flomax and potassium
 

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Iodure de Potassium-Recip


Iodure de Potassium-Recip may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Iodure de Potassium-Recip Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Iodure de Potassium-Recip in the following countries:

Luxembourg

International Drug Name Search


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Flomax


Generic Name: tamsulosin (Oral route)

tam-SOO-loe-sin hye-droe-KLOR-ide

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Flomax

Available Dosage Forms:

Capsule

Therapeutic Class: Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Tamsulosin

Uses For Flomax

Tamsulosin is used to treat men who have symptoms of an enlarged prostate gland, which is also known as benign enlargement of the prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH). Benign enlargement of the prostate is a problem that can occur in men as they get older. The prostate gland is located below the bladder. As the prostate gland enlarges, certain muscles in the gland may become tight and get in the way of the tube that drains urine from the bladder. This can cause problems in urinating, such as a need to urinate often, a weak stream when urinating, or a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely.

Tamsulosin helps relax the muscles in the prostate and the opening of the bladder. This may help increase the flow of urine or decrease the symptoms. However, tamsulosin will not shrink the prostate. The prostate may continue to get larger. This may cause the symptoms to become worse over time. Therefore, even though tamsulosin may lessen the problems caused by enlarged prostate now, surgery still may be needed in the future.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Flomax

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Tamsulosin is not indicated for use in the pediatric population.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of tamsulosin in the elderly.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Atazanavir Clarithromycin Indinavir Itraconazole Ketoconazole Nefazodone Nelfinavir Ritonavir Saquinavir Tadalafil Telithromycin

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Acebutolol Alprenolol Atenolol Betaxolol Bevantolol Bisoprolol Bucindolol Carteolol Carvedilol Celiprolol Cimetidine Dilevalol Esmolol Labetalol Levobunolol Mepindolol Metipranolol Metoprolol Nadolol Nebivolol Oxprenolol Paroxetine Penbutolol Pindolol Propranolol Sildenafil Sotalol Talinolol Tertatolol Timolol Vardenafil Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Allergy to sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole, sulfasalazine, sulfasoxazole, Azulfidine®, Bactrim®, or Septra®)—Increased allergic reaction risk in patients with this condition. Kidney disease or Liver disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body. Low blood pressure—Use with caution. May make this conditions worse. Proper Use of Flomax

Take this medicine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

This medicine comes with a patient information insert. Read and follow the instructions in the insert carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

Take the capsule approximately 30 minutes after the same meal each day. Swallow the capsule whole. Do not crush, chew, or open it.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For oral dosage form (capsules): For benign prostatic hyperplasia: Adults—At first, 0.4 milligram (mg) once a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. Children—Use is not recommended. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions While Using Flomax

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly and to check for unwanted effects.

Women and children should not use this medicine.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur after you take this medicine, especially when you get up from a lying or sitting position. Getting up slowly may help lessen this problem. If you feel dizzy, lie down so you do not faint. Then sit for a few moments before standing to prevent the dizziness from returning.

Because tamsulosin may cause some people to become dizzy or feel faint, make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or not alert.

This medication may rarely cause a severe allergic reaction (swelling of face, tongue, or throat; difficulty breathing; and blistering of the skin. Check with your doctor immediately if this occurs.

You should seek medical attention right away if you experience a prolonged erection while using this medicine. This is an extremely rare unwanted effect that must be treated right away to prevent permanent erectile damage (impotence).

If you plan to have cataract surgery, tell your eye doctor (ophthalmologist) that you are taking this medicine or that you used this medicine in the past 9 months. A serious eye problem called Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS) has occurred in some patients who were taking this medicine or who had recently taken this medicine when they had cataract surgery.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Flomax Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Cough or hoarseness fever or chills lower back or side pain painful or difficult urination Less common Chest pain Rare Dizziness or lightheadedness dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position fainting feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings painful or prolonged erection of the penis sensation of spinning Incidence not known Blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin blurred vision confusion diarrhea difficult or labored breathing fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse itching joint or muscle pain large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs red skin lesions, often with a purple center red, irritated eyes shortness of breath or troubled breathing sore throat sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips sweating tightness of the chest or wheezing unusual tiredness or weakness

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Abnormal ejaculation back pain body aches or pain congestion headache lack or loss of strength sneezing stuffy or runny nose tender, swollen glands in the neck trouble with swallowing voice changes Less common Decreased interest in sexual intercourse decreased sexual drive or performance drowsiness inability to have or keep an erection increased cough loss in sexual ability, desire, drive, or performance nausea pain or tenderness around the eyes and cheekbones sleepiness or unusual drowsiness sleeplessness tooth disorder trouble with sleeping unable to sleep Incidence not known Constipation hives or welts redness of the skin skin rash vomiting

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Flomax side effects (in more detail)

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More Flomax resources Flomax Side Effects (in more detail) Flomax Dosage Flomax Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Flomax Drug Interactions Flomax Support Group 53 Reviews for Flomax - Add your own review/rating Flomax Prescribing Information (FDA) Flomax Consumer Overview Flomax Monograph (AHFS DI) Flomax MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tamsulosin Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Flomax with other medications Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Overactive Bladder Urinary Tract Stones
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tamsulosin


Generic Name: tamsulosin (tam soo LOE sin)
Brand Names: Flomax

What is tamsulosin?

Tamsulosin is in a group of drugs called alpha-adrenergic (AL-fa ad-ren-ER-jik) blockers. Tamsulosin relaxes the muscles in the prostate and bladder neck, making it easier to urinate.

Tamsulosin is used to improve urination in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate).

Tamsulosin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about tamsulosin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to tamsulosin. Do not take tamsulosin with other similar medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), silodosin (Rapaflo), or terazosin (Hytrin). Tamsulosin may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it or when you start taking it again. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated during exercise and in hot weather. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. If you stop taking tamsulosin for any reason, call your doctor before you start taking it again. You may need a dose adjustment.

Tamsulosin can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using tamsulosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

There are many other drugs that can interact with tamsulosin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking tamsulosin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to tamsulosin. Do not take tamsulosin with other similar medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), silodosin (Rapaflo), or terazosin (Hytrin).

If you have a history of prostate cancer, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this tamsulosin.

Tamsulosin can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using tamsulosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

Although this medication is not for use in women, tamsulosin is not expected to harm an unborn baby. If you are a woman using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Tamsulosin is not for use in children. How should I take tamsulosin?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Tamsulosin is usually taken once a day, approximately 30 minutes after a meal. Try to take this medication at the same time each day. Do not crush, chew, or open a tamsulosin capsule. Swallow it whole. Tamsulosin lowers blood pressure and may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it, or when you start taking it again. Call your doctor if you have severe dizziness or feel like you might pass out.

You may feel very dizzy when you first wake up. Be careful when standing or sitting up from a lying position.

If you stop taking tamsulosin for any reason, call your doctor before you start taking it again. You may need a dose adjustment.

Your blood pressure and prostate will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Some things can cause your blood pressure to get too low. This includes vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, heart disease, dialysis, a low-salt diet, or taking diuretics (water pills). Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Tamsulosin dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

If you miss your doses for several days in a row, contact your doctor before restarting the medication. You may need a lower dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme dizziness or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking tamsulosin? Tamsulosin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

To prevent dizziness, avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated during exercise and in hot weather.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of tamsulosin. Tamsulosin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using tamsulosin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

feeling like you might pass out;

chest pain;

fever, chills, body aches, or flu symptoms; or

penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild dizziness;

weakness, drowsiness;

headache;

nausea, diarrhea;

back pain;

blurred vision;

dental problems;

sleep problems (insomnia);

abnormal ejaculation, decreased sex drive; or

runny nose, sore throat, cough.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Tamsulosin Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia:

0.4 mg orally once daily one-half hour following the same meal each day

What other drugs will affect tamsulosin?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

cimetidine (Tagamet);

conivaptan (Vaprisol);

cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);

imatinib (Gleevec);

isoniazid (for treating tuberculosis);

methimazole (Tapazole);

pioglitazone (Actos);

ropinirole (Requip);

ticlopidine (Ticlid);

warfarin (Coumadin);

an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), dalfopristin/quinupristin (Synercid), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin), metronidazole (Flagyl, Protostat), telithromycin (Ketek), or terbinafine (Lamisil);

an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), duloxetine (Cymbalta), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), imipramine (Tofranil), nefazodone, paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

antifungal medication such as clotrimazole (Mycelex Troche), itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Extina, Ketozole, Nizoral, Xolegal), or voriconazole (Vfend);

anti-malaria medication such as chloroquine (Arelan) or pyrimethamine (Daraprim), or quinine (Qualaquin);

erectile dysfunction medicine such as sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), or vardenafil (Levitra);

heart or blood pressure medication such as diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others;

a heart rhythm medication such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) or quinidine (Quin-G);

HIV/AIDS medicine such as atazanavir (Reyataz), delavirdine (Rescriptor), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), saquinavir (Invirase), or ritonavir (Norvir); or

medicine to treat psychiatric disorders, such as aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), haloperidol (Haldol), perphenazine (Trilafon), or thioridazine (Mellaril).

This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with tamsulosin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you. More tamsulosin resources Tamsulosin Side Effects (in more detail)Tamsulosin DosageTamsulosin Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesTamsulosin Drug InteractionsTamsulosin Support Group65 Reviews for Tamsulosin - Add your own review/rating tamsulosin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Tamsulosin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tamsulosin Prescribing Information (FDA) Flomax Prescribing Information (FDA) Flomax Monograph (AHFS DI) Flomax Consumer Overview Compare tamsulosin with other medications Benign Prostatic HyperplasiaOveractive BladderUrinary Tract Stones Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about tamsulosin.

See also: tamsulosin side effects (in more detail)


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Ion-K


Ion-K may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Ion-K Potassium Gluconate

Potassium Gluconate is reported as an ingredient of Ion-K in the following countries:

Colombia

International Drug Name Search


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Jodid-CT


Jodid-CT may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Jodid-CT Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodid-CT in the following countries:

Germany

International Drug Name Search


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InfectoDell


InfectoDell may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for InfectoDell Potassium Hydroxide

Potassium Hydroxide is reported as an ingredient of InfectoDell in the following countries:

Germany

International Drug Name Search


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Jodox


Jodox may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Jodox Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodox in the following countries:

Poland

International Drug Name Search


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Jodetten


Jodetten may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Jodetten Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodetten in the following countries:

Germany

International Drug Name Search


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Jodix


Jodix may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Jodix Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodix in the following countries:

Finland

International Drug Name Search


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Cardura


Generic Name: doxazosin (dox AY zo sin)
Brand Names: Cardura, Cardura XL

What is doxazosin?

Doxazosin is in a group of drugs called alpha-adrenergic (AL-fa ad-ren-ER-jik) blockers. Doxazosin relaxes your veins and arteries so that blood can more easily pass through them. It also relaxes the muscles in the prostate and bladder neck, making it easier to urinate.

Doxazosin is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), or to improve urination in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate).

Doxazosin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about doxazosin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to doxazosin or similar medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), prazosin (Minipress), silodosin (Rapaflo), tamsulosin (Flomax), or terazosin (Hytrin). Doxazosin may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it or when you start taking it again. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated during exercise and in hot weather. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. If you stop taking doxazosin for any reason, call your doctor before you start taking it again. You may need a dose adjustment.

Doxazosin can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using doxazosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially other blood pressure medications including diuretics (water pills).

What should I discuss with my doctor before taking doxazosin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to doxazosin or similar medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), prazosin (Minipress), silodosin (Rapaflo), tamsulosin (Flomax), or terazosin (Hytrin).

If you have liver disease or a history of prostate cancer, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take doxazosin.

Doxazosin can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using doxazosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether doxazosin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether doxazosin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take doxazosin?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Doxazosin lowers blood pressure and may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it, or when you start taking it again. Call your doctor if you have severe dizziness or feel like you might pass out.

You may feel very dizzy when you first wake up. Be careful when standing or sitting up from a lying position.

If you stop taking doxazosin for any reason, call your doctor before you start taking it again. You may need a dose adjustment.

Your blood pressure or prostate will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Some things can cause your blood pressure to get too low. This includes vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, heart disease, dialysis, a low-salt diet, or taking diuretics (water pills). Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

If you miss your doses for several days in a row, contact your doctor before restarting the medication. You may need a lower dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme dizziness or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking doxazosin? Doxazosin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

To prevent dizziness, avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated during exercise and in hot weather.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of doxazosin. Doxazosin side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

feeling like you might pass out;

fast or pounding heartbeats, fluttering in your chest;

trouble breathing;

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or

penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild dizziness;

tired feeling, drowsiness;

headache;

nausea; or

runny nose.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect doxazosin?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

sildenafil (Viagra, Revatio)

tadalafil (Cialis);

vardenafil (Levitra); or

other blood pressure medications, including diuretics (water pills).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with doxazosin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Cardura resources Cardura Side Effects (in more detail) Cardura Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Cardura Drug Interactions Cardura Support Group 3 Reviews for Cardura - Add your own review/rating Cardura Monograph (AHFS DI) Cardura Prescribing Information (FDA) Cardura Consumer Overview Cardura Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Cardura MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Doxazosin Prescribing Information (FDA) Cardura XL Prescribing Information (FDA) Cardura XL Extended-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Cardura with other medications Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia High Blood Pressure Raynaud's Syndrome Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about doxazosin.

See also: Cardura side effects (in more detail)


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Diuretics


Diuretics are drugs that increase the volume of urine produced by promoting the excretion of salt and water from the kidneys. There are several types of diuretics, each working in a distinct way.

Loop diuretics prevent re-absorption of sodium and chloride ions in the Loop of Henle. Thiazide diuretics inhibit sodium re-absorption at the beginning of the distal convoluted tubules. Potassium sparing diuretics prevent excessive loss of potassium at the distal convoluted tubules.

Diuretics are used to reduce the edema caused due to salt and water retention in disorders of the heart, kidneys, liver or lungs. They are used commonly in treatment of hypertension.

See also carbonic anhydrase inhibitors loop diuretics miscellaneous diuretics potassium-sparing diuretics thiazide diuretics Drug List:
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Sterile Potassium Chloride Concentrate 15% (hameln)


Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have further questions, please ask your doctor or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you personally and you should not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. In this leaflet: 1. What your medicine is and what it is used for 2. Before you receive it 3. How it is administered 4. Possible side effects 5. Storing your injection 6. Use by date Sterile Potassium Chloride Concentrate 15%

Each ml contains 0.15 g potassium chloride in a sterile solution for injection. The other ingredients are hydrochloric acid and water for injections.

Holder of the Marketing Authorisation: hameln pharmaceuticals ltd Gloucester United Kingdom Manufacturer: hameln Pharmaceuticals gmbh Langes Feld 13 31789 Hameln Germany What potassium chloride is and what it is used for

Potassium chloride occurs naturally in your body.

It is used to replace the loss of potassium from your body, if this cannot be achieved when given by mouth or in the diet.

The injection is supplied in clear glass ampoules containing 10 ml.

10 ampoules are supplied in each carton.

Before the injection is given to you

Please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before being given the injection if you:

suffer from impaired kidney function suffer from Addison's disease (a disease characterised by a reduced secretion of hormones from a gland situated near the kidneys) are very dehydrated suffer from heat cramps suffer from disturbances in the salt content of your blood are pregnant or breast-feeding

Please inform your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, even those not prescribed, especially diuretics (water tablets) as these may interfere with this injection.

How the injection is given to you

Your doctor, nurse or pharmacist will give you the injection.

Sterile Potassium Chloride Concentrate 15% may be given by an intravenous injection (into a vein).

In emergencies, it may be necessary to give the injection without your knowledge.

Your doctor will decide on the correct dosage for you and when or how the injection will be given.

The injection must be diluted at least 50 times before it is given to you.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, potassium chloride can have side effects.

Potassium chloride may cause the following side effects:

pain at the site of injection inflammation of the vein into which the solution is being injected raised blood levels of potassium

If you experience these or any other side effects not mentioned in this leaflet, please inform your doctor, nurse or pharmacist

Storing your injection

Your injection will be stored under 25°C, protected from light and out of the reach and sight of children.

Use by date

The doctor, nurse or pharmacist will check that the injection is not past its expiry date before giving you the injection.

This leaflet was last updated on March 25th 2004.

PL01502/0007R

43856/19/04


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Jodid Verla


Jodid Verla may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Jodid Verla Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodid Verla in the following countries:

Germany

International Drug Name Search


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Jodid-ratiopharm


Jodid-ratiopharm may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Jodid-ratiopharm Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodid-ratiopharm in the following countries:

Germany

International Drug Name Search


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Pima


Generic Name: potassium iodide (poe TAH see um EYE oh dide)
Brand Names: Pima

What is Pima (potassium iodide)?

Potassium iodide is the potassium salt form of iodide, a naturally occurring substance.

Potassium iodide is an expectorant. It thins mucus secretions in the respiratory tract that may be caused by chronic respiratory problems such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Potassium iodide is also used to protect the thyroid gland from radiation injury before and following administration of radioactive iodide (e.g., for diagnostic purposes) and in radiation emergencies (e.g., accidental exposure to radiation).

Potassium iodide may also be used for purposes other than those listed here.

What is the most important information I should know about Pima (potassium iodide)?

Tell your doctor and dentist that you are taking this medication before having surgery or taking other medicines.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Pima (potassium iodide)?

Before taking potassium iodide, talk to your doctor if you have

a history of previous allergic reaction to iodide, iodine, or other medicines;

Addison's disease;

dehydration;

a high level of potassium in the blood (hyperkalemia);

cystic fibrosis;

tuberculosis;

thyroid problems;

goiter (enlargement of the thyroid gland); or

kidney problems.

You may not be able to take potassium iodide, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.

Potassium iodide is in the FDA pregnancy category D. This means that it is known to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take potassium iodide without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. Potassium iodide passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing baby. Do not take potassium iodide without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Pima (potassium iodide)?

Take potassium iodide exactly as directed. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist to explain them to you.

To ensure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Take the oral solution with water or another beverage as directed by your doctor.

It is important to take potassium iodide regularly to get the most benefit.

Your doctor may want you to have blood tests or other medical evaluations during treatment with potassium iodide to monitor progress and side effects.

Store potassium iodide at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and only take the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a potassium iodide overdose are not known.

What should I avoid while taking Pima (potassium iodide)?

Tell your doctor and dentist that you are taking this medication before having surgery or taking other medicines.

Pima (potassium iodide) side effects Stop taking potassium iodide and seek emergency medical attention if you experience a rare but serious allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take potassium iodide and talk to your doctor if you experience

nausea, vomiting, upset stomach, or stomach pain;

mild skin rash; or

a metallic taste in the mouth.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Pima (potassium iodide)?

Potassium iodide may interact with other medications. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products, during treatment with potassium iodide.

More Pima resources Pima Side Effects (in more detail) Pima Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Pima Drug Interactions Pima Support Group 1 Review for Pima - Add your own review/rating Pima Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Pima Syrup MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Potassium Iodide MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Potassium Iodide Monograph (AHFS DI) ThyroShield Solution MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Thyroshield Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Pima with other medications Cough Cutaneous Sporotrichosis Hyperthyroidism Radiation Emergency Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about potassium iodide written for healthcare professionals that you may read.

See also: Pima side effects (in more detail)


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Jodthyrox


Jodthyrox may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Jodthyrox Levothyroxine

Levothyroxine sodium salt (a derivative of Levothyroxine) is reported as an ingredient of Jodthyrox in the following countries:

Austria Germany Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodthyrox in the following countries:

Austria Germany

International Drug Name Search


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Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate


Pronunciation: SOE-dee-um FLUR-ide/po-TAS-ee-um NYE-trate
Generic Name: Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate
Brand Name: PreviDent 5000 Sensitive
Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate is used for:

Preventing tooth decay. It is also used to help reduce painful sensitivity of the teeth to touch; sweets; or hot, cold, or acidic substances.

Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate is a topical fluoride toothpaste. It works by strengthening the tooth enamel.

Do NOT use Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate:

Some medical conditions may interact with Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have kidney problems

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate. However, no specific interactions with Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate are known at this time.

Ask your health care provider if Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate:

Use Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Use Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate in place of your regular toothpaste unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Place at least a 1-inch strip of the paste onto a soft bristle toothbrush. Brush the teeth thoroughly for at least 1 minute, then spit out the paste. Do NOT swallow. Rinse the mouth well. Spit out the rinse water. Be sure to brush all sensitive areas of the teeth. Use Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. Using Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate at the same time each day will help you remember to use it. If you miss a dose of Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate, use it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate.

Important safety information: Do NOT use more than the recommended dose or use for longer than 4 weeks without checking with your doctor. If your symptoms do not get better or if they get worse, check with your doctor. Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate may cause harm if a large amount is swallowed. If you may have taken it by mouth, contact your poison control center or emergency room right away. Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate should not be used in CHILDREN younger than 12 years old without checking with your doctor or dentist; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate while you are pregnant. It is not known if Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate is found in breast milk after topical use. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. No COMMON side effects have been reported with this product. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue).

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include bloody vomit; burning in the mouth; diarrhea; drooling; nausea; sore tongue; stomach pain or cramping; or vomiting.

Proper storage of Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate:

Store Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate resources Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate Support Group 3 Reviews for Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate - Add your own review/rating Compare Sodium Fluoride/Potassium Nitrate with other medications Prevention of Dental Caries
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potassium aminobenzoate


Generic Name: potassium aminobenzoate (po TAS ee um a MEE noe BEN zoe ate)
Brand Names: Potaba

What is potassium aminobenzoate?

Potassium aminobenzoate is a form of Vitamin B, which supports many important body functions.

Potassium aminobenzoate works by causing a softening of skin or tissues when used over time. It also raises oxygen levels in tissues of the body.

Potassium aminobenzoate is used to treat conditions that cause skin or tissues to harden, including scleroderma (skler-oh-DERM-a), dermatomyositis (der-mat-oh-mye-oh-SYE-tis), and Peyronie's (pe-ROE-neez) disease.

Potassium aminobenzoate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about potassium aminobenzoate?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, diabetes, or chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Tell your doctor if you are taking a sulfa antibiotic, such as Bactrim, Cotrim, Septra, and others.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking potassium aminobenzoate?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

kidney disease;

diabetes; or

chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

Potassium aminobenzoate may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether potassium aminobenzoate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take potassium aminobenzoate?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

The oral powder and tablet forms of this medicine should be mixed with cold water or juice. Crush the tablets before dissolving them in liquid. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Store potassium aminobenzoate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Be sure to take the medicine with food. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I avoid while taking potassium aminobenzoate? Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Potassium aminobenzoate side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low while you are taking this medicine. You may have hypoglycemia if you take potassium aminobenzoate without food.

Symptoms of low blood sugar include:

hunger, headache, confusion, irritability;

drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors;

sweating, fast heartbeat;

seizure (convulsions); or

fainting, coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

nausea;

loss of appetite;

fever; or

mild skin rash.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect potassium aminobenzoate?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are using a sulfa antibiotic such as:

Bactrim;

Cotrim;

Proloprim;

Septra;

SMX / TMP; or

Trimpex.

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect potassium aminobenzoate. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More potassium aminobenzoate resources Potassium aminobenzoate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Potassium aminobenzoate Drug Interactions Potassium aminobenzoate Support Group 0 Reviews for Potassium aminobenzoate - Add your own review/rating Potaba Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Potaba MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare potassium aminobenzoate with other medications Dietary Supplementation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about potassium aminobenzoate written for health professionals that you may read.
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Meglitinides


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Meglinitides work by stimulating the pancreas to release insulin in response to a meal. It closes ATP-dependent potassium channels in functioning pancreatic beta cells. This blockade of potassium channels depolarizes the beta cells, which leads to opening of calcium channels resulting in influx of calcium. Increased intracellular calcium induces insulin secretion.

Meglitinides are used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes.

See also

Medical conditions associated with meglitinides:

Diabetes, Type 2 Drug List: Prandin Starlix
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Jodid Draseln? a sodn?


Jodid Draseln? a sodn? may be available in the countries listed below.

Ingredient matches for Jodid Draseln? a sodn? Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodid Draseln? a sodn? in the following countries:

Slovakia Sodium Iodide

Sodium Iodide is reported as an ingredient of Jodid Draseln? a sodn? in the following countries:

Slovakia

International Drug Name Search


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