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Laxido Orange, powder for oral solution, sugar-free


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Laxido Orange, powder for oral solution.

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Each sachet contains the following quantitative composition of active ingredients:

Macrogol 3350 13.125g

Sodium Chloride 350.7mg

Sodium Hydrogen Carbonate 178.5mg

Potassium Chloride 46.6mg

The content of electrolyte ions per sachet following reconstitution in 125ml of water is equivalent to:

Sodium 65mmol/l

Chloride 53mmol/l

Hydrogen Carbonate (Bicarbonate) 17mmol/l

Potassium 5.4mmol/l

For a full list of excipients, see section 6.1.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Powder for oral solution. Single-dose sachet containing a free flowing white powder.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

For the treatment of chronic constipation. Laxido Orange is also effective in resolving faecal impaction, defined as refractory constipation with faecal loading of the rectum and/or colon.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Laxido Orange is for oral use.

Chronic Constipation:

A course of treatment for chronic constipation with Laxido Orange does not normally exceed 2 weeks, although this can be repeated if required. As for all laxatives, prolonged use is not usually recommended. Extended use may be necessary in the care of patients with severe chronic or resistant constipation, secondary to multiple sclerosis or Parkinson's Disease, or induced by regular constipating medication in particular opioids and antimuscarinics.

Adults, adolescents and the elderly: 1-3 sachets daily in divided doses, according to individual response. For extended use, the dose can be adjusted down to 1 or 2 sachets daily.

Children below 12 years old: Not recommended.

Faecal Impaction:

A course of treatment for faecal impaction with Laxido Orange does not normally exceed 3 days.

Adults, adolescents and the elderly: 8 sachets daily, all of which should be consumed within a 6 hour period.

Children below 12 years old: Not recommended.

Patients with impaired cardiovascular function: For the treatment of faecal impaction the dose should be divided so that no more than 2 sachets are taken in any one hour.

Patients with renal insufficiency: No dosage change is necessary for the treatment of constipation or faecal impaction.

Administration:

Each sachet should be dissolved in 125 ml water. For use in faecal impaction, 8 sachets may be dissolved in 1 litre of water.

4.3 Contraindications

Laxido Orange is contraindicated in intestinal obstruction or perforation caused by functional or structural disorder of the gut wall, ileus and in patients with severe inflammatory conditions of the intestinal tract (e.g. ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and toxic megacolon).

Hypersensitivity to the active substances or any of the excipients.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

The faecal impaction diagnosis should be confirmed by appropriate physical or radiological examination of the rectum and abdomen.

Mild adverse drug reactions are possible as indicated in Section 4.8. If patients develop any symptoms indicating shifts of fluids/electrolytes (e.g. oedema, shortness of breath, increasing fatigue, dehydration, cardiac failure) Laxido Orange should be stopped immediately and electrolytes measured and any abnormality should be treated appropriately.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

There are no known interactions of Laxido Orange with other medicinal products. However, macrogol 3350 raises the solubility of medicinal products that are soluble in alcohol and mainly insoluble in water. It is a theoretical possibility that absorption of these drugs could be reduced transiently. Therefore, other medicines should not be taken orally for one hour before and for one hour after taking Laxido Orange.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

There is no experience with the use of Laxido Orange during pregnancy and lactation and it should not be used during pregnancy and lactation unless clearly necessary.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Laxido Orange has no influence on the ability to drive and use machines.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Immune System Disorders:

Allergic reactions are possible.

Gastro-intestinal Disorders:

Potential gastro-intestinal effects that may occur include abdominal distension and pain, borborygmi and nausea. Mild diarrhoea may also occur, but normally resolves after dose reduction.

4.9 Overdose

Severe distension or pain can be treated using nasogastric aspiration. Vomiting or diarrhoea may induce extensive fluid loss, possibly leading to electrolyte disturbances that should be treated appropriately.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Pharmacotherapeutic group: Osmotically acting laxatives.

ATC code: A06A D65

Macrogol 3350 induces a laxative effect through its osmotic action in the gut. This product also contains electrolytes to ensure that there is no overall gain or loss of water, potassium or sodium.

Clinical studies using the listed active substances for the treatment of chronic constipation have shown that the dose required to produce normally formed stools tends to decrease over time. For most patients, the maintenance dose will be one to two sachets per day (adjusted according to individual response).

Comparative studies in faecal impaction using active controls (e.g. enemas) have not been performed. However, results from a non-comparative study have shown that, from a population of 27 adult patients, the listed combination of active substances cleared faecal impaction in 12/27 (44%) patients after one day's treatment, increasing to 23/27 (85%) following two days' treatment and 24/27 (89%) recovered at the end of three days.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Macrogol 3350 is virtually unabsorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract and is excreted, unaltered, in faeces. Any macrogol 3350 that enters the systemic circulation is excreted in urine.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Preclinical studies provide evidence that macrogol 3350 has no significant systemic toxicity potential, although no tests of its effects on reproduction or genotoxicity have been conducted.

There are no long-term animal toxicity or carcinogenicity studies involving macrogol 3350, although there are toxicity studies using high levels of orally administered high-molecular weight macrogols that provide evidence of safety at the recommended therapeutic dose.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Acesulfame Potassium (E950)

Orange Flavour

(Orange flavour contains the following constituents: natural flavouring substances and preparations, maltodextrin and propylene glycol [E1520])

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not applicable.

6.3 Shelf Life

Sachet: Two years.

Reconstituted solution: Six hours.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Sachet: Store below 25°C.

Reconstituted solution: Store covered in a refrigerator (2°C to 8°C).

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

The sachet is composed of paper, low density polyethylene and aluminium.

Sachets are packed in cartons of 2, 8, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

No special requirements.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Galen Limited

Seagoe Industrial Estate

Craigavon

BT63 5UA

UK

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 21590/0087.

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

01 May 2008.

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

10 February 2010


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Salmonella Enteric Fever Medications


Definition of Salmonella Enteric Fever:

Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever, often referred to collectively as 'Enteric Fever', are diseases caused by bacteria called Salmonella typhi and Salmonella paratyphi.

Untreated, the illness can last for three to four weeks and is fatal in about ten percent of cases. Fatal complications happen only in the latter stages of the disease, however, and if caught early enough the disease can be cured with a course of antibiotics.

Drugs associated with Salmonella Enteric Fever

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Salmonella Enteric Fever. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Salmonella Enteric Fever

Medical Encyclopedia:

Typhoid fever
Drug List: Cipro Cipro-I-V Cipro-Xr-Extended-Release-Tablets Floxin Maxaquin Noroxin
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potassium aminobenzoate


Generic Name: potassium aminobenzoate (po TAS ee um a MEE noe BEN zoe ate)
Brand Names: Potaba

What is potassium aminobenzoate?

Potassium aminobenzoate is a form of Vitamin B, which supports many important body functions.

Potassium aminobenzoate works by causing a softening of skin or tissues when used over time. It also raises oxygen levels in tissues of the body.

Potassium aminobenzoate is used to treat conditions that cause skin or tissues to harden, including scleroderma (skler-oh-DERM-a), dermatomyositis (der-mat-oh-mye-oh-SYE-tis), and Peyronie's (pe-ROE-neez) disease.

Potassium aminobenzoate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about potassium aminobenzoate?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, diabetes, or chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Tell your doctor if you are taking a sulfa antibiotic, such as Bactrim, Cotrim, Septra, and others.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking potassium aminobenzoate?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

kidney disease;

diabetes; or

chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

Potassium aminobenzoate may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether potassium aminobenzoate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take potassium aminobenzoate?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

The oral powder and tablet forms of this medicine should be mixed with cold water or juice. Crush the tablets before dissolving them in liquid. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Store potassium aminobenzoate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Be sure to take the medicine with food. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I avoid while taking potassium aminobenzoate? Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Potassium aminobenzoate side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low while you are taking this medicine. You may have hypoglycemia if you take potassium aminobenzoate without food.

Symptoms of low blood sugar include:

hunger, headache, confusion, irritability;

drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors;

sweating, fast heartbeat;

seizure (convulsions); or

fainting, coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

nausea;

loss of appetite;

fever; or

mild skin rash.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect potassium aminobenzoate?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are using a sulfa antibiotic such as:

Bactrim;

Cotrim;

Proloprim;

Septra;

SMX / TMP; or

Trimpex.

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect potassium aminobenzoate. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More potassium aminobenzoate resources Potassium aminobenzoate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Potassium aminobenzoate Drug Interactions Potassium aminobenzoate Support Group 0 Reviews for Potassium aminobenzoate - Add your own review/rating Potaba Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Potaba MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare potassium aminobenzoate with other medications Dietary Supplementation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about potassium aminobenzoate written for health professionals that you may read.
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Potaba


Generic Name: potassium aminobenzoate (po TAS ee um a MEE noe BEN zoe ate)
Brand Names: Potaba

What is Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Potassium aminobenzoate is a form of Vitamin B, which supports many important body functions.

Potassium aminobenzoate works by causing a softening of skin or tissues when used over time. It also raises oxygen levels in tissues of the body.

Potassium aminobenzoate is used to treat conditions that cause skin or tissues to harden, including scleroderma (skler-oh-DERM-a), dermatomyositis (der-mat-oh-mye-oh-SYE-tis), and Peyronie's (pe-ROE-neez) disease.

Potassium aminobenzoate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, diabetes, or chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Tell your doctor if you are taking a sulfa antibiotic, such as Bactrim, Cotrim, Septra, and others.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

kidney disease;

diabetes; or

chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

Potassium aminobenzoate may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether potassium aminobenzoate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

The oral powder and tablet forms of this medicine should be mixed with cold water or juice. Crush the tablets before dissolving them in liquid. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Take this medicine with a meal or snack. This will help prevent upset stomach, and will keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Tell your doctor if you are on a special diet, or if you need to schedule any other medications around your eating schedule.

Potassium aminobenzoate is usually taken 4 times each day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Store potassium aminobenzoate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Be sure to take the medicine with food. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of potassium aminobenzoate is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms, but you may have low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, and fast heartbeat. If blood sugar gets too low, you may have seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

What should I avoid while taking Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)? Avoid drinking alcohol while taking potassium aminobenzoate. Alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low while you are taking this medicine. You may have hypoglycemia if you take potassium aminobenzoate without food.

Symptoms of low blood sugar include:

hunger, headache, confusion, irritability;

drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors;

sweating, fast heartbeat;

seizure (convulsions); or

fainting, coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

nausea;

loss of appetite;

fever; or

mild skin rash.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Potaba (potassium aminobenzoate)?

Before using potassium aminobenzoate, tell your doctor if you are using a sulfa antibiotic such as:

Bactrim;

Cotrim;

Proloprim;

Septra;

SMX / TMP; or

Trimpex.

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use potassium aminobenzoate, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect potassium aminobenzoate. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Potaba resources Potaba Side Effects (in more detail) Potaba Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Potaba Drug Interactions Potaba Support Group 0 Reviews for Potaba - Add your own review/rating Potaba Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Potaba MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Potaba with other medications Dietary Supplementation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about potassium aminobenzoate written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: Potaba side effects (in more detail)


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Stavudine


Pronunciation: STAV-ue-deen
Generic Name: Stavudine
Brand Name: Zerit

Severe and sometimes fatal lactic acidosis (buildup of an acid in the blood) has been reported with this type of medicine. The risk may be increased in women, in patients with liver problems, and in patients who are very overweight. It may also be increased in patients who have taken certain HIV medicines for a prolonged period of time. Fatal lactic acidosis has been reported in pregnant women who use Stavudine in combination with certain other medicines. Tell your doctor right away if you experience extreme weakness or tiredness; unusual muscle pain; difficulty breathing; stomach pain with nausea and vomiting; feeling cold, especially in the arms and legs; dizziness and lightheadedness; or fast or irregular heartbeat.

Severe and sometimes fatal liver problems have been reported with this type of medicine. Tell your doctor right away if you experience yellowing of the skin or eyes, dark urine, pale stools, loss of appetite, nausea, or stomach pain.

When used in combination with certain medicines, pancreatitis (sometimes fatal) has occurred on rare occasions. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop severe stomach or abdominal pain.


Stavudine is used for:

Treating HIV infection when used in combination with other medicines.

Stavudine is a nucleoside analogue antiviral. It blocks the growth of HIV.

Do NOT use Stavudine if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Stavudine you are taking zidovudine you are taking didanosine or hydroxyurea you have an enlarged liver or lactic acidosis

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Stavudine:

Some medical conditions may interact with Stavudine. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have kidney or liver problems, abnormal liver function tests, diabetes, inflammation of the pancreas, gallstones, or problems with tingling or numbness in your hands or feet if you are very overweight or if you drink alcohol

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Stavudine. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Didanosine because the risk of side effects, including lactic acidosis, inflammation of the pancreas, or numbness or tingling of the hands or feet, may be increased Didanosine, doxorubicin, hydroxyurea, interferon, or ribavirin because the risk of severe and sometimes fatal liver problems may be increased Methadone or zidovudine because they may decrease Stavudine's effectiveness

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Stavudine may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Stavudine:

Use Stavudine as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Stavudine comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Stavudine refilled. Take Stavudine by mouth with or without food. Continue to take Stavudine even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of Stavudine, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Stavudine.

Important safety information: Avoid drinking alcohol while you take Stavudine. Drinking alcohol may increase your risk of liver or pancreas problems. Stavudine does not stop the spread of HIV to others through blood or sexual contact. Use barrier methods of birth control (eg, condoms) if you have HIV infection. Do not share needles, injection supplies, or items like toothbrushes or razors. Stavudine is not a cure for HIV infection. Patients may still get illnesses and infections associated with HIV. Remain under the care of your doctor. When your medicine supply is low, get more from your doctor or pharmacist as soon as you can. Do not stop taking Stavudine, even for a short period of time. If you do, the virus may grow resistant to the medicine and become harder to treat. Stavudine may improve immune system function. This may reveal hidden infections in some patients. Tell your doctor right away if you notice symptoms of infection (eg, fever, sore throat, weakness, cough, shortness of breath) after you start Stavudine. Changes in body fat (eg, an increased amount of fat in the upper back, neck, breast, and trunk, and loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face) may occur in some patients taking Stavudine. The risk of a loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face may be greater with Stavudine than with other similar medicines. Discuss any concerns with your doctor. Tell your doctor right away if you notice a change in your body's appearance. Diabetes patients - Stavudine may affect your blood sugar. Check blood sugar levels closely. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine. Lab tests, including liver and kidney function, may be performed while you use Stavudine. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: It is not known if Stavudine can cause harm to the fetus. If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Stavudine while you are pregnant. It is not known if Stavudine is found in breast milk. Mothers infected with HIV should not breast-feed. There is a risk of passing the HIV infection or Stavudine to the baby. Possible side effects of Stavudine:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Changes in body fat; diarrhea; headache; loss of appetite; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chills; fever; muscle aches or weakness; numbness, tingling, or pain in the hands or feet; sore throat; stomach pain (with or without nausea or vomiting); stomach swelling; symptoms of high blood sugar (eg, increased thirst or urination, confusion, unusual drowsiness); symptoms of lactic acidosis (eg, general body discomfort, cold feeling, dizziness, lightheadedness, fast or irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing, shortness of breath, unexplained weight loss); symptoms of liver problems (eg, yellowing of the skin or eyes, dark urine, pale stools, persistent loss of appetite, persistent nausea or vomiting); unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual tiredness or weakness; weakness in the arms or legs.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Stavudine side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include numbness or tingling in the hands or feet; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

Proper storage of Stavudine:

Store Stavudine at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C), in a tightly closed container. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Stavudine out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Stavudine, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Stavudine is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Stavudine. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Stavudine resources Stavudine Side Effects (in more detail)Stavudine DosageStavudine Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesStavudine Drug InteractionsStavudine Support Group0 Reviews for Stavudine - Add your own review/rating Stavudine Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Stavudine Monograph (AHFS DI) stavudine Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Zerit Prescribing Information (FDA) Zerit Consumer Overview Compare Stavudine with other medications HIV InfectionNonoccupational Exposure
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Ferrous Fumarate


Pronunciation: FER-us FYOO-ma-rate
Generic Name: Ferrous Fumarate
Brand Name: Examples include Ferretts and Hemocyte

Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years of age. Keep this product out of the reach of children. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.


Ferrous Fumarate is used for:

Preventing or treating low levels of iron in the blood. It also may be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Ferrous Fumarate is an essential body mineral. It works by replacing iron in the body when the body does not produce enough on its own.

Do NOT use Ferrous Fumarate if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Ferrous Fumarate you have high levels of iron in your blood

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Ferrous Fumarate:

Some medical conditions may interact with Ferrous Fumarate. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have inflammation of the colon, Crohn disease, digestive problems, ulcers, certain types of anemia, or a blood disease such as porphyria if you have had multiple blood transfusions

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Ferrous Fumarate. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Doxycycline, mycophenolate, penicillamine, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because the effectiveness of these medicines may be decreased

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Ferrous Fumarate may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Ferrous Fumarate:

Use Ferrous Fumarate as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Ferrous Fumarate is absorbed better on an empty stomach but may be taken with food if it upsets your stomach. If you are also taking a bisphosphonate (eg, alendronate), cephalosporin (eg, cephalexin), penicillamine, quinolone (eg, ciprofloxacin), or tetracycline (eg, minocycline) along with Ferrous Fumarate, you may need to space the doses several hours apart. Ask your doctor or pharmacist how much time is needed between doses of Ferrous Fumarate and your other medicines. Do not take Ferrous Fumarate within 1 hour before or 2 hours after antacids, eggs, whole grain breads or cereal, milk, milk products, coffee, or tea. Take Ferrous Fumarate with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking Ferrous Fumarate. If you miss a dose of Ferrous Fumarate, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Ferrous Fumarate.

Important safety information: Do not take large doses of vitamins (megadoses or megavitamin therapy) unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Do not take Ferrous Fumarate for longer than 6 months without checking with your doctor. Ferrous Fumarate contains iron. Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years of age. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately. LAB TESTS, including blood tests and iron levels, may be performed to monitor your progress or to check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Ferrous Fumarate with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed. Ferrous Fumarate contains iron. Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6 years of age. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you plan on becoming pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Ferrous Fumarate during pregnancy. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Ferrous Fumarate, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Ferrous Fumarate:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; diarrhea; green stools; nausea; stomach upset.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; blood or streaks of blood in the stool; fever; vomiting with continuing sharp stomach pain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Ferrous Fumarate side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include difficulty breathing; loss of consciousness; seizures; severe nausea; stomach pain; tarry stools; unusual tiredness; vomiting; weak, fast heartbeat.

Proper storage of Ferrous Fumarate:

Store Ferrous Fumarate at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Ferrous Fumarate out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Ferrous Fumarate, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Ferrous Fumarate is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Ferrous Fumarate. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Ferrous Fumarate resources Ferrous Fumarate Side Effects (in more detail) Ferrous Fumarate Dosage Ferrous Fumarate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Ferrous Fumarate Drug Interactions Ferrous Fumarate Support Group 0 Reviews for Ferrous Fumarate - Add your own review/rating ferrous fumarate Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Femiron Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Ferrous Fumarate with other medications Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation
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acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene


Generic Name: acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene (a SEET a MIN o fen, KAF een, EYE soe meth EP teen)
Brand Names: MigraTen, Prodrin

What is acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene?

Acetaminophen is a pain reliever and a fever reducer.

Caffeine is a stimulant that causes narrowing of blood vessels (vasoconstriction).

Isometheptene also causes narrowing of blood vessels.

The combination of acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene is used to treat migraine headaches or severe tension headaches.

Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene? Tell your doctor if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis) or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day. You may not be able to take medicine that contains acetaminophen. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Do not use acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene? Tell your doctor if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis) or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day. You may not be able to take medicine that contains acetaminophen. Do not use acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects. You should not take this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen (Tylenol), caffeine, or isometheptene, or if you have:

glaucoma;

severe kidney disease;

severe liver disease (especially cirrhosis);

severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure; or

heart disease.

To make sure you can safely take acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney or liver disease;

a history of alcoholism;

high blood pressure;

blood circulation problems; or

if you have recently had a heart attack.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. This medication can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death.

To treat migraine headache pain:

Take the first dose of this medication as soon as you notice headache symptoms, or after an attack has already begun.

If your headache does not completely go away, take 1 tablet or capsule every hour until you feel relief.

Do not take more than a total of 5 tablets or capsules in any 12-hour period to treat a migraine.

If you still have migraine symptoms after taking a total of 5 tablets or capsules, call your doctor.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

To treat tension headache pain:

Take the first dose of this medication as soon as you notice tension headache symptoms.

If your headache does not completely go away, take 1 tablet or capsule every 4 hours until you feel relief.

Do not take more than a total of 8 tablets or capsules in any 24-hour period to treat a tension headache.

If you still have tension headache pain after taking a total of 8 tablets or capsules, call your doctor.

Acetaminophen may cause false urine glucose test results. Talk to your doctor if you have diabetes and you notice changes in glucose test results while taking acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene.

See also: Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene is taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene can be fatal.

The first signs of an acetaminophen overdose include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, sweating, and confusion or weakness. Later symptoms may include pain in your upper stomach, dark urine, and yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

What should I avoid while taking acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene? Avoid drinking alcohol. Alcohol may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. Avoid coffee, tea cola, diet pills, energy drinks or other sources of caffeine while taking this medication. They can add to the side effects of the caffeine in the medication. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

low fever with nausea, stomach pain, and loss of appetite;

dark urine, clay-colored stools; or

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness;

mild skin rash;

sleep problems (insomnia); or

feeling nervous, irritable, or jittery.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Headache:

Migraine headache: 2 capsules or caplets at once orally, followed by one capsule or caplet every hour until relieved, up to 5 capsules or caplets within a 12 hour period
Tension headache: 1 to 2 capsules or caplets every 4 hours, up to 8 capsules or caplets a day

What other drugs will affect acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene?

There may be other drugs that can interact with acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene resources Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene Side Effects (in more detail) Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene Dosage Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene Drug Interactions Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene Support Group 6 Reviews for Acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene - Add your own review/rating Compare acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene with other medications Headache Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene.

See also: acetaminophen, caffeine, and isometheptene side effects (in more detail)


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Marten-Tab


Generic Name: acetaminophen and butalbital (a SEET a MIN oh fen and bue TAL bi tal)
Brand Names: Bupap, Cephadyn, Marten-Tab, Phrenilin, Phrenilin Forte, Promacet, Sedapap

What is Marten-Tab (acetaminophen and butalbital)?

Acetaminophen is a pain reliever and fever reducer.

Butalbital is in a group of drugs called barbiturates. It relaxes muscle contractions involved in a tension headache.

The combination of acetaminophen and butalbital is used to treat tension headaches. This medicine is not for treating headaches that come and go.

Acetaminophen and butalbital may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Marten-Tab (acetaminophen and butalbital)? Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Tell your doctor if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis) or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day. You may not be able to take medicine that contains acetaminophen.

Before you take acetaminophen and butalbital, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver or kidney disease, a stomach or intestinal disorder, or a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

Butalbital may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share this medication with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Marten-Tab (acetaminophen and butalbital)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen (Tylenol) or butalbital, or if you have porphyria. Tell your doctor if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis) or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day. You may not be able to take medicine that contains acetaminophen. Butalbital may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share this medication with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

To make sure you can safely take acetaminophen and butalbital, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease; kidney disease;

a stomach or intestinal disorder; or

a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

Tell your doctor if you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day or if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis). You may not be able to take medication that contains acetaminophen.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether acetaminophen and butalbital will harm an unborn baby, but it can cause seizures in a newborn if the mother takes the medication late in pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Acetaminophen and butalbital can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

How should I take Marten-Tab (acetaminophen and butalbital)? Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain. Take this medicine with a full glass of water. Do not stop using acetaminophen and butalbital suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using this medication.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using acetaminophen and butalbital.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using acetaminophen and butalbital. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep track of the amount of medicine used from each new bottle. Butalbital is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription. What happens if I miss a dose?

Since acetaminophen and butalbital is taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of acetaminophen and butalbital can be fatal.

The first signs of an acetaminophen overdose include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, sweating, and confusion or weakness. Later symptoms may include pain in your upper stomach, dark urine, and yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

Overdose symptoms may also include extreme drowsiness, confusion, fainting, shallow breathing, or no breathing.

What should I avoid while taking Marten-Tab (acetaminophen and butalbital)? This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. Marten-Tab (acetaminophen and butalbital) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fast or pounding heart rate, feeling short of breath;

feeling like you might pass out;

confusion, depression;

feeling restless, excited, or agitated;

seizure (convulsions); or

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects include:

headache, dizziness, drowsiness, shaky feeling;

drunk feeling;

vomiting, constipation;

heartburn, trouble swallowing;

numbness or tingly feeling;

dry mouth;

sweating or urinating more than usual;

leg pain, tired muscles;

stuffy nose, ear pain, ringing in your ears; or

mild itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Marten-Tab (acetaminophen and butalbital)? Cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by butalbital. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with acetaminophen and butalbital. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Marten-Tab resources Marten-Tab Side Effects (in more detail) Marten-Tab Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Marten-Tab Drug Interactions Marten-Tab Support Group 0 Reviews for Marten-Tab - Add your own review/rating Axocet MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Cephadyn Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Phrenilin Prescribing Information (FDA) Tencon Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Marten-Tab with other medications Headache Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about acetaminophen and butalbital.

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Menopur injectable


Generic Name: menotropins (injectable) (MEN oh troe pins)
Brand Names: Menopur, Repronex

What are menotropins?

Menotropins are an equal mixture of the naturally occurring follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). FSH and LH are important for the development of follicles (eggs) produced by the ovaries and for the development of sperm.

Menotropins are used to stimulate ovulation (the release of an egg) when a woman's ovaries can produce a follicle but hormonal stimulation is deficient. Menotropins are also used to stimulate the development of multiple eggs for in vitro fertilization. Likewise, menotropins are used to stimulate the production of sperm in men who have functioning testes but in whom hormonal stimulation is deficient.

Menotropins may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about menotropins?

Menotropins may increase the likelihood of multiple births. Multiple births may carry additional risk both for the mother and for the fetuses.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using menotropins?

Menotropins will not induce ovulation or sperm production if your ovaries or testes are not functioning properly.

Do not use menotropins without first taking to your doctor if you

might be pregnant;

have a thyroid problem;

have cancer or a tumor of the breast, ovary, uterus, hypothalamus, or pituitary gland;

have undiagnosed vaginal bleeding;

have ovarian cysts or enlargement; or

have any other serious or chronic medical illness.

You may not be able to use menotropins, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Do not use menotropins if you are pregnant. Menotropins are in the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that they are known to cause birth defects. It is not known whether menotropins pass into breast milk. Do not use menotropins without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use menotropins?

Use menotropins exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist to explain them to you.

Formulations of menotropins intended for intramuscular injection (an injection into muscle) must not be administered subcutaneously (under the skin), and vice versa. If you are administering this medication at home, your doctor will give you detailed instructions on how to mix the solution and give yourself the injection. Do not inject menotropins if you are not sure how.

Use the solution immediately after it is mixed. Throw away any medicine that is left over.

Never reuse a needle or syringe. Dispose of all needles and syringes in an appropriate, puncture-resistant disposal container.

Store menotropins at room temperature or in the refrigerator, away from direct light, moisture, and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor if you miss a dose of menotropins. Do not use a double dose of this medication without first talking to your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? An overdose of menotropins is unlikely to threaten life. Notify your doctor immediately or call an emergency room or poison control center for advice.

Symptoms of a menotropins overdose are not known. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) may result with an overdose of menotropins. Symptoms of OHSS include swelling of the hands or legs, abdominal pain and swelling, shortness of breath, weight gain, and nausea or vomiting. OHSS can be fatal.

What should I avoid while using menotropins?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity during therapy with menotropins unless your doctor directs otherwise.

Menotropins side effects Stop using menotropins and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Less than 2% of female patients treated with menotropins develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), especially after the first cycle of therapy. Symptoms of OHSS include swelling of the hands or legs, abdominal pain and swelling, shortness of breath, weight gain, and nausea or vomiting. OHSS can be fatal. Notify your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical attention if you develop any of these side effects.

Serious pulmonary (lung and breathing) conditions have been reported in patients using menotropins. Seek medical attention if you experience any sudden changes in your breathing.

Other side effects may also occur. Notify your doctor if you experience

ovarian enlargement presenting as abdominal or pelvic pain, tenderness, pressure, or swelling;

nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea;

shortness of breath;

pain, warmth, or tenderness centralized in an arm or leg;

fever or chills;

headache or drowsiness;

weakness or aching of muscles or joints;

breast enlargement or tenderness;

pain, swelling, or irritation at the injection site; or

rash.

Menotropins may increase the likelihood of multiple births. Multiple births may carry additional risk both for the mother and for the fetuses.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect menotropins?

It is not known whether other medications will interact with menotropins. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Menopur resources Menopur Side Effects (in more detail)Menopur Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingMenopur Drug InteractionsMenopur Support Group0 Reviews for Menopur - Add your own review/rating Compare Menopur with other medications Female InfertilityFollicle StimulationOvulation Induction Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about menotropins.

See also: Menopur side effects (in more detail)


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Thymoglobulin rabbit


Generic Name: anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit) (AN tee THYE moe syt GLOB ue lin)
Brand Names: Thymoglobulin

What is anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit)?

Anti-thymocyte globulin is a sterilized solution made of the cells of rabbits that have been injected with white blood cells from humans.

Anti-thymocyte globulin lowers your body's immune system. The immune system helps your body fight infections. The immune system can also fight or "reject" a transplanted organ such as a liver or kidney. This is because the immune system treats the new organ as an invader.

Anti-thymocyte globulin is used together with other medicines to prevent your body from rejecting a kidney transplant.

Anti-thymocyte globulin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to rabbit proteins, or if you have ever had an allergic reaction to anti-thymocyte globulin.

To make sure you can safely take anti-thymocyte globulin, tell your doctor if you have an active or chronic infection, or a serious infection called sepsis.

Serious and sometimes fatal infections may occur during treatment with anti-thymocyte globulin. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of infection such as: fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, mouth and throat ulcers, rapid heart rate, rapid and shallow breathing, weakness, tired feeling, or feeling like you might pass out. Do not receive a "live" vaccine while using anti-thymocyte globulin. The vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to rabbit proteins, or if you have ever had an allergic reaction to anti-thymocyte globulin.

To make sure you can safely take anti-thymocyte globulin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

an active or chronic infection; or

a serious infection called sepsis.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether anti-thymocyte globulin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether anti-thymocyte globulin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using anti-thymocyte globulin.

Using anti-thymocyte globulin may increase your risk of developing certain types of cancer, such as lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes). Talk with your doctor about your specific risk.

How is anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit) given?

Anti-thymocyte globulin is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting. Anti-thymocyte globulin must be given slowly, and the IV infusion can take 4 to 6 hours to complete.

You may be given other medications to help prevent serious side effects or allergic reaction.

Anti-thymocyte globulin can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to get sick from being around others who are ill. Your blood may need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly. What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for your anti-thymocyte globulin injection.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include some of the serious side effects listed in this medication guide.

What should I avoid while receiving anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit)? Do not receive a "live" vaccine while using anti-thymocyte globulin. The vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease. Live vaccines include measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), Bacillus Calmette-Gu?rin (BCG), oral polio, rotavirus, smallpox, typhoid, yellow fever, varicella (chickenpox), H1N1 influenza, and nasal flu vaccine. Anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Serious and sometimes fatal infections may occur during treatment with anti-thymocyte globulin. Stop using this medicine and call your doctor right away if you have signs of infection such as:

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

mouth and throat ulcers;

rapid heart rate, rapid and shallow breathing;

weakness, tired feeling; or

feeling like you might pass out.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;

white patches inside your mouth or on your lips;

swollen glands, rash or itching, joint pain;

pain or burning when you urinate;

dry cough, wheezing, feeling short of breath;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, sweating, general ill feeling; or

high potassium (slow heart rate, weak pulse, muscle weakness, tingly feeling).

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, dizziness;

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain;

swelling in your hands or feet; or

pain, swelling, or redness where the injection was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially other drugs that weaken the immune system.

There may be other drugs that can interact with anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit). Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Thymoglobulin resources Thymoglobulin Side Effects (in more detail) Thymoglobulin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Thymoglobulin Drug Interactions Thymoglobulin Support Group 0 Reviews for Thymoglobulin - Add your own review/rating Compare Thymoglobulin with other medications Renal Transplant Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit).

See also: Thymoglobulin side effects (in more detail)


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Phenergan Suppositories


Pronunciation: proe-METH-a-zeen
Generic Name: Promethazine
Brand Name: Phenergan

Phenergan Suppositories should not be used in children younger than 2 years old. Potentially fatal side effects (eg, difficult or slowed breathing, drowsiness leading to coma) may occur in this age group when taking Phenergan Suppositories.

Caution should be used when using Phenergan Suppositories in children 2 years old and older. The lowest possible dose should be used in this age group, and Phenergan Suppositories should not be used with other medicines that cause slowed breathing.


Phenergan Suppositories are used for:

Relieving allergy symptoms, including hives or runny nose. It is used to prevent and control nausea and vomiting during and after surgery. It is also used to help produce light sleep; prevent and treat motion sickness; or treat pain after surgery, in combination with other medicines. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Phenergan Suppositories are a phenothiazine. It works by blocking the action of various chemicals in the brain, preventing or reducing the symptoms these chemicals cause.

Do NOT use Phenergan Suppositories if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Phenergan Suppositories you have severe central nervous system depression or are in a coma you are taking astemizole, cisapride, terfenadine, or tramadol

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Phenergan Suppositories:

Some medical conditions may interact with Phenergan Suppositories. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have nervous system problems, bone marrow depression, alcoholism, heart problems, a blood disease, glaucoma, increased eye pressure, low blood pressure, liver problems, prostate problems, Parkinson disease, seizures, or Reye syndrome, or if you have been in a coma

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Phenergan Suppositories. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Charcoal or lithium because they may decrease Phenergan Suppositories's effectiveness Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril), astemizole, cisapride, general anesthetics (eg, thiopental), methyldopa, terfenadine, or tramadol because side effects, such as low blood pressure and seizures, may occur ACE inhibitors (eg, enalapril), haloperidol, lithium, meperidine, metrizamide, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) (eg, phenelzine), naltrexone, polypeptide antibiotics (eg, actinomycin), or trazodone because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Phenergan Suppositories Bromocriptine, epinephrine, levodopa, or pergolide because their effectiveness may be decreased by Phenergan Suppositories

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Phenergan Suppositories may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Phenergan Suppositories:

Use Phenergan Suppositories as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Wash your hands before and after using Phenergan Suppositories. If the suppository is too soft to use, put it in the refrigerator for about 15 minutes. You may also run cold water over it. Remove the wrapper. Moisten the suppository with cool water. Lie down on your side. Insert the pointed end of the suppository into the rectum. Use your finger to push it in completely. If you are using Phenergan Suppositories for motion sickness, take a dose at least 30 to 60 minutes before you begin traveling. If you miss a dose of Phenergan Suppositories and you are using it regularly, use it as soon as possible. If several hours have passed or if it is nearing time for the next dose, do not double the dose to catch up, unless advised by your health care provider. Do not use 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Phenergan Suppositories.

Important safety information: Phenergan Suppositories may cause drowsiness or dizziness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Phenergan Suppositories with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Phenergan Suppositories; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a possibly fatal syndrome that can be caused by Phenergan Suppositories. Symptoms may include fever; stiff muscles; confusion; abnormal thinking; fast or irregular heartbeat; and sweating. Contact your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms. Phenergan Suppositories may cause you to become sunburned more easily. Avoid the sun, sunlamps, or tanning booths until you know how you react to Phenergan Suppositories. Use a sunscreen or wear protective clothing if you must be outside for more than a short time. Use Phenergan Suppositories with extreme caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Phenergan Suppositories should not be used in CHILDREN younger than 2 years old. Serious, and sometimes fatal, side effects (difficult or slowed breathing, drowsiness leading to coma) have occurred when Phenergan Suppositories has been used in children in this age group. Phenergan Suppositories should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN 2 years old or older. The lowest effective dose should be used in children 2 years old and older. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Phenergan Suppositories while you are pregnant. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Phenergan Suppositories, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Phenergan Suppositories:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Blurred vision; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); confusion; excessive sweating; fainting; fever, chills, or sore throat; hallucinations; mental or mood changes (eg, agitation, delirium, exaggerated sense of well-being, excitability, hysteria, nervousness); seizures; severe of persistent dizziness; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; slow or fast heartbeat; tremor; trouble sleeping; uncontrolled muscle movements; unusual brusing or bleeding; yellowing of skin or eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Phenergan side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include convulsions; dry mouth; flushing; hallucinations; loss of consciousness; nightmares; seizures; shortness of breath; trouble breathing; unusual drowsiness or restlessness.

Proper storage of Phenergan Suppositories:

Store Phenergan Suppositories in the refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C). Do not freeze. Keep Phenergan Suppositories out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Phenergan Suppositories, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Phenergan Suppositories are to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Phenergan Suppositories. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Phenergan resources Phenergan Side Effects (in more detail) Phenergan Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Phenergan Drug Interactions Phenergan Support Group 45 Reviews for Phenergan - Add your own review/rating Compare Phenergan with other medications Allergic Reactions Anaphylaxis Hay Fever Light Sedation Motion Sickness Nausea/Vomiting Opiate Adjunct Sedation Urticaria Vertigo
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Ferrex 150 Plus


Generic Name: ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide (as KORE bik AS id and EYE urn SAK a ride)
Brand Names: Fe-Tinic 150, Ferrex 150 Plus, Niferex-150

What is Ferrex 150 Plus (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)?

Ascorbic acid is found in citrus fruit, tomatoes, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Ascorbic acid is important for the skin and connective tissues, for normal chemical and hormonal production, and for the immune system.

Iron polysaccharide is a form of the mineral iron. Iron is important for many functions in the body, especially for the transport of oxygen in the blood.

Ascorbic acid is used to treat and prevent vitamin C deficiency.

Iron polysaccharide is used as a dietary supplement, and to prevent and to treat iron deficiencies and iron deficiency anemia.

Ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Ferrex 150 Plus (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)? Do not take more ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide than is prescribed for you or than is directed on the package. Keep this product out of reach of children. Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

Ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide may decrease the absorption of other medicines. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide if you take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Ferrex 150 Plus (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)?

If you do not have an iron deficiency, talk to your doctor about the use of ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide. Generally, ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide should not be taken chronically by individuals with a normal iron balance.

To make sure you can safely take ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

diabetes;

hemosiderosis;

hemolytic anemia;

hemochromatosis;

kidney disease or an increased risk of kidney stones;

if you are on a sodium restricted diet; or

if you are allergic to sulfites or tartrazine.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Ferrex 150 Plus (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)? Keep this product out of reach of children. Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide may decrease the absorption of other medicines. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide if you take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide.

Store at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose can cause decreased energy, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, tarry stools, weak or rapid pulse, fever, or seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking Ferrex 150 Plus (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)? Do not take ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide within 2 hours before or after you take any of the following medicines

levodopa (Larodopa, Dopar, Sinemet);

levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, others);

methyldopa (Aldomet);

penicillamine (Cuprimine);

antacids (Amphojel, Maalox, Mylanta, Rolaids, Rulox, Tums, and others);

a tetracycline antibiotic such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap); or

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), and others.

Ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide may decrease the absorption of the drugs listed above.

Ferrex 150 Plus (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fever;

severe lower back pain;

painful or difficult urination;

blood in your urine; or

black or dark stools.

Less serious side effects may include:

stomach upset;

nausea or vomiting;

diarrhea;

constipation; or

temporary staining of the teeth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Ferrex 150 Plus (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

an estrogen such as Premarin, Ogen, Estratest, Vivelle, Climara, Estring, Estrace, and others; or

an oral birth control pill such as Alesse, Levlen, Ovral, Triphasil, Tri-Levlen, Lo-Ovral, and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Ferrex 150 Plus resources Ferrex 150 Plus Side Effects (in more detail) Ferrex 150 Plus Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Ferrex 150 Plus Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Ferrex50 Plus - Add your own review/rating Compare Ferrex 150 Plus with other medications Dietary Supplementation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide.

See also: Ferrex50 Plus side effects (in more detail)


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Vopac


Generic Name: acetaminophen and codeine (a SEET a MIN o fen and KOE deen)
Brand Names: Capital with Codeine Suspension, Cocet, Cocet Plus, EZ III, Tylenol with Codeine #3, Tylenol with Codeine #4, Vopac

What is Vopac (acetaminophen and codeine)?

Codeine is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. Acetaminophen is a less potent pain reliever that increases the effects of codeine.

The combination of acetaminophen and codeine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

Acetaminophen and codeine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Vopac (acetaminophen and codeine)? Tell your doctor if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis) or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day. You may not be able to take acetaminophen. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Codeine may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Acetaminophen and codeine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Vopac (acetaminophen and codeine)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen (Tylenol) or codeine. Codeine may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share acetaminophen and codeine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

Tell your doctor if you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day or if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis). You may not be able to take medication that contains acetaminophen.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests:

asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;

liver or kidney disease;

a history of head injury or brain tumor;

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

low blood pressure;

a stomach or intestinal disorder;

underactive thyroid;

Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorder;

enlarged prostate, urination problems;

curvature of the spine;

mental illness; or

a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this medication is harmful to an unborn baby, but it could cause breathing problems or addiction/withdrawal symptoms in a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Acetaminophen and codeine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. The use of codeine by some nursing mothers may lead to life-threatening side effects in the baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Vopac (acetaminophen and codeine)? Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

One acetaminophen and codeine tablet may contain up to 650 mg of acetaminophen. Know the amount of acetaminophen in the specific product you are taking.

Take this medicine with food or milk to ease stomach upset.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Drink 6 to 8 full glasses of water daily to help prevent constipation while you are taking acetaminophen and codeine. Do not use a stool softener (laxative) without first asking your doctor. Do not stop using acetaminophen and codeine suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using acetaminophen and codeine.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain urine tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using acetaminophen and codeine.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using acetaminophen and codeine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep track of the amount of medicine used from each new bottle. Codeine is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription. What happens if I miss a dose?

Since this medication is taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of acetaminophen and codeine can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, pinpoint pupils, cold and clammy skin, fainting, weak pulse, seizure (convulsions), coma, blue lips, shallow breathing, or no breathing.

The first signs of an acetaminophen overdose include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, sweating, and confusion or weakness. Later symptoms may include pain in your upper stomach, dark urine, and yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

What should I avoid while taking Vopac (acetaminophen and codeine)? This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. Vopac (acetaminophen and codeine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

shallow breathing, slow heartbeat;

feeling light-headed, fainting;

confusion, unusual thoughts or behavior;

seizure (convulsions);

easy bruising or bleeding; or

nausea, stomach pain, loss of appetite, itching, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects include:

feeling dizzy or drowsy;

mild nausea, vomiting, upset stomach, constipation;

headache;

blurred vision; or

dry mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Vopac (acetaminophen and codeine)? Before taking acetaminophen and codeine, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, other pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by codeine.

Also tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

mepenzolate (Cantil);

atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop);

bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare);

a bronchodilator such as ipratroprium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or

irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with acetaminophen and codeine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over the counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Vopac resources Vopac Side Effects (in more detail) Vopac Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Vopac Drug Interactions Vopac Support Group 0 Reviews for Vopac - Add your own review/rating Vopac Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Cocet Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Tylenol with Codeine Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Vopac with other medications Cough Osteoarthritis Pain Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about acetaminophen and codeine.

See also: Vopac side effects (in more detail)


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acetaminophen and caffeine


Generic Name: acetaminophen and caffeine (a SEET a MIN oh fen and KAF een)
Brand Names: Excedrin Quick Tab Peppermint, Excedrin Quick Tab Spearmint, Excedrin Tension Headache, Excedrin Tension Headache Caplet, Excedrin Tension Headache Express Gels, Excedrin Tension Headache Geltab, Valorin Extra

What is acetaminophen and caffeine?

Acetaminophen is a pain reliever and a fever reducer.

Caffeine is used in this product to increase the pain relieving effects of acetaminophen.

The combination of acetaminophen and caffeine is used to treat pain from conditions such as headache, muscle aches, menstrual cramps, arthritis, backache, toothaches, colds and fevers.

Acetaminophen and caffeine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about acetaminophen and caffeine? Do not take this medication without a doctor's advice if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis) or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day. You may not be able to take medicine that contains acetaminophen. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking acetaminophen and caffeine? Do not take this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen (Tylenol) or caffeine. Do not take this medication without a doctor's advice if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis) or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day. You may not be able to take medicine that contains acetaminophen.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have kidney or liver disease, or a history of alcoholism.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take acetaminophen and caffeine without medical advice if you are pregnant. Acetaminophen and caffeine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take acetaminophen and caffeine?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death.

One acetaminophen and caffeine pill contains 500 mg of acetaminophen. Know the amount of acetaminophen in the specific product you are taking.

The orally disintegrating tablet (Excedrin QuickTabs) should be placed directly on the tongue. Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing. Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves. If desired, you may drink liquid to help swallow the dissolved tablet.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, especially if you still have a fever after 3 days of using this medication, or pain after 10 days of use. Stop taking acetaminophen and caffeine and call your doctor at any time if your symptoms get worse.

Acetaminophen may cause false urine glucose test results. Talk to your doctor if you have diabetes and you notice changes in glucose test results while taking acetaminophen and caffeine.

Store at room temperature away from heat and moisture.

See also: Acetaminophen and caffeine dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since acetaminophen and caffeine is taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include loss of appetite, confusion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating, fast or uneven heart rate, seizure (convulsions), pain in your upper stomach, dark urine, and yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

What should I avoid while taking acetaminophen and caffeine? Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. Avoid coffee, tea, cola, energy drinks or other sources of caffeine while taking this medication. They can add to the side effects of the caffeine in the medication. Acetaminophen and caffeine side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using acetaminophen and caffeine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

low fever with nausea, stomach pain, and loss of appetite;

dark urine, clay-colored stools; or

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

sleep problems (insomnia); or

feeling nervous, irritable, or jittery.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Acetaminophen and caffeine Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Cold Symptoms:

2 caplets or geltabs per dose every 6 hours while symptoms persist.
Do not to exceed 4 doses in 24 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Dysmenorrhea:

2 caplets or geltabs per dose every 6 hours while symptoms persist.
Do not to exceed 4 doses in 24 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoarthritis:

2 caplets or geltabs per dose every 6 hours while symptoms persist.
Do not to exceed 4 doses in 24 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Pain:

2 caplets or geltabs per dose every 6 hours while symptoms persist.
Do not to exceed 4 doses in 24 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Sinusitis:

2 caplets or geltabs per dose every 6 hours while symptoms persist.
Do not to exceed 4 doses in 24 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Headache:

2 caplets or geltabs per dose every 6 hours while symptoms persist.
Do not to exceed 4 doses in 24 hours

What other drugs will affect acetaminophen and caffeine?

There may be other drugs that can interact with acetaminophen and caffeine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over the counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More acetaminophen and caffeine resources Acetaminophen and caffeine Side Effects (in more detail) Acetaminophen and caffeine Dosage Acetaminophen and caffeine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Acetaminophen and caffeine Drug Interactions Acetaminophen and caffeine Support Group 3 Reviews for Acetaminophen and caffeine - Add your own review/rating Compare acetaminophen and caffeine with other medications Cold Symptoms Headache Osteoarthritis Pain Period Pain Sinusitis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about acetaminophen and caffeine.

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Niferex-150


Generic Name: ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide (as KORE bik AS id and EYE urn SAK a ride)
Brand Names: Fe-Tinic 150, Ferrex 150 Plus, Niferex-150

What is Niferex-150 (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)?

Ascorbic acid is found in citrus fruit, tomatoes, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Ascorbic acid is important for the skin and connective tissues, for normal chemical and hormonal production, and for the immune system.

Iron polysaccharide is a form of the mineral iron. Iron is important for many functions in the body, especially for the transport of oxygen in the blood.

Ascorbic acid is used to treat and prevent vitamin C deficiency.

Iron polysaccharide is used as a dietary supplement, and to prevent and to treat iron deficiencies and iron deficiency anemia.

Ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Niferex-150 (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)? Do not take more ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide than is prescribed for you or than is directed on the package. Keep this product out of reach of children. Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

Ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide may decrease the absorption of other medicines. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide if you take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Niferex-150 (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)?

If you do not have an iron deficiency, talk to your doctor about the use of ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide. Generally, ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide should not be taken chronically by individuals with a normal iron balance.

To make sure you can safely take ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

diabetes;

hemosiderosis;

hemolytic anemia;

hemochromatosis;

kidney disease or an increased risk of kidney stones;

if you are on a sodium restricted diet; or

if you are allergic to sulfites or tartrazine.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Niferex-150 (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)? Keep this product out of reach of children. Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide may decrease the absorption of other medicines. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide if you take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide.

Store at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose can cause decreased energy, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, tarry stools, weak or rapid pulse, fever, or seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking Niferex-150 (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)? Do not take ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide within 2 hours before or after you take any of the following medicines

levodopa (Larodopa, Dopar, Sinemet);

levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, others);

methyldopa (Aldomet);

penicillamine (Cuprimine);

antacids (Amphojel, Maalox, Mylanta, Rolaids, Rulox, Tums, and others);

a tetracycline antibiotic such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap); or

an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), and others.

Ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide may decrease the absorption of the drugs listed above.

Niferex-150 (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fever;

severe lower back pain;

painful or difficult urination;

blood in your urine; or

black or dark stools.

Less serious side effects may include:

stomach upset;

nausea or vomiting;

diarrhea;

constipation; or

temporary staining of the teeth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Niferex-150 (ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

an estrogen such as Premarin, Ogen, Estratest, Vivelle, Climara, Estring, Estrace, and others; or

an oral birth control pill such as Alesse, Levlen, Ovral, Triphasil, Tri-Levlen, Lo-Ovral, and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Niferex-150 resources Niferex-150 Side Effects (in more detail) Niferex-150 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Niferex-150 Drug Interactions Niferex-150 Support Group 0 Reviews for Niferex-150 - Add your own review/rating Compare Niferex-150 with other medications Dietary Supplementation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about ascorbic acid and iron polysaccharide.

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Capital with Codeine Suspension


Generic Name: acetaminophen and codeine (a SEET a MIN o fen and KOE deen)
Brand Names: Capital with Codeine Suspension, Cocet, Cocet Plus, EZ III, Tylenol with Codeine #3, Tylenol with Codeine #4, Vopac

What is Capital with Codeine Suspension (acetaminophen and codeine)?

Codeine is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. Acetaminophen is a less potent pain reliever that increases the effects of codeine.

The combination of acetaminophen and codeine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

Acetaminophen and codeine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Capital with Codeine Suspension (acetaminophen and codeine)? Tell your doctor if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis) or if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages per day. You may not be able to take acetaminophen. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Codeine may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Acetaminophen and codeine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Capital with Codeine Suspension (acetaminophen and codeine)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen (Tylenol) or codeine. Codeine may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share acetaminophen and codeine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

Tell your doctor if you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day or if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis). You may not be able to take medication that contains acetaminophen.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests:

asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;

liver or kidney disease;

a history of head injury or brain tumor;

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

low blood pressure;

a stomach or intestinal disorder;

underactive thyroid;

Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorder;

enlarged prostate, urination problems;

curvature of the spine;

mental illness; or

a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this medication is harmful to an unborn baby, but it could cause breathing problems or addiction/withdrawal symptoms in a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Acetaminophen and codeine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. The use of codeine by some nursing mothers may lead to life-threatening side effects in the baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Capital with Codeine Suspension (acetaminophen and codeine)? Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of acetaminophen can damage your liver or cause death. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

One acetaminophen and codeine tablet may contain up to 650 mg of acetaminophen. Know the amount of acetaminophen in the specific product you are taking.

Take this medicine with food or milk to ease stomach upset.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Drink 6 to 8 full glasses of water daily to help prevent constipation while you are taking acetaminophen and codeine. Do not use a stool softener (laxative) without first asking your doctor. Do not stop using acetaminophen and codeine suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using acetaminophen and codeine.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain urine tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using acetaminophen and codeine.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using acetaminophen and codeine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep track of the amount of medicine used from each new bottle. Codeine is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription. What happens if I miss a dose?

Since this medication is taken as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of acetaminophen and codeine can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, pinpoint pupils, cold and clammy skin, fainting, weak pulse, seizure (convulsions), coma, blue lips, shallow breathing, or no breathing.

The first signs of an acetaminophen overdose include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, sweating, and confusion or weakness. Later symptoms may include pain in your upper stomach, dark urine, and yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

What should I avoid while taking Capital with Codeine Suspension (acetaminophen and codeine)? This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Acetaminophen (sometimes abbreviated as APAP) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much acetaminophen which can lead to a fatal overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains acetaminophen or APAP. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of liver damage while taking acetaminophen. Capital with Codeine Suspension (acetaminophen and codeine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

shallow breathing, slow heartbeat;

feeling light-headed, fainting;

confusion, unusual thoughts or behavior;

seizure (convulsions);

easy bruising or bleeding; or

nausea, stomach pain, loss of appetite, itching, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects include:

feeling dizzy or drowsy;

mild nausea, vomiting, upset stomach, constipation;

headache;

blurred vision; or

dry mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Capital with Codeine Suspension (acetaminophen and codeine)? Before taking acetaminophen and codeine, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, other pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by codeine.

Also tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

mepenzolate (Cantil);

atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop);

bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare);

a bronchodilator such as ipratroprium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or

irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with acetaminophen and codeine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over the counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Capital with Codeine Suspension resources Capital with Codeine Suspension Side Effects (in more detail) Capital with Codeine Suspension Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Capital with Codeine Suspension Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Capital with Codeine - Add your own review/rating Cocet Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Tylenol with Codeine Prescribing Information (FDA) Vopac Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Capital with Codeine Suspension with other medications Cough Osteoarthritis Pain Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about acetaminophen and codeine.

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abacavir and lamivudine


Generic Name: abacavir and lamivudine (a BAK a veer and la MIV yoo deen)
Brand Names: Epzicom

What is abacavir and lamivudine?

Abacavir and lamivudine is an antiviral medication. It is in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) medicines called reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Abacavir and lamivudine helps keep the HIV virus from reproducing in the body.

Abacavir and lamivudine is used to treat HIV, which causes the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Abacavir and lamivudine is not a cure for HIV or AIDS.

Abacavir and lamivudine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about abacavir and lamivudine? Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: fever; rash; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain; general tiredness, body aches; shortness of breath, cough, sore throat. Once you have had an allergic reaction to abacavir and lamivudine, you must never use it again.

Before taking abacavir and lamivudine, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, heart disease, high blood pressure, or a risk factor for heart disease such as smoking, diabetes, or high cholesterol.

You may need a blood test before you start taking abacavir and lamivudine for the first time, or if you are restarting the medication after stopping for reasons not related to an allergic reaction.

Read the Warning Card that comes with this medication, and carry it with you at all times so you will know the symptoms of allergic reaction to watch for.

Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking abacavir and lamivudine. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Do not allow this medicine to run out completely before you get your prescription refilled. If you miss several doses, you could have a dangerous or even fatal allergic reaction when you start taking the medicine again. If you stop taking abacavir and lamivudine for any reason, talk to your doctor before you start taking the medication again. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking abacavir and lamivudine? You should not take abacavir and lamivudine if you have liver disease. Do not take this medicine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to abacavir. Tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction to any medicine that contains abacavir, such as Trizivir or Ziagen. Once you have had an allergic reaction to abacavir and lamivudine, you must never use it again.

You may need a blood test before you start taking abacavir and lamivudine for the first time, or if you are restarting the medication after stopping for reasons not related to an allergic reaction.

Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking abacavir and lamivudine. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you are overweight or have liver disease, if you are a woman, or if you have taken HIV or AIDS medications for a long time. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk.

To make sure you can safely take abacavir and lamivudine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney disease;

heart disease or high blood pressure; or

a risk factor for heart disease such as smoking, diabetes, or high cholesterol.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether abacavir and lamivudine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. HIV can be passed to your baby if you are not properly treated during pregnancy. Take all of your HIV medicines as directed to control your infection. Women with HIV or AIDS should not breast-feed a baby. Even if your baby is born without HIV, the virus may be passed to the baby in your breast milk. This medication should not be given to children under 18 years old. How should I take abacavir and lamivudine?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

You may take abacavir and lamivudine with or without food.

This medicine comes with a Medication Guide and a Warning Card that lists the symptoms of an allergic reaction. Read this information carefully and carry the Warning Card with you at all times so you will know what symptoms to watch for.

HIV/AIDS is usually treated with a combination of drugs. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor's advice. Every person with HIV or AIDS should remain under the care of a doctor.

If you have hepatitis B you may develop liver symptoms after you stop taking this medication, even months after stopping. Your doctor may want to check your liver function for several months after you stop using abacavir and lamivudine. Visit your doctor regularly.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Abacavir and lamivudine dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Do not allow this medicine to run out completely before you get your prescription refilled. It is important that you not stop taking the medicine once you have started. If you miss several doses, you may have a dangerous or even fatal allergic reaction once you start taking abacavir again. If you stop taking abacavir and lamivudine for any reason, talk to your doctor before you start taking the medication again. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking abacavir and lamivudine? Avoid taking other medications that contain abacavir or lamivudine, such as Combivir, Epivir, Trizivir, or Ziagen. Taking this medication will not prevent you from passing HIV to other people. Avoid having unprotected sex or sharing razors or toothbrushes. Talk with your doctor about safe ways to prevent HIV transmission during sex. Sharing drug or medicine needles is never safe, even for a healthy person. Abacavir and lamivudine side effects Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to abacavir:

Group 1 - fever;

Group 2 - rash;

Group 3 - nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain;

Group 4 - general tiredness, body aches;

Group 5 - shortness of breath, cough, sore throat.

Once you have had an allergic reaction to abacavir, you must never use it again. If you stop taking abacavir and lamivudine for any reason, talk to your doctor before you start taking the medication again. Other serious side effects that may not be signs of an allergic reaction include:

stomach pain, low fever, lost appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

lactic acidosis - muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; or

white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips.

Less serious side effects include:

changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, face, neck, breasts, and trunk);

sleep problems or strange dreams;

headache, depression, anxiety; or

mild diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Abacavir and lamivudine Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for HIV Infection:

1 tablet orally once every 24 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Nonoccupational Exposure:

1 tablet orally once every 24 hours
Duration: Prophylaxis should be initiated as soon as possible, within 72 hours of exposure, and continued for 28 days.
In general, the alternative regimens recommended for nonoccupational postexposure HIV prophylaxis include abacavir-lamivudine as part of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based, protease inhibitor (PI)-based, or triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) regimens.

What other drugs will affect abacavir and lamivudine?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

methadone (Methadose, Dolophine);

ribavirin (Copegus, Rebetron, Virazole);

interferon (Rebetron, Roferon, Intron, Alferon, Infergen, Avonex, Rebif, Betaseron, Actimune); or

other medications that contain abacavir or lamivudine (Combivir, Epivir, Trizivir, Ziagen).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with abacavir and lamivudine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More abacavir and lamivudine resources Abacavir and lamivudine Side Effects (in more detail)Abacavir and lamivudine DosageAbacavir and lamivudine Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingAbacavir and lamivudine Drug InteractionsAbacavir and lamivudine Support Group1 Review for Abacavir and lamivudine - Add your own review/rating Compare abacavir and lamivudine with other medications HIV InfectionNonoccupational Exposure Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about abacavir and lamivudine.

See also: abacavir and lamivudine side effects (in more detail)


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Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate


Pronunciation: MUL-ti-VYE-ta-mins/FOE-lik AS-id/EYE-urn/DOK-ue-sate
Generic Name: Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate
Brand Name: Examples include Nephron FA and Ferro-Plex Hematinic

Accidental overdose of products that contain iron is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years old. Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, call a doctor or poison control center right away.


Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate is used for:

Treating or preventing low levels of vitamins, folic acid, and iron in the body. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate is a vitamin, folic acid, iron, and stool softener combination. It works by providing extra vitamins, folic acid, and iron to the body when you need more than what you get in your diet. The stool softener helps prevent constipation that may occur with iron products.

Do NOT use Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate you have certain iron metabolism problems (eg, hemosiderosis, hemochromatosis) or high levels of iron in your blood

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate:

Some medical conditions may interact with Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have bowel problems (eg, colitis, Crohn disease, diverticulitis), certain blood disorders (eg, hemolytic or pernicious anemia, porphyria cutanea tarda, thalassemia), glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, or a peptic ulcer if you have had multiple blood transfusions

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Fluorouracil because the risk of its side effects may be increased by Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate Cephalosporin antibiotics (eg, cephalexin), eltrombopag, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), methyldopa, mycophenolate, penicillamine, quinolone antibiotics (eg, ciprofloxacin), tetracycline antibiotics (eg, doxycycline), or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate:

Use Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Take Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Do not take an antacid within 1 hour before or 2 hours after you take Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate. Avoid taking Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate with dairy products; they may interfere with the absorption of the iron in Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate. If you miss a dose of Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate.

Important safety information: Do not take large doses of vitamins while you use Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate unless your doctor tells you to. Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate may discolor the stools. This is normal and not a cause for concern. Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate has iron in it. Iron overdose is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years old. In case of an overdose, call a doctor or poison control center right away. Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate has pyridoxine (vitamin B6), folic acid, and iron in it. Before you start any medicine, check the label to see if it has pyridoxine (vitamin B6), folic acid, or iron in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate while you are pregnant. It is not known if Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; dark or discolored stools; diarrhea; nausea; stomach upset; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; blood in the vomit; persistent nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; stomach pain or cramping.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include black, tarry stools; blood in the vomit; diarrhea; headache; nausea; vomiting.

Proper storage of Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate:

Store Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate at room temperature. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate resources Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate Drug Interactions Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate Support Group 11 Reviews for Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate - Add your own review/rating Compare Multivitamins with Folic Acid/Iron/Docusate with other medications Anemia Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency
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Corvite FE


Pronunciation: VYE-ta-min D/FOE-lik AS-id/EYE-urn with MIN-er-als
Generic Name: B-Complex/Vitamin D/Folic Acid/Iron with Minerals
Brand Name: Corvite FE

Accidental overdose of products that contain iron is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years. Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, call the poison control center or a doctor at once.


Corvite FE is used for:

Preventing and treating certain types of anemia (eg, caused by low blood iron levels, poor nutrition). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Corvite FE is a vitamin, folic acid, iron, and mineral combination. It works by providing vitamins, folic acid, iron, and minerals to the body.

Do NOT use Corvite FE if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Corvite FE you have certain iron metabolism problems (eg, hemosiderosis, hemochromatosis), pernicious anemia, or you have high levels of iron in your blood

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Corvite FE:

Some medical conditions may interact with Corvite FE. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have another type of anemia (eg, hemolytic anemia) or other blood problems (eg, porphyria, thalassemia) if you have bowel problems (eg, colitis, Crohn disease, diverticulitis) or a peptic ulcer if you have had multiple blood transfusions

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Corvite FE. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Fluorouracil because the risk of its side effects may be increased by Corvite FE Doxycycline, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), mycophenolate, penicillamine, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Corvite FE

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Corvite FE may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Corvite FE:

Use Corvite FE as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Corvite FE by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. If you also take an antacid, a bisphosphonate (eg, etidronate), a cephalosporin (eg, cefdinir), doxycycline, methyldopa, penicillamine, a quinolone (eg, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin), a tetracycline (eg, minocycline), or a thrombopoietin mimetic (eg, eltrombopag), ask your doctor or pharmacist how to take them with Corvite FE. If you miss a dose of Corvite FE, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Corvite FE.

Important safety information: Do not take more than the recommended dose without checking with your doctor. Do not take large doses of vitamins while you use Corvite FE unless your doctor tells you to. Corvite FE has folic acid and iron in it. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has folic acid or iron in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist. Corvite FE has iron in it. Iron overdose is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years. In case of an overdose, call a doctor or poison control center right away. Corvite FE may interfere with certain lab tests, including tests used to check for blood in the stool. Be sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are taking Corvite FE. Lab tests, including hematocrit, hemoglobin levels, and blood iron levels, may be performed while you use Corvite FE. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Corvite FE should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Corvite FE while you are pregnant. Corvite FE is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Corvite FE, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Corvite FE:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; dark or discolored stools; diarrhea; nausea; stomach pain; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry, or bloody stools; severe or persistent stomach pain; vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Corvite FE side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include black, tarry, or bloody stools; blue or unusually pale skin; confusion; drowsiness or dizziness; fainting; fast heartbeat; increased thirst or urination; seizures; severe or persistent nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach pain; sluggishness; vomit that looks like coffee grounds; weakness.

Proper storage of Corvite FE:

Store Corvite FE at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Corvite FE out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Corvite FE, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Corvite FE is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Corvite FE. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Corvite FE resources Corvite FE Side Effects (in more detail) Corvite FE Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Corvite FE Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Corvite FE - Add your own review/rating Compare Corvite FE with other medications Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency
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Ferrex 150


Pronunciation: PAHL-ee-SAA-kah-ride-EYE-run
Generic Name: Polysaccharide-Iron
Brand Name: Examples include Ferrex 150 and Myferon 150

Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years of age. Keep this and all medicines out of reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, call the poison control center or a doctor immediately.


Ferrex 150 is used for:

Treating and preventing low levels of iron in the blood caused by certain types of anemia. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Ferrex 150 is an essential body mineral. It works by replacing iron in your body if your body does not produce enough on its own.

Do NOT use Ferrex 150 if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Ferrex 150 you have high levels of iron in your blood

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Ferrex 150:

Some medical conditions may interact with Ferrex 150. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have inflammation of the intestines, Crohn disease, digestive problems, ulcers, anemia, or a blood disease (eg, porphyria, thalassemia) if you have had multiple blood transfusions if you have a history of alcohol abuse

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Ferrex 150. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Doxycycline, mycophenolate, penicillamine, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because the effectiveness of these medicines may be decreased

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Ferrex 150 may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Ferrex 150:

Use Ferrex 150 as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Ferrex 150 may be taken with food if it upsets your stomach. Swallow Ferrex 150 whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. Do not take Ferrex 150 within 1 hour before or 2 hours after antacids, eggs, whole grain breads, cereal, milk, milk products, coffee, or tea. Take Ferrex 150 with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking Ferrex 150. If you are also taking a bisphosphonate (eg, alendronate), a cephalosporin (eg, cephalexin), methyldopa, penicillamine, a quinolone (eg, ciprofloxacin), or a tetracycline (eg, minocycline) along with Ferrex 150, you may need to space the doses several hours apart. Ask your doctor or pharmacist how much time is needed between doses of Ferrex 150 and your other medicines. If you miss a dose of Ferrex 150, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Ferrex 150.

Important safety information: Do not take large doses of vitamins (megadoses or megavitamin therapy) while taking Ferrex 150 unless directed to by your doctor. Do not exceed the recommended dose or take Ferrex 150 for longer than 6 months without checking with your doctor. Ferrex 150 may cause your stools to darken. This is normal and not a cause for concern. Ferrex 150 contains iron. Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years of age. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately. Ferrex 150 may interfere with certain lab tests, such as tests used to check for blood in the stool. Make sure your doctor and laboratory personnel know you are using Ferrex 150. LAB TESTS, including blood tests and iron levels, may be performed to monitor your progress or to check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Ferrex 150 with extreme caution in CHILDREN. Safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant while taking Ferrex 150, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Ferrex 150 during pregnancy. Ferrex 150 is excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Ferrex 150, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Ferrex 150:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; darkened or green stools; diarrhea; nausea; stomach upset.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; blood or streaks of blood in the stool; fever; vomiting, especially with continuing sharp stomach pain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Ferrex50 side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include difficulty breathing; loss of consciousness; seizures; severe nausea or diarrhea; stomach pain; tarry stools; unusual tiredness or drowsiness; unusually pale skin; vomiting; vomiting blood; weak, fast heartbeat.

Proper storage of Ferrex 150:

Store Ferrex 150 at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Ferrex 150 out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Ferrex 150, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Ferrex 150 is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Ferrex 150. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Ferrex 150 resources Ferrex 150 Side Effects (in more detail) Ferrex 150 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Ferrex 150 Drug Interactions Ferrex 150 Support Group 0 Reviews for Ferrex50 - Add your own review/rating Compare Ferrex 150 with other medications Iron Deficiency Anemia
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