria, including syphilis (a sexually transmitted disease).

Do not use this medication for any other infection that has not been checked by your doctor.

Procaine penicillin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about procaine penicillin ? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to penicillin. Tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a cephalosporin antibiotic such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Omnicef, Keflex, and others.

Before using procaine penicillin, tell your doctor if you have asthma or a history of allergies, or kidney disease.

Do not inject this medication into a vein or life-threatening side effects may result.

Use this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Call your doctor if your infection does not improve, or if it gets worse while using procaine penicillin.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially gout medication, a blood thinner, a diuretic, a tetracycline antibiotic, or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

Procaine penicillin can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while using procaine penicillin. Hormonal forms of contraception (such as birth control pills, injections, implants, skin patches, and vaginal rings) may not be effective enough to prevent pregnancy during your treatment.

After you have finished your treatment with procaine penicillin, your doctor may want to do tests to make sure your infection has completely cleared up.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before using procaine penicillin ? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to penicillin. Tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a cephalosporin antibiotic such as Ceclor, Ceftin, Duricef, Keflex, Lorabid, Omnicef, Spectracef, and others.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use procaine penicillin:

asthma or a history of allergies; or

kidney disease. FDA pregnancy category B. Procaine penicillin is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Procaine penicillin can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while using procaine penicillin. Hormonal forms of contraception (such as birth control pills, injections, implants, skin patches, and vaginal rings) may not be effective enough to prevent pregnancy during your treatment. Procaine penicillin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Wycillin (procaine penicillin)?

Procaine penicillin is given as an injection into a muscle. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be shown how to inject your medicine at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Procaine penicillin must be injected slowly into a muscle of the buttock or upper thigh.

Do not inject the medication into a vein or life-threatening side effects could result.

Your procaine penicillin injections should be given at evenly spaced intervals.

Use this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Procaine penicillin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Call your doctor if your infection does not improve, or if it gets worse while using procaine penicillin.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain lab tests, including tests to check for glucose (sugar) in the urine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using procaine penicillin.

After you have finished your treatment with procaine penicillin, your doctor may want to do tests to make sure your infection has completely cleared up.

Store this medication in the refrigerator. Do not freeze. Do not use the mixed medication if it has changed colors or has any particles in it. What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to use the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include mood changes, agitation, confusion, and seizure (convulsions). What should I avoid while using Wycillin (procaine penicillin)?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, stop using this medication and call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to.

Do not receive a "live" vaccine such as typhoid vaccine, cholera vaccine, or BCG (Bacillus Calmette and Gu?rin) vaccine. Procaine penicillin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

peeling skin , severe pain, or changes in skin color where the medicine was injected;

dizziness, joint or muscle pain;

fast or pounding heartbeats;

numbness, tingling, pain, swelling, or redness in your arms or legs;

confusion, agitation, depression, unusual thoughts or behavior;

chest pain, problems with vision or speech;

feeling like you might pass out;

fever, chills, dizziness, muscle pain, rapid breathing or heart rate;

uncontrolled muscle movements, problems with balance or walking;

pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

sore throat, flu symptoms;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

rash or itching with swollen glands, joint pain, or general ill feeling; or

slow heart rate, weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing.

Less serious side effects may include:

pain where the injection was given;

vaginal itching or discharge;

white patches in your mouth or throat;

nausea, vomiting;

blurred vision, ringing in your ears;

headache, dizziness; or

mild skin rash,

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Wycillin (procaine penicillin)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

probenecid (Benemid);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

a diuretic (water pill) such as furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Lopressor HCT, Vasoretic, Zestoretic), and others;

methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall);

a tetracycline antibiotic, such as demeclocycline (Declomycin, Ledermycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Vibramycin, Periostat), minocycline (Minocin), or tetracycline (Broadspec, Panmycin, Sumycin); or

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), meloxicam (Mobic), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with procaine penicillin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Wycillin resources Wycillin Side Effects (in more detail) Wycillin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Wycillin Drug Interactions Wycillin Support Group 0 Reviews for Wycillin - Add your own review/rating Compare Wycillin with other medications Anthrax Prophylaxis Bacterial Infection Congenital Syphilis Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis Diphtheria Endocarditis Fusospirochetosis, Trench Mouth Neurosyphilis Pneumonia Rat-bite Fever Skin Infection Streptococcal Infection Syphilis, Early Syphilis, Latent Tertiary Syphilis Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about procaine penicillin.

See also: Wycillin side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


Soltamox


Generic Name: tamoxifen (ta MOX i fen)
Brand Names: Soltamox

What is Soltamox (tamoxifen)?

Tamoxifen blocks the actions of estrogen, a female hormone. Certain types of breast cancer require estrogen to grow.

Tamoxifen is used to treat some types of breast cancer in men and women. Tamoxifen is also used to lower a woman's chance of developing breast cancer if she has a high risk (such as a family history of breast cancer).

Tamoxifen may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Soltamox (tamoxifen)? Do not use tamoxifen if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. Use a barrier form of birth control (such as a condom or diaphragm with spermicide) while you are using this medication and for at least 2 months after your treatment ends. You should not use tamoxifen if you are allergic to it, or if you have a history of blood clots in your veins or your lungs, or if you are also taking a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Before using tamoxifen, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, high triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood), a history of cataract, or a history of stroke or blood clot. Also tell your doctor if you if you are receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

If you are taking tamoxifen to reduce your risk of breast cancer, you may need to take your first dose while you are having a menstrual period. You may also need to have a pregnancy test before you start taking tamoxifen, to make sure you are not pregnant. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Taking tamoxifen may increase your risk of uterine cancer, stroke, or a blood clot in the lung, which can be fatal. Talk with your doctor about your specific risks in taking this medication.

To make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your doctor may want you to have mammograms and to perform routine breast self exams on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Soltamox (tamoxifen)? You should not use tamoxifen if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

a history of blood clots in your veins or your lungs; or

if you are also taking a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

To make sure you can safely take tamoxifen, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease;

high cholesterol or triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood);

a history of stroke or blood clot;

a history of cataract; or

if you are receiving chemotherapy or radiation.

Taking tamoxifen may increase your risk of uterine cancer, stroke, or a blood clot in the lung, which can be fatal. Talk with your doctor about your specific risks in taking this medication. FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use tamoxifen if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. Use a barrier form of birth control (such as a condom or diaphragm with spermicide) while you are using this medication and for at least 2 months after your treatment ends.

Hormonal contraception (such as birth control pills, injections, implants, skin patches, and vaginal rings) may not be effective enough to prevent pregnancy during your treatment.

It is not known whether tamoxifen passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. However, this medication may slow breast milk production. You should not breast-feed while taking tamoxifen. How should I take Soltamox (tamoxifen)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medication with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

Tamoxifen can be taken with or without food.

If you are taking tamoxifen to reduce your risk of breast cancer, you may need to take your first dose while you are having a menstrual period. You may also need to have a pregnancy test before you start taking tamoxifen, to make sure you are not pregnant. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Use tamoxifen regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely. You may need to keep using this medication for up to 5 years.

To make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your doctor may want you to have mammograms and to perform routine breast self exams on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, or cold. Do not freeze. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking Soltamox (tamoxifen)?

Avoid eating soy or soy products without first asking your doctor.

Soltamox (tamoxifen) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using tamoxifen and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden severe headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

chest pain, sudden cough, wheezing, rapid breathing, fast heart rate;

pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in one or both legs;

nausea, loss of appetite, increased thirst, muscle weakness, confusion, and feeling tired or restless;

unusual vaginal bleeding or discharge;

irregular menstrual periods;

pain or pressure in your pelvic area;

blurred vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;

easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

new breast lump; or

upper stomach pain, itching, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

hot flashes;

bone pain, joint pain, or tumor pain;

swelling in your hands or feet;

vaginal itching or dryness;

decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm;

headache, dizziness, depression; or

thinning hair.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Soltamox (tamoxifen)?

Many drugs can interact with tamoxifen. Below is just partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these medications:

bromocriptine (Parlodel);

cimetidine (Tagamet);

clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo);

cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar);

isoniazid (for treating tuberculosis);

letrozole (Femara);

methimazole (Tapazole);

nicardipine (Cardene);

pioglitazone (Actos);

rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane);

ropinirole (Requip);

ticlopidine (Ticlid);

tranylcypromine (Parnate);

anti-malaria medication such as chloroquine (Arelan) or pyrimethamine (Daraprim), or quinine (Qualaquin);

an antibiotic such as terbinafine (Lamisil);

an antidepressant such as bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), duloxetine (Cymbalta), fluoxetine (Prozac), imipramine (Tofranil), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

a heart rhythm medication such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) or quinidine (Quin-G);

HIV or AIDS medicine such as delavirdine (Rescriptor) or ritonavir (Norvir); or

medicine to treat psychiatric disorders, such as aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), haloperidol (Haldol), perphenazine (Trilafon), or thioridazine (Mellaril).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with tamoxifen. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Soltamox resources Soltamox Side Effects (in more detail) Soltamox Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Soltamox Drug Interactions Soltamox Support Group 0 Reviews for Soltamox - Add your own review/rating Soltamox Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Soltamox Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Soltamox Prescribing Information (FDA) Tamoxifen Prescribing Information (FDA) Nolvadex Monograph (AHFS DI) Nolvadex MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nolvadex Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Soltamox with other medications Breast Cancer Breast Cancer, Adjuvant Breast Cancer, Male Breast Cancer, Metastatic Breast Cancer, Palliative McCune-Albright Syndrome Precocious Puberty Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about tamoxifen.

See also: Soltamox side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


troleandomycin


Generic Name: troleandomycin (troe lee an doe MYE sin)
Brand Names: Tao

What is troleandomycin?

Troleandomycin is in a class of drugs called macrolide antibiotics. It fights bacteria in the body.

Troleandomycin is used to treat many different types of bacterial infections, such as tonsillitis, bronchitis, sinusitis, and pneumonia.

Troleandomycin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about troleandomycin? Take all of the troleandomycin that has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking troleandomycin?

Before taking troleandomycin, tell your doctor if you have liver disease. You may not be able to take troleandomycin, or you may require special monitoring during therapy.

It is not known whether troleandomycin will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is also not known whether troleandomycin passes into breast milk. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take troleandomycin?

Take troleandomycin exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass (8 ounces) of water. Take all of the troleandomycin that has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Troleandomycin dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and take the next one as directed. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a troleandomycin overdose might include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal discomfort.

What should I avoid while taking troleandomycin? Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight. Troleandomycin may increase the sensitivity of your skin to sunlight. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when exposure to the sun is unavoidable. Troleandomycin side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking troleandomycin and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or

liver problems (yellowing of the skin or eyes, nausea, abdominal pain or discomfort, unusual bleeding or bruising, severe fatigue).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take troleandomycin and talk to your doctor if you experience

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain;

dizziness, fatigue, or headache; or

vaginal yeast infection.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

Troleandomycin Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia:

250 to 500 mg orally 4 times a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Streptococcal Infection:

250 to 500 mg orally 4 times a day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumonia:

The safety and efficacy of troleandomycin in children
>= 1 year: 125 to 250 mg every 6 hours.
When used in streptococcal infections, therapy should be continued for 10 days.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Streptococcal Infection:

The safety and efficacy of troleandomycin in children
>= 1 year: 125 to 250 mg every 6 hours.
When used in streptococcal infections, therapy should be continued for 10 days.

What other drugs will affect troleandomycin?

Before taking troleandomycin, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

a seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenytoin (Dilantin), or valproic acid (Depakote, Depakene);

the asthma medication theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Theochron, others);

the anticoagulant (blood thinner) warfarin (Coumadin); or

another antibiotic.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with troleandomycin. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products.

More troleandomycin resources Troleandomycin Dosage Troleandomycin Drug Interactions Troleandomycin Support Group 0 Reviews for Troleandomycin - Add your own review/rating Compare troleandomycin with other medications Pneumonia Streptococcal Infection Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about troleandomycin written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Troleandomycin is available with a prescription under the brand name Tao. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

Tao 250 mg--white capsules


read more / Download


COZAAR 12.5mg, 25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg Film-Coated Tablets


Cozaar 12.5 mg film-coated tablets

Cozaar 25 mg film-coated tablets

Cozaar 50 mg film-coated tablets

Cozaar 100 mg film-coated tablets

Losartan potassium

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Cozaar is and what it is used for 2. Before you take Cozaar 3. How to take Cozaar 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Cozaar 6. Further information What Cozaar Is And What It Is Used For

Losartan belongs to a group of medicines known as angiotensin-II receptor antagonists. Angiotensin-II is a substance produced in the body which binds to receptors in blood vessels, causing them to tighten. This results in an increase in blood pressure. Losartan prevents the binding of angiotensin-II to these receptors, causing the blood vessels to relax which in turn lowers the blood pressure. Losartan slows the decrease of kidney function in patients with high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes.

Cozaar is used

to treat patients with high blood pressure (hypertension) in adults and in children and adolescents 6-18 years of age. to protect the kidney in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients with laboratory evidence of impaired renal function and proteinuria ? 0.5 g per day (a condition in which urine contains an abnormal amount of protein). to treat patients with chronic heart failure when therapy with specific medicines called angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors, medicine used to lower high blood pressure) is not considered suitable by your doctor. If your heart failure has been stabilised with an ACE inhibitor you should not be switched to losartan. in patients with high blood pressure and a thickening of the left ventricle, COZAAR has been shown to decrease the risk of stroke (“LIFE indication”). Before You Take Cozaar Do not take Cozaar if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to losartan or to any of its other ingredients, if your liver function is severely impaired, if you are more than 3 months pregnant. (It is also better to avoid Cozaar in early pregnancy-see "Pregnancy".). Take special care with Cozaar

You must tell your doctor if you think you are (or might become) pregnant. Cozaar is not recommended in early pregnancy, and must not be taken if you are more than 3 months pregnant, as it may cause serious harm to your baby if used at that stage (see pregnancy section)

It is important to tell your doctor before taking Cozaar:

if you have had a history of angiooedema (swelling of the face, lips, throat, and/or tongue) (see also section 4 ‘Possible side effects’), if you suffer from excessive vomiting or diarrhoea leading to an extreme loss of fluid and/or salt in your body, if you receive diuretics (medicines that increase the amount of water that you pass out through your kidneys) or are under dietary salt restriction leading to an extreme loss of fluid and salt in your body (see section 3 ‘Dosage in special patient groups’), if you are known to have narrowing or blockage of the blood vessels leading to your kidneys or if you have received a kidney transplant recently, if your liver function is impaired (see sections 2 "Do not take Cozaar" and 3 "Dosage in special patient groups"), if you suffer from heart failure with or without renal impairment or concomitant severe life threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Special caution is necessary when you are treated with a ?-blocker concomitantly, if you have problems with your heart valves or heart muscle, if you suffer from coronary heart disease (caused by a reduced blood flow in the blood vessels of the heart) or from cerebrovascular disease (caused by a reduced blood circulation in the brain), if you suffer from primary hyperaldosteronism (a syndrome associated with increased secretion of the hormone aldosterone by the adrenal gland, caused by an abnormality within the gland). Taking other medicines

Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription or herbal medicines and natural products.

Take particular care if you are taking the following medicines while under treatment with Cozaar:

other blood pressure lowering medicines as they may additionally reduce your blood pressure. Blood pressure may also be lowered by one of the following drugs/ class of drugs: tricyclic antidepressants, antipsychotics, baclofen, amifostine, medicines which retain potassium or may increase potassium levels (e.g. potassium supplements, potassium-containing salt substitutes or potassium-sparing medicines such as certain diuretics [amiloride, triamterene, spironolactone] or heparin), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as indometacin, including COX-2-inhibitors (medicines that reduce inflammation, and can be used to help relieve pain) as they may reduce the blood lowering effect of losartan.

If your kidney function is impaired, the concomitant use of these medicines may lead to a worsening of the kidney function.

Lithium containing medicines should not be taken in combination with losartan without close supervision by your doctor. Special precautionary measures (e.g. blood tests) may be appropriate.

Taking Cozaar with food and drink

Cozaar may be taken with or without food.

Pregnancy and breast feeding

Pregnancy

You must tell your doctor if you think you are (or might become) pregnant. Your doctor will normally advise you to stop taking Cozaar before you become pregnant or as soon as you know you are pregnant and will advise you to take another medicine instead of Cozaar. Cozaar is not recommended in early pregnancy, and must not be taken when more than 3 months pregnant, as it may cause serious harm to your baby if used after the third month of pregnancy.

Breast Feeding

Tell your doctor if you are breast feeding or about to start breast feeding. Cozaar is not recommended for mothers who are breast feeding, and your doctor may choose another treatment for you if you wish to breast feed. Especially if your baby is a newborn, or born prematurely.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking any medicine.

Use in children and adolescents

Cozaar has been studied in children. For more information,, talk to your doctor.

Driving and using machines

No studies on the effects on the ability to drive and use machines have been performed.

Cozaar is unlikely to affect your ability to drive or use machines. However, as with many other medicines used to treat high blood pressure, losartan may cause dizziness or drowsiness in some people. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, you should consult your doctor before attempting such activities.

Important information about some of the ingredients of Cozaar

Cozaar contains lactose monohydrate. If you have been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before taking this medicine.

How To Take Cozaar

Always take Cozaar exactly as your doctor has instructed you. Your doctor will decide on the appropriate dose of Cozaar, depending on your condition and whether you are taking other medicines.

It is important to continue taking Cozaar for as long as your doctor prescribes it in order to maintain smooth control of your blood pressure.

Adult Patients with high blood pressure

Treatment usually starts with 50 mg losartan (one tablet Cozaar 50 mg) once a day. The maximal blood pressure lowering effect should be reached 3-6 weeks after beginning treatment. In some patients the dose may later be increased to 100 mg losartan (two tablets Cozaar 50 mg) once daily. If you have the impression that the effect of losartan is too strong or too weak, please talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Use in children or adolescents (6 to 18 years old)

The recommended starting dose in patients who weigh between 20 and 50 kg is 0.7 mg of losartan per kg of body weight administered once a day (up to 25 mg of Cozaar). The doctor may increase the dose if blood pressure is not controlled.

Adult Patients with high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes

Treatment usually starts with 50 mg losartan (one tablet Cozaar 50 mg) once a day. The dose may later be increased to 100 mg losartan (two tablets Cozaar 50 mg) once daily depending on your blood pressure response.

Losartan tablets may be administered with other blood pressure lowering medicines (e.g. diuretics, calcium channel blockers, alpha- or beta-blockers, and centrally acting agents) as well as with insulin and other commonly used medicines that decrease the level of glucose in the blood (e.g. sulfonylureas, glitazones and glucosidase inhibitors).

Adult Patients with heart failure

Treatment usually starts with 12.5 mg losartan (one tablet Cozaar 12.5 mg) once a day. Generally, the dose should be increased weekly step-by-step (i.e., 12.5 mg daily during the first week, 25 mg daily during the second week, 50 mg daily during the third week) up to the usual maintenance dose of 50 mg losartan (one tablet Cozaar 50 mg) once daily, according to your condition.

In the treatment of heart failure, losartan is usually combined with a diuretic (medicine that increases the amount of water that you pass out through your kidneys) and/or digitalis (medicine that helps to make the heart stronger and more efficient) and/or a beta-blocker.

Dosage in special patient groups

The doctor may advise a lower dose, especially when starting treatment in certain patients such as those treated with diuretics in high doses, in patients with liver impairment, or in patients over the age of 75 years. The use of losartan is not recommended in patients with severe hepatic impairment (see section "Do not take Cozaar").

Administration

The tablets should be swallowed with a glass of water. You should try to take your daily dose at about the same time each day. It is important that you continue to take Cozaar until your doctor tells you otherwise.

If you take more Cozaar than you should

If you accidentally take too many tablets, contact your doctor immediately. Symptoms of overdose are low blood pressure, increased heartbeat, possibly decreased heartbeat.

If you forget to take Cozaar

If you accidentally miss a daily dose, just take the next dose as normal. Do not take a double dose to make up for a forgotten tablet. If you have any further questions on the use of this product, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, Cozaar can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

If you experience the following, stop taking losartan tablets and tell your doctor immediately or go to the casualty department of your nearest hospital:

A severe allergic reaction (rash, itching, swelling of the face, lips, mouth or throat that may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing).

This is a serious but rare side effect, which affects more than 1 out of 10,000 patients but fewer than 1 out of 1,000 patients. You may need urgent medical attention or hospitalisation.

The side effects of medicines are classified as follows:

very common: affects more than 1 user in 10
common: affects 1 to 10 users in 100
uncommon affects 1 to 10 users in 1,000
rare: affects 1 to in 10 users in 10,000
very rare: affects less than 1 user in 10,000 patients
not known: frequency cannot be estimated from the available data

The following side effects have been reported with Cozaar:

Common:

dizziness, low blood pressure, debility, fatigue, too little sugar in the blood (hypoglycaemia), too much potassium in the blood (hyperkalaemia).

Uncommon:

somnolence, headache, sleep disorders, feeling of increased heart rate (palpitations), severe chest pain (angina pectoris), low blood pressure (especially after excessive loss of water from the body within blood vessels e.g. in patients with severe heart failure or under treatment with high dose diuretics), dose-related orthostatic effects such as lowering of blood pressure appearing when rising from a lying or sitting position, shortness of breath (dyspnoea), abdominal pain, obstipation, diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, hives (urticaria), itching (pruritus), rash, localised swelling (oedema).

Rare:

inflammation of blood vessels (vasculitis including Henoch-Schonlein purpura), numbness or tingling sensation (paraesthesia), fainting (syncope), very rapid and irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation) brain attack (stroke), inflammation of the liver (hepatitis), elevated blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, usually resolved upon discontinuation of treatment.

Not known:

reduced number of red blood cells (anaemia), reduced number of thrombocytes, migraine, cough, liver function abnormalities, muscle and joint pain, changes in kidney function (may be reversible upon discontinuation of treatment) including kidney failure, flu-like symptoms, increase in blood urea, serum creatinine and serum potassium in patients with heart failure, back pain and urinary tract infection, increased sensitivity to the sun (photosensitivity), unexplained muscle pain with dark (tea-coloured) urine (rhabdomyolysis), impotence, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), low levels of sodium in the blood (hyponatraemia), depression, generally feeling unwell (malaise), ringing, buzzing, roaring, or clicking in the ears (tinnitus).

Side effects in children are similar to those seen in adults.

If any of the side effects get serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How To Store Cozaar

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not use Cozaar after the expiry date which is stated on the carton or the bottle label. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.

Blisters

Store Cozaar in the original package in order to protect from light and moisture. Do not open the blister pack until you are ready to take the medicine.

Bottles

Store Cozaar in the original package. Store the bottle below 25°C. Keep the bottle tightly closed in order to protect from light and moisture.

Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

Further Information What Cozaar contains

The active substance is losartan potassium.

Each Cozaar 12.5 mg tablet contains 12.5 mg of losartan potassium.

Each Cozaar 25 mg tablet contains 25 mg of losartan potassium.

Each Cozaar 50 mg tablet contains 50 mg of losartan potassium.

Each Cozaar 100 mg tablet contains 100 mg of losartan potassium.

The other ingredients are microcrystalline cellulose (E460), lactose monohydrate, pregelatinized maize starch, magnesium stearate (E572), hyprolose (E463), hypromellose (E464).

Cozaar 12.5 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg contain potassium in the following amounts: 1.06 mg (0.027 mEq), 2.12 mg (0.054 mEq), 4.24 mg (0.108 mEq) and 8.48 mg (0.216 mEq) respectively.

The Cozaar 12.5 mg tablets also contain
carnauba wax (E903), titanium dioxide (E171), indigo carmine (E132) aluminum lake.

The Cozaar 25 mg tablets also contain Carnauba wax (E903), Titanium dioxide (E171).

The Cozaar 50 mg tablets also contain Carnauba wax (E903), Titanium dioxide (E171).

The Cozaar 100 mg tablets also may contain Carnauba wax (E903), Titanium dioxide (E171).

What Cozaar looks like and contents of the pack

Cozaar is supplied as unscored film-coated tablets containing 12.5 mg of losartan potassium.

Cozaar is supplied as unscored film-coated tablets containing 25 mg of losartan potassium.

Cozaar is supplied as scored film-coated tablets containing 50 mg of losartan potassium. The tablets can be divided into equal halves.

Cozaar is supplied as unscored film-coated tablets containing 100 mg of losartan potassium.

Cozaar is supplied in the following pack sizes:

Cozaar 12.5 mg - PVC/PE/PVDC blister packages with aluminum foil lidding in packs of 7, 14, 21, 28, 50, 98, 210 or 500 tablets and a unit-dose package of 28 tablets for hospital use. HDPE bottles of 100 tablets.

Cozaar 25 mg - PVC/PE/PVDC blister packages with aluminum foil lidding in packs of 7 or 28 tablets.

Cozaar 50 mg - PVC/PE/PVDC blister packages with aluminum foil lidding in packs of 7, 10, 14, 20, 28, 30, 50, 56, 84, 90, 98, 280 or 500 tablets and unit-dose packages of 28, 56 and 98 tablets for hospital use. HDPE bottles of 100 or 300 tablets.

Cozaar 100 mg - PVC/PE/PVDC blister packages with aluminum foil lidding in packs of 7, 10, 14, 15, 20, 28, 30, 50, 56, 90, 98 or 280 tablets and unit-dose packages of 28, 56 and 98 tablets for hospital use. HDPE bottles of 100 tablets.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer

Marketing Authorisation Holder:

Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited Hertford Road Hoddesdon Hertfordshire EN11 9BU UK

Manufacturer:

12.5 mg:

Merck Sharp & Dohme BV/MMD Waarderweg 39 2031 BN Haarlem Netherlands

25mg, 50mg and 100mg:

Merck Manufacturing Division Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited Shotton Lane Cramlington Northumberland NE23 3JU UK

This medicinal product is authorised in the Member States of the EEA under the following names:

Member State : Invented name

Austria: COSAAR 12,5 mg, 50mg or 100mg Filmtabletten
Belgium: COZAAR 12.5 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg
Belgium: COZAAR 12.5 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg
LOORTAN 12.5 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg
Bulgaria: COZAAR
Cyprus: COZAAR
Denmark: COZAAR, COZAAR STARTPAKKE
Estonia: COZAAR, COZAAR 12,5 mg
Finland: COZAAR 50 or 100 mg
France: COZAAR 50 scored coated or 100 mg film-coated tablets
Germany: CARDOPAL START 12.5 mg Filmtabletten
Germany: LORZAAR 50 mg or 100 mg Filmtabletten
Germany: LORZAAR PROTECT 50 mg or 100 mg Filmtabletten
Germany: LORZAAR START 12,5 mg Filmtabletten
Germany: PINZAAR 50 mg or 100 mg Filmtabletten
Germany: LORZAAR VARIPHARMSTART 12,5 mg Filmtabletten
Greece: COZAAR
Hungary: COZAAR
Ireland: COZAAR 12.5 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg Film-coated Tablets
Italy: LORTAAN 12.5 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg compresse rivestite con film
Italy: NEO-LOTAN 12.5 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg compresse rivestite con film
Italy: LOSAPREX 12.5 mg, 50 mg, or 100 mg compresse rivestite con film
Latvia: COZAAR 50 mg or 100 mg film-coated tablets
Lithuania: COZAAR
(Losartan)
Luxembourg: COZAAR 12.5mg, 50 mg or 100 mg
Luxembourg: LOORTAN 12.5 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg
Malta: COZAAR 12.5 mg, 50mg or 100 mgfilm-coated tablets
Netherlands: COZAAR 50 or 100
Poland: COZAAR
Portugal: COZAAR, COZAAR 100 mg, COZAAR IC
Portugal: LORTAAN , LORTAAN 100mg , LORTAAN IC
Romania: COZAAR, comprimate filmate, 50 mg
Slovenia: COZAAR 12,5 , 50 mg or 100 mg filmsko oblo?ene tablete
Spain: COZAAR 12,5 mg Inicio, COZAAR 50 or 100 mg
Sweden: COZAAR 50 or 100 mg 12,5 mg, 50 mg, or 100 mg filmdragerade tabletter
United Kingdom: COZAAR 12.5 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg FILM-COATED TABLETS
Iceland: COZAAR
Norway: COZAAR

This leaflet was last approved (11/2009)

PIL.CZR.09.UK.3197 REN

LOGO MSD

Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited Hertford Road Hoddesdon Hertfordshire
EN11 9BU UK

Registered trademark of

EI du Pont de Nemours and Company Wilmington Delaware USA
read more / Download


vitamin A


Generic Name: vitamin A (VYE ta min A)
Brand Names: A-25, A/Fish Oil, Aquasol A

What is vitamin A?

Vitamin A is found in foods such as liver, milk, cheese, eggs, carrots, squash, dark green and yellow vegetables, and fruits such as cantaloupe or apricots. Vitamin A is important for the eyes and skin, and for normal growth.

Vitamin A is used to treat vitamin A deficiency.

Vitamin A may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about vitamin A? Never take more than the recommended dose of vitamin A. Avoid taking more than one vitamin product at the same time unless your doctor tells you to. Taking similar vitamin products together can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects. An overdose of vitamin A can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Do not take vitamin A without medical advice if you are pregnant. Vitamin A can cause birth defects if taken in large doses.

Before taking vitamin A, tell your doctor about all other medicines you use.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking vitamin A?

Before using vitamin A, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use vitamin A if you have certain medical conditions.

Do not take vitamin A without medical advice if you are pregnant. Although some vitamin A is needed for the normal development of a baby, vitamin A can cause birth defects if taken in large doses. You may need to use a prenatal vitamin specially formulated for pregnant women. Ask your doctor about taking vitamin A if you are breast-feeding a baby. Your dose needs may be different while you are nursing. How should I take vitamin A?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Swallow the tablet or capsule whole.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Never take more than the recommended dose of vitamin A. Avoid taking more than one vitamin product at the same time unless your doctor tells you to. Taking similar vitamin products together can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Your healthcare provider may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from vitamin A. The recommended dietary allowance of vitamin A increases with age. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions. You may also consult the National Academy of Sciences "Dietary Reference Intake" or the U.S. Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Reference Intake" (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances" or RDA) listings for more information.

Store at room temperature away from light, moisture, and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of vitamin A can cause serious or life-threatening side effects.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, vision changes, hair loss, peeling skin, cracked skin around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, dizziness, drowsiness, tired feeling, bone or joint pain, severe headache, pain behind your eyes, severe stomach pain, dark urine, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

What should I avoid while taking vitamin A? Avoid taking orlistat (alli, Xenical) or mineral oil while you are taking vitamin A. Vitamin A side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, and you may have none at all.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect vitamin A? Do not take vitamin A without your doctor's advice if you are also taking:

birth control pills;

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

bexarotene (Targretin);

cholestyramine (Questran, Prevalite);

acitretin (Soriatane);

tretinoin (Vesanoid); or

isotretinoin (Accutane, Sotret, Claravis, Amnesteem).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with vitamin A. Tell your healthcare provider about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More vitamin A resources Vitamin A Drug Interactions Vitamin A Support Group 0 Reviews for Vitamin A - Add your own review/rating Aquasol A Prescribing Information (FDA) Vitamin A Monograph (AHFS DI) vitamin a Oral, Intramuscular Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare vitamin A with other medications Vitamin A Deficiency Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about vitamin A.
read more / Download


Anugesic HC Cream


ANUGESIC HC CREAM

Pramocaine hydrochloride, Hydrocortisone acetate, Zinc oxide, Balsam peru, Benzyl benzoate, Bismuth oxide

In this leaflet: 1. What Anugesic HC Cream is and what it is used for 2. Before you use Anugesic HC Cream 3. How to use Anugesic HC Cream 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Anugesic HC Cream 6. Further information Important things that you SHOULD know about your medicine: Anugesic HC Cream is used to treat severe pain and discomfort associated with haemorrhoids (piles), and pruritus ani (itching around the anus) in adults. Anugesic HC Cream may be used for either of these conditions. Anugesic HC Cream is for topical use and should only be used as directed. Do not swallow the cream or use on other areas of the skin. If you accidentally swallow Anugesic HC Cream, tell your doctor immediately. Anugesic HC Cream can sometimes cause burning, itching or stinging around the anus (See Section 4 for more details). See your doctor immediately if these symptoms do not go away

Please read the rest of this leaflet. It includes other important information on the safe and effective use of this medicine that might be especially important to you.

What ANUGESIC HC Cream is and what it is used for Anugesic HC Cream contains several active ingredients. One of these is Pramocaine hydrochloride which is an anaesthetic which acts on the skin and mucous membranes to relieve pain and itching. Another of the active ingredients is Hydrocortisone acetate which is one of the group of medicines called corticosteroids which help to relieve inflammation. The other active ingredients of Anugesic HC Cream have astringent, protective, soothing and mild antiseptic properties. The cream may also provide lubrication for the insertion of suppositories. (For Other ingredients see Section 6). Anugesic HC Cream is used to treat the severe pain and discomfort associated with haemorrhoids (piles), and pruritus ani (itching around the anus). Haemorrhoids (piles) are enlarged or swollen blood vessels around the anus, which can cause varying degrees of discomfort, itching and irritation, particularly after a bowel movement. They may either be internal (inside the anus) or external (outside the anus). Anugesic HC Cream is used in adults only and not recommended for children. Before you use Anugesic HC Cream Do not use Anugesic HC Cream if you have : tubercular, fungal or viral lesions e.g genital warts had a reaction to Anugesic HC Cream or any of the individual ingredients had a reaction to other similar medicines containing balsam peru Important information about some of the ingredients of Anugesic HC Cream

Methyl parahydroxybenzoate (E218) and propyl parahydroxybenzoate (E216) may cause allergic reactions. Propylene glycol and balsam peru may cause skin irritation.

Take special care with Anugesic HC Cream:

Tell your doctor if any of these apply to you, to help him or her decide if Anugesic HC Cream is suitable for you:

If you suffer from any rectal bleeding (bleeding from the back passage). Although bleeding, (shown as streaks of blood on toilet paper), is not uncommon in people with piles, it may be a sign of a more serious condition and you should see your doctor to check this. If you have any cuts or infection around the anus. Ask your pharmacist or doctor if you are in any doubt about this as it is important not to use Anugesic HC Cream if the area around the anus is infected. If you are pregnant, trying to become pregnant now, or likely to want to try to become pregnant in the future. If you have chicken pox or shingles If you have recently had a smallpox vaccination. Taking other medicines:

There are no known interactions with other medicines but it is wise to inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, or have recently taken any other medicine –including those bought without a prescription.

Pregnancy and Breast-feeding:

If you are pregnant, trying to become pregnant or breastfeeding, ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before using Anugesic HC cream as there may be better alternative treatments for you.

How to use Anugesic HC Cream Wash the anal area thoroughly and then dry carefully with a soft towel. Apply a small amount of Anugesic HC cream to the affected area at night, again in the morning and after each bowel movement. For internal application, use the plastic applicator nozzle provided. After use the nozzle should be washed each time in hot soapy water and then thoroughly rinsed in cold water. Do not use the cream for longer than seven days unless your doctor tells you to. If the condition gets worse, or if rectal bleeding starts, consult a doctor immediately. Anugesic HC Cream is for topical use only. Do not swallow the cream or apply it to any part of the body except for the area around the anus (bottom) or into the rectum (back passage) using the applicator. If you accidentally swallow any cream or use more than your prescribed dose, tell your doctor or pharmacist immediately. Possible side effects

Like all medicines Anugesic HC Cream can sometimes cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. The following side effects that have been seen with Anugesic HC Cream mostly affect the skin and tissues around the anus. These side effects are usually mild and go away after a short time:

A burning, itching or stinging is occasionally felt around the anus, especially if the skin is broken. Very rarely there are sensitivity reactions, such as a rash. Continuous use for long periods of time (longer than seven days) can be harmful, causing the skin to thin, develop a stripy appearance or affect the blood vessels just below the skin. If you use Anugesic HC Cream regularly and are at all worried, speak to your doctor or pharmacist immediately.

If you experience any of the above side effects or notice any side effects not mentioned in this leaflet, tell your doctor or pharmacist at once.

How to store Anugesic HC Cream Keep out of the reach and sight of children. Anugesic HC Cream should not be used after the expiry date printed on the tube and on the carton. Store in the original container. Do not store above 25?C. Further information What Anugesic HC Cream contains and the contents of the pack

Each 100 g of cream contains the active ingredients: Pramocaine hydrochloride, Hydrocortisone acetate, Zinc oxide, Balsam peru, Benzyl benzoate, Bismuth oxide.

Anugesic HC Cream also contains the inactive ingredients: liquid paraffin, propylene glycol, polysorbate 60, sorbitan stearate, glyceryl monostearate, titanium dioxide (E171), the preservatives methyl parahydroxybenzoate (E218) and propyl parahydroxybenzoate (E216) and purified water.

Anugesic HC Cream is a buff coloured cream with an antiseptic odour.

Marketing Authorisation Holder:

The Marketing Authorisation Holder in the United Kingdom is

Pfizer Limited Ramsgate Road Sandwich Kent CT13 9NJ United Kingdom

The Marketing Authorisation holder in Ireland is

Pfizer Healthcare Ireland 9 Riverwalk National Digital Park Citywest Business Campus Dublin 24 Manufacturer: McNeil Manufacturing 5 Avenue de Concyr 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 France Company contact address:

For further information on your medicine, please contact Medical Information at the address below

Pfizer Limited Walton Oaks Dorking Road Tadworth Surrey KT20 7NS Telephone:01304 616161

Leaflet last updated: May 2008

Ref: AU 6_0


read more / Download


zinc gluconate


Generic Name: zinc gluconate (ZINK GLUE koe nate)
Brand names: Orazinc, Orazinc 110(obsolete)

What is zinc gluconate?

Zinc is a naturally occurring mineral. Zinc is important for growth and for the development and health of body tissues.

Zinc gluconate is used to treat and to prevent zinc deficiency.

Zinc gluconate may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about zinc gluconate?

Before using zinc gluconate, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use zinc gluconate if you have certain medical conditions.

Avoid taking this medication with foods that are high in calcium or phosphorus, which can make it harder for your body to absorb zinc gluconate. Foods high in calcium or phosphorus include milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, dried beans or peas, lentils, nuts, peanut butter, beer, cola soft drinks, and hot cocoa.

Zinc gluconate can make certain antibiotics less effective. Tell your doctor about all other medications you are using before you start taking zinc gluconate.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking zinc gluconate?

Before using zinc gluconate, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use zinc gluconate if you have certain medical conditions.

It is not known whether zinc gluconate will harm an unborn baby. Do not take zinc gluconate without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether zinc gluconate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take zinc gluconate?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take zinc gluconate with a full glass of water. Take zinc gluconate with food if it upsets your stomach.

Your healthcare provider may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from zinc gluconate. The recommended dietary allowance of zinc gluconate increases with age. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions. You may also consult the National Academy of Sciences "Dietary Reference Intake" or the U.S. Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Reference Intake" (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances" or RDA) listings for more information.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, severe vomiting, dehydration, and restlessness.

What should I avoid while taking zinc gluconate? Avoid taking this medication with foods that are high in calcium or phosphorus, which can make it harder for your body to absorb zinc gluconate. Foods high in calcium or phosphorus include milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, dried beans or peas, lentils, nuts, peanut butter, beer, cola soft drinks, and hot cocoa. Zinc gluconate side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea; or

upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Zinc gluconate Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Dietary Supplement:

Dosage: 105 mg to 350 mg daily.

What other drugs will affect zinc gluconate?

The following drugs can interact with or be made less effective by zinc gluconate. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

methyltestosterone (Android, Methitest, Oreton);

penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen);

risedronate (Actonel);

a tetracycline antibiotic such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap); or

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with zinc gluconate. Tell your healthcare provider about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More zinc gluconate resources Zinc gluconate Side Effects (in more detail) Zinc gluconate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Zinc gluconate Drug Interactions Zinc gluconate Support Group 0 Reviews for Zinc gluconate - Add your own review/rating Orazinc MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare zinc gluconate with other medications Dietary Supplementation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about zinc gluconate.

See also: zinc gluconate side effects (in more detail)


read more / Download


zinc sulfate


Generic Name: zinc sulfate (ZINK SUL fate)
Brand names: Orazinc 110, Orazinc 220, Verazinc, Zinc-220, Zincate, Zinca-pak, Mar-Zinc, Zinc CR, Micro-Zn, Zinc 50 mg Pink

What is zinc sulfate?

Zinc is a naturally occurring mineral. Zinc is important for growth and for the development and health of body tissues.

Zinc sulfate is used to treat and to prevent zinc deficiency.

Zinc sulfate may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about zinc sulfate?

Before using zinc sulfate, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use zinc sulfate if you have certain medical conditions.

Avoid taking this medication with foods that are high in calcium or phosphorus, which can make it harder for your body to absorb zinc sulfate. Foods high in calcium or phosphorus include milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, dried beans or peas, lentils, nuts, peanut butter, beer, cola soft drinks, and hot cocoa.

Zinc sulfate can make certain antibiotics less effective. Tell your doctor about all other medications you are using before you start taking zinc sulfate.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking zinc sulfate?

Before using zinc sulfate, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use zinc sulfate if you have certain medical conditions.

It is not known whether zinc sulfate will harm an unborn baby. Do not take zinc sulfate without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether zinc sulfate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take zinc sulfate?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take zinc sulfate with a full glass of water. Take zinc sulfate with food if it upsets your stomach.

Your healthcare provider may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from zinc sulfate. The recommended dietary allowance of zinc sulfate increases with age. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions. You may also consult the National Academy of Sciences "Dietary Reference Intake" or the U.S. Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Reference Intake" (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances" or RDA) listings for more information.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, severe vomiting, dehydration, and restlessness.

What should I avoid while taking zinc sulfate? Avoid taking this medication with foods that are high in calcium or phosphorus, which can make it harder for your body to absorb zinc sulfate. Foods high in calcium or phosphorus include milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, dried beans or peas, lentils, nuts, peanut butter, beer, cola soft drinks, and hot cocoa. Zinc sulfate side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea; or

upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect zinc sulfate?

The following drugs can interact with or be made less effective by zinc sulfate. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

methyltestosterone (Android, Methitest, Oreton);

penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen);

risedronate (Actonel);

a tetracycline antibiotic such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap); or

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with zinc sulfate. Tell your healthcare provider about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More zinc sulfate resources Zinc sulfate Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesZinc sulfate Drug InteractionsZinc sulfate Support Group1 Review for Zinc sulfate - Add your own review/rating Zinc Sulfate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zinc Sulfate Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Orazinc 110 Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare zinc sulfate with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about zinc sulfate.
read more / Download


Related Search:

Search


 

Best ED Pills

 

Erectile Dysfunction

 

RX Pharmacy Drugs List - Buy Pills Online

RSS | Site Map | Map | PageMap

Copyright © Online Pharmacy Drug Store. All rights reserved.