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Left Ventriculography Medications


Drugs associated with Left Ventriculography

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Left Ventriculography. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.


Drug List: Optiray-160 Optiray-240 Optiray-300 Optiray-320 Optiray-350 Oxilan
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Aortic Stenosis Medications


Definition of Aortic Stenosis: The aorta is the large artery that originates in the left ventricle (lower chamber) of the heart. Aortic stenosis is the narrowing or obstruction of the heart??s aortic valve, which prevents it from opening properly and blocks the flow of blood from the left ventricle to the aorta.

Drugs associated with Aortic Stenosis

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Aortic Stenosis. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Aortic Stenosis

Micromedex Care Notes:

Aortic Stenosis

Medical Encyclopedia:

Aortic insufficiency Aortic stenosis Congenital heart disease Mitral stenosis
Drug List: Inderal Inderal-La-Sustained-Release-Capsules
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Pegfilgrastim


Pronunciation: peg-fil-GRAS-tim
Generic Name: Pegfilgrastim
Brand Name: Neulasta
Pegfilgrastim is used for:

Decreasing the incidence of infection in certain cancer patients undergoing myelosuppressive cancer treatments.

Pegfilgrastim is an amino acid. It works by stimulating bone marrow to produce white blood cells, which fight infection.

Do NOT use Pegfilgrastim if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Pegfilgrastim, filgrastim, or Escherichia coli (E. coli)-derived proteins

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Pegfilgrastim:

Some medical conditions may interact with Pegfilgrastim. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have other blood problems (eg, sickle cell anemia), bone marrow leukemia, spleen problems, lung or breathing problems, or a blood or tissue infection if you are or will be undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Pegfilgrastim. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Lithium because it may increase the risk of Pegfilgrastim's side effects

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Pegfilgrastim may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Pegfilgrastim:

Use Pegfilgrastim as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Pegfilgrastim. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Pegfilgrastim is usually given as an injection at your doctor's office, hospital, or clinic. If you will be using Pegfilgrastim at home, a health care provider will teach you how to use it. Be sure you understand how to use Pegfilgrastim. Follow the procedures you are taught when you use a dose. Contact your health care provider if you have any questions. Do not shake Pegfilgrastim. Do not use Pegfilgrastim if it contains particles, is cloudy or discolored, or if the vial is cracked or damaged. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Ask your health care provider how to dispose of these materials after use. Follow all local rules for disposal. If you miss a dose of Pegfilgrastim, contact your doctor right away.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Pegfilgrastim.

Important safety information: Serious and sometimes fatal spleen problems (including spleen rupture) have been reported in patients using Pegfilgrastim. Notify your doctor immediately if you experience left-sided upper stomach pain and/or shoulder tip pain. Pegfilgrastim may reduce the chance of infection, but it does not prevent all infection. Tell your doctor right away if you notice symptoms of infection (eg, fever; chills; sore throat; diarrhea; redness, swelling, or pain around a cut or sore) while you take Pegfilgrastim. Tell your doctor if you develop a lump, swelling, or bruising at the injection site that does not go away. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Pegfilgrastim before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Lab tests, including blood cell counts, may be performed while you use Pegfilgrastim. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Pegfilgrastim should not be used in INFANTS, CHILDREN, or SMALLER ADOLESCENTS weighing less than 100 pounds (45 kilograms); safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Pegfilgrastim while you are pregnant. It is not known if Pegfilgrastim is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Pegfilgrastim, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Pegfilgrastim:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Bone or joint pain; constipation; muscle pain.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; dizziness; fast heartbeat; increased sweating; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); fast breathing; fever; left-sided shoulder tip pain; left-sided upper stomach pain; a lump, swelling, or bruising at the injection site; severe or persistent bone, chest, joint, or stomach pain; shortness of breath; swelling of the hands, feet, arms, or legs; wheezing.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Pegfilgrastim side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Pegfilgrastim:

Store Pegfilgrastim in the refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C), in the original carton. Do not freeze. If accidentally frozen, allow the medicine to thaw in the refrigerator. If frozen more than once, the medicine should be thrown away. If Pegfilgrastim is left at room temperature for more than 48 hours, it should be discarded. Protect from light. Keep Pegfilgrastim, as well as needles and syringes, out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Pegfilgrastim, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Pegfilgrastim is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Pegfilgrastim. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Pegfilgrastim resources Pegfilgrastim Side Effects (in more detail) Pegfilgrastim Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pegfilgrastim Drug Interactions Pegfilgrastim Support Group 7 Reviews for Pegfilgrastim - Add your own review/rating Pegfilgrastim Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Pegfilgrastim Monograph (AHFS DI) pegfilgrastim Subcutaneous Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Neulasta Prescribing Information (FDA) Neulasta Consumer Overview Compare Pegfilgrastim with other medications Neutropenia Associated with Chemotherapy
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Other immunosuppressants


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

See also

Medical conditions associated with other immunosuppressants:

Acute Lymphoblastic LeukemiaAcute Lymphocytic LeukemiaAcute Nonlymphocytic LeukemiaAnemiaAsthma, MaintenanceAtopic DermatitisAutoimmune HepatitisBehcet's DiseaseBiliary CirrhosisBladder CancerBrain TumorBreast CancerBullous PemphigoidCervical CancerChoriocarcinomaChronic Active HepatitisChronic Inflammatory Demyelinating PolyradiculoneuropathyCogan's SyndromeColorectal CancerCrohn's DiseaseCrohn's Disease, AcuteCrohn's Disease, MaintenanceDermatomyositisEctopic PregnancyEczemaEsophageal CarcinomaGastric CancerGlomerulonephritisGraft-versus-host diseaseHead and Neck CancerHodgkin's LymphomaIdiopathic Thrombocytopenic PurpuraInflammatory Bowel DiseaseLeprosy, Erythema Nodosum LeprosumLymphomaMeningeal LeukemiaMultiple MyelomaMultiple SclerosisMyasthenia GravisMycosis FungoidesMyopathyNeoplastic DiseasesNephrotic SyndromeNeurosarcoidosisNon-Hodgkin's LymphomaNon-Small Cell Lung CancerOrgan Transplant, Rejection ProphylaxisOsteosarcomaOvarian CancerPancreatic CancerPemphigoidPemphigusPityriasis rubra pilarisPsoriasisPsoriatic ArthritisRenal TransplantRheumatoid ArthritisSarcoidosisSmall Cell Lung CancerSoft Tissue SarcomaSolid TumorsSystemic Lupus ErythematosusSystemic SclerosisTakayasu's ArteritisTrophoblastic DiseaseUlcerative ColitisUveitis Drug List:/tags/revlimid/
/tags/azasan/
/tags/rheumatrex/
Trexall
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Nebcin


Pronunciation: TOE-bra-MYE-sin
Generic Name: Tobramycin
Brand Name: Nebcin

Nebcin has caused kidney problems, nerve damage, or permanent hearing loss, even at usual doses. Hearing loss can occur even after the medicine is stopped. If you already have kidney problems or hearing difficulty, tell your doctor. Notify your doctor right away if any of the following occur: ringing in ears, hearing loss, unusual change in amount of urine, dizziness, numbness, skin tingling, muscle twitching, or seizures. Nebcin may be stopped if you develop kidney or hearing problems. Your doctor will monitor your progress to minimize the possibility of these effects occurring and to run certain tests (eg, hearing and/or kidney tests). Do not use Nebcin with other medicines that can cause nerve, kidney, or hearing problems. Other factors that increase the risk of these side effects occurring include premature and newborn infants, advanced age, or dehydration. Avoid other medicines that may harm the kidneys or decrease hearing (eg, other aminoglycosides [eg, gentamicin], cephaloridine, viomycin, polymyxin B, colistin, cisplatin, vancomycin) while you are using Nebcin. Do not use Nebcin with certain diuretics (eg, furosemide, ethacrynic acid).

Nebcin may cause fetal harm if used during pregnancy.


Nebcin is used for:

Treating serious infections caused by certain bacteria.

Nebcin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic. It works by killing sensitive bacteria.

Do NOT use Nebcin if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Nebcin or another aminoglycoside antibiotic (eg, gentamicin) you are taking certain diuretics (eg, furosemide, ethacrynic acid), cyclosporine, methoxyflurane, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Nebcin:

Some medical conditions may interact with Nebcin. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have myasthenia gravis (a condition in which the muscles become progressively paralyzed) or Parkinson disease if you have hearing problems, nerve problems, kidney problems, or severe or extensive burns, or you are dehydrated

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Nebcin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Cephaloridine, cephalosporins (eg, ceftizoxime), cisplatin, colistin, cyclosporine, fludarabine, loop diuretics (eg, furosemide, ethacrynic acid), methoxyflurane, nitrosoureas (eg, carmustine), NSAIDs (eg, ibuprofen), polymyxin B, vancomycin, or viomycin because they may increase the risk of Nebcin's side effects, including increased risk of kidney or hearing loss Beta-lactam antibiotics (eg, penicillin, imipenem, ceftizoxime) because they may decrease Nebcin's effectiveness Nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (eg, atracurium) or succinylcholine because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Nebcin

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Nebcin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Nebcin:

Use Nebcin as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Nebcin is usually given as an injection at your doctor's office, hospital, or clinic. If you will be using Nebcin at home, a health care provider will teach you how to use it. Be sure you understand how to use Nebcin. Follow the procedures you are taught when you use a dose. Contact your health care provider if you have any questions. Do not use Nebcin if it contains particles, is cloudy or discolored, or if the vial is cracked or damaged. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Ask your health care provider how to dispose of these materials after use. Follow all local rules for disposal. If you miss a dose of Nebcin, use it as soon as possible. Check with your doctor or pharmacist for instructions on scheduling other doses.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Nebcin.

Important safety information: Nebcin only works against bacteria; it does not treat viral infections (eg, the common cold). Drinking extra fluids while you are using Nebcin is recommended. Check with your doctor for instructions. Mild diarrhea is common with antibiotic use. However, a more serious form of diarrhea (pseudomembranous colitis) may rarely occur. This may develop while you use the antibiotic or within several months after you stop using it. Contact your doctor right away if stomach pain or cramps, severe diarrhea, or bloody stools occur. Do not treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Be sure to use Nebcin for the full course of treatment. If you do not, the medicine may not clear up your infection completely. The bacteria could also become less sensitive to this or other medicines. This could make the infection harder to treat in the future. Long-term or repeated use of Nebcin may cause a second infection. Tell your doctor if signs of a second infection occur. Your medicine may need to be changed to treat this. Some of these products contain sulfites. Sulfites may cause an allergic reaction in some patients (eg, asthma patients). If you have ever had an allergic reaction to sulfites, ask your pharmacist if your product has sulfites in it. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Nebcin before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Lab tests, including kidney function, hearing tests, blood electrolyte levels, and tobramycin levels, may be performed while you use Nebcin. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Nebcin with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially kidney or hearing problems. Nebcin should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 10 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Nebcin has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Nebcin while you are pregnant. It is not known if Nebcin is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Nebcin. Possible side effects of Nebcin:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; headache; nausea; pain, swelling, or redness at the injection site; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); clumsiness; confusion; decreased hearing or other hearing changes; decreased urination; dizziness or lightheadedness; feeling of a whirling motion; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; hearing loss; loss of coordination; muscle weakness; numbness or tingling; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; ringing or roaring in the ears; seizures; severe or persistent diarrhea; stomach pain or cramps; unusual bruising or bleeding; vaginal irritation or discharge.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Nebcin side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms include decreased urination; dizziness; hearing loss; trouble breathing.

Proper storage of Nebcin:

Nebcin is usually handled and stored by a health care provider. If you are using Nebcin at home, store Nebcin as directed by your pharmacist or health care provider. Keep Nebcin, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Nebcin, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Nebcin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Nebcin. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Nebcin resources Nebcin Side Effects (in more detail) Nebcin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Nebcin Drug Interactions Nebcin Support Group 0 Reviews for Nebcin - Add your own review/rating Nebcin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Nebcin injection Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Tobramycin Prescribing Information (FDA) Tobramycin eent Monograph (AHFS DI) Tobramycin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Tobi Prescribing Information (FDA) Tobi inhalation Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Tobi Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Tobi Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Nebcin with other medications Bacteremia Bacterial Infection Bone infection Burns, External Cystic Fibrosis Endocarditis Febrile Neutropenia Intraabdominal Infection Kidney Infections Meningitis Peritonitis Pneumonia Rabbit Fever Sepsis Shunt Infection Skin Infection
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Antipsoriatics


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Antipsoriatics are agents that are either taken orally or applied locally on the skin to treat psoriasis. Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition with itchy, dry scaly patches. These agents have different modes of action but in due course they work to control psoriasis.

See also

Medical conditions associated with antipsoriatics:

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia Bladder Cancer Brain Tumor Breast Cancer Bullous Pemphigoid Cervical Cancer Choriocarcinoma Cogan's Syndrome Colorectal Cancer Dermatomyositis Ectopic Pregnancy Eczema Esophageal Carcinoma Gastric Cancer Graft-versus-host disease Head and Neck Cancer Hodgkin's Lymphoma Lymphoma Meningeal Leukemia Mycosis Fungoides Neoplastic Diseases Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Osteosarcoma Ovarian Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Pemphigoid Pemphigus Pityriasis rubra pilaris Psoriasis Psoriatic Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Small Cell Lung Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Solid Tumors Systemic Sclerosis Trophoblastic Disease Uveitis Drug List: Soriatane Rheumatrex Soriatane-Ck Trexall
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gefitinib


Generic Name: gefitinib (ge FI ti nib)
Brand Names: Iressa

What is gefitinib?

Gefitinib is a cancer chemotherapy medication. Gefitinib interferes with the growth of cancer cells and slows their growth and spread in the body.

Gefitinib is used in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

Gefitinib may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about gefitinib?

Gefitinib should only be administered under the supervision of a qualified healthcare provider experienced in the use of cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

Serious side effects have been reported with the use of gefitinib including: allergic reactions (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); lung problems; liver problems; eye problems; severe nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, or diarrhea; and others. Talk to your doctor about the possible side effects from treatment with gefitinib.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking gefitinib? Do not use gefitinib without first talking to your doctor if you have liver disease; or

lung or breathing problems (other than lung cancer).

You may not be able to take gefitinib, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Gefitinib is in the FDA pregnancy category D. This means that it is known to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use gefitinib without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. Birth control should be used during treatment with gefitinib. It is not known whether gefitinib passes into breast milk. Do not take gefitinib without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use gefitinib?

Gefitinib should only be administered under the supervision of a qualified healthcare provider experienced in the use of cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

Take each dose of gefitinib with a full glass of water.

Gefitinib can be taken with or without food.

Your doctor will determine the correct amount and frequency of treatment with gefitinib depending upon the type of cancer being treated and other factors. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns regarding the treatment schedule.

It is important to take gefitinib regularly to get the most benefit.

Your doctor may want you to have blood tests and other medical evaluations during treatment with gefitinib to monitor progress and side effects.

Your healthcare provider will store gefitinib as directed by the manufacturer. If you are storing gefitinib at home, follow the directions provided by your healthcare provider.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor if you miss a dose of gefitinib.

What happens if I overdose? If an overdose of gefitinib is suspected, seek emergency medical attention or contact your healthcare provider immediately.

Symptoms of a gefitinib overdose tend to be similar to side effects caused by the medication, although often more severe.

What should I avoid while using gefitinib?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity during treatment with gefitinib unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Gefitinib side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects from gefitinib, contact your doctor immediately:

an allergic reaction (including difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

lung problems (difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, increased coughing, fever, or chest pain);

severe or persistent nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, or diarrhea; or

eye pain or irritation.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue taking gefitinib and talk to your doctor if you experience:

mild to moderate nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, or diarrhea;

skin rash, dryness, itching, or acne; or

weakness.

Other side effects have also been reported. Discuss with your doctor any side effect that occurs during treatment with gefitinib. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Gefitinib Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer:

250 mg orally with or without food

What other drugs will affect gefitinib?

Before taking gefitinib, tell your doctor if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

warfarin (Coumadin);

rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane);

phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek);

ketoconazole (Nizoral);

itraconazole (Sporanox); or

a stomach acid reducer such as cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB), ranitidine (Zantac, Zantac 75), esomeprazole (Nexium), lansoprazole (Prevacid), omeprazole (Prilosec), and others.

You may not be able to take gefitinib, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.

Many other drugs may interact with gefitinib. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More gefitinib resources Gefitinib Side Effects (in more detail) Gefitinib Dosage Gefitinib Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Gefitinib Drug Interactions Gefitinib Support Group 3 Reviews for Gefitinib - Add your own review/rating gefitinib Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Gefitinib Monograph (AHFS DI) Gefitinib MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Iressa Prescribing Information (FDA) Iressa Consumer Overview Compare gefitinib with other medications Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Where can I get more information? Your healthcare provider may have additional information about gefitinib that you may read.

See also: gefitinib side effects (in more detail)


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Familial Mediterranean Fever Medications


Definition of Familial Mediterranean Fever: Familial Mediterranean fever is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent fever and inflammation, often involving the abdomen or the lung.

Drugs associated with Familial Mediterranean Fever

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Familial Mediterranean Fever. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Familial Mediterranean Fever

Medical Encyclopedia:

Familial Mediterranean fever
Drug List: Colcrys
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Serostim


Generic Name: somatropin (soe ma TROE pin)
Brand Names: Genotropin, Genotropin Miniquick, Humatrope, Norditropin, Norditropin Cartridge, Norditropin FlexPro Pen, Norditropin Nordiflex Pen, Nutropin, Nutropin AQ, Omnitrope, Saizen, Serostim, Tev-tropin, Zorbtive

What is Serostim (somatropin)?

Somatropin is a form of human growth hormone. Human growth hormone is important in the body for the growth of bones and muscles.

Somatropin is used to treat growth failure in children and adults who lack natural growth hormone, and in those with chronic kidney failure, Noonan syndrome, Turner syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, short stature at birth with no catch-up growth, and other causes. Somatropin is also used to prevent severe weight loss in people with AIDS, or to treat short bowel syndrome.

Somatropin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Serostim (somatropin)?

Before you receive somatropin, tell your doctor about all your past and present medical conditions, especially allergies, trauma, surgery, diabetes, cancer, breathing problems, liver or kidney disease, scoliosis, high blood pressure, pancreas disorder, underactive thyroid, or a brain tumor.

Also tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially steroids or diabetes medications. Your dosages of these medicines may need to be changed when you start using somatropin. Do not stop using a steroid suddenly or change any of your medication doses without your doctor's advice.

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome and are using somatropin, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring.

Call your doctor at once if you have sudden and severe pain in your upper stomach with nausea and vomiting, fast heartbeat, increased thirst or urination, weight loss, or vision changes and sudden, severe pain behind your eyes. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Serostim (somatropin)? Before you receive somatropin, tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a growth hormone medicine, or to drug preservatives such as benzyl alcohol, metacresol or glycerin. You should not use this medication if you are allergic to somatropin, or if you have:

diabetic retinopathy (a serious eye condition caused by diabetes);

cancer; or

Prader-Willi syndrome and are also overweight or have sleep apnea or severe respiratory (lung) problems.

You should also not use somatropin if you have a serious medical condition after having:

open heart surgery or stomach surgery;

trauma or other medical emergency; or

breathing problems (such as lung failure).

To make sure you can safely take somatropin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease;

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

diabetes;

a pituitary gland disorder;

scoliosis;

high blood pressure (hypertension);

a pancreas disorder (especially in children);

a history of cancer;

carpal tunnel syndrome;

underactive thyroid; or

a brain tumor or lesion.

FDA pregnancy category B. Some brands of somatropin are not expected to harm an unborn baby, including Genotropin, Omnitrope, Saizen, Serostim, and Zorbtive. FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether certain other brands of somatropin will harm an unborn baby, including Humatrope, Norditropin, Nutropin, and Tev-tropin. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether somatropin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use somatropin without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Serostim (somatropin)?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your dose and brand of somatropin, and how often you give it will depend on what you are being treated for. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Somatropin is injected into a muscle or under the skin. You may be shown how to use injections at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Use a different place on your body each time you give the injection. Your care provider will show you the best places on your body to inject the medication. Do not inject into the same place two times in a row. Do not inject this medicine into skin or muscle that is red, sore, infected, or injured.

Do not shake the medication bottle or you may ruin the medicine. When mixing somatropin with a diluent (liquid), use a gentle swirling motion. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Use a disposable needle only once. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harm, your blood and growth progress will need to be tested often. Your eyes may also need to be checked. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you are being treated for short bowel syndrome, follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor to help control your condition. Somatropin is not a cure for short bowel syndrome.

If you use a form of somatropin that comes in a cartridge for use with an injection pen, use only the pen injection system provided with the somatropin brand you use.

How you store this medicine will depend on what brand you are using and what diluent you are mixing somatropin with. After mixing somatropin, you may need to use it right away or you may be able to store it for later use. Read and carefully follow the instructions provided with your medicine about proper storage of somatropin before and after it has been mixed. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about proper storage of your medication.

Throw away any somatropin left over after the expiration date on the label has passed.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Call your doctor if you miss more than 3 doses in a row. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose can cause tremors or shaking, cold sweats, increased hunger, headache, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, fast heartbeat, and nausea. Long-term overdose may cause excessive growth.

What should I avoid while using Serostim (somatropin)?

If you use Zorbtive to treat short bowel syndrome, avoid drinking fruit juices or soda beverages. Follow the instructions of your doctor or nutrition counselor about what types of liquids you should drink while using Zorbtive.

Avoid drinking alcohol if you have short bowel syndrome. Alcohol can irritate your stomach and could make your condition worse. Serostim (somatropin) side effects

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring. Rare cases of serious breathing problems have occurred in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome who use somatropin.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate;

increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, and weight loss;

sudden and severe pain behind your eyes, vision changes;

swelling in your head, face, hands, or feet; or

numbness or tingling in your wrist, hand, or fingers.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, feeling tired;

redness, soreness, swelling, rash, itching, pain, or bruising where the medicine was injected;

pain in your arms or legs, joint stiffness or pain;

muscle pain; or

cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Serostim (somatropin)?

Before using somatropin, tell your doctor if you use insulin or take oral (by mouth) medicine to treat diabetes. Somatropin may affect blood sugar levels and you may need to adjust your dose of the diabetes medication. Do not change the dose of your diabetes medication without your doctor's advice.

Tell your doctor if you use any type of steroid medicine such as cortisone, dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, prednisone, and others. Steroids can make somatropin less effective and your doses may need to be adjusted. Do not stop using a steroid suddenly. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune), seizure medication, birth control pills, anabolic steroids, or hormone replacement medications for men or women.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with somatropin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Serostim resources Serostim Side Effects (in more detail) Serostim Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Serostim Drug Interactions Serostim Support Group 1 Review for Serostim - Add your own review/rating Serostim MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Serostim Prescribing Information (FDA) Serostim Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Somatropin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Genotropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Genotropin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Genotropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humatrope Cartridge MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humatrope Prescribing Information (FDA) Norditropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Norditropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Nutropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nutropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Nutropin AQ MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nutropin AQ Prescribing Information (FDA) Nutropin Depot Prescribing Information (FDA) Omnitrope Prescribing Information (FDA) Omnitrope Consumer Overview Omnitrope MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Saizen Prescribing Information (FDA) Saizen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tev-Tropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Tev-Tropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zorbtive Prescribing Information (FDA) Zorbtive Consumer Overview Zorbtive MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Serostim with other medications AIDS Related Wasting Cachexia Short Stature for Age Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about somatropin.

See also: Serostim side effects (in more detail)


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Saizen


Generic Name: somatropin (soe ma TROE pin)
Brand Names: Genotropin, Genotropin Miniquick, Humatrope, Norditropin, Norditropin Cartridge, Norditropin FlexPro Pen, Norditropin Nordiflex Pen, Nutropin, Nutropin AQ, Omnitrope, Saizen, Serostim, Tev-tropin, Zorbtive

What is Saizen (somatropin)?

Somatropin is a form of human growth hormone. Human growth hormone is important in the body for the growth of bones and muscles.

Somatropin is used to treat growth failure in children and adults who lack natural growth hormone, and in those with chronic kidney failure, Noonan syndrome, Turner syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, short stature at birth with no catch-up growth, and other causes. Somatropin is also used to prevent severe weight loss in people with AIDS, or to treat short bowel syndrome.

Somatropin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Saizen (somatropin)?

Before you receive somatropin, tell your doctor about all your past and present medical conditions, especially allergies, trauma, surgery, diabetes, cancer, breathing problems, liver or kidney disease, scoliosis, high blood pressure, pancreas disorder, underactive thyroid, or a brain tumor.

Also tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially steroids or diabetes medications. Your dosages of these medicines may need to be changed when you start using somatropin. Do not stop using a steroid suddenly or change any of your medication doses without your doctor's advice.

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome and are using somatropin, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring.

Call your doctor at once if you have sudden and severe pain in your upper stomach with nausea and vomiting, fast heartbeat, increased thirst or urination, weight loss, or vision changes and sudden, severe pain behind your eyes. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Saizen (somatropin)? Before you receive somatropin, tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a growth hormone medicine, or to drug preservatives such as benzyl alcohol, metacresol or glycerin. You should not use this medication if you are allergic to somatropin, or if you have:

diabetic retinopathy (a serious eye condition caused by diabetes);

cancer; or

Prader-Willi syndrome and are also overweight or have sleep apnea or severe respiratory (lung) problems.

You should also not use somatropin if you have a serious medical condition after having:

open heart surgery or stomach surgery;

trauma or other medical emergency; or

breathing problems (such as lung failure).

To make sure you can safely take somatropin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease;

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

diabetes;

a pituitary gland disorder;

scoliosis;

high blood pressure (hypertension);

a pancreas disorder (especially in children);

a history of cancer;

carpal tunnel syndrome;

underactive thyroid; or

a brain tumor or lesion.

FDA pregnancy category B. Some brands of somatropin are not expected to harm an unborn baby, including Genotropin, Omnitrope, Saizen, Serostim, and Zorbtive. FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether certain other brands of somatropin will harm an unborn baby, including Humatrope, Norditropin, Nutropin, and Tev-tropin. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether somatropin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use somatropin without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Saizen (somatropin)?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your dose and brand of somatropin, and how often you give it will depend on what you are being treated for. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Somatropin is injected into a muscle or under the skin. You may be shown how to use injections at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Use a different place on your body each time you give the injection. Your care provider will show you the best places on your body to inject the medication. Do not inject into the same place two times in a row. Do not inject this medicine into skin or muscle that is red, sore, infected, or injured.

Do not shake the medication bottle or you may ruin the medicine. When mixing somatropin with a diluent (liquid), use a gentle swirling motion. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Use a disposable needle only once. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harm, your blood and growth progress will need to be tested often. Your eyes may also need to be checked. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you are being treated for short bowel syndrome, follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor to help control your condition. Somatropin is not a cure for short bowel syndrome.

If you use a form of somatropin that comes in a cartridge for use with an injection pen, use only the pen injection system provided with the somatropin brand you use.

How you store this medicine will depend on what brand you are using and what diluent you are mixing somatropin with. After mixing somatropin, you may need to use it right away or you may be able to store it for later use. Read and carefully follow the instructions provided with your medicine about proper storage of somatropin before and after it has been mixed. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about proper storage of your medication.

Throw away any somatropin left over after the expiration date on the label has passed.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Call your doctor if you miss more than 3 doses in a row. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose can cause tremors or shaking, cold sweats, increased hunger, headache, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, fast heartbeat, and nausea. Long-term overdose may cause excessive growth.

What should I avoid while using Saizen (somatropin)?

If you use Zorbtive to treat short bowel syndrome, avoid drinking fruit juices or soda beverages. Follow the instructions of your doctor or nutrition counselor about what types of liquids you should drink while using Zorbtive.

Avoid drinking alcohol if you have short bowel syndrome. Alcohol can irritate your stomach and could make your condition worse. Saizen (somatropin) side effects

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring. Rare cases of serious breathing problems have occurred in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome who use somatropin.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate;

increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, and weight loss;

sudden and severe pain behind your eyes, vision changes;

swelling in your head, face, hands, or feet; or

numbness or tingling in your wrist, hand, or fingers.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, feeling tired;

redness, soreness, swelling, rash, itching, pain, or bruising where the medicine was injected;

pain in your arms or legs, joint stiffness or pain;

muscle pain; or

cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Saizen (somatropin)?

Before using somatropin, tell your doctor if you use insulin or take oral (by mouth) medicine to treat diabetes. Somatropin may affect blood sugar levels and you may need to adjust your dose of the diabetes medication. Do not change the dose of your diabetes medication without your doctor's advice.

Tell your doctor if you use any type of steroid medicine such as cortisone, dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, prednisone, and others. Steroids can make somatropin less effective and your doses may need to be adjusted. Do not stop using a steroid suddenly. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune), seizure medication, birth control pills, anabolic steroids, or hormone replacement medications for men or women.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with somatropin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Saizen resources Saizen Side Effects (in more detail) Saizen Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Saizen Drug Interactions Saizen Support Group 1 Review for Saizen - Add your own review/rating Saizen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Saizen Prescribing Information (FDA) Saizen Subcutaneous, Injection Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Somatropin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Genotropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Genotropin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Genotropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humatrope Cartridge MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humatrope Prescribing Information (FDA) Norditropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Norditropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Nutropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nutropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Nutropin AQ MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nutropin AQ Prescribing Information (FDA) Nutropin Depot Prescribing Information (FDA) Omnitrope Prescribing Information (FDA) Omnitrope MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Omnitrope Consumer Overview Serostim Prescribing Information (FDA) Serostim MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tev-Tropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Tev-Tropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zorbtive Prescribing Information (FDA) Zorbtive Consumer Overview Zorbtive MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Saizen with other medications Adult Human Growth Hormone Deficiency Pediatric Growth Hormone Deficiency Short Stature for Age Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about somatropin.

See also: Saizen side effects (in more detail)


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Nutropin AQ


Generic Name: somatropin (soe ma TROE pin)
Brand Names: Genotropin, Genotropin Miniquick, Humatrope, Norditropin, Norditropin Cartridge, Norditropin FlexPro Pen, Norditropin Nordiflex Pen, Nutropin, Nutropin AQ, Omnitrope, Saizen, Serostim, Tev-tropin, Zorbtive

What is Nutropin AQ (somatropin)?

Somatropin is a form of human growth hormone. Human growth hormone is important in the body for the growth of bones and muscles.

Somatropin is used to treat growth failure in children and adults who lack natural growth hormone, and in those with chronic kidney failure, Noonan syndrome, Turner syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, short stature at birth with no catch-up growth, and other causes. Somatropin is also used to prevent severe weight loss in people with AIDS, or to treat short bowel syndrome.

Somatropin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Nutropin AQ (somatropin)?

Before you receive somatropin, tell your doctor about all your past and present medical conditions, especially allergies, trauma, surgery, diabetes, cancer, breathing problems, liver or kidney disease, scoliosis, high blood pressure, pancreas disorder, underactive thyroid, or a brain tumor.

Also tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially steroids or diabetes medications. Your dosages of these medicines may need to be changed when you start using somatropin. Do not stop using a steroid suddenly or change any of your medication doses without your doctor's advice.

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome and are using somatropin, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring.

Call your doctor at once if you have sudden and severe pain in your upper stomach with nausea and vomiting, fast heartbeat, increased thirst or urination, weight loss, or vision changes and sudden, severe pain behind your eyes. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Nutropin AQ (somatropin)? Before you receive somatropin, tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a growth hormone medicine, or to drug preservatives such as benzyl alcohol, metacresol or glycerin. You should not use this medication if you are allergic to somatropin, or if you have:

diabetic retinopathy (a serious eye condition caused by diabetes);

cancer; or

Prader-Willi syndrome and are also overweight or have sleep apnea or severe respiratory (lung) problems.

You should also not use somatropin if you have a serious medical condition after having:

open heart surgery or stomach surgery;

trauma or other medical emergency; or

breathing problems (such as lung failure).

To make sure you can safely take somatropin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease;

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

diabetes;

a pituitary gland disorder;

scoliosis;

high blood pressure (hypertension);

a pancreas disorder (especially in children);

a history of cancer;

carpal tunnel syndrome;

underactive thyroid; or

a brain tumor or lesion.

FDA pregnancy category B. Some brands of somatropin are not expected to harm an unborn baby, including Genotropin, Omnitrope, Saizen, Serostim, and Zorbtive. FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether certain other brands of somatropin will harm an unborn baby, including Humatrope, Norditropin, Nutropin, and Tev-tropin. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether somatropin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use somatropin without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Nutropin AQ (somatropin)?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your dose and brand of somatropin, and how often you give it will depend on what you are being treated for. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Somatropin is injected into a muscle or under the skin. You may be shown how to use injections at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Use a different place on your body each time you give the injection. Your care provider will show you the best places on your body to inject the medication. Do not inject into the same place two times in a row. Do not inject this medicine into skin or muscle that is red, sore, infected, or injured.

Do not shake the medication bottle or you may ruin the medicine. When mixing somatropin with a diluent (liquid), use a gentle swirling motion. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Use a disposable needle only once. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harm, your blood and growth progress will need to be tested often. Your eyes may also need to be checked. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you are being treated for short bowel syndrome, follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor to help control your condition. Somatropin is not a cure for short bowel syndrome.

If you use a form of somatropin that comes in a cartridge for use with an injection pen, use only the pen injection system provided with the somatropin brand you use.

How you store this medicine will depend on what brand you are using and what diluent you are mixing somatropin with. After mixing somatropin, you may need to use it right away or you may be able to store it for later use. Read and carefully follow the instructions provided with your medicine about proper storage of somatropin before and after it has been mixed. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about proper storage of your medication.

Throw away any somatropin left over after the expiration date on the label has passed.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Call your doctor if you miss more than 3 doses in a row. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose can cause tremors or shaking, cold sweats, increased hunger, headache, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, fast heartbeat, and nausea. Long-term overdose may cause excessive growth.

What should I avoid while using Nutropin AQ (somatropin)?

If you use Zorbtive to treat short bowel syndrome, avoid drinking fruit juices or soda beverages. Follow the instructions of your doctor or nutrition counselor about what types of liquids you should drink while using Zorbtive.

Avoid drinking alcohol if you have short bowel syndrome. Alcohol can irritate your stomach and could make your condition worse. Nutropin AQ (somatropin) side effects

If you have Prader-Willi syndrome, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring. Rare cases of serious breathing problems have occurred in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome who use somatropin.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate;

increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, and weight loss;

sudden and severe pain behind your eyes, vision changes;

swelling in your head, face, hands, or feet; or

numbness or tingling in your wrist, hand, or fingers.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, feeling tired;

redness, soreness, swelling, rash, itching, pain, or bruising where the medicine was injected;

pain in your arms or legs, joint stiffness or pain;

muscle pain; or

cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Nutropin AQ (somatropin)?

Before using somatropin, tell your doctor if you use insulin or take oral (by mouth) medicine to treat diabetes. Somatropin may affect blood sugar levels and you may need to adjust your dose of the diabetes medication. Do not change the dose of your diabetes medication without your doctor's advice.

Tell your doctor if you use any type of steroid medicine such as cortisone, dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, prednisone, and others. Steroids can make somatropin less effective and your doses may need to be adjusted. Do not stop using a steroid suddenly. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune), seizure medication, birth control pills, anabolic steroids, or hormone replacement medications for men or women.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with somatropin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Nutropin AQ resources Nutropin AQ Side Effects (in more detail) Nutropin AQ Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Nutropin AQ Drug Interactions Nutropin AQ Support Group 0 Reviews for Nutropin AQ - Add your own review/rating Nutropin AQ MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nutropin AQ Prescribing Information (FDA) Somatropin Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Genotropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Genotropin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Genotropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Humatrope Prescribing Information (FDA) Humatrope Cartridge MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Norditropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Norditropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Nutropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Nutropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nutropin Aq Subcutaneous, Injection Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Nutropin Depot Prescribing Information (FDA) Omnitrope Prescribing Information (FDA) Omnitrope Consumer Overview Omnitrope MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Saizen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Saizen Prescribing Information (FDA) Serostim MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Serostim Prescribing Information (FDA) Tev-Tropin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tev-Tropin Prescribing Information (FDA) Zorbtive Prescribing Information (FDA) Zorbtive MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Zorbtive Consumer Overview Compare Nutropin AQ with other medications Adult Human Growth Hormone Deficiency Growth Retardation, Chronic Renal Failure Hypopituitarism Idiopathic Short Stature Pediatric Growth Hormone Deficiency Short Stature for Age Turner's Syndrome Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about somatropin.

See also: Nutropin AQ side effects (in more detail)


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Skin Cancer Medications


Definition of Skin Cancer:

Skin cancer is the uncontrolled growth of skin cells. If left unchecked, these cancer cells can spread from the skin into other tissues and organs.

There are different types of skin cancer. Basal cell carncinoma is the most common. Melanoma is less common, but more dangerous.

Drugs associated with Skin Cancer

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Skin Cancer. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Topics under Skin Cancer Basal Cell Carcinoma (6 drugs) Melanoma (16 drugs in 2 topics) Squamous Cell Carcinoma (2 drugs) Learn more about Skin Cancer

Micromedex Care Notes:

Liposarcoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Medical Encyclopedia:

Skin cancer

Drugs.com Health Center:

Skin Cancer
Drug List: Carac-Cream Efudex-Cream Efudex-Occlusion-Pack Fluoroplex-Cream
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Respiratory agents


Respiratory agents are drugs or a combination of drugs used to prevent, relieve or treat respiratory diseases. They can be taken as pills or liquid, for the drugs to work systemically. Or they can be available as inhalers or other forms or inhalation devices, where the medicine is delivered directly into the lungs.

See also antiasthmatic combinations antihistamines antitussives bronchodilators adrenergic bronchodilators anticholinergic bronchodilators bronchodilator combinations methylxanthines decongestants expectorants leukotriene modifiers lung surfactants miscellaneous respiratory agents respiratory inhalant products inhaled anti-infectives inhaled corticosteroids mast cell stabilizers mucolytics selective phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors upper respiratory combinations Drug List:
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Nexavar


Pronunciation: soe-RAF-e-nib
Generic Name: Sorafenib
Brand Name: Nexavar
Nexavar is used for:

Treating advanced kidney cancer. It is also used to treat certain types of liver cancer. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Nexavar is a multikinase inhibitor. It works by decreasing tumor growth and replication.

Do NOT use Nexavar if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Nexavar you have a certain type of irregular heartbeat (congenital long QT syndrome) you have a certain type of lung cancer (squamous cell) and are taking carboplatin and paclitaxel

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Nexavar:

Some medical conditions may interact with Nexavar. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have heart failure or other heart problems (eg, disease of the blood vessels in the heart, a recent heart attack, slow or irregular heartbeat), chest pain, high blood pressure, bleeding problems, active bleeding, blood electrolyte problems (eg, low blood calcium, magnesium, or potassium levels), or liver or kidney problems if you are on dialysis, or you have or are being treated for lung cancer if you have had or will be having surgery or a dental procedure if you take any medicine that may increase the risk of a certain type of irregular heartbeat (prolonged QT interval). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are unsure if any of your medicines may increase the risk of this type of irregular heartbeat

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Nexavar. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Warfarin because risk of bleeding may be increased Docetaxel, doxorubicin, fluorouracil/leucovorin, or irinotecan because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Nexavar Barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital, primidone), carbamazepine, dexamethasone, hydantoins (eg, fosphenytoin, phenytoin), nevirapine, oral neomycin, rifamycins (eg, rifabutin, rifampin), or St. John's wort because they may decrease Nexavar's effectiveness

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Nexavar may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Nexavar:

Use Nexavar as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

An extra patient leaflet is available with Nexavar. Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about this information. Take Nexavar on an empty stomach at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating. Swallow Nexavar whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. Take Nexavar with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Continue to take Nexavar even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of Nexavar, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Nexavar.

Important safety information: Nexavar may reduce the number of clot-forming cells (platelets) in your blood. Avoid activities that may cause bruising or injury. Tell your doctor if you have unusual bruising or bleeding. Tell your doctor if you have dark, tarry, or bloody stools. Nexavar may lower the ability of your body to fight infection. Avoid contact with people who have colds or infections. Tell your doctor if you notice signs of infection like fever, sore throat, rash, or chills. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Nexavar before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Both men and women who are taking Nexavar should use effective contraception (birth control) during treatment with Nexavar and for at least 2 weeks after stopping treatment. Lab tests, including blood pressure, blood electrolyte levels, and electrocardiograms (ECGs), may be performed while you use Nexavar. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Nexavar should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Nexavar may cause harm to the fetus. Avoid becoming pregnant while you are taking it and for at least 2 weeks after you stop taking it. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of taking Nexavar while you are pregnant. It is not known if Nexavar is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Nexavar. Possible side effects of Nexavar:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; dry skin; hair thinning or loss; headache; loss of appetite; mouth, bone, muscle, stomach, or joint pain; nausea; tiredness; vomiting; weakness; weight loss.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); black, tarry stools; chest, jaw, or left arm pain; confusion; coughing or vomiting blood; decreased sexual ability; decreased urination; depression; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or sore throat; mouth sores; numbness of an arm or leg; one-sided weakness; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; redness, pain, swelling, numbness, tingling, ulcers, or blisters on the palms of hands or soles of feet; seizures; severe or persistent dizziness, headache, or light-headedness; severe stomach pain, vomiting, or nausea; shortness of breath; speech changes; sudden increased sweating; sudden weight gain; swelling of the ankles, hands, or feet; symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, loss of appetite, pale stools, unusual tiredness, yellowing of the eyes or skin); unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness or weakness; vision changes; vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Nexavar side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include rash, redness, swelling, blistering, or itching of skin; severe or persistent diarrhea.

Proper storage of Nexavar:

Store Nexavar at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Nexavar out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Nexavar, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Nexavar is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Nexavar. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Nexavar resources Nexavar Side Effects (in more detail) Nexavar Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Nexavar Drug Interactions Nexavar Support Group 3 Reviews for Nexavar - Add your own review/rating Nexavar Prescribing Information (FDA) Nexavar Consumer Overview Nexavar Monograph (AHFS DI) Nexavar Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Sorafenib Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Nexavar with other medications Hepatic Tumor Hepatocellular Carcinoma Renal Cell Carcinoma Thyroid Cancer
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Miscellaneous antineoplastics


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Antineoplastics or anticancer drugs affect growth and cell division i.e. are antiproliferative. They work by different mechanisms to prevent the development and spread of neoplastic cells.

They also affect rapidly dividing normal cells, therefore are likely to suppress the bone marrow, suppress growth, impair healing, cause sterility and cause hair loss.

See also

Medical conditions associated with miscellaneous antineoplastics:

Acne Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Adrenal Cortical Carcinoma Anaplastic Astrocytoma Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma Anemia Cancer Cervical Cancer Colorectal Cancer Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma Esophageal Carcinoma Glioblastoma Multiforme Granuloma Annulare Hodgkin's Lymphoma Leprosy, Erythema Nodosum Leprosum Lymphoma Macular Degeneration Melanoma Melanoma, Metastatic Multiple Myeloma Myelodysplastic Syndrome Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Ovarian Cancer Pityriasis rubra pilaris Prostate Cancer Renal Cell Carcinoma Rheumatoid Arthritis Rosacea Small Cell Lung Cancer Tuberculosis, Prophylaxis Urinary Tract Tumors Drug List: Hexalen Proleukin Revlimid Sotret Zytiga Accutane Amnesteem Claravis Vesanoid Velcade Vidaza Camptosar Elspar Ergamisol Erwinaze Hycamtin Lysodren Matulane Oncaspar Ontak Photofrin Targretin Thalomid Theracys Tice-Bcg Tice-Bcg-Vaccine Trisenox Visudyne
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Alkylating agents


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Alkylating agents are a class of chemotherapy drugs that bind to DNA and prevent proper DNA replication. They have chemical groups that can form permanent covalent bonds with nucleophilic substances in the DNA.

Alkylating agents are used as part of chemotherapy in different types of cancers.

See also

Medical conditions associated with alkylating agents:

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia Anaplastic Astrocytoma Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma Bladder Cancer Blood Cell Transplantation Bone Marrow Transplantation Brain Tumor Breast Cancer Bullous Pemphigoid Cancer Cervical Cancer Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cogan's Syndrome Colorectal Cancer Dermatomyositis Endometrial Cancer Ewing's Sarcoma Glioblastoma Multiforme Histiocytosis Hodgkin's Lymphoma IgA Nephropathy Lymphoma Malignant Glioma Melanoma Melanoma, Metastatic Multiple Myeloma Multiple Sclerosis Mycosis Fungoides Nephrotic Syndrome Neuroblastoma Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Organ Transplant, Rejection Prophylaxis Osteogenic Sarcoma Osteosarcoma Ovarian Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Pemphigoid Pemphigus Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Serosal Cavity Neoplastic Disease Small Cell Lung Cancer Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Systemic Sclerosis Testicular Cancer Thrombocythemia Wegener's Granulomatosus Wilms' Tumor Drug List: Cytoxan Myleran Leukeran Paraplatin Treanda Neosar Temodar Alkeran Bicnu Busulfex Ceenu Cytoxan-Lyophilized-Oral-Injection Dtic-Dome Eloxatin Gliadel-Implant-Wafer Ifex-Solution Mustargen Platinol Platinol-Aq Thioplex Zanosar
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Hedrin 4% cutaneous solution (P)


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Hedrin® 4% cutaneous solution

Packaging to state: Hedrin 4% lotion dimeticone

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Dimeticone 4% w/w

For a full list of excipients, see section 6.1.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Cutaneous solution.

Hedrin is a clear, colourless liquid.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Hedrin is indicated for the eradication of headlice infestations.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Adults and children (aged six months and above)

For topical external use only.

Apply sufficient lotion to cover dry hair from the base to the tip to ensure that no part of the scalp is left uncovered. Work into the hair spreading the liquid evenly from roots to tips. Allow hair to dry naturally. Hedrin should be left on hair for a minimum of 8 hours or overnight. Wash out with normal shampoo, rinsing thoroughly with water. Repeat the treatment after seven days.

Children under the age of six months should only be treated under medical supervision.

4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to any of the ingredients.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Discontinue at the first appearance of a skin rash or any other signs of local or general hypersensitivity.

For external use only.

If accidentally introduced into the eyes, flush with water.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Dimeticone is not known to interact with other drugs.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

There is no data to suggest that Hedrin may not be used in pregnancy.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

None known.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Dimeticone is usually well tolerated. Minor adverse events include an itchy or flaky scalp and dripping/irritation around the eyes.

4.9 Overdose

There are no known recognised symptoms of overdose.

It is unlikely that Hedrin will enter the bloodstream via scratched skin however if this does occur, available data suggests it will be rapidly eliminated unchanged. If the lotion were to be accidentally ingested, again, the available data suggests that there are no specific safety concerns.

No special procedures are likely to be needed.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

ATC Code: PO3 AX Other entoparasiticides, incl Scabicides

The solution contains dimeticone, which is used in many pharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations. A 4% concentration has been found to affect the physico-physiological activity of lice. It is less effective in its ovicidal activity and therefore two applications 7 days apart are required.

Hedrin contains no neurotoxic organophosphate insecticides and therefore does not work by acting on specific enzymes within the louse. Hedrin acts on the lice by a physical process to cover the lice and disrupt the ability of the lice to manage its water balance so that treated insects fail to excrete surplus water. Hedrin activity is not diminished in insecticide resistant head lice.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Hedrin is applied topically to the affected area but there is little or no absorption of Hedrin through the skin.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

There are no further relevant data.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Cyclomethicone 5.

6.2 Incompatibilities

None known.

6.3 Shelf Life

Three years, when stored unopened.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

This product does not require any special storage conditions.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

HDPE dropper containers with screw caps; 150ml, 200ml & 250ml capacity.

HDPE containers incorporating plastic trigger spray, cap and PE dip tube; 120ml capacity.

Not all packs may be marketed

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

Care should be taken as the product may cause a slip hazard if accidentally spilt onto smooth surfaces.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Thornton & Ross Ltd

Linthwaite

Huddersfield

HD7 5QH

United Kingdom

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL00240/0345

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

07.03.2008

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

11/07/2011

11 DOSIMETRY

Not Applicable

12 INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS

Not Applicable


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Timoptol-LA 0.25 and 0.5% w / v Gel-Forming Eye Drops Solution


Timoptol-LA 0.25% w/v Gel-Forming Eye Drops Solution

Timoptol-LA 0.5% w/v Gel-Forming Eye Drops Solution

timolol (as maleate)

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Timoptol-LA is and what it is used for 2. Before you use Timoptol-LA 3. How to use Timoptol-LA 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Timoptol-LA 6. Further information What Timoptol-La Is And What It Is Used For

Timoptol-LA contains a substance called timolol which belongs to a group of medicines called beta-blockers. Timolol lowers the pressure in your eye(s). It is used to treat glaucoma, when the pressure in the eye is raised.

Before You Use Timoptol-La Do not use Timoptol-LA if: you are allergic (hypersensitive) to timolol maleate or any of the other ingredients of Timoptol-LA (see section 6 for Further Information) you have respiratory disease, such as asthma, a history of asthma or chronic obstructive lung disease you have heart problems slow or irregular heartbeat heart failure "cardiogenic shock" – a serious heart condition caused by very low blood pressure, which may result in the following symptoms: dizziness and lightheadedness, fast pulse rate, white skin, sweating, restlessness, loss of consciousness you wear contact lenses.

If you are not sure whether you should use Timoptol-LA talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Take special care with Timoptol-LA

Tell your doctor about any medical problems you have now or have had in the past. In particular tell them about any of the following, before you use Timoptol-LA.

asthma and other lung problems heart or circulation problems low blood pressure allergies to any medicines.

If your eye becomes irritated or any new eye problems come on, talk to your doctor straight away. Eye problems could include redness of the eye or swelling of the eyelids (see Section 4: Possible Side Effects).

If you suspect that Timoptol-LA is causing an allergic reaction or hypersensitivity (for example, skin rash, or redness and itching of the eye), stop using Timoptol-LA and contact your doctor immediately.

Tell you doctor if:

you get an eye infection you injure your eye or have an operation on it your eye problems get worse or you get any new symptoms. Use in children

Timoptol-LA is not recommended for use in children and adolescents

Using other medicines

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including other eye drops or medicines obtained without a prescription. It is important to tell your doctor before using Timoptol-LA if you are taking one or more of the following medicines:

a calcium antagonist, such as nifedipine, verapamil or diltiazem, often used to treat high blood pressure, angina, an abnormal heartbeat or Raynaud’s syndrome digoxin, a medicine used for heart failure or abnormal heartbeat medicines known as catecholamine-depleting agents, such as, rauwolfia alkaloids and reserpine used for high blood pressure medicines called pressor amines, such as adrenaline used to treat severe allergic reaction quinidine, a medicine often used for abnormal heartbeat clonidine, a medicine used for high blood pressure other beta-blockers taken by mouth or used as eye drops, because they belong to the same group of medicines as Timoptol-LA and could have an additive effect. Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Ask your doctor for advice before taking any medicine.

Use in pregnancy

You should not use Timopol-LA during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or intend to become pregnant.

Use in breast-feeding

You should not use Timoptol-LA if you are breast-feeding. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding or intend to breast-feed.

Driving and using machines

After putting your eye drops in your eye, your vision may be blurred for 30 seconds up to 5 minutes. In some patients this may last up to 30 minutes or longer. You may also feel dizzy which may affect your ability to drive or operate machinery. Do not drive and/or operate machinery until you feel well and your vision is clear.

How To Use Timoptol-La

Always use Timoptol-LA exactly as your doctor has told you. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure. The doctor will decide how many drops you should take each day and how long you should use them.

The usual dose is one drop in the affected eye(s) once each day.

If your doctor recommends that you use Timoptol-LA with another eye drop, the other medicine should be administered at least 10 minutes before Timoptol-LA.

Do not change your usual dose without talking to your doctor.

Do not allow the tip of the container to touch the eye or areas around the eye. It may become contaminated with bacteria that can cause eye infection leading to serious damage of the eye, even loss of vision. To avoid possible contamination of the container, keep the tip of the container away from contact with any surface.

Instructions for use.

It is recommended that you wash your hands before putting in your eye drops.

1. Before using the medication for the first time, be sure the Safety Strip on the front of the bottle is unbroken. A gap between the bottle and the cap is normal for an unopened bottle. 2. Tear off the safety strip to break the seal. 3. Invert the closed bottle and shake ONCE before each use. (it is not necessary to shake the bottle more than once). To open the bottle, unscrew the cap by turning as indicated by the arrows on top of the cap. Do not pull the cap directly up and away from the bottle.

Pulling the cap directly up will prevent your dispenser from operating properly.

4. Tilt your head back and pull your lower eyelid down slightly to form a pocket between your eyelid and your eye. 5. Invert the bottle, and press lightly with your thumb or first finger over the ‘Finger Push Area’ as shown, until a single drop is dispensed into your eye, as directed by your doctor.

DO NOT TOUCH YOUR EYE OR EYELID WITH THE DROPPER TIP.

Ophthalmic medications, if handled improperly, can become contaminated by common bacteria known to cause infections. Serious damage to the eye and subsequent loss of vision may result from using contaminated ophthalmic medications. If you think your medication may be contaminated, or if you develop an eye infection, contact your doctor immediately concerning continued use of this bottle.

6. If drop dispensing is difficult after opening for the first time, replace the cap on the bottle and tighten (do not overtighten) and then remove by turning the cap in the opposite direction as indicated by the arrows on top of the cap.
7. Repeat steps 4 & 5 with the other eye if instructed to do so by your doctor.
8. Replace the cap by turning until it is firmly touching the bottle. The arrow on the left side of the cap must be aligned with the arrow on the left side of the bottle label for proper closure. Do not overtighten or you may damage the bottle and cap.
9. The dispenser tip is designed to provide a single drop; therefore do NOT enlarge the hole of the dispenser tip.
10. After you have used all doses there will be some Timoptol-LA left in the bottle. You should not be concerned since an extra amount of Timoptol-LA has been added and you will get the full amount of Timoptol-LA that your doctor has prescribed. Do not attempt to remove the excess medicine from the bottle. If you use more Timoptol-LA than you should

If you put too many drops in your eye or swallow any of the drops, you may:

have a headache feel dizzy or light-headed have difficulty breathing feel that your heart rate has slowed down.

If this happens, contact your doctor immediately.

If you forget to use Timoptol-LA

It is important to take Timoptol-LA as prescribed by your doctor.

If you miss a dose, use the drops as soon as possible. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take the next dose at the usual time. Do not take a double dose to make up for the forgotten dose. If you stop using Timoptol-LA

If you want to stop using this medicine talk to your doctor first. If you have any further questions on the use of this product, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines Timoptol-LA may cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. If they do occur, you may need medical attention. In some patients these may include:

Allergic reactions allergic skin rash and hives severe allergic reaction which causes difficulty in breathing or dizziness. Eyes and ears burning and stinging dry eyes irritation and redness of eye or eyelid sensitivity to light discharge from your eye visual changes such as double vision decreased sensation of your eye surface pain in your eye drooping eyelid ringing in your ears. Heart and circulation chest pain heart attack fainting palpitations an irregular heartbeat a slowing of your heart rate low blood pressure interference with your blood supply to the brain which may lead to a stroke too much fluid, mainly water, accumulating in your body limping because there is a reduced blood supply to your legs swelling or coldness of your hands, feet and extremities, caused by constriction of your blood vessels. Chest wheezing shortness of breath difficulty breathing cough. Stomach and gut nausea diarrhoea indigestion dry mouth. Sexual decreased sex drive in men a condition which effects your penis called Peyronie’s disease. The signs may be abnormal curve, pain or hardening of the tissue of your penis. Skin and hair hair loss a skin disease called psoriasis, where areas of skin such as knees and elbows are covered in scales worsening of psoriasis. Nervous system dizziness depression unable to sleep nightmares memory loss increase in signs and symptoms of myasthenia gravis tingling sensation General headache tiredness weakness a condition called lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus)

Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information about the side effects. Both have a more complete list of side effects.

If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How To Store Timoptol-La

Keep your eye drops out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not store your eye drops above 25°C. Do not freeze. Store the bottle in the outer carton. You can use Timoptol-LA for 28 days after first opening the bottle.

Do not use Timoptol-LA after the expiry date which is stated on the carton after EXP. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.

Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

Further Information What Timoptol-LA contains

The active substance is timolol maleate.

Timoptol-LA is available in two strengths:

0.25% w/v solution of timolol maleate 0.5% w/v solution of timolol maleate.

The other ingredients are:

benzododecinium bromide as preservative gellan gum mannitol E421 trometamol water for injections. What Timoptol-LA looks like and contents of the pack

Timoptol-LA is a sterile gel-forming eye drops solution and is available in bottles containing 2.5 ml of sterile eye drops solution.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer

Marketing Authorisation Holder UK and Malta

Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd Hertford Road Hoddesdon Hertfordshire EN11 9BU United Kingdom

Marketing Authorisation Holder Ireland

Merck Sharp & Dohme Ireland (Human Health) Ltd Pelham House South County Business Park Leopardstown Dublin 18 Ireland

Manufacturer

Laboratories Merck Sharp & Dohme – Chibret (Mirabel) Route de Marsat RIOM 63963Clermont –Ferrand Cedex 9 France

This leaflet was last approved in June 2008.

This leaflet gives the most important patient information about Timoptol-LA. If you have any questions after you have read it, ask your doctor or pharmacist who will give you further information.

Further information about glaucoma is available from:

International Glaucoma Association (IGA) 15A Highpoint Business Village Henwood Ashford Kent TN24 8DH Tel:01233 648170 E-mail: info@iga.org.uk

Registered Charity number 274681.

(The IGA is an independent charity organisation which helps glaucoma patients and their relatives, and is not associated with Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited.)

Alternatively, if you or someone you know has problems with their vision, and you require further advice or information, please phone the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) Helpline on 0845 776 9999, Monday to Friday 9am to 5 pm, calls charged at local rates.

(The RNIB is an independent UK charity and is not associated with Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited).

denotes registered trademark of

Merck & Co., Inc. Whitehouse Station NJ USA

© Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited 2008. All rights reserved.

PIL.TOTX.09.UK.2765 230209


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Mineral Oil Enema


Pronunciation: MIN-uh-ral
Generic Name: Mineral Oil
Brand Name: Fleet
Mineral Oil Enema is used for:

Relieving occasional constipation or fecal impaction (severe constipation). It may also be used to cleanse and remove residue from the bowel in certain situations (eg, after using a barium enema).

Mineral Oil Enema is a lubricant laxative that works by slowing the absorption of water from the bowel, which softens the stool.

Do NOT use Mineral Oil Enema if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Mineral Oil Enema you have appendicitis or a blockage in your intestines you are bedridden

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Mineral Oil Enema:

Some medical conditions may interact with Mineral Oil Enema. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have heart failure, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, or kidney problems

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Mineral Oil Enema. However, no specific interactions with Mineral Oil Enema are known at this time.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Mineral Oil Enema may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Mineral Oil Enema:

Use Mineral Oil Enema as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

To use Mineral Oil Enema, lie on your left side with your knee bent and your arms resting comfortably. You may also kneel, then lower your head and chest forward until the left side of your face is resting on the surface with your left arm folded comfortably. Remove the orange protective shield from the enema tip before inserting. With steady pressure, gently insert the enema tip into the rectum with a slight side to side movement. Insertion may be easier if you bear down, as if having a bowel movement. This helps to relax the muscles around the anus. Do not force the enema tip into the rectum. This may cause injury. Squeeze the bottle until nearly all of the liquid is gone, unless directed otherwise by your doctor or the dosing instructions on the package labeling. It is not necessary to empty the bottle completely. Remove the enema tip from your rectum, then hold in the medicine according to your doctor's instructions. Take Mineral Oil Enema at least 2 hours before bedtime. If you miss a dose of Mineral Oil Enema and you are using it regularly, use it as soon as possible. If several hours have passed or if it is nearing time for the next dose, do not double the dose to catch up, unless advised by your health care provider. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Mineral Oil Enema.

Important safety information: Do not use Mineral Oil Enema or any laxative for more than 1 week unless directed to do so by your health care provider. Do not exceed the recommended dose or use Mineral Oil Enema for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Use of Mineral Oil Enema for a long time may result in loss of normal bowel function. Do not take additional laxatives or stool softeners with Mineral Oil Enema unless directed by your doctor. If you notice a sudden change in bowel habits that lasts for 2 weeks or more, do not continue using Mineral Oil Enema. Instead, check with your doctor. Stop use and contact your doctor immediately if you experience rectal bleeding or failure to have a bowel movement after using a laxative. This may be a sign of a serious condition. If you develop nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain, stop using Mineral Oil Enema and contact your doctor immediately. Mineral Oil Enema is not recommended for use in CHILDREN younger than 2 years of age. Safety and effectiveness in this age group have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Mineral Oil Enema during pregnancy. It is unknown if Mineral Oil Enema is excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding, check with your doctor to discuss the risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Mineral Oil Enema:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Bloating; diarrhea; gas; nausea; stomach cramps.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); dizziness; failure to have a bowel movement within 6 to 8 hours after using Mineral Oil Enema; fainting; muscle cramps or pain; rectal bleeding; swelling, pain, or irritation; weakness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch .

See also: Mineral side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include diarrhea; stomach cramps.

Proper storage of Mineral Oil Enema:

Store Mineral Oil Enema at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) in a tightly closed container. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Protect from freezing. Keep Mineral Oil Enema out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Mineral Oil Enema, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Mineral Oil Enema is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Mineral Oil Enema. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Mineral Oil resources Mineral Oil Side Effects (in more detail) Mineral Oil Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Mineral Oil Drug Interactions Mineral Oil Support Group 0 Reviews · Be the first to review/rate this drug
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Heparins


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Heparin is an injectable anticoagulant that activates antithrombin III, which inhibits thrombin and factor Xa, factors necessary in the final stages of blood clotting cascade.

There are two types of heparins: high molecular weight heparins and low molecular weight heparins.

High molecular weight heparins require daily blood monitoring to check the aPTT. Low molecular weight heparins give a better anticoagulant response and do not need daily blood monitoring.

Heparin is used to treat or prevent clots in conditions where there is a high risk of clot formation and thromboembolism, such as in atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, deep vein thrombosis, knee and hip surgery and so on.

See also

Medical conditions associated with heparins:

Acute Coronary Syndrome Angina Anticoagulation During Pregnancy Antiphospholipid Syndrome Deep Vein Thrombosis Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Abdominal Surgery Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Hip Replacement Surgery Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Orthopedic Surgery Deep Vein Thrombosis, Prophylaxis Heart Attack Patency Maintenance of Indwelling Intravenous Devices Pulmonary Embolism Thrombotic/Thromboembolic Disorder Venous Thromboembolism Drug List: Fragmin Innohep Lovenox Normiflo Heparin-Lock-Flush Heparin-Sodium Orgaran
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