iv missed shot hard bruise turning gray
 

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Boots Alternatives Arnica Bruise Relief


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Arnica Cream

Nelsons Natural Care Bruise Cream

Boots Alternatives Arnica Bruise Relief

Savlon Natural First Aid for Bruises

* Only one trade name used on each product

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Arnica montana tincture 1/10 HSE 9.0% v/w

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Cream

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

A topical herbal remedy traditionally used in the symptomatic treatment of bruises.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

By external application. Apply gently to bruised areas.

The dosage is the same for adults, children and the elderly.

4.3 Contraindications

Known hypersensitivity to any of the ingredients.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Do not apply to broken skin.

Discontinue use if skin rash or contact dermatitis appears.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Not known.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

As with many other medicaments, use during this period is at the physician's discretion.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Not applicable.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

May cause hypersensitivity reactions and may cause dermatitis when applied to skin of sensitised individuals.

4.9 Overdose

If accidentally ingested, overdosage with Arnica may cause irritation of the gastro-intestinal tract, and possibly severe gastro-intestinal, nervous system and cardiovascular disturbances and collapse. Initial treatment should consist of gastric lavage; otherwise treatment should be symptomatic and supportive and may include the administration of demulcent.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Not applicable.

Used in accordance with homoeopathic tradition by reference to homoeopathic materia medica.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Not applicable.

Used in accordance with homoeopathic tradition by reference to homoeopathic materia medica.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Not applicable

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Purified Water

White soft paraffin

Cetearyl Alcohol, PEG-20 Stearate

Methyl parahydroxybenzoate

Honey

Propyl parahydroxybenzoate

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not known.

6.3 Shelf Life

60 months.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Store below 25°C.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Epoxy phenolic lacquered aluminium tube. Polyethylene cap. 25 g, 30 g.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

Not applicable

Administrative Data 7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

A. Nelson & Co. Limited.

5 Endeavour Way

Wimbledon

London

SW19 9UH

Trading style: Nelsons Homoeopathy

Boots Alternatives

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 01175/5037R

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

Renewal of authorisation: 29/05/2001

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

01/09/2003


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Toxi Sorb Bolus



Dosage Form: FOR ANIMAL USE ONLY
TOXI-SORB BOLUS INDICATIONS

INDICATIONS: For use as an aid in relief of simple non-infectious diarrhea in horses and cattle.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: Administer orally.Give two (2) boluses to adult cattle and horses. Give one (1) bolus to calves and foals.

Repeat treatment at 4 to 6 hour intervals as needed. Discontinue use of product  after 3 days. If symptoms persist after using this preparation for 3 days, consult a veterinarian.

T-7667-02              Rev. 12-09

COMPOSITION

COMPOSITION: Each bolus contains: Activated Attapulgite 20%, Carob Flour, Pectin and Magnesium Trisilicate, in a sugar and starch base.

Store at room temperature between 15o and 30oC (59o-86oF).

TAKE TIME OBSERVE LABEL DIRECTIONS

LOT NO.:                             EXP. DATE:


TOXI-SORB BOLUS 
activated attapulgite  tablet Product Information Product Type OTC ANIMAL DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 58005-667 Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength ATTAPULGITE (ATTAPULGITE) ATTAPULGITE 3.7  g Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength No Inactive Ingredients Found Product Characteristics Color gray (Light gray to brownish) Score 2 pieces Shape OVAL (Oblong) Size 5mm Flavor Imprint Code 2 Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 58005-667-02 50 BOLUS In 1 JAR None
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date unapproved drug other 11/01/1992
Labeler - Sparhawk Laboratories, Inc. (958829558) Revised: 01/2010Sparhawk Laboratories, Inc.

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Pneumovax 23


Generic Name: pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent (NOO moe KOK al POL ee SAK a rides, 23-VAY lent)
Brand Names: Pneumovax 23

What is pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain and these conditions can be fatal.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV) is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. PPSV contains 23 of the most common types of pneumococcal bacteria.

PPSV works by exposing you to a small dose of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes your body to develop immunity to the disease. PPSV will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

PPSV is for use only in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. For children younger than 2 years old, another vaccine called Prevnar (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV] 7-valent) is used, usually given between the ages of 2 months and 15 months.

Like any vaccine, PPSV may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine?

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine? You should not receive this vaccine if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine.

Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia, or easy bruising.

The timing and number of PPSV doses you receive will depend on whether you have any of these other conditions:

cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma;

HIV or AIDS;

sickle cell disease;

a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome;

a history of organ or bone marrow transplant;

if you are receiving chemotherapy;

if you have been using steroid medication for a long period of time;

if you are scheduled to have your spleen removed (splenectomy); or

if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Vaccines may be harmful to an unborn baby and generally should not be given to a pregnant woman. However, not vaccinating the mother could be more harmful to the baby if the mother becomes infected with a disease that this vaccine could prevent. Your doctor will decide whether you should receive this vaccine, especially if you have a high risk of infection with pneumococcal disease. It is not known whether PPSV passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is this vaccine given?

PPSV is given as an injection (shot) under the skin or into a muscle of your arm or thigh. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

PPSV is usually given as a routine vaccination in adults who are 65 years and older.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 2 and 64 years old who have:

heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes;

a cerebrospinal fluid leak, or a cochlear implant (an electronic hearing device);

alcoholism or liver disease (including cirrhosis);

sickle cell disease or a disorder of the spleen;

a weak immune system caused by HIV, AIDS, cancer, kidney failure, organ transplantation, or a damaged spleen; or

a weak immune system caused by taking steroids or receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 19 and 64 years old who smoke or have asthma.

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

If your doctor has prescribed an antibiotic (such as penicillin) to help prevent infection with pneumococcal bacteria, do not stop using the antibiotic after you receive the PPSV. Take the antibiotic for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

Most people receive only one PPSV shot during their lifetime. However, people in certain age groups or with certain disease conditions that put them at risk of infection may need to receive more than one vaccine. Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since PPSV is usually given only one time, you will most likely not be on a dosing schedule. If you are receiving a repeat PPSV shot, be sure to tell your doctor if it has been less than 5 years since you last received a pneumococcal vaccine.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is not likely to occur.

What should I avoid' before or after receiving this vaccine ? PPSV should not be given within 4 weeks before or after you receive a herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax). This vaccine side effects You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

high fever (103 degrees or higher);

easy bruising or bleeding;

swollen glands with skin rash or itching, joint pain, and general ill feeling;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, confusion or weakness;

numbness or tingly feeling in your feet and spreading upward, severe lower back pain;

changes in behavior, problems with vision, speech, swallowing, or bladder and bowel functions; or

slow heart rate, trouble breathing, feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

low fever (102 degrees or less), chills, tired feeling;

swelling, pain, tenderness, or redness anywhere on your body;

headache, nausea, vomiting;

joint or muscle pain;

swelling or stiffness in the arm or leg the vaccine was injected into;

mild skin rash; or

mild soreness, warmth, redness, swelling, or a hard lump where the shot was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

What other drugs will affect pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)? Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you have recently received drugs or treatments that can weaken the immune system, including:

an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;

medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or

medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with PPSV. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Pneumovax 23 resources Pneumovax 23 Side Effects (in more detail) Pneumovax 23 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pneumovax 23 Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Pneumovax 23 - Add your own review/rating Pneumovax 23 Prescribing Information (FDA) Pneumovax 23 Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Pneumovax 23 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Pneumovax 23 with other medications Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist may have additional information about pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine. You may also find additional information from your local health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

See also: Pneumovax 23 side effects (in more detail)


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pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent


Generic Name: pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent (NOO moe KOK al POL ee SAK a rides, 23-VAY lent)
Brand Names: Pneumovax 23

What is pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain and these conditions can be fatal.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV) is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. PPSV contains 23 of the most common types of pneumococcal bacteria.

PPSV works by exposing you to a small dose of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes your body to develop immunity to the disease. PPSV will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

PPSV is for use only in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. For children younger than 2 years old, another vaccine called Prevnar (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV] 7-valent) is used, usually given between the ages of 2 months and 15 months.

Like any vaccine, PPSV may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine?

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine? You should not receive this vaccine if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine.

Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia, or easy bruising.

The timing and number of PPSV doses you receive will depend on whether you have any of these other conditions:

cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma;

HIV or AIDS;

sickle cell disease;

a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome;

a history of organ or bone marrow transplant;

if you are receiving chemotherapy;

if you have been using steroid medication for a long period of time;

if you are scheduled to have your spleen removed (splenectomy); or

if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Vaccines may be harmful to an unborn baby and generally should not be given to a pregnant woman. However, not vaccinating the mother could be more harmful to the baby if the mother becomes infected with a disease that this vaccine could prevent. Your doctor will decide whether you should receive this vaccine, especially if you have a high risk of infection with pneumococcal disease. It is not known whether PPSV passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is this vaccine given?

PPSV is given as an injection (shot) under the skin or into a muscle of your arm or thigh. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

PPSV is usually given as a routine vaccination in adults who are 65 years and older.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 2 and 64 years old who have:

heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes;

a cerebrospinal fluid leak, or a cochlear implant (an electronic hearing device);

alcoholism or liver disease (including cirrhosis);

sickle cell disease or a disorder of the spleen;

a weak immune system caused by HIV, AIDS, cancer, kidney failure, organ transplantation, or a damaged spleen; or

a weak immune system caused by taking steroids or receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 19 and 64 years old who smoke or have asthma.

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

If your doctor has prescribed an antibiotic (such as penicillin) to help prevent infection with pneumococcal bacteria, do not stop using the antibiotic after you receive the PPSV. Take the antibiotic for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

Most people receive only one PPSV shot during their lifetime. However, people in certain age groups or with certain disease conditions that put them at risk of infection may need to receive more than one vaccine. Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since PPSV is usually given only one time, you will most likely not be on a dosing schedule. If you are receiving a repeat PPSV shot, be sure to tell your doctor if it has been less than 5 years since you last received a pneumococcal vaccine.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is not likely to occur.

What should I avoid' before or after receiving this vaccine ? PPSV should not be given within 4 weeks before or after you receive a herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax). This vaccine side effects You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

high fever (103 degrees or higher);

easy bruising or bleeding;

swollen glands with skin rash or itching, joint pain, and general ill feeling;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, confusion or weakness;

numbness or tingly feeling in your feet and spreading upward, severe lower back pain;

changes in behavior, problems with vision, speech, swallowing, or bladder and bowel functions; or

slow heart rate, trouble breathing, feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

low fever (102 degrees or less), chills, tired feeling;

swelling, pain, tenderness, or redness anywhere on your body;

headache, nausea, vomiting;

joint or muscle pain;

swelling or stiffness in the arm or leg the vaccine was injected into;

mild skin rash; or

mild soreness, warmth, redness, swelling, or a hard lump where the shot was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis:

0.5 mL dose injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly (preferably in the deltoid muscle or lateral mid-thigh).

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis:

>= 2 years: 0.5 mL dose injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly (preferably in the deltoid muscle or lateral mid-thigh).

What other drugs will affect pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)? Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you have recently received drugs or treatments that can weaken the immune system, including:

an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;

medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or

medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with PPSV. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent resources Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Dosage Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Drug Interactions Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent Support Group 0 Reviews for Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent - Add your own review/rating Compare pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV), 23-valent with other medications Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist may have additional information about pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine. You may also find additional information from your local health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
read more / Download


pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent


Generic Name: pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent (NOO moe KOK al POL ee SAK a rides, 23-VAY lent)
Brand Names: Pneumovax 23

What is pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain and these conditions can be fatal.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV) is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. PPSV contains 23 of the most common types of pneumococcal bacteria.

PPSV works by exposing you to a small dose of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes your body to develop immunity to the disease. PPSV will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

PPSV is for use only in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. For children younger than 2 years old, another vaccine called Prevnar (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV] 7-valent) is used, usually given between the ages of 2 months and 15 months.

Like any vaccine, PPSV may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine?

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine? You should not receive this vaccine if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine.

Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia, or easy bruising.

The timing and number of PPSV doses you receive will depend on whether you have any of these other conditions:

cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma;

HIV or AIDS;

sickle cell disease;

a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome;

a history of organ or bone marrow transplant;

if you are receiving chemotherapy;

if you have been using steroid medication for a long period of time;

if you are scheduled to have your spleen removed (splenectomy); or

if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Vaccines may be harmful to an unborn baby and generally should not be given to a pregnant woman. However, not vaccinating the mother could be more harmful to the baby if the mother becomes infected with a disease that this vaccine could prevent. Your doctor will decide whether you should receive this vaccine, especially if you have a high risk of infection with pneumococcal disease. It is not known whether PPSV passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is this vaccine given?

PPSV is given as an injection (shot) under the skin or into a muscle of your arm or thigh. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

PPSV is usually given as a routine vaccination in adults who are 65 years and older.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 2 and 64 years old who have:

heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes;

a cerebrospinal fluid leak, or a cochlear implant (an electronic hearing device);

alcoholism or liver disease (including cirrhosis);

sickle cell disease or a disorder of the spleen;

a weak immune system caused by HIV, AIDS, cancer, kidney failure, organ transplantation, or a damaged spleen; or

a weak immune system caused by taking steroids or receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

PPSV may also be given to people between the ages 19 and 64 years old who smoke or have asthma.

PPSV should be given at least 2 weeks before the start of any treatment that can weaken your immune system. PPSV is also given at least 2 weeks before you undergo a splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen).

The timing of this vaccination is very important for it to be effective. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

If your doctor has prescribed an antibiotic (such as penicillin) to help prevent infection with pneumococcal bacteria, do not stop using the antibiotic after you receive the PPSV. Take the antibiotic for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

Most people receive only one PPSV shot during their lifetime. However, people in certain age groups or with certain disease conditions that put them at risk of infection may need to receive more than one vaccine. Before receiving this vaccine, tell your doctor if you have received a pneumococcal vaccine within the past 3 to 5 years.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since PPSV is usually given only one time, you will most likely not be on a dosing schedule. If you are receiving a repeat PPSV shot, be sure to tell your doctor if it has been less than 5 years since you last received a pneumococcal vaccine.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is not likely to occur.

What should I avoid' before or after receiving this vaccine ? PPSV should not be given within 4 weeks before or after you receive a herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax). This vaccine side effects You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever need to receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease (such as pneumonia or meningitis) is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

high fever (103 degrees or higher);

easy bruising or bleeding;

swollen glands with skin rash or itching, joint pain, and general ill feeling;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, confusion or weakness;

numbness or tingly feeling in your feet and spreading upward, severe lower back pain;

changes in behavior, problems with vision, speech, swallowing, or bladder and bowel functions; or

slow heart rate, trouble breathing, feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

low fever (102 degrees or less), chills, tired feeling;

swelling, pain, tenderness, or redness anywhere on your body;

headache, nausea, vomiting;

joint or muscle pain;

swelling or stiffness in the arm or leg the vaccine was injected into;

mild skin rash; or

mild soreness, warmth, redness, swelling, or a hard lump where the shot was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis:

0.5 mL dose injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly (preferably in the deltoid muscle or lateral mid-thigh).

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis:

>= 2 years: 0.5 mL dose injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly (preferably in the deltoid muscle or lateral mid-thigh).

What other drugs will affect pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV)? Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you have recently received drugs or treatments that can weaken the immune system, including:

an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;

medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or

medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with PPSV. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent resources Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Dosage Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Drug Interactions Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent Support Group 0 Reviews for Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent - Add your own review/rating Compare pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV), 23-valent with other medications Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist may have additional information about pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine. You may also find additional information from your local health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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gold sodium thiomalate


Generic Name: gold sodium thiomalate (gold SOE dee um thye OH ma late)
Brand names: Myochrysine, Aurolate

What is gold sodium thiomalate?

Gold sodium thiomalate is a form of gold. Gold suppresses the inflammatory process.

Gold sodium thiomalate is used as an injection to treat adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

Gold sodium thiomalate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about gold sodium thiomalate?

Contact your doctor immediately if you experience itching, a rash, a sore mouth, indigestion, a metallic taste in the mouth, severe or bloody diarrhea, easy bruising, or a nosebleed. These could be early signs of a toxic effect.

In rare cases, exposure to sunlight may cause areas of the skin to turn a bluish-gray color. To lessen this effect, minimize exposure to sunlight and wear a sunscreen and protective clothing when exposure to the sun is unavoidable. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking gold sodium thiomalate?

Before taking gold sodium thiomalate, tell your doctor if you

have ever had any type of reaction to a gold compound or to any other medication;

have a history of bone marrow depression or blood problems;

have kidney disease; have liver disease;

have congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, or any other type of heart disease;

have diabetes;

have inflammatory bowel disease;

have a rash; or

have severe lung disease.

You may not be able to take gold sodium thiomalate, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during your therapy if you have any of these conditions.

Gold sodium thiomalate is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether gold sodium thiomalate will be harmful to an unborn baby. Gold sodium thiomalate does cross the placenta, and may accumulate in the tissue of a baby. Do not take gold sodium thiomalate without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. Gold sodium thiomalate passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing infant. Gold sodium thiomalate is not recommended for use during breast-feeding. Do not take gold sodium thiomalate without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take gold sodium thiomalate?

Gold sodium thiomalate is given by injection. Your doctor or nurse will administer your doses, usually on a weekly basis to begin with, then every other week to monthly, depending upon your response to the medication.

You may want to lie down after injections, and your doctor will want to monitor you for side effects for 10 to 15 minutes following each shot.

Gold sodium thiomalate can cause serious side effects involving white and red blood cells. Your doctor will want to test your blood and urine before each injection to monitor any changes before they become dangerous.

Do not stop using gold sodium thiomalate without first talking to your doctor. It may take up to 3 months for you to see any effects from this medication, and it may be 6 months or more before the full benefits are realized. What happens if I miss a dose?

Doses are given on a weekly basis. You should receive the missed dose as soon as possible, but a double dose should not be injected to make up for a missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of an gold sodium thiomalate overdose include blood in the urine, painful urination, fever, sores or ulcers in the mouth, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, and itching. A gold sodium thiomalate overdose can result in death.

What should I avoid while using gold sodium thiomalate? In rare cases, exposure to sunlight may cause areas of the skin to turn a bluish-gray color. To lessen this effect, minimize exposure to sunlight and wear a sunscreen and protective clothing when exposure to the sun is unavoidable. Gold sodium thiomalate side effects Stop taking gold sodium thiomalate and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Rarely, other serious side effects may also occur. Call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following:

itching or a rash;

a sore mouth, indigestion, or a metallic taste in the mouth;

severe or bloody diarrhea;

easy bruising or a nosebleed;

yellow skin or eyes;

abdominal pain;

seizures;

confusion or hallucinations;

blood in vomit or stools;

blood in the urine or painful urination; or

shortness of breath; or

weakness, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, sweating, fainting, and flushing shortly after an injection.

In addition, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Talk to your doctor if you experience any of the following:

diarrhea or loose stools;

nausea, stomach upset, decreased appetite;

changes in taste; or

sores or ulcers in the mouth.

Arthritic symptoms may appear to worsen for 1 to 2 days following an injection and should decrease with subsequent injections.

Gold sodium thiomalate can cause serious side effects involving white and red blood cells. Your doctor will want to test your blood and urine before each injection to monitor any changes before they become dangerous.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Gold sodium thiomalate Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis:

Initial dose: 10 mg IM one time as a test dose.
Observe for 15-30 minutes for adverse/allergic reaction.
25 mg IM one week later and repeat in another week. Then 50 mg IM once a week until a cumulative dose of 1000 mg has been reached.
Maintenance dose: 25 to 50 mg every other week for 2 to 20 weeks. If the clinical course remains stable, give 25 to 50 mg every third and subsequently every fourth week indefinitely.

What other drugs will affect gold sodium thiomalate?

Before using gold sodium thiomalate, tell your doctor and pharmacist about all prescription and over-the-counter medicines that you take, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products, so that your treatment can be monitored for interactions.

More gold sodium thiomalate resources Gold sodium thiomalate Side Effects (in more detail) Gold sodium thiomalate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Gold sodium thiomalate Drug Interactions Gold sodium thiomalate Support Group 0 Reviews for Gold sodium thiomalate - Add your own review/rating Gold Sodium Thiomalate Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Gold Sodium Thiomalate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Myochrysine Prescribing Information (FDA) Myochrysine Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare gold sodium thiomalate with other medications Felty's Syndrome Pemphigus Rheumatoid Arthritis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has more information about gold sodium thiomalate written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: gold sodium thiomalate side effects (in more detail)


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Engerix-B


Generic Name: hepatitis B adult vaccine (HEP a TYE tis)
Brand Names: Engerix-B, Recombivax HB Adult, Recombivax HB Dialysis Formulation

What is hepatitis B vaccine?

Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by virus.

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver that is spread through blood or bodily fluids, sexual contact or sharing IV drug needles with an infected person, or during childbirth when a baby is born to a mother who is infected. Hepatitis causes inflammation of the liver, vomiting, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Hepatitis can lead to liver cancer, cirrhosis, or death.

The hepatitis B vaccine is used to help prevent this disease.

This vaccine works by exposing you to a small amount of the virus, which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

Vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for all adults and children who are at risk of getting hepatitis B. Risk factors include: having more than one sex partner in 6 months; being a homosexual male; having sexual contact with infected people; having cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis C; using intravenous (IV) drugs; being on dialysis or receiving blood transfusions; working in healthcare or public safety and being exposed to infected blood or body fluids; being in the military or traveling to high-risk areas; and living with a person who has chronic hepatitis B infection.

Like any vaccine, the hepatitis B vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine? Hepatitis B vaccine will not protect against infection with hepatitis A, C, and E, or other viruses that affect the liver. It may also not protect against hepatitis B if you are already infected with the virus, even if you do not yet show symptoms.

Vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for all adults and children who are at risk of getting hepatitis B. Risk factors include: having more than one sex partner in 6 months; being a homosexual male; having sexual contact with infected people; having cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis C; using intravenous (IV) drugs; being on dialysis or receiving blood transfusions; working in healthcare or public safety and being exposed to infected blood or body fluids; being in the military or traveling to high-risk areas; and living with a person who has chronic hepatitis B infection.

The hepatitis B vaccine is given in a series of shots. The booster shots are sometimes given 1 month and 6 months after the first shot. If you have a high risk of hepatitis B infection, you may be given an additional booster 2 months after the first shot.

Your individual booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by your local health department.

Be sure to receive all recommended doses of this vaccine. You may not be fully protected if you do not receive the full series.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with hepatitis B is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine? Hepatitis B vaccine will not protect against infection with hepatitis A, C, and E, or other viruses that affect the liver. It may also not protect against hepatitis B if you are already infected with the virus, even if you do not yet show symptoms. You should not receive this vaccine if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any vaccine containing hepatitis B, or if you are allergic to baker's yeast. You also should not receive this vaccine if you have received cancer chemotherapy or radiation treatment in the past 3 months.

If you have any of these other conditions, your vaccine may need to be postponed or not given at all:

multiple sclerosis;

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia or easy bruising;

a history of seizures;

a neurologic disorder or disease affecting the brain (or if this was a reaction to a previous vaccine);

an allergy to latex rubber;

a weak immune system caused by disease, bone marrow transplant, or by using certain medicines or receiving cancer treatments; or

if you are taking a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this vaccine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while receiving the series of hepatitis B vaccines. It is not known whether hepatitis B vaccine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not receive this vaccine without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is this vaccine given?

The vaccine is injected into a muscle. You will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting.

The hepatitis B vaccine is given in a series of shots. The booster shots are sometimes given 1 month and 6 months after the first shot. If you have a high risk of hepatitis B infection, you may be given an additional booster 2 months after the first shot.

Your individual booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by your local health department.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

It is especially important to prevent fever from occurring if you have a seizure disorder such as epilepsy. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor if you will miss a booster dose or if you get behind schedule. The next dose should be given as soon as possible. There is no need to start over.

Be sure to receive all recommended doses of this vaccine. You may not be fully protected if you do not receive the full series.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this vaccine is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid before or after receiving this vaccine?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

This vaccine side effects You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot. Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell your doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with hepatitis B is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;

irritability;

fast or pounding heartbeats; or

easy bruising or bleeding.

Less serious side effects include:

redness, pain, swelling, or a lump where the shot was given;

headache, dizziness;

low fever;

joint pain, body aches;

tired feeling; or

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

What other drugs will affect hepatitis B vaccine? Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received.

Also tell the doctor if you have received drugs or treatments in the past 2 weeks that can weaken the immune system, including:

an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine;

medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), efalizumab (Raptiva), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or

medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

If you are using any of these medications, you may not be able to receive the vaccine, or may need to wait until the other treatments are finished.

There may be other drugs that can affect this vaccine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Engerix-B resources Engerix-B Side Effects (in more detail) Engerix-B Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Engerix-B Drug Interactions Engerix-B Support Group 0 Reviews for Engerix-B - Add your own review/rating Engerix-B Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Engerix-B MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Engerix-B Consumer Overview Compare Engerix-B with other medications Hepatitis B Prevention Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about this vaccine. Additional information is available from your local health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

See also: Engerix-B side effects (in more detail)


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Pnu-Imune 23


Generic Name: pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV adult, 23-valent) (new moe CAW cull pah lee SAH cah ride)
Brand Names: Pneumovax 23, Pnu-Imune 23

What is pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

Pneumococcal disease is a serious disease caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) exposes the individual to a small dose of the bacteria (or a protein from the bacteria) and causes the body to develop immunity to the disease.

Pneumococcal infection can cause ear infection, sinus infection, pneumonia, blood infection (bacteremia), and meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain). About 1 out of every 20 people who get pneumococcal pneumonia dies from it, as do about 2 out of every 10 who get bacteremia, and 3 out of 10 who get meningitis. Pneumococcal disease kills more people in the United States every year than all other vaccine-preventable diseases combined.

PPV (adult, 23-valent) is recommended for: all adults 65 years of age and older; anyone over 2 years of age who has long-term health problems such as sickle cell disease; heart disease; lung disease; alcoholism; diabetes; cirrhosis; or leaks of cerebrospinal fluid; anyone over 2 years of age who has a condition that lowers the body's resistance to infection such as: Hodgkin's disease, lymphoma, leukemia, kidney failure, multiple myeloma, nephrotic syndrome, damaged spleen or no spleen, or organ transplant; anyone over 2 years of age who is taking any drug or treatment that lowers the body's resistance to infection such as long-term steroids, radiation therapy, and certain cancer drugs; and all Alaskan natives and certain Native American populations.

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine can help prevent the disease. Many more people would get the disease if vaccination did not occur.

What is the most important information I should know about pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. Those who are moderately or severely ill or have a fever should usually wait until they recover before getting pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine? Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction after receiving a dose of PPV should not get another dose.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. Those who are moderately or severely ill or have a fever should usually wait until they recover before getting pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

Before receiving PPV, talk to your doctor if you:

are over the age of 65 years and if the first dose was given when you were younger than 65 and 5 or more years have passed since that dose;

have HIV or AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system;

are taking a medication that affects the immune system (e.g. steroids, anti-rejection medications);

have had an organ or bone marrow transplant;

have cancer;

are receiving cancer treatment with x-rays, radiation, or medication;

have a damaged spleen or no spleen;

have sickle-cell disease; or

have kidney failure or nephrotic syndrome.

A second dose of the vaccine may be recommended in some cases.

Talk to your doctor before receiving pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. How is pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine administered?

Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will administer the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine as an injection.

Most people need only one dose of PPV.

A second dose may be recommended for some individuals. Your healthcare provider will determine if a second dose is needed and when it should be given.

Otherwise healthy children who often get ear infection, sinus infection, or other upper respiratory diseases do not need to get PPV because of these conditions.

Your doctor may recommend reducing fever or pain that may occur by taking an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, Tempra, others) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Your healthcare provider can tell you the appropriate dosages of these medications.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since only one dose of the vaccine is usually given, missing a dose should not occur. If a second dose is recommended and it is missed or delayed, contact your doctor.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid before or after getting pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity before or after receiving pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine side effects

Getting pneumococcal disease is much riskier than getting pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. However, a vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

Seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately if any of the following rare but serious side effects from pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine are experienced:

a serious allergic reaction including swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; hives; paleness; weakness; dizziness; or a fast heart beat within a few minutes to a few hours after the shot; or

high fever; or

behavior changes.

About half of those who get PPV have very mild side effects, such as redness or pain where the shot is given. Less and 1% develop fever, muscle aches, or more severe local reactions.

Your doctor may recommend reducing fever or pain that may occur by taking an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, Tempra, others) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Your healthcare provider can tell you the appropriate dosages of these medications.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Contact your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

Talk to your doctor before receiving pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine if you are taking any of the following medications that may affect the immune system:

an oral or injectable steroid medication such as betamethasone (Celestone), cortisone (Cortone), dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexone), hydrocortisone (Cortef, Hydrocortone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred), prednisone (Orasone, Deltasone, others), or triamcinolone (Aristocort);

an inhaled or nasal steroid such as beclomethasone (Qvar, Beclovent, Beconase, Vanceril, Vancenase), budesonide (Pulmicort, Rhinocort), flunisolide (Aerobid, Nasalide, Nasarel), fluticasone (Flovent, Flonase), mometasone (Nasonex), or triamcinolone (Azmacort, Nasacort);

treatment for cancer with chemotherapy (medication), radiation, or x-rays;

azathioprine (Imuran);

basiliximab (Simulect);

cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf);

etanercept (Enbrel);

leflunomide (Arava);

muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone);

mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept);

sirolimus (Rapamune); or

tacrolimus (Prograf).

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine can be given at the same time as other vaccinations.

Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist may have additional information or suggest additional resources regarding pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.
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Arcalyst


Generic Name: rilonacept (Subcutaneous route)

ril-ON-a-sept

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Arcalyst

Available Dosage Forms:

Powder for Solution

Therapeutic Class: Immunological Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Interleukin-1 Inhibitor

Uses For Arcalyst

Rilonacept is used to treat cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), including familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS). Rilonacept can help lessen the signs and symptoms of CAPS, such as rash, joint pain, fever, and tiredness .

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription .

Before Using Arcalyst

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of rilonacept in children below 12 years of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established .

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatrics-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of rilonacept in the elderly. However, specific side effects may be especially likely to occur in elderly patients, who are usually more sensitive than younger adults to the effects of rilonacept .

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Adalimumab Adenovirus Vaccine Type 4, Live Adenovirus Vaccine Type 7, Live Anakinra Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin Vaccine, Live Etanercept Infliximab Influenza Virus Vaccine, Live Measles Virus Vaccine, Live Mumps Virus Vaccine, Live Poliovirus Vaccine, Live Rotavirus Vaccine, Live Rubella Virus Vaccine, Live Smallpox Vaccine Typhoid Vaccine Varicella Virus Vaccine Yellow Fever Vaccine Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Asthma or Diabetes or Immune system problems—Patients with these conditions will have an increased risk of infection . Serious infections (e.g., HIV, hepatitis B or C, tuberculosis)—Rilonacept may decrease the body's ability to fight infection . Proper Use of Arcalyst

This medicine is given as a shot under your skin. Rilonacept may sometimes be given at home to patients who do not need to be in the hospital. If you are using this medicine at home, your doctor will teach you how to prepare and inject the medicine. Be sure that you understand exactly how the medicine is prepared and injected .

This medicine comes with a patient instructions. Read and follow the instructions in the insert carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions .

Use a new needle and syringe each time you inject your medicine .

You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas. This will help prevent skin problems from the injections. Do not inject into skin areas that are bruised, red, tender, or hard .

This powder medicine must be mixed with the liquid provided in your dose kit. Mix the medicine only when you are ready to use it. Do not use if it is cloudy or has specks floating in it .

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form (vial): For cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes: Adults—At first, 320 milligrams (mg) given as two, 2-milliliter (mL) doses of 160 mg injected under the skin on the same day at two different sites. Your dose will be adjusted to 160 mg once a week, given as a single, 2 mL injection. Children and teenagers 12 to 17 years of age—At first, 4.4 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight up to 320 mg given as one or two, 2-milliliter (mL) doses injected under the skin. Your dose will be adjusted to 2.2 mg per kg of body weight up to 160 mg once a week, given as a single, 2 mL injection. Children below 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor . Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Once the powder medicine has been mixed with the liquid, this mixture may be stored at room temperature, away from direct light. You must use this mixture within 3 hours. Throw away any leftover mixture .

Throw away used needles in a hard, closed container that the needles cannot poke through. Keep this container away from children and pets .

Precautions While Using Arcalyst

It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects (e.g., increased amount of cholesterol or fats in the blood) .

Your body's ability to fight infection may be reduced while you are being treated with rilonacept. It is very important that you call your doctor at the first signs of any infection (such as fever or chills; cough or hoarseness; lower back or side pain; or painful or difficult urination) .

While you are being treated with rilonacept, do not have any immunizations (vaccinations) without your doctor's approval. Rilonacept may lower your body's resistance and there is a chance you might get the infection the immunization is meant to prevent. Tell your doctor about any vaccinations you have received in the past. Ask your doctor whether you should receive any vaccinations, including pneumonia and flu shots, before receiving rilonacept .

You will need to have a skin test for tuberculosis before you start using this medicine. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your home has ever had a positive reaction to a tuberculosis test .

Using this medicine may increase your risk of certain types of cancer. Talk with your doctor about this risk .

Rilonacept may cause a serious allergic reaction. Check with your doctor right away if you have a rash; itching; swelling of the face, tongue, and throat; trouble with breathing; or chest pain after you get the injection .

Do not take adalimumab (Humira®), anakinra (Kineret®), etanercept (Enbrel®), or infliximab (Remicade®) while you are being treated with this medicine, unless your doctor says it is okay .

Arcalyst Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Bleeding, blistering, burning, coldness, discoloration of skin, feeling of pressure, hives, infection, inflammation, itching, lumps, numbness, pain, rash, redness, scarring, soreness, stinging, swelling, tenderness, tingling, ulceration, or warmth at site body aches or pain chills cough difficulty in breathing ear congestion fever headache loss of voice nasal congestion runny nose sneezing sore throat unusual tiredness or weakness Incidence not known Bloody or black, tarry stools constipation cough producing mucus lower back or side pain pain or tenderness around eyes and cheekbones painful or difficult urination severe stomach pain shortness of breath or troubled breathing tenderness tightness of chest or wheezing vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings Less common Stomach discomfort

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Arcalyst side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Arcalyst resources Arcalyst Side Effects (in more detail) Arcalyst Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Arcalyst Drug Interactions Arcalyst Support Group 1 Review for Arcalyst - Add your own review/rating Arcalyst Prescribing Information (FDA) Arcalyst Consumer Overview Arcalyst Monograph (AHFS DI) Arcalyst MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Rilonacept Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Arcalyst with other medications Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome Muckle Wells Syndrome
read more / Download


Fragmin


Generic Name: dalteparin (Subcutaneous route)

dal-te-PAR-in

Subcutaneous route(Solution)

Epidural or spinal hematomas, which may result in long-term or permanent paralysis, may occur in patients who are anticoagulated with low molecular weight heparins or heparinoids and are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. Factors that can increase the risk of developing these hematomas include: use of indwelling epidural catheters, concomitant use of drugs affecting hemostasis such as NSAIDs, platelet inhibitors, or other anticoagulants, or history of traumatic or repeated epidural or spinal puncture, spinal deformity, or spinal surgery. Monitor patients frequently for neurological impairment. If neurological compromise is noted, urgent treatment is necessary. Consider risks/benefits before neuraxial intervention in patients anticoagulated or to be anticoagulated for thromboprophylaxis .

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Fragmin

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Injectable

Therapeutic Class: Anticoagulant

Pharmacologic Class: Low Molecular Weight Heparin

Uses For Fragmin

Dalteparin is used to prevent deep venous thrombosis, a condition in which harmful blood clots form in the blood vessels of the legs. These blood clots can travel to the lungs and can become lodged in the blood vessels of the lungs, causing a condition called pulmonary embolism. This medicine prevents blood clots from forming in blood vessels of patients with unstable angina or heart attack. Dalteparin is used for several days after abdominal surgery, while you are unable to walk. It is during this time that blood clots are most likely to form. Dalteparin also may be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Fragmin

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of dalteparin in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of dalteparin in the elderly. However, elderly patients may require an adjustment in the dose, especially those who are at risk of bleeding or those who have kidney disease.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Abciximab Aceclofenac Acemetacin Acenocoumarol Alclofenac Alteplase, Recombinant Anistreplase Antithrombin, Recombinant Apazone Argatroban Benoxaprofen Bivalirudin Bromfenac Bufexamac Carprofen Citalopram Clometacin Clonixin Clopidogrel Dabigatran Etexilate Danaparoid Dexketoprofen Diclofenac Diflunisal Dipyridamole Dipyrone Drotrecogin Alfa Droxicam Enoxaparin Eptifibatide Escitalopram Etodolac Etofenamate Felbinac Fenbufen Fenoprofen Fentiazac Floctafenine Flufenamic Acid Fluoxetine Flurbiprofen Fluvoxamine Fondaparinux Heparin Ibuprofen Indomethacin Indoprofen Isoxicam Ketoprofen Ketorolac Lepirudin Lornoxicam Meclofenamate Mefenamic Acid Meloxicam Nabumetone Naproxen Niflumic Acid Nimesulide Oxaprozin Oxyphenbutazone Paroxetine Phenindione Phenprocoumon Phenylbutazone Pirazolac Piroxicam Pirprofen Propyphenazone Proquazone Reteplase, Recombinant Rivaroxaban Sertraline Streptokinase Sulindac Suprofen Tenecteplase Tenidap Tenoxicam Tiaprofenic Acid Ticlopidine Tinzaparin Tirofiban Tolmetin Urokinase Warfarin Zomepirac

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Aspirin Benorilate Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate Mesalamine Olsalazine Salicylamide Salicylic Acid Salsalate Sodium Salicylate Sodium Thiosalicylate Trolamine Salicylate Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bleeding, active or Regional anesthesia or Thrombocytopenia (low platelet count in the blood), heparin-induced, or history of—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Bleeding problems or Catheter insertion in your spine or Eye problems caused by diabetes or high blood pressure or Heart infection or Hypertension (high blood pressure), severe and uncontrolled or Kidney disease or Liver disease or Stomach or intestinal ulcer or bleeding, active or recent or Stroke or Surgery (e.g., surgery of the eye, brain, or spine), recent or history of or Thrombocytopenia—Use with caution. The risk of bleeding may be increased. Proper Use of Fragmin

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine. This medicine is given as a shot under your skin (usually in the abdomen, buttocks, or thighs).

If you are using dalteparin at home, your doctor will teach you how to inject yourself with the medicine. Be sure to follow the directions carefully. Check with your doctor if you have any problems using the medicine.

You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas. This will help prevent skin problems from the injections.

If the medicine in the vial (glass container) or prefilled syringe has changed color, or if you see particles in it, do not use it.

Put used syringes in a puncture-resistant, disposable container, or dispose of them as directed by your doctor.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form: For prevention of deep venous thrombosis (leg clots) and pulmonary embolism (lung clots): Adults—The dose will be determined by your doctor, based on your condition. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For prevention of blood clots after unstable angina (chest pain) or non–Q-wave myocardial infarction (a type of heart attack): Adults—120 International Units (IU) per kilogram (kg) of body weight injected under the skin (but not more than 10,000 IU) given every 12 hours for 5 to 8 days. Unless your doctor recommends otherwise, aspirin should be given 75 to 165 milligrams (mg) daily. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

If you were given a bottle of medicine to use with your syringes, you must use the medicine within 14 days after the first shot. Throw away the unused medicine in the bottle after 14 days.

Throw away used needles in a hard, closed container that the needles cannot poke through. Keep this container away from children and pets.

Precautions While Using Fragmin

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to see if the medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Be sure to keep all appointments.

Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests.

This medicine may increase your chance of bleeding or bruising. This risk is higher if you have a catheter in your back for pain medicine or anesthetics. This is sometimes called an "epidural". Check with your doctor right away if you notice any unusual bleeding or bruising; black, tarry stools; blood in the urine or stools; or pinpoint red spots on your skin. Avoid picking your nose. If you need to blow your nose, blow it gently.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor right away if you start having pain in chest, groin, or legs, especially the calves; difficulty with breathing; severe, sudden headache; slurred speech; sudden, unexplained shortness of breath; sudden loss of coordination; sudden, severe weakness or numbness in arm or leg; or vision changes. These may be symptoms of thromboembolism.

Be careful when using a regular toothbrush, dental floss, or toothpick. Your medical doctor, dentist, or nurse may recommend other ways to clean your teeth and gums. Check with your medical doctor before having any dental work done.

Be careful not to cut yourself when you are using sharp objects, such as a safety razor or fingernail or toenail cutters. Avoid contact sports or other situations where bruising or injury could occur.

This medicine contains benzyl alcohol which may cause serious reactions to newborn or premature infants. Discuss this with your doctor if you are concerned.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Fragmin Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Deep, dark purple bruise, pain, or swelling at the place of injection Less common Bleeding of gums coughing up blood difficulty with breathing or swallowing dizziness headache increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding nosebleeds paralysis prolonged bleeding from cuts red or black, tarry stools red or dark brown urine shortness of breath unexplained pain, swelling, or discomfort, especially in the chest, abdomen or stomach, joints, or muscles unusual bruising vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds weakness Rare Back pain bleeding from mucous membranes bluish or black discoloration, flushing, or redness of the skin burning, pricking, tickling, or tingling sensation coughing feeling faint fever leg weakness numbness problems with bowel or bladder function skin rash (which may consist of pinpoint, purple-red spots), hives, or itching sloughing of the skin at place of injection swelling of the eyelids, face, or lips tightness in the chest or wheezing

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Fragmin side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Fragmin resources Fragmin Side Effects (in more detail) Fragmin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Fragmin Drug Interactions Fragmin Support Group 1 Review for Fragmin - Add your own review/rating Fragmin Prescribing Information (FDA) Fragmin Monograph (AHFS DI) Fragmin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Fragmin Consumer Overview Compare Fragmin with other medications Angina Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Abdominal Surgery Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Orthopedic Surgery Deep Vein Thrombosis, Prophylaxis Heart Attack Venous Thromboembolism
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plerixafor Subcutaneous


pler-IX-a-fore

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Mozobil

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution

Therapeutic Class: Hematopoietic

Uses For plerixafor

Plerixafor is used to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma (MM). It is used together with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor or G-CSF (e.g., filgrastim, pegfilgrastim) to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for collection and transplantation.

plerixafor is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using plerixafor

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For plerixafor, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to plerixafor or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of plerixafor in the pediatric population.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of plerixafor in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney problems, which may require an adjustment of dose in patients receiving plerixafor.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters D Studies in pregnant women have demonstrated a risk to the fetus. However, the benefits of therapy in a life threatening situation or a serious disease, may outweigh the potential risk. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of plerixafor. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bone marrow cancer or other bone marrow problems (e.g., leukemia) or Enlarged spleen or Leukocytosis (high white blood cell count) or Thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet count)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Kidney disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body. Proper Use of plerixafor

A nurse or other trained health professional may give you plerixafor. plerixafor is given as a shot under your skin.

Precautions While Using plerixafor

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure plerixafor is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Using plerixafor while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control to keep from getting pregnant. If a pregnancy occurs while you are using plerixafor, tell your doctor right away. Do not breastfeed while you are using plerixafor.

Check with your doctor right away if you are having a pain in the upper left part of your abdomen or at the tip of the left shoulder. This could be a symptom of a serious side effect with the spleen.

Tell your doctor right away if you have slow heartbeat; severe, unusual tiredness or weakness; cold sweats; confusion; or dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position after you get the injection.

If you develop a skin rash, hives, swelling around the eyes, shortness of breath, or any allergic reaction to plerixafor, stop taking the medicine and check with your doctor as soon as possible.

plerixafor may cause diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain in some patients. Ask your doctor or nurse about other ways to control these side effects.

plerixafor Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Bleeding gums burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings collection of blood under skin coughing up blood deep, dark purple bruise difficulty in breathing or swallowing dizziness feeling of heat flushing, redness of the skin hard lump headache hives or welts increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding irritation itching skin nosebleeds pain paralysis prolonged bleeding from cuts red or black, tarry stools red or dark brown urine redness of the skin shortness of breath skin rash swelling unusually warm skin Rare Chills cold sweats confusion dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position fainting fast heartbeat swelling around the eyes tightness in the chest weakness wheezing

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Bloated diarrhea difficulty in moving excess air or gas in stomach or intestines full feeling muscle pain or stiffness nausea pain in the joints passing gas sleeplessness trouble sleeping unable to sleep unusual tiredness or weakness vomiting Less common Acid or sour stomach belching difficulty having a bowel movement (stool) dry mouth general feeling of discomfort or illness heartburn increased sweating indigestion muscle or bone pain pressure in the stomach stomach discomfort, upset, or pain swelling of abdominal or stomach area

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: plerixafor Subcutaneous side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More plerixafor Subcutaneous resources Plerixafor Subcutaneous Side Effects (in more detail) Plerixafor Subcutaneous Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Plerixafor Subcutaneous Support Group 0 Reviews for Plerixafor Subcutaneous - Add your own review/rating Compare plerixafor Subcutaneous with other medications Multiple Myeloma Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
read more / Download


Innohep


Generic Name: tinzaparin (Subcutaneous route)

tin-za-PAR-in

Subcutaneous route(Solution)

Epidural or spinal hematomas, which may result in long-term or permanent paralysis, may occur in patients who are anticoagulated with low molecular weight heparins or heparinoids and are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. Factors that can increase the risk of developing these hematomas include: use of indwelling epidural catheters, concomitant use of drugs affecting hemostasis such as NSAIDs, platelet inhibitors, or other anticoagulants, or history of traumatic or repeated epidural or spinal puncture, spinal deformity, or spinal surgery. Monitor patients frequently for neurological impairment. If neurological compromise is noted, urgent treatment is necessary. Consider risks/benefits before neuraxial intervention in patients anticoagulated or to be anticoagulated for thromboprophylaxis .

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Innohep

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution

Therapeutic Class: Anticoagulant

Pharmacologic Class: Low Molecular Weight Heparin

Uses For Innohep

Tinzaparin is used for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis, a condition in which harmful blood clots form in the blood vessels of the legs. These blood clots can travel to the lungs and can become lodged in the blood vessels of the lungs, causing a condition called pulmonary embolism. Tinzaparin is used for several days after surgery, while you are unable to walk. It is during this time that blood clots are most likely to form. Tinzaparin also may be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Innohep

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of tinzaparin in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of tinzaparin in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney problems, which may require an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving tinzaparin.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Abciximab Aceclofenac Acemetacin Acenocoumarol Alclofenac Alteplase, Recombinant Anistreplase Antithrombin, Recombinant Apazone Argatroban Benoxaprofen Bivalirudin Bromfenac Bufexamac Carprofen Citalopram Clometacin Clonixin Clopidogrel Dabigatran Etexilate Dalteparin Danaparoid Dexketoprofen Dextran Diclofenac Diflunisal Dipyridamole Dipyrone Drotrecogin Alfa Droxicam Enoxaparin Eptifibatide Escitalopram Etodolac Etofenamate Felbinac Fenbufen Fenoprofen Fentiazac Floctafenine Flufenamic Acid Fluoxetine Flurbiprofen Fluvoxamine Ibuprofen Indomethacin Indoprofen Isoxicam Ketoprofen Ketorolac Lepirudin Lornoxicam Meclofenamate Mefenamic Acid Meloxicam Nabumetone Naproxen Niflumic Acid Nimesulide Oxaprozin Oxyphenbutazone Paroxetine Phenindione Phenprocoumon Phenylbutazone Pirazolac Piroxicam Pirprofen Propyphenazone Proquazone Reteplase, Recombinant Rivaroxaban Sertraline Streptokinase Sulindac Suprofen Tenecteplase Tenidap Tenoxicam Tiaprofenic Acid Ticlopidine Tirofiban Tolmetin Urokinase Warfarin Zomepirac

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Aspirin Benorilate Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate Mesalamine Olsalazine Salicylamide Salicylic Acid Salsalate Sodium Salicylate Sodium Thiosalicylate Trolamine Salicylate Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Major bleeding, active or Thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced (or history of)—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Blood disease or bleeding problems or Catheter insertion in your spine or Eye problems caused by diabetes or high blood pressure or Heart infection or Hypertension (high blood pressure), severe and uncontrolled or Liver disease or Stomach or intestinal ulcer, active or history of or Stroke, recent or Surgery (e.g., surgery of the eye, brain, or spine), recent or history of or Thrombocytopenia—Use with caution. The risk of bleeding may be increased. Kidney disease—Effects of tinzaparin may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body. Prosthetic heart valve—Tinzaparin may not protect these patients from developing a blood clot. Proper Use of Innohep

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine. This medicine is given as a shot under your skin, usually in the abdomen.

If you are using tinzaparin at home, your doctor will teach you how to inject yourself with the medicine. Be sure to follow the directions carefully. Check with your doctor if you have any problems using the medicine.

You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas. This will help prevent skin problems from the injections.

If the medicine in the vial (glass container) has changed color, or if you see particles in it, do not use it.

Put used syringes in a puncture-resistant, disposable container, or dispose of them as directed by your doctor.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form: For prevention of deep venous thrombosis (leg clots) due to surgery: Adults General surgery—3500 International Units (IU) given 2 hours before surgery then 3500 IU once a day for 7 to 10 days. Hip surgery—50 International Units (IU) per kilogram (kg) of body weight given 2 hours before surgery then 50 IU per kg of body weight once a day for 7 to 10 days, or 75 IU per kg of body weight given after surgery once a day for 7 to 10 days. Knee surgery—75 International Units (IU) per kilogram (kg) of body weight given after surgery once a day for 7 to 10 days. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For treatment of deep venous thrombosis (leg clots) with or without pulmonary embolism (lung clots): Adults—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 175 International Units (IU) per kilogram (kg) of body weight injected under the skin once a day for 6 to 7 days. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

Call your doctor or pharmacist for instructions.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Throw away used needles in a hard, closed container that the needles cannot poke through. Keep this container away from children and pets.

Precautions While Using Innohep

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests will be needed to check for unwanted effects. Be sure to keep all appointments.

This medicine may cause a serious type of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Tell your doctor right away if you have a rash; itching; swelling of the face, tongue, and throat; trouble breathing; or chest pain after you receive this medicine.

Make sure your doctor knows if you have had an allergic reaction to heparin, sulfites, benzyl alcohol, or pork products.

Tinzaparin may increase your chance of bleeding or bruising. This risk is higher if you have a catheter in your back for pain medicine or anesthesia (sometimes called an "epidural"), or if you have kidney problems. The risk of bleeding increases as the severity of your kidney problems increases. Check with your doctor right away if you notice any unusual bleeding or bruising; black, tarry stools; bleeding gums; blood in the urine or stools; or pinpoint red spots on your skin.

You may bleed and bruise more easily while you are using this medicine. Stay away from rough sports or other situations where you could be bruised, cut, or injured. Be careful when using sharp objects, including razors and fingernail clippers. Avoid nose picking and forceful nose blowing.

Be careful when using a regular toothbrush, dental floss, or toothpick. Your medical doctor, dentist, or nurse may recommend other ways to clean your teeth and gums. Check with your medical doctor before having any dental work done.

Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using tinzaparin several days before having surgery or medical tests.

This medicine contains benzyl alcohol which may cause serious reactions to newborn or premature infants. Discuss this with your doctor if you are concerned.

Do not take or discontinue other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines, and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Innohep Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Deep, dark purple bruise, pain, or swelling at the place of injection Less common Bladder pain bleeding gums blood in the urine bloody or cloudy urine blurred vision chest pain chest tightness chills confusion cough coughing up blood difficulty with breathing or swallowing dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat fever frequent urge to urinate headache increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding lower back or side pain nosebleeds pain or burning while urinating painful or difficult urination pale skin palpitations paralysis pounding in the ears prolonged bleeding from cuts red or black, tarry stools red or dark brown urine severe or continuing dull nervousness shortness of breath skin rash sore throat sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth sweating swollen glands troubled breathing, exertional unexplained pain, swelling, or discomfort, especially in the chest, abdomen or stomach, joints, or muscles unusual bleeding or bruising unusual tiredness or weakness vomiting of blood or material like coffee grounds Rare Blue-green to black skin discoloration bowel or bladder dysfunction hives itching leg weakness numbness pain, redness, or sloughing of the skin at the place of injection puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue wheezing Incidence not known Abdominal or stomach pain accumulation of pus break in the skin, especially associated with blue-black discoloration, swelling, or drainage of fluid change in vision clay-colored stools collection of blood under the skin diarrhea excessive thirst general feeling of discomfort or illness hoarseness large, flat, blue or purplish patches in the skin large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs loss of appetite muscle cramps numbness and tingling of the face, fingers, or toes pain in the arms, legs, or lower back, especially pain in the calves or heels upon exertion pain, redness, or swelling painful knees and ankles pale, bluish-colored, or cold hands or feet problems with vision or hearing raised, red swellings on the skin, buttocks, legs or ankles red or irritated eyes redness, tenderness, burning, blistering, or peeling of the skin (usually on the backs of arms and the fronts of legs, mouth, eyes, hands, or feet) seeing floating spots before the eyes swollen, red, or tender area of infection unpleasant breath odor weak or absent pulses in the legs yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common or rare Constipation nausea and vomiting prolonged, painful, or inappropriate erection of the penis trouble with sleeping Incidence not known Hives or welts redness of the skin

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Innohep side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Innohep resources Innohep Side Effects (in more detail) Innohep Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Innohep Drug Interactions Innohep Support Group 1 Review for Innohep - Add your own review/rating Innohep Prescribing Information (FDA) Innohep Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Innohep Monograph (AHFS DI) Innohep MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Innohep with other medications Deep Vein Thrombosis
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Gelato Chlorhexidine Rinse


Generic Name: chlorhexidine gluconate
Dosage Form: oral rinse
Gelato Chlorhexidine Distilled Water, Glycerin, Polysorbate 20, Poloxamer 407, Sodium Saccharin, Mint Flavor, FD and C Blue #1

The effect of Chlohexidrine Gluconate Oral Rinse on periodontitis has not been determined. An increase in supragingival calculus was not noted in clinical testing in chlohexidine gluconate oral rinse users compared with control users. It is not known if Chlorhexidine Gluconate oral rinse use results in an increase in subgingival calculus. Calculus deposits should be removed by a dental prophylaxis at intervals not greater than six months. Hypersensitivity and generalized allergic reactions have occured. read CONTRAINDICATIONS indicated on the insert inside the box.

To open, press down while turning cap. To seal, turn until cap clicks and is tight. Fill dosage cup to the fill like (150ml). Swish in your mouth undiluted for 30 seconds, the spit out. Use after breakfast and before bedtime. Or, use as prescribed by your dentist.

Chlorhexidine Gluconate Oral Rinse is indicated for use between dental visits as part of a professional program for the treatment of gingivitis as characterized by redness and swelling of the gingivae, including gingival bleeding upon probing. For patients having coexisting gingivitis and periodontitis, read PRECAUTIONS indicated on the insert inside the box.

Store at controlled room temperature 68-77F (20-25C). Protect from freezing.

0.12% Chlorhexidine Gluconate

Antigingivitis


GELATO CHLOROHEXIDINE 
chlorhexidine gluconate  rinse Product Information Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 68400-500 Route of Administration DENTAL, TOPICAL, ORAL DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength CHLORHEXIDINE GLUCONATE (CHLORHEXIDINE) CHLORHEXIDINE GLUCONATE 56.76 mL  in 473 mL Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength Water   Glycerin   FD&C BLUE NO. 1   SACCHARIN SODIUM   POLYSORBATE 20   POLOXAMER 407   Product Characteristics Color      Score      Shape Size Flavor MINT Imprint Code Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 68400-500-16 473 mL In 1 BOTTLE None
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date unapproved drug other 03/31/2010
Labeler - Deepak Products, inc. (124886743) Establishment Name Address ID/FEI Operations Deepak Products, inc. 124886743 manufacture Revised: 04/2011Deepak Products, inc.
More Gelato Chlorhexidine Rinse resources Gelato Chlorhexidine Rinse Side Effects (in more detail) Gelato Chlorhexidine Rinse Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Gelato Chlorhexidine Rinse Support Group 1 Review for Gelato Chlorhexidine - Add your own review/rating Compare Gelato Chlorhexidine Rinse with other medications Gingivitis Mucositis Periodontitis
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follitropin beta Subcutaneous


fol-i-TROE-pin BAY-ta

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Follistim Follistim AQ Gonal-f RFF

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Powder for Solution Kit

Therapeutic Class: Human Follicle Stimulating Hormone Combination

Pharmacologic Class: Human Follicle Stimulating Hormone

Uses For follitropin beta

Follitropin beta injection is used to treat infertility in both men and women. follitropin beta is a man-made hormone called follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). FSH is produced in the body by the pituitary gland. FSH helps to develop eggs in the ovaries of women and sperm in the testes of men. Follitropin beta replaces natural FSH in the body.

Follitropin beta will help develop eggs in women who have not been able to become pregnant because of problems with ovulation. Some women will use follitropin beta while enrolled in a fertility program called Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART). ART uses procedures such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or embryo transfer (ET). Follitropin beta is used together with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in these procedures.

Follistim® AQ Cartridge is also used in women with healthy ovaries who are undergoing reproductive procedures such as IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycle. follitropin beta is used together with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in these procedures.

Follitropin beta is used together with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to increase sperm production in men.

follitropin beta is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using follitropin beta

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For follitropin beta, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to follitropin beta or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of follitropin beta injection in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of follitropin beta injection have not been performed in the geriatric population.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters X Studies in animals or pregnant women have demonstrated positive evidence of fetal abnormalities. This drug should not be used in women who are or may become pregnant because the risk clearly outweighs any possible benefit. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of follitropin beta. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Adrenal gland problems, uncontrolled or Allergy to certain antibiotics (e.g., neomycin, streptomycin), or history of or Cysts in the ovaries or enlarged ovaries or High levels of FSH in the blood or Pituitary gland problems, uncontrolled or Thyroid gland problems, uncontrolled or Tumor in the brain (hypothalamus area or pituitary gland) or Tumor in the breast or Tumor in the ovary or uterus or Tumor in the testis or Vaginal bleeding of unknown cause, heavy or irregular—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Blood clots (thrombosis), or history of or Blood vessel problems or Lung or breathing problems or Ovarian torsion (twisting of the ovary), history of or Stomach surgery, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of follitropin beta

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you follitropin beta. follitropin beta is given as a shot under the skin (for men and women) or into a muscle (for women only).

Follitropin beta is used with another hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). At the proper time, your doctor or nurse will give you follitropin beta.

follitropin beta comes with patient instructions. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

follitropin beta is available in two forms: a cartridge and a vial. Ask your doctor which dosage form is right for you.

You might be taught how to give your medicine at home. If you are using follitropin beta at home:

Wash your hands with soap and water and use a clean work area to prepare your injection. Make sure you understand and carefully follow your doctor's instructions on how to give yourself an injection, including the proper use of a needle and syringe, or a cartridge and pen. Do not mix follitropin beta with other medicines in the same cartridge, vial, or syringe. Check the solution in the cartridge or vial. It should be clear and colorless. If it is cloudy, discolored, or contains large flecks (particles), do not use it. Do not inject more or less of the medicine than your doctor ordered. You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas. This will prevent skin problems. Use a new needle and syringe each time you inject your medicine. It is very important that you keep track of each dose you inject. Your doctor or nurse will help you with this.

If you are using the Follistim® AQ cartridge:

follitropin beta should only be used with the Follistim® pen. Do not use follitropin beta if you are blind or have vision problems, unless another person with good vision who is trained in the proper use of the cartridge injects your medicine. Do not re-use the BD Micro-Fine™ pen needle. Dosing

The dose of follitropin beta will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of follitropin beta. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form: For the treatment of infertility in men: Adults—450 international units (IU) per week injected under the skin, divided and given as either 225 IU two times per week or 150 IU three times per week. Children—Use is not recommended. For the treatment of infertility in women: Adults— Follistim® AQ injection: At first, 75 international units (IU) once a day injected under the skin or into a muscle. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 300 IU per day. Follistim® AQ cartridge: At first, 50 IU once a day injected under the skin for at least the first 7 days. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 250 IU per day. Children—Use is not recommended. For use with assisted reproductive technology procedures: Follistim® AQ injection: Adults—150 to 225 international units (IU) once a day injected under the skin or into a muscle. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 600 IU per day. Children—Use is not recommended. For women with healthy ovaries undergoing reproductive procedures (such as IVF or ICSI): Follistim® AQ cartridge: Adults—At first, 200 international units (IU) once a day injected under the skin for at least the first 7 days of treatment. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 500 IU per day. Children—Use is not recommended. Missed Dose

Call your doctor or pharmacist for instructions.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

You may store Follistim® AQ cartridge or injection in a refrigerator or at room temperature. If you store the medicine at room temperature, it will only be good for a maximum of 3 months unless the expiration date is less than 3 months. If the Follistim® AQ cartridge has been pierced by a needle, you may store it up to 28 days. Keep the cartridge away from light.

Throw away used needles and syringes in a hard, closed container that the needles cannot poke through. Keep this container away from children and pets.

Ask your pharmacist, doctor, or nurse about the best way to dispose of any leftover medicine, glass containers (vials), cartridges, and other supplies. You should not use any leftover medicine in the glass container (vial) or cartridge.

Precautions While Using follitropin beta

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits while you are using follitropin beta, to make sure that the medicine is working properly and to check for unwanted effects. Blood and urine tests will be needed to make sure that the medicine is working properly.

Call your doctor right away if you think you have become pregnant while you are using follitropin beta. You may have a higher risk of an ectopic pregnancy if you get pregnant while undergoing IVF or ICSI procedures. An ectopic pregnancy can be a serious and life-threatening condition. It can also cause problems that may make it harder for you to become pregnant in the future.

follitropin beta may increase your risk of having a blood clot, heart attack, or stroke. This is more likely in people who already have heart disease. Contact your doctor right away if you have chest pain, tightness in the chest, a fast or irregular heartbeat, unusual flushing or warmth of the skin, increased coughing, trouble with breathing, a sudden difficulty with breathing at night, or abnormal swelling in your ankles or legs. These could be symptoms of serious heart problems or blood clots.

For women who are using follitropin beta:

If your doctor has asked you to record your basal body temperature (BBT) each day, make sure that you understand how to do this. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions. follitropin beta may increase your risk of having a problem with the ovaries called ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). OHSS is a serious problem that can be life-threatening. Stop using follitropin beta and call your doctor right away if you have severe pain in the lower stomach area, nausea, vomiting, weight gain, diarrhea, decreased urine output, or trouble with breathing. follitropin beta may cause more than one egg to be released from your ovary at the same time. This means you may become pregnant with more than one baby. Talk with your doctor about this possibility before you start using follitropin beta. follitropin beta Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Abdominal or stomach pain that is severe bloating diarrhea severe nausea or vomiting stomach or pelvic discomfort, aching, or heaviness weight gain that is rapid Less common Heavy non-menstrual vaginal bleeding redness, pain, or swelling at the injection site unusual tiredness or weakness Incidence not known Difficulty with breathing pain in the chest, groin, or legs, especially the calves severe, sudden headache slurred speech sudden loss of coordination sudden, severe weakness or numbness in the arm or leg sudden, unexplained shortness of breath vision changes

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Blemishes on the skin headache pimples Less common Body aches or pain chills difficulty having a bowel movement (stool) dizziness dry skin fast or racing heart fever hair loss hives quick or shallow breathing rash swelling of the breasts or breast soreness in both females and males Incidence not known Breast tenderness normal menstrual bleeding occurring earlier, possibly lasting longer than expected

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: follitropin beta Subcutaneous side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More follitropin beta Subcutaneous resources Follitropin beta Subcutaneous Side Effects (in more detail) Follitropin beta Subcutaneous Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Follitropin beta Subcutaneous Drug Interactions Follitropin beta Subcutaneous Support Group 2 Reviews for Follitropin beta Subcutaneous - Add your own review/rating Compare follitropin beta Subcutaneous with other medications Follicle Stimulation Hypogonadism, Male Ovulation Induction
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japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular


jap-a-NEEZ en-sef-a-LYTE-is VYE-rus VAX-een, in-AK-ti-vay-ted ad-SORBD

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Ixiaro

Available Dosage Forms:

Suspension

Therapeutic Class: Vaccine

Uses For japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed

Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed (IXIARO®) is used to prevent infection caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus. It works by causing your body to produce its own protection (antibodies) against the virus.

Japanese encephalitis is caused by the bite of a mosquito that lives in certain parts of Asia. It is a serious infection that can cause flu-like symptoms (e.g., fever, chills, tiredness, headache, nausea, and vomiting), confusion, agitation, brain damage, and possibly death. This vaccine does not protect against encephalitis caused by other viruses.

This vaccine is only available from your doctor or other authorized health care professional.

Before Using japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed

In deciding to use a vaccine, the risks of taking the vaccine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this vaccine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed in children and teenagers younger than 17 years of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed in the elderly.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this vaccine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bleeding problems or Hypersensitivity to protamine sulfate, history of or Thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet count)—May cause side effects to become worse. High fever (more than 100°F) or Infection—The symptoms of the condition may be confused with the possible side effects of the vaccine. Immune deficiency or Immune system problem—May not work properly in patients with these conditions and may cause side effects to become worse. Proper Use of japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this vaccine. This vaccine is given as a shot into the muscle of your upper arm.

This vaccine is given in 2 doses. Dose 2 is scheduled 28 days after Dose 1. It is very important that you receive both doses of the vaccine at least 7 days before you plan to travel out of the country. If you miss the second shot, call your doctor to make another appointment as soon as possible.

If you have received the second dose of the vaccine series more than 1 year ago, consult first with your doctor. A booster dose may be given before you plan to travel out of the country.

japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed comes with a patient information sheet. It is very important that you read and understand this information. Be sure to ask your doctor about anything you do not understand.

Precautions While Using japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed

It is very important that you return to your doctor at the right time for the second dose. Be sure to tell your doctor about any side effects that occur after you receive this vaccine.

Since the vaccine may not protect everyone completely, it is very important that you use precautions to reduce your chance of mosquito bites. These include using insect repellents and mosquito nets, wearing protective clothing, and staying indoors during twilight and after dark.

japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Chills cough diarrhea fever general feeling of discomfort or illness headache joint pain loss of appetite muscle aches and pains nausea runny nose shivering sore throat sweating trouble sleeping unusual tiredness or weakness vomiting Less common Body aches or pain difficulty with breathing ear congestion loss of voice nasal congestion sneezing Incidence not known Burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings numbness or tingling of the hands, feet, or face

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Difficulty with moving joint pain muscle cramps or stiffness swollen joints Less common Back pain pain, itching, redness, or swelling where the shot was given rash stuffy nose

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular resources Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular Drug Interactions Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular Support Group 0 Reviews for Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular - Add your own review/rating Compare japanese encephalitis virus vaccine, inactivated adsorbed Intramuscular with other medications Japanese Encephalitis Virus Prophylaxis
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Trusopt 20 mg / ml Eye drops, solution


TRUSOPT 20 mg/ml eye drops, solution

dorzolamide

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What TRUSOPT is and what it is used for 2. Before you use TRUSOPT 3. How to use TRUSOPT 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store TRUSOPT 6. Further information What Trusopt Is And What It Is Used For

TRUSOPT contains dorzolamide which belongs to a group of medicines called "carbonic anhydrase inhibitors".

This medicine is prescribed to lower raised pressure in the eye and to treat glaucoma. This medicine can be used alone or in addition to other medicines which lower the pressure in the eye (so-called beta-blockers).

Before You Use Trusopt Do not use TRUSOPT if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to dorzolamide hydrochloride or any of the other ingredients of this medicine. if you have severe kidney impairment or problems, or a prior history of kidney stones. Take special care with TRUSOPT

Tell your doctor about any medical problems you have now or have had in the past, including eye problems and eye surgeries, and about any allergies to any medications.

If you develop any eye irritation or any new eye problems such as redness of the eye or swelling of the eyelids, contact your doctor immediately.

If you suspect that this medicine is causing an allergic reaction (for example, skin rash or itching) stop its use and contact your doctor immediately.

Use in children.

TRUSOPT has been studied in infants and children less than 6 years of age who have raised pressure in the eye(s) or have been diagnosed with glaucoma. For more information, talk to your doctor.

Use in elderly.

In studies with TRUSOPT, the effects of TRUSOPT were similar in both elderly and younger patients.

Use in patients with liver impairment.

Tell your doctor about any liver problems you now have or have suffered from in the past.

Using other medicines

Tell your doctor about all drugs (including eye drops) that you are using or plan to use, including those obtained without a prescription, particularly another carbonic anhydrase inhibitor such as acetazolamide.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking any medicine.

Use in pregnancy

You should not use this medicine during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or intend to become pregnant.

Use in breast-feeding

If treatment with this medicine is required, breast-feeding is not recommended. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding or intend to breast-feed.

Driving and using machines

No studies on the effects on the ability to drive or use machines have been performed. There are side effects associated with this medicine, such as dizziness and blurred vision, which may affect your ability to drive and/or operate machinery. Do not drive or operate machinery until you feel well or your vision is clear.

Important information about some of the ingredients of TRUSOPT

TRUSOPT contains the preservative benzalkonium chloride. This preservative may be deposited in soft contact lenses and may possibly discolour the lenses. If you wear contact lenses, you should consult your doctor before using this medicine.

How To Use Trusopt

Always use TRUSOPT exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure. The appropriate dosage and duration of treatment will be established by your doctor.

When this medicine is used alone, the dose is one drop in the affected eye(s) in the morning, in the afternoon and in the evening.

If your doctor has recommended you use this medicine with a beta-blocker eye drop to lower eye pressure, then the dose is one drop of TRUSOPT in the affected eye(s) in the morning and in the evening.

If you are using this medicine with another eye drop, the drops should be instilled at least 10 minutes apart.

Do not allow the tip of the container to touch the eye or areas around the eye. It may become contaminated with bacteria that can cause eye infections leading to serious damage of the eye, even loss of vision.

To avoid possible contamination, wash your hands before using this medicine and keep the tip of the container away from contact with any surface. If you think your medication may be contaminated, or if you develop an eye infection, contact your doctor immediately concerning continued use of this bottle.

Instructions for Use: 1. Before using the medication for the first time, be sure the Safety Strip on the front of the bottle is unbroken. A gap between the bottle and the cap is normal for an unopened bottle. 2. Tear off the Safety Strip to break the seal. 3. To open the bottle, unscrew the cap by turning as indicated by the arrows on the top of the cap. Do not pull the cap directly up and away from the bottle. Pulling the cap directly up will prevent your dispenser from operating properly. 4. Tilt your head back and pull your lower eyelid down slightly to form a pocket between your eyelid and your eye. 5. Invert the bottle, and press lightly with the thumb or index finger over the “Finger Push Area” (as shown) until a single drop is dispensed into the eye as directed by your doctor.

DO NOT TOUCH YOUR EYE OR EYELID WITH THE DROPPER TIP.

6. If drop dispensing is difficult after opening for the first time, replace the cap on the bottle and tighten (Do not overtighten) and then remove by turning the cap in the opposite directions as indicated by the arrows on the top of the cap.
7. Repeat steps 4 & 5 with the other eye if instructed to do so by your doctor
8. Replace the cap by turning until it is firmly touching the bottle. The arrow on the left side of the cap must be aligned with the arrow on the left side of the bottle label for proper closure. Do not overtighten or you may damage the bottle and cap.
9. The dispenser tip is designed to provide a single drop; therefore, do NOT enlarge the hole of the dispenser tip.
10. After you have used all doses, there will be some medicine left in the bottle. You should not be concerned since an extra amount of medicine has been added and you will get the full amount of medicine that your doctor prescribed. Do not attempt to remove the excess medicine from the bottle. If you use more TRUSOPT than you should

If you put too many drops in your eye or the contents of the container are swallowed, you should contact your doctor immediately.

If you forget to use TRUSOPT

It is important to take this medicine as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

Do not take a double dose to make up for the forgotten dose.

If you stop using TRUSOPT

If you want to stop using this medicine talk to your doctor first. If you have any further questions on the use of this product, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, TRUSOPT can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

If you develop allergic reactions including hives, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and/or throat which may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing, you should stop using this medicine and seek immediate medical advice.

The following side effects have been reported with TRUSOPT either during clinical trials or during post-marketing experience:

Very Common side effects: (more than 1 user in 10)

Burning and stinging of the eyes.

Common side effects: (1 to 10 users in 100)

Disease of the cornea with sore eye and blurred vision (superficial punctuate keratitis), discharge with itching of the eyes (conjunctivitis), irritation/inflammation of the eyelid, blurred vision, headache, nausea, bitter taste, and fatigue.

Uncommon side effects: (1 to 10 users in 1,000)

Inflammation of the iris.

Rare side effects: (1 to 10 user in 10,000)

Tingling or numbness of the hands or feet, temporary shortsightedness which may resolve when treatment is stopped, development of fluid under the retina (choroidal detachment, following filtration surgery), eye pain, eyelid crusting, low pressure in the eye, swelling of the cornea (with symptoms of visual disturbances), eye irritation including redness, kidney stones, dizziness, nose bleed, throat irritation, dry mouth, localized skin rash (contact dermatitis), allergic type reactions such as rash, hives, itching, in rare cases possible swelling of the lips, eyes and mouth, shortness of breath, and more rarely wheezing.

If any of the side effects get serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in the leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How To Store Trusopt

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not use TRUSOPT after the expiry date which is stated by the six numbers following EX (or EXP) on the bottle and outer carton. The first two numbers indicate the month; the last four numbers indicate the year. The expiry date refers to the last day of the month.

TRUSOPT should be used within 28 days after the bottle is opened.

This medicinal product does not require any special temperature storage conditions.

Store bottle in outer carton in order to protect from light.

Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

Further Information What TRUSOPT contains The active substance is dorzolamide. Each ml contains 20 mg of dorzolamide (as 22.26 mg dorzolamide hydrochloride). The other ingredients are hydroxyethyl cellulose, mannitol, sodium citrate, sodium hydroxide, and water for injections. Benzalkonium chloride is added as a preservative. What TRUSOPT looks like and contents of the pack

TRUSOPT is a clear, colourless to nearly colourless slightly viscous solution. The OCUMETER Plus Ophthalmic Dispenser consists of a translucent high-density polyethylene container containing 5.0 ml of solution. Tamper evidence is provided by a safety strip on the container label.

Pack sizes:

1 x 5.0 ml (single 5 ml container)

3 x 5.0 ml (three 5 ml containers)

6 x 5.0 ml (six 5 ml containers)

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer

Marketing Authorisation Holder in UK and Malta:

Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited Hertford Road Hoddesdon Hertfordshire EN11 9BU UK

Manufacturer:

Merck Manufacturing Division, Laboratoires Merck Sharp & Dohme-Chibret Mirabel Plant Route de Marsat Riom 63963 Clermont Ferrand Cedex 9 France

This medicinal product is authorised in the Member States of the EEA under the following names

Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxemburg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, UK:

TRUSOPT

This leaflet was last approved in December 2009.

How can I learn more about TRUSOPT, increased eye pressure or glaucoma?

This leaflet gives you the most important information about TRUSOPT. If you have any questions after you have read it, ask your doctor or pharmacist, who can give you more information about TRUSOPT and your eye condition.

Further information about glaucoma is available from:

International Glaucoma Association (IGA) Woodcote House 15 Highpoint Business Village Henwood Ashford Kent TN24 8DH Tel:01233 648170

Registered Charity number 274681.

Alternatively, if you or someone you know has problems with their vision, and you require further advice or information, please phone the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) Helpline on 0303 123 9999, Monday to Friday 9 am to 5 pm, calls charged at local rate.

(The IGA and RNIB are independent UK charities and are not associated with Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited.)

denotes registered trademark of

Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. Whitehouse Station N.J. U.S.A.

© Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited 2009. All rights reserved

Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited Hertford Road Hoddesdon Hertfordshire EN11 9BU UK

PIL.DHZ.09.UK/IRL.3164 (R03)


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Mixtard 30 InnoLet 100 IU / ml suspension for injection in a pre-filled pen


Mixtard 30 InnoLet

100 IU/ml suspension for injection in a pre-filled pen

Insulin human (rDNA)

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using your insulin. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, diabetes nurse or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, diabetes nurse or your pharmacist. This side of the leaflet: 1. What Mixtard is and what it is used for 2. Before you use Mixtard 3. How to use Mixtard 4. What to do in an emergency 5. Possible side effects 6. How to store Mixtard 7. Further information

Overleaf: How to use your InnoLet

What Mixtard is and what it is used for

Mixtard is human insulin to treat diabetes. Mixtard is a mixture of fast-acting insulin and long-acting insulin. This means that it will start to lower your blood sugar about half an hour after you take it, and the effect will last for approximately 24 hours.

Before you use Mixtard Do not use Mixtard If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to this insulin product, metacresol or any of the other ingredients (see 7 Further information). Look out for the signs of allergy in 5 Possible side effects If you feel a hypo coming on (a hypo is short for a hypoglycaemic reaction and is a symptom of low blood sugar). See 4 What to do in an emergency for more about hypos. Take special care with Mixtard If you have trouble with your kidneys or liver, or with your adrenal, pituitary or thyroid glands If you are drinking alcohol: watch for signs of a hypo and never drink alcohol on an empty stomach If you are exercising more than usual or if you want to change your usual diet If you are ill: carry on taking your insulin If you are going abroad: travelling over time zones may affect your insulin needs and the timing of your injections. Using other medicines

Many medicines affect the way glucose works in your body and they may influence your insulin dose. Listed below are the most common medicines which may affect your insulin treatment. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you take or have recently taken any other medicines, even those not prescribed.

Your need for insulin may change if you also take: oral antidiabetic products; monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI); beta-blockers; ACE-inhibitors; acetylsalicylic acid; anabolic steroids; sulphonamides; oral contraceptives; thiazides; glucocorticoids; thyroid hormone therapy; beta-sympathomimetics; growth hormone; danazol; octreotide or lanreotide.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

If you are pregnant, planning a pregnancy or breast-feeding: please contact your doctor for advice.

Driving and using machines

If you drive or use tools or machines: watch out for signs of a hypo. Your ability to concentrate or to react will be less during a hypo. Never drive or use machinery if you feel a hypo coming on. Discuss with your doctor whether you can drive or use machines at all, if you have a lot of hypos or if you find it hard to recognise hypos.

How to use Mixtard

Talk about your insulin needs with your doctor and diabetes nurse. Follow their advice carefully. This leaflet is a general guide.

If your doctor has switched you from one type or brand of insulin to another, your dose may have to be adjusted by your doctor.

Eat a meal or snack containing carbohydrates within 30 minutes of the injection.

It is recommended that you measure your blood glucose regularly.

Injecting insulin

See overleaf for detailed instructions.

Before using Mixtard Check the label to make sure it is the right type of insulin Always use a new needle for each injection to prevent contamination. Do not use Mixtard In insulin infusion pumps If InnoLet is dropped, damaged or crushed there is a risk of leakage of insulin If it hasn’t been stored correctly or been frozen (see 6 How to store Mixtard) If it’s not uniformly white and cloudy when it’s resuspended.

Mixtard is for injection under the skin (subcutaneously). Never inject your insulin directly into a vein or muscle. Always vary the sites you inject, to avoid lumps (see 5 Possible side effects). The best places to give yourself an injection are: the front of your waist (abdomen); your buttocks; the front of your thighs or upper arms. Your insulin will work more quickly if you inject it around the waist.

What to do in an emergency If you get a hypo

A hypo means your blood sugar level is too low.

The warning signs of a hypo may come on suddenly and can include: cold sweat; cool pale skin; headache; rapid heart beat; feeling sick; feeling very hungry; temporary changes in vision; drowsiness; unusual tiredness and weakness; nervousness or tremor; feeling anxious; feeling confused; difficulty in concentrating.

If you get any of these signs, eat glucose tablets or a high sugar snack (sweets, biscuits, fruit juice), then rest.

Don’t take any insulin if you feel a hypo coming on.

Carry glucose tablets, sweets, biscuits or fruit juice with you, just in case.

Tell your relatives, friends and close colleagues that if you pass out (become unconscious), they must: turn you on your side and seek medical advice straight away. They must not give you any food or drink as it could choke you.

If severe hypoglycaemia is not treated, it can cause brain damage (temporary or permanent) and even death If you have a hypo that makes you pass out, or a lot of hypos, talk to your doctor. The amount or timing of insulin, food or exercise may need to be adjusted. Using glucagon

You may recover more quickly from unconsciousness with an injection of the hormone glucagon by someone who knows how to use it. If you are given glucagon you will need glucose or a sugary snack as soon as you are conscious. If you do not respond to glucagon treatment, you will have to be treated in a hospital. Seek medical advice after an injection of glucagon; you need to find the reason for your hypo to avoid getting more.

Causes of a hypo

You get a hypo if your blood sugar gets too low. This might happen:

If you take too much insulin If you eat too little or miss a meal If you exercise more than usual. If your blood sugar gets too high

Your blood sugar may get too high (this is called hyperglycaemia).

The warning signs appear gradually. They include: increased urination; feeling thirsty; losing your appetite; feeling sick (nausea or vomiting); feeling drowsy or tired; flushed, dry skin; dry mouth and a fruity (acetone) smell of the breath.

If you get any of these signs, test your blood sugar level and test your urine for ketones if you can. Then seek medical advice straight away.

These may be signs of a very serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. If you don’t treat it, this could lead to diabetic coma and death.

Causes of hyperglycaemia Having forgotten to take your insulin Repeatedly taking less insulin than you need An infection or a fever Eating more than usual Less exercise than usual. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Mixtard can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. Mixtard may cause hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar). See the advice in 4 What to do in an emergency.

Side effects reported uncommonly

(in less than 1 patient in 100)

Changes at the injection site (Lipodystrophy). If you inject yourself too often at the same site, fatty tissue under the skin at this site may shrink (lipoatrophy) or thicken (lipohypertrophy). Changing the site with each injection may help to prevent such skin changes. If you notice your skin pitting or thickening at the injection site, tell your doctor or diabetes nurse because these reactions can become more severe, or they may change the absorption of your insulin if you inject in such a site.

Signs of allergy. Reactions (redness, swelling, itching) at the injection site may occur (local allergic reactions). These usually disappear after a few weeks of taking your insulin. If they do not disappear, see your doctor.

Seek medical advice immediately:

if signs of allergy spread to other parts of the body, or if you suddenly feel unwell and you start sweating; start being sick (vomiting); have difficulty in breathing; have a rapid heart beat; feel dizzy; feel like fainting.

You may have a very rare serious allergic reaction to Mixtard or one of its ingredients (called a systemic allergic reaction). See also warning in 2 Before you use Mixtard.

Diabetic retinopathy (eye background changes). If you have diabetic retinopathy and your blood glucose levels improve very fast, the retinopathy may get worse. Ask your doctor about this.

Swollen joints. When you start taking insulin, water retention may cause swelling around your ankles and other joints. This soon disappears.

Painful neuropathy (nerve related pain). If your blood glucose levels improve very fast it may cause a burning, tingling or electric pain. This is called acute painful neuropathy and it usually disappears. If it does not disappear, see your doctor.

Side effects reported very rarely

(in less than 1 patient in 10,000)

Vision problems. When you first start your treatment, it may disturb your vision, but the reaction usually disappears.

If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, diabetes nurse or pharmacist.

How to store Mixtard

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not use Mixtard after the expiry date which is stated on the label and the carton. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.

The InnoLet that is not being used is to be stored in a refrigerator (2°C - 8°C).

Do not store them in or too near the freezer section or cooling element.

Do not freeze.

The InnoLet that is being used, about to be used or carried as a spare is not to be kept in a refrigerator. After removing the InnoLet from the refrigerator it is recommended to let it reach room temperature before resuspending the insulin as instructed for the first time use. See 3 How to use Mixtard. You can carry it with you and keep it at room temperature (not above 30°C) for up to 6 weeks. Always keep the pen cap on your InnoLet when you’re not using it in order to protect it from light. Mixtard must be protected from excessive heat and sunlight.

Mixtard should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

Further information What Mixtard 30 contains The active substance is insulin human made by recombinant biotechnology (30% as soluble insulin and 70% as isophane insulin). 1 ml contains 100 IU of insulin human. 1 pre-filled pen contains 3 ml equivalent to 300 IU The other ingredients are zinc chloride, glycerol, metacresol, phenol, disodium phosphate dihydrate, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, protamine sulphate and water for injections. What Mixtard looks like and contents of the pack

The suspension for injection comes as a cloudy, white, aqueous suspension.

It is supplied in packs of 1, 5 or 10 pre-filled pens of 3 ml. Not all packs may be marketed.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer Novo Nordisk A/S Novo All? DK-2880 Bagsv?rd Denmark

Now turn over for information on how to use your InnoLet.

This leaflet was last approved in 09/2007

Mixtard , InnoLet and NovoFine S are trademarks owned by Novo Nordisk A/S, Denmark

© 2000/2007

Novo Nordisk A/S

Information on how to use Mixtard 30 InnoLet

Please read the following instructions carefully before using your Mixtard 30 InnoLet .

Introduction

Mixtard 30 InnoLet is a simple, compact pre-filled pen able to deliver 1 to 50 units in increments of 1 unit. Mixtard 30 InnoLet is designed to be used with NovoFine S needles of 8 mm or shorter in length. Look for an S on the needle box. The S stands for short cap.

As a precautionary measure, always carry a spare insulin delivery device in case your InnoLet is lost or damaged.

Preparing for injection

Check the label to make sure that your Mixtard 30 InnoLet contains the correct type of insulin. Take off the pen cap (as shown by the arrow).

Resuspending is easier when the insulin has reached room temperature.

Suspending the insulin

Before every injection:

Check there are at least 12 units of insulin left in the cartridge to allow even resuspending. If there are less than 12 units left, use a new Mixtard 30 InnoLet Move the pen up and down between positions A and B and back so that the glass ball moves from one end of the cartridge to the other (picture 1A) at least 20 times. Repeat this movement at least 10 times before each injection. The movement must always be repeated until the liquid appears uniformly white and cloudy After resuspending, complete all of the following stages of injection without delay.

Attaching the needle

Disinfect the rubber membrane with a medicinal swab Always use a new needle for each injection to prevent contamination Remove the protective tab from a NovoFine S needle Screw the needle straight and tightly onto Mixtard 30 InnoLet (picture 1B) Pull off the big outer needle cap and the inner needle cap. You may want to store the big outer needle cap in the compartment.

Priming to expel air

Small amounts of air may collect in the needle and cartridge during normal use.

To avoid injection of air and ensure proper dosing:

Dial 2 units by turning the dose selector clockwise Hold Mixtard 30 InnoLet with the needle pointing upwards and tap the cartridge gently with your finger a few times to make any air bubbles collect at the top of the cartridge (picture 1C). Keeping the needle upwards, press the push-button and the dose selector returns to zero A drop of insulin must appear at the needle tip. If not, change the needle and repeat the procedure no more than 6 times.

If a drop of insulin still does not appear, the device is defective and must not be used.

Setting the dose Always check that the push-button is fully depressed and the dose selector is set at zero Dial the number of units required by turning the dose selector clockwise (picture 2). Do not use the residual scale to measure your dose of insulin You will hear a click for every single unit dialled. The dose can be corrected by turning the dial either way.

You cannot set a dose larger than the number of units left in the cartridge.

Injecting the insulin Insert the needle into your skin. Use the injection technique advised by your doctor Deliver the dose by pressing the push-button fully down (picture 3). You will hear clicks as the dose selector returns to zero After the injection, the needle must remain under the skin for at least 6 seconds to ensure that the full dose has been delivered Make sure not to block the dose selector while injecting, as the dose selector must be allowed to return to zero when you press the push-button Remove the needle after each injection. Removing the needle Replace the big outer needle cap and unscrew the needle (picture 4). Dispose of it carefully.

Use a new needle for each injection.

Remove the needle after each injection and store InnoLet without the needle attached. Otherwise, the liquid may leak out which can cause inaccurate dosing.

Health care professionals, relatives and other carers must follow general precautionary measures for removal and disposal of needles to eliminate the risk of unintended needle penetration.

Dispose of your used Mixtard 30 InnoLet carefully without the needle attached.

Maintenance

Your Mixtard 30 InnoLet is designed to work accurately and safely. It must be handled with care.

Do not refill Mixtard 30 InnoLet.

You can clean your Mixtard 30 InnoLet by wiping it with a medicinal swab. Do not soak it, wash or lubricate it. This may damage the mechanism.

8-9603-01-002-3


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influenza virus vaccine, h5n1 Intramuscular


in-floo-EN-za AY VYE-rus VAX-een, H5N1, in-AK-ti-vay-ted

Available Dosage Forms:

Suspension

Therapeutic Class: Vaccine

Uses For influenza virus vaccine, h5n1

Influenza virus vaccine, H5N1 is used to prevent an infection caused by the H5N1 influenza virus subtype. The vaccine works by causing your body to produce its own protection (antibodies) against the disease . It is also known as avian influenza vaccine or avian flu shot.

This vaccine is only available from public health officials, and will be used to prevent a major outbreak of avian flu .

Before Using influenza virus vaccine, h5n1

In deciding to use a vaccine, the risks of taking the vaccine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this vaccine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to influenza virus vaccine, h5n1 or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of influenza virus vaccine, H5N1 in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established .

Geriatric

Appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of influenza virus vaccine, H5N1 have not been performed in the geriatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established .

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this vaccine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Allergy to chicken or egg products, history of—Use with caution. This vaccine contains small amounts of chicken and egg proteins . Guillain Barr? syndrome, history of—Use with caution. This vaccine may cause a recurrence of the symptoms of the condition . Immune system problems (e.g., cancer, HIV)—This vaccine may not work as well if you have weak immune system . Proper Use of influenza virus vaccine, h5n1

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this vaccine. This vaccine is given as a shot into one of your muscles .

You will need two doses of this vaccine for it to work properly. Make sure you follow your doctor's instructions on when you should come back for the second dose. The second dose is usually given 28 days after the first dose .

Dosing

The dose of influenza virus vaccine, h5n1 will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of influenza virus vaccine, h5n1. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

Precautions While Using influenza virus vaccine, h5n1

It is very important that you return to your doctor's office at the right time for the second dose. Be sure to notify your doctor of any side effects that occur after you receive this vaccine .

This vaccine will not treat flu symptoms if you already have the virus .

influenza virus vaccine, h5n1 Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Fever Less common Body aches or pain chills cough difficulty in breathing ear congestion headache loss of voice nasal congestion runny nose sneezing sore throat unusual tiredness or weakness

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Nausea pain, redness, swelling, or tenderness at injection site Less common Diarrhea

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.


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Soltamox 10mg / 5ml Oral Solution


SOLTAMOX 10mg/5ml Oral Solution

Tamoxifen

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine because it contains important information for you. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have further questions, please ask your doctor or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you personally and you should not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours.

In this leaflet:

1. What Soltamox is and what it is used for 2. Before you take Soltamox 3. How to take Soltamox 4. Possible side-effects 5. Storing Soltamox 6. Further information

SOLTAMOX 10mg/5ml Oral Solution

Active substance: tamoxifen.

The active substance is 10 mg tamoxifen (as tamoxifen citrate).

The medicine is presented as 1 bottle with 150 ml of solution.

What Soltamox Is And What It Is Used For

Tamoxifen belongs to a group of medicines known as anti-oestrogens.

Soltamox is used to treat breast cancer.

Before You Take Soltamox

Do not take this medicine but speak to your doctor if:

You are allergic to tamoxifen or any of the ingredients. You are pregnant or breast feeding. You should not become pregnant while taking this medicine or within 2 months of finishing the course. If you are sexually active, you should use a barrier method or other non-hormonal method of contraception. Discuss this with your doctor. If you think you have become pregnant you should speak to your doctor immediately. You are taking anastrozole to treat breast cancer.

This medicine is not intended for use in children.

Take special care with this medicine:

Consult your doctor before taking this medicine if:

You have not yet gone through the menopause, as your doctor will have to ensure you are not pregnant before starting treatment. You have a family history of strokes or blood clots.

Tamoxifen can cause absence of or change in the regularity of periods.

Driving and using machines

As tamoxifen can cause changes in eyesight and light headedness, you should take care when driving or using machines.

Important information about some of the ingredients of Soltamox

This product contains 19% v/v ethanol. Each 5 ml dose contains 0.75g of alcohol equivalent to 19ml of beer or 8ml of wine. It is harmful for those suffering from alcoholism. Speak to the doctor before taking this medicine if you suffer from liver disease or epilepsy. It may also modify or increase the effect of other medicines.

This product contains glycerol which may cause headache, stomach upset and diarrhoea.

It also contains sorbitol. If you have been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, speak to your doctor before taking this product.

Taking other medicines

Please inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, even those not prescribed.

Consult your doctor before using this medicine if you are taking:

anastrozole, used to treat breast cancer anticoagulants e.g. warfarin or anti-platelets e.g. aspirin or clopidogrel that prevent blood clots forming other cytotoxic medicines or are undergoing chemotherapy bromocriptine rifampicin hormone preparations (e.g. oral contraceptives). How To Take Soltamox

Always take Soltamox exactly as your doctor has instructed you.

This medicine is only to be taken by mouth. Do not exceed or take less than the stated dose. Do not take this medicine more or less often than prescribed.

You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are unsure.

When not prescribed otherwise by the doctor, the usual dose is:

Adults (including the elderly): 20 mg to 40 mg as a single dose or in divided doses.

Children: Not applicable.

If you take too much medicine a doctor or hospital should be contacted immediately.

If you forget to take a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember then carry on as before. Never take two doses together.

Possible Side-Effects

The frequency of side effects is assessed on the following basis:

Very common: in more than 1 in 10 subjects treated

Common: in more than 1 in 100 subjects treated

Uncommon: in more than 1 in 1000 subjects treated

Rare: in more than 1 in 10,000 subjects treated

Very rare: in 1 or fewer than 1 in 10,000 subjects treated, including isolated cases.

Very common

Hot flushes, vaginal discharge, genital itching, abnormal vaginal bleeding.

Common

Bone and tumour pain, fluid retention, an increased risk of blood clots, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (a blood clot in the lungs), light headedness, headache, changes in vision as a result of cataracts or changes to the cornea or retina, nausea, thinning of hair, leg cramps.

If you develop sudden shortness of breath, chest pain, coughing up blood, calf or thigh pain or swelling in the legs, seek medical attention immediately.

Uncommon

Vomiting.

If you notice you have excessive thirst, nausea or vomiting you should contact your doctor as you may have too much calcium in your blood and the doctor may want to perform tests.

Rare

Temporary disorders of the blood system which may show as a tendency to bruise more easily and which can disappear on stopping treatment, skin rash and liver problems such as jaundice and hepatitis.

Rarely an allergic reaction may occur which may show as difficulty in breathing and generalised swelling. If this happens, seek medical help immediately.

Menstrual disturbances, vaginal discharge, cancer of the womb, changes in the lining of the womb which may be seen as pain or pressure in the pelvis and abnormal vaginal bleeding and swollen ovaries. If you notice abnormal bleeding or pain and pressure in the pelvis you should speak to your doctor straight away.

Very rare

Severe blood disorders which may show as a tendency to bruise more easily, very high cholesterol levels, pancreatitis which may result in stomach pain radiating to the back, fever and nausea, liver cell damage, Stevens-Johnson syndrome with severe skin rashes, which may also include ring-shaped rashes and the formation of large blisters.

Inflammation of the lungs may occur. This may show as a dry cough, progressive difficulty in breathing, swelling of the ends of the fingers, bluish discolouration of the skin and fever. If this happens, seek medical help immediately.

Cases of optic nerve diseases, which cause problems with your sight, have been reported. In a small number of cases blindness has occurred.

If you have any of the symptoms listed or other effects it is advisable to speak to your doctor.

Storing Soltamox

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Do not use after the expiry date stated on the bottle and outer packaging.

Discard 3 months after first opening.

Soltamox should not be stored above 25°C. Do not refrigerate or freeze. Store in the original package in order to protect from light.

Always keep the medicine in the bottle in which it was originally given to you.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine that is no longer wanted. Take it to your pharmacist for safe disposal.

If you notice any defects, or signs of deterioration in the medicine you should consult your pharmacist.

Further Information

The other ingredients are: ethanol (19% v/v), glycerol (E422), propylene glycol (E1520), sorbitol liquid (non-crystallising) (E420), natural aniseed flavouring (flavouring preparations, isopropyl alcohol, water), liquorice flavouring (flavouring preparations, natural flavouring substances, artificial flavouring substances, propylene glycol E1520, isopropyl alcohol) and purified water.

The marketing authorisations (PL 00427/0121 – UK, PA 312/8/1 – Eire) are held by and the product is manufactured by

Rosemont Pharmaceuticals Ltd Rosemont House Yorkdale Industrial Park Braithwaite Street Leeds LS11 9XE UK

This leaflet was prepared in April 2009.

P0451


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pegaptanib Intraocular


peg-AP-ta-nib

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Macugen

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution

Therapeutic Class: Ophthalmologic Agent

Uses For pegaptanib

Pegaptanib is used to treat neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a disorder of the retina of the eye that causes blurring of vision or blindness .

pegaptanib is available only with your doctor's prescription .

Before Using pegaptanib

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For pegaptanib, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to pegaptanib or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of pegaptanib in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established .

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatrics-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of pegaptanib in the elderly .

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of pegaptanib. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Eye infection—Pegaptanib should NOT be used in patients with an infection in or around the eye . Glaucoma—pegaptanib may increase eye pressure after injection. Your doctor will monitor your eye pressure during the week after every injection . Proper Use of pegaptanib

A doctor will give you pegaptanib. Pegaptanib is given through a shot into your eye. .

Precautions While Using pegaptanib

Your doctor will want to check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you receive pegaptanib .

Serious eye problems may occur after treatment with pegaptanib. Check with your doctor immediately if your eye becomes red, sensitive to light, painful or develops a change in vision several days after your treatment.

pegaptanib Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Bladder pain blindness bloody eye bloody or cloudy urine blurred vision burning, dry, or itching eyes cough producing mucus decreased vision or other changes in vision difficult, burning, or painful urination difficulty breathing discharge, excessive tearing disturbed color perception double vision drainage from eyes eye pain frequent urge to urinate gradual loss of vision halos around lights itching of eyelid looking through water lower back or side pain nausea night blindness overbright appearance of lights painful irritation of the clear front part of the eye redness, pain, swelling of eye, eyelid, or inner lining of eyelid seeing flashes or sparks of light seeing floating spots before the eyes shortness of breath sore eyes swelling of the eye tightness in chest tunnel vision vomiting wheezing Less Common Bigger, dilated, or enlarged pupils (black part of the eye) change in vision not present before treatment chest pain confusion decrease in frequency of urination decrease in urine volume difficulty in passing urine (dribbling) dizziness or lightheadedness dry mouth eye irritation fatigue feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings flushed, dry skin fruit-like breath odor headache hearing loss inability to speak increased hunger increased sensitivity of eyes to light increased thirst increased urination loss of consciousness numbness or tingling in face, arms, or legs seeing floaters, veil or curtain appearing across part of vision seizures sensation of spinning severe or sudden headache slurred speech stomachache sweating temporary blindness trouble speaking, thinking, or walking troubled breathing unexplained weight loss weakness in arm and/or leg on one side of the body, sudden and severe Incidence not determined Difficulty swallowing fast heartbeat hives itching puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue skin rash unusual tiredness or weakness

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Diarrhea Less common Acid or sour stomach belching blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of skin bruise difficulty in moving heartburn indigestion itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, swelling of skin muscle pain or stiffness pain, swelling, or redness in joints stomach discomfort, upset, or pain

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: pegaptanib Intraocular side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More pegaptanib Intraocular resources Pegaptanib Intraocular Side Effects (in more detail)Pegaptanib Intraocular Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingPegaptanib Intraocular Drug InteractionsPegaptanib Intraocular Support Group0 Reviews for Pegaptanib Intraocular - Add your own review/rating Compare pegaptanib Intraocular with other medications Macular Degeneration
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