RX Pharmacy Drugs List
 

Pills
 

ED Pills

ED Drugs
 

Nytol Caplet

Generic Name: diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen) Brand Names: Aler-Tab, Allergy, Allermax, Altaryl, Benadryl Allergy, Benadryl DF, Benadryl Dye Free Allergy, Benadryl Ultratab, Children's Allergy, Diphen Cough, Diphenhist, Dytuss, PediaCare Children's Allergy, Q-Dryl, Q-Dryl A/F, Siladryl, Siladryl Allergy, Silphen Cough, Simply Sleep, Sleep-ettes, Sleep-ettes D, Sominex Maximum Strength Caplet, Theraflu Thin Strips Multi Symptom, Triaminic Thin Strips Cough & Runny Nose, Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength, Valu-Dryl

What is Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)?

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine. Diphenhydramine blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in the body.

Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing; runny nose; itching, watery eyes; hives; rashes; itching; and other symptoms of allergies and the common cold.

Diphenhydramine is also used to suppress coughs, to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat mild forms of Parkinson's disease.

Diphenhydramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye;

a stomach ulcer;

an enlarged prostate, bladder problems or difficulty urinating;

an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);

hypertension or any type of heart problems; or

asthma.

You may not be able to take diphenhydramine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Diphenhydramine is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of antihistamines, and side effects could occur in a breast-feeding baby. Do not take diphenhydramine without first talking to your doctor if you are nursing a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from diphenhydramine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. How should I take Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)?

Take diphenhydramine exactly as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Diphenhydramine can be taken with or without food.

For motion sickness, a dose is usually taken 30 minutes before motion, then with meals and at bedtime for the duration of exposure.

As a sleep aid, diphenhydramine should be taken approximately 30 minutes before bedtime.

To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the liquid forms of diphenhydramine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular tablespoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. The maximum amount of diphenhydramine that you should take in any 24-hour period is 300 mg.

Store diphenhydramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a diphenhydramine overdose include extreme sleepiness, confusion, weakness, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, large pupils, dry mouth, flushing, fever, shaking, insomnia, hallucinations, and possibly seizures.

What should I avoid while taking Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking diphenhydramine. Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine) side effects Stop taking diphenhydramine and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take diphenhydramine and talk to your doctor if you experience

sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness;

headache;

dry mouth; or

difficulty urinating or an enlarged prostate.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Nytol Caplet (diphenhydramine)? Do not take diphenhydramine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Talk to your pharmacist before taking other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or insomnia medications. These products may contain medicines similar to diphenhydramine, which could lead to an antihistamine overdose.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:

anxiety or sleep medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion);

medications for depression such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), or paroxetine (Paxil); or

any other medications that make you feel drowsy, sleepy, or relaxed.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with diphenhydramine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

More Nytol Caplet resources Nytol Caplet Side Effects (in more detail)Nytol Caplet Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingNytol Caplet Drug InteractionsNytol Caplet Support Group0 Reviews for Nytol Caplet - Add your own review/rating Compare Nytol Caplet with other medications Insomnia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about diphenhydramine.

See also: Nytol Caplet side effects (in more detail)


Geravim

Generic Name: multivitamin with iron (MUL tee VYE ta mins with i ron) Brand Names:

What is Geravim (multivitamin with iron)?

Multivitamin are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Iron is normally found in foods like red meat. In the body, iron becomes a part of your hemoglobin (HEEM o glo bin) and myoglobin (MY o glo bin). Hemoglobin carries oxygen through your blood to tissues and organs. Myoglobin helps your muscle cells store oxygen.

Multivitamin and iron are used to provide vitamins and iron that are not taken in through the diet. They are also used to treat iron or vitamin deficiencies caused by illness, pregnancy, poor nutrition, digestive disorders, and many other conditions.

Multivitamin and iron may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Geravim (multivitamin with iron)? Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamin with iron. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects. Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Iron and other minerals contained in a multivitamin can also cause serious overdose symptoms if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include severe stomach pain, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, coughing up blood, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, warmth or tingly feeling, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine or stools, black and tarry stools, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, weakness, shallow breathing, weak and rapid pulse, pale skin, blue lips, and seizure (convulsions).

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin with iron. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Geravim (multivitamin with iron)? Iron and certain vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

If you have any medical conditions, ask your doctor before taking a multivitamin with iron. If you have certain conditions, you may need a certain vitamin formulation or special tests while taking this product.

Do not take multivitamin with iron without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Some vitamins and minerals can harm an unborn baby if taken in large doses. You may need to use a prenatal vitamin specially formulated for pregnant women. Multivitamin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Geravim (multivitamin with iron)?

Use this medication as directed on the label, or as your doctor has prescribed. Do not use the medication in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Never take more than the recommended dose of multivitamin with iron. Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamin with iron. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

Take your multivitamin with a full glass of water. You may take the multivitamin with food if it upsets your stomach.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in the mouth before swallowing.

Measure the liquid form of this multivitamin using a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Liquid multivitamin may sometimes be mixed with water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Follow the directions on the medicine label.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

It is important to take multivitamin with iron regularly to get the most benefit.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the liquid medicine from freezing.

Store multivitamin in their original container. Storing multivitamin in a glass container can ruin the medication.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Iron and other minerals contained in a multivitamin can also cause serious overdose symptoms.

Overdose symptoms may include severe stomach pain, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, coughing up blood, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, warmth or tingly feeling, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine or stools, black and tarry stools, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, weakness, shallow breathing, weak and rapid pulse, pale skin, blue lips, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking Geravim (multivitamin with iron)? Avoid taking any other multivitamin product within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamin with iron. Taking similar vitamin products together at the same time can result in a vitamin overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Avoid taking an antibiotic medicine within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamin with iron. This is especially important if you are taking an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap).

Certain foods can also make it harder for your body to absorb iron. Avoid taking this multivitamin within 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating fish, meat, liver, and whole grain or "fortified" breads or cereals.

Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin. Geravim (multivitamin with iron) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor if you have serious side effects such as:

bright red blood in your stools; or

pain in your chest or throat when swallowing a ferrous fumarate tablet.

When taken as directed, multivitamin are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

constipation, diarrhea;

nausea, vomiting, heartburn;

stomach pain, upset stomach;

black or dark-colored stools or urine;

temporary staining of the teeth;

headache; or

unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Geravim (multivitamin with iron)?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking multivitamin with iron, tell your doctor if you also use:

acetohydroxamic acid (Lithostat);

cimetidine (Tagamet);

deferoxamine (Desferal);

etidronate (Didronel);

diuretics (water pills);

heart or blood pressure medications;

tretinoin (Vesanoid);

isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);

dimercaprol (an injection used to treat poisoning by arsenic, lead, or mercury);

penicillamine (Cuprimine);

pancrelipase (Cotazym, Creon, Ilozyme, Pancrease, Ultrase);

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Septra, TMP/SMX); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other medications that can interact with or be affected by multivitamin with iron. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Geravim resources Geravim Side Effects (in more detail)Geravim Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingGeravim Drug InteractionsGeravim Support Group0 Reviews for Geravim - Add your own review/rating Multivitamin with Iron Suspension MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Anemagen MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) BiferaRx MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Chromagen Forte MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ferocon MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ferotrin Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferralet 90 Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferralet 90 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ferrex 150 Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 150 Forte Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 150 Forte Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ferrex 28 Prescribing Information (FDA) FerroGels Forte MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) FerroGels Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) FoliTab 500 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Fumatinic MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hematogen Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Integra MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Integra F MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Integra F Prescribing Information (FDA) Integra Plus MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Integra Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Irospan 24/6 MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Irospan 24/6 Prescribing Information (FDA) NovaFerrum Prescribing Information (FDA) NovaFerrum MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Proferrin-Forte MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tricon Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Geravim with other medications AnemiaVitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about multivitamin with iron.

See also: Geravim side effects (in more detail)


Mestinon Timespan

Generic Name: pyridostigmine (py rid o STIG meen) Brand Names: Mestinon, Mestinon Timespan

What is Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)?

Pyridostigmine affects chemicals in the body that are involved in the communication between nerve impulses and muscle movement.

Pyridostigmine is used to treat the symptoms of myasthenia gravis. It is also used in military personnel who have been exposed to nerve gas.

Pyridostigmine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)? You should not use pyridostigmine if you are allergic to it, or if you have a bladder or bowel obstruction.

Before taking pyridostigmine, tell your doctor if you have asthma, kidney disease, an ulcer or other serious stomach disorder, high blood pressure, heart disease, overactive thyroid, or a history of seizures.

The amount and timing of this medicine is extremely important to the success of your treatment. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions about how much medicine to take and when to take it.

This medication may cause blurred vision or impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. You may be asked to keep a daily record of when you took each dose and how long the effects lasted. This will help your doctor determine if your dose needs to be adjusted.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using pyridostigmine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)? You should not use pyridostigmine if you are allergic to it, or if you have a bladder or bowel obstruction.

To make sure you can safely take pyridostigmine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

asthma;

kidney disease;

an ulcer or other serious stomach disorder;

high blood pressure, heart disease;

overactive thyroid; or

a history of seizures.

It is not known whether pyridostigmine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether pyridostigmine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with food or milk if it upsets your stomach. Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The amount and timing of this medicine is extremely important to the success of your treatment. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions about how much medicine to take and when to take it.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. You may be asked to keep a daily record of when you took each dose and how long the effects lasted. This will help your doctor determine if your dose needs to be adjusted.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using pyridostigmine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep the tablets in their original container, along with the canister of moisture-absorbing preservative that comes with this medicine.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps, sweating, blurred vision, drooling, and weak or shallow breathing.

Worsening muscle weakness, or no change in your myasthenia gravis symptoms, may also be signs of overdose.

What should I avoid while taking Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)? This medication may cause blurred vision or impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of pyridostigmine. Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using pyridostigmine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

extreme muscle weakness, muscle twicthing;

slurred speech, vision problems;

severe vomiting or diarrhea;

cough with mucus;

confusion, anxiety, panic attacks;

seizure (convulsions); or

worsening or no improvement in your symptoms of myasthenia gravis.

Less serious side effects may include:

cold sweat, pale skin;

urinating more than usual;

watery eyes;

mild nausea, vomiting, or upset stomach;

warmth or tingly feeling; or

mild rash or itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Mestinon Timespan (pyridostigmine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

atropine (Atreza, Sal-Tropine);

belladonna (Donnatal, and others);

benztropine (Cogentin);

clidinium (Quarzan);

clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo);

dimenhydrinate (Dramamine);

methscopolamine (Pamine), scopolamine (Transderm Scop);

glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

mepenzolate (Cantil);

bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare);

bronchodilators such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);

cold medicine, allergy medicine, or sleeping pills that contain an antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (Tylenol PM) or doxylamine (Unisom);

heart rhythm medication such as quinidine (Quin-G), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), disopyramide (Norpace), flecaininde (Tambocor), mexiletine (Mexitil), propafenone, (Rythmol), and others;

irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Hyomax), or propantheline (Pro Banthine);

medicine to treat Alzheimer's dementia, such as donepezil (Aricept), rivastigmine (Exelon), or tacrine (Cognex); or

a steroid such as betamethasone (Celestone) or dexamethasone (Cortastat, Dexasone, Solurex, DexPak).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with pyridostigmine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Mestinon Timespan resources Mestinon Timespan Side Effects (in more detail)Mestinon Timespan Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesMestinon Timespan Drug InteractionsMestinon Timespan Support Group1 Review for Mestinon Timespan - Add your own review/rating Pyridostigmine Prescribing Information (FDA) Mestinon MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Mestinon Prescribing Information (FDA) Pyridostigmine Bromide Monograph (AHFS DI) Regonol Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Mestinon Timespan with other medications DysautonomiaMyasthenia GravisNerve Agent PretreatmentReversal of Nondepolarizing Muscle Relaxants Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about pyridostigmine.

See also: Mestinon Timespan side effects (in more detail)


levocetirizine

lee-voe-se-TIR-a-zeen

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Xyzal

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Tablet

Therapeutic Class: Respiratory Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Antihistamine, Less-Sedating

Chemical Class: Piperazine (class)

Uses For levocetirizine

Levocetirizine is an antihistamine used to relieve the symptoms of hay fever and hives of the skin. It works by preventing the effects of a substance called histamine, which is produced by the body. Histamine can cause itching, sneezing, runny nose, and watery eyes. It can close up the bronchial tubes (air passages of the lungs) and make breathing difficult. Histamine can also cause some persons to have hives, with severe itching of the skin.

levocetirizine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using levocetirizine

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For levocetirizine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to levocetirizine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of levocetirizine in children. Safety and efficacy have not been established in infants younger than 6 months old.

Use in children 6 months to 11 years of age with kidney disease is not recommended.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of levocetirizine in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving levocetirizine.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of levocetirizine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Kidney disease—Use with caution. Effects of levocetirizine may be increased because of slower removal from the body. Kidney disease, severe or Kidney failure—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Proper Use of levocetirizine

Take levocetirizine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of side effects.

You may take levocetirizine with or without food.

Measure the oral solution with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup.

Dosing

The dose of levocetirizine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of levocetirizine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For oral dosage forms (solution or tablets): For hay fever or hives: Adults and children 12 years of age and older—5 milligrams (mg) or 10 milliliters (mL) once a day in the evening. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. Children 6 to 11 years of age—2.5 mg (half tablet) or 5 mL once a day in the evening. Children 6 months to 5 years of age—1.25 mg or 2.5 mL once a day in the evening. Infants up to 6 months old—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of levocetirizine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions While Using levocetirizine

If your symptoms do not improve within a few days or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

levocetirizine may cause some people to become dizzy, drowsy, or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to levocetirizine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or not alert.

levocetirizine will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicine for hay fever, other allergies or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine; prescription pain medicine or narcotics; medicine for seizures; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your doctor or dentist before taking any of the above while you are taking levocetirizine.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

levocetirizine Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common Bloody nose fever Incidence not known Anxiety attack, assault, or force blurred or loss of vision cough dark urine difficult or labored breathing difficulty with swallowing disturbed color perception dizziness double vision dry mouth fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse general tiredness and weakness halos around lights hives or welts hyperventilation irritability itching skin joint or muscle pain large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs light-colored stools nausea and vomiting nervousness night blindness overbright appearance of lights puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue redness of the skin restlessness seizures shaking shortness of breath skin rash tightness in the chest trouble with sleeping tunnel vision upper right abdominal pain wheezing yellow eyes and skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Headache muscle aches sleepiness or unusual drowsiness sore throat stuffy or runny nose Less common Body aches or pain congestion diarrhea dryness or soreness of the throat earache hoarseness redness or swelling in the ear tender, swollen glands in the neck trouble with swallowing voice changes

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: levocetirizine side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More levocetirizine resources Levocetirizine Side Effects (in more detail)Levocetirizine Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesLevocetirizine Drug InteractionsLevocetirizine Support Group63 Reviews for Levocetirizine - Add your own review/rating Levocetirizine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levocetirizine Prescribing Information (FDA) Levocetirizine Dihydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Xyzal Prescribing Information (FDA) Xyzal Consumer Overview Compare levocetirizine with other medications AllergiesHay FeverUrticaria


V-Max Powder
Dosage Form: FOR ANIMAL USE ONLYV-MaxTM


Avelox Tablets
Pronunciation: MOX-i-FLOX-a-sinGeneric Name: MoxifloxacinBrand Name: Avelox


Myelography Medications

There are currently no drugs listed for "Myelography". See Diagnosis and Investigation.

Definition of Myelography: Myelography is an imaging examination that shows the passage of contrast material in the space around the spinal cord (the subarachnoid space) and nerve roots using a form of x-ray called fluoroscopy.

Drug List:


ControlRx Toothpaste
Dosage Form: oral paste, dentifriceControlRx™


Salazopyrin Suppositories
1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Salazopyrin Suppositories

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Sulfasalazine EP 0.5 g

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Suppository

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Ulcerative colitis or Crohn's Disease affecting the rectum.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

The dose is adjusted according to the severity of the disease and the patient's tolerance of the drug.

Acute attack or relapse - Adults and the Elderly

Two suppositories are to be inserted in the morning and two at bedtime after defecation. After three weeks the dosage is gradually reduced as improvement occurs.

Adjustment to oral therapy - Adults and the Elderly

In severe generalised ulcerative colitis of the rectum or recto sigmoid, or in cases who are responding slowly to oral therapy, one or two suppositories may be given in the morning and at bedtime additional to oral therapy.

Children

The adult dose is reduced on the basis of body weight.

4.3 Contraindications

General

Because of lower absorption levels and shorter retention time in the body, Salazopyrin Suppositories give rise to fewer adverse events than equivalent treatment by mouth. However, because of the theoretical possibility that serious adverse events can arise from treatment from either route, the details below are based on adverse event reports to both oral and rectal treatment.

i) A known hypersensitivity to sulfasalazine, its metabolites or any of theexcipients as well as sulfonamides or salicylates.

ii) Use in infants under two years old.

iii) Porphyria.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Complete blood counts (including differential white cell count), liver function tests and assessment of renal function (including urinalysis) should be performed in all patients before starting therapy with sulfasalazine, and frequently during the first 3 months of therapy. Thereafter, monitoring should be performed as clinically indicated. The patient should also be counselled to report immediately with any sore throat, fever, malaise, pallor, purpura, jaundice or unexpected non-specific illness during sulfasalazine treatment, this may indicate myelosuppression, haemolysis or hepatoxicity. Treatment should be stopped immediately while awaiting the results of blood tests. .

Sulfasalazine should not be given to patients with impaired hepatic or renal function or with blood dyscrasias, unless the potential benefit outweighs the risk.

Sulfasalazine should be given with caution to patients with severe allergy or bronchial asthma.

Use in children with the concomitant condition systemic onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may result in a serum sickness like reaction; therefore sulfasalazine is not recommended in these patients.

Since sulfasalazine may cause haemolytic anaemia, it should be used with caution in patients with G-6-PD deficiency.

Oral sulfasalazine inhibits the absorption and metabolism of folic acid and may cause folic acid deficiency potentially resulting in serious blood disorders (e.g., macrocytosis and pancytopenia), this can be normalised by administration of folic acid or folinic acid (leucovorin).

Because sulfasalazine causes crystalluria and kidney stone formation, adequate fluid intake should be ensured during treatment.

Oligospermia and infertility may occur in men treated with sulfasalazine. Discontinuation of the drug appears to reverse these effects within 2 to 3 months. As far as is know oligospermia has not occurred during therapy per rectum.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

There have been no adverse interactions reported, due to the drug largely remaining confined to the rectum. However, there is a potential for interaction as follows:

Reduced absorption of digoxin , resulting in non-therapeutic serum levels, has been reported when used concomitantly with oral sulfasalazine.

Sulfonamides bear certain chemical similarities to some oral hypoglycemic agents. Hypoglycemia has occurred in patients receiving sulfonamides. Patients receiving sulfasalazine and hypoglycemic agents should be closely monitored.

Due to inhibition of thiopurine methyltransferase by salazopyrin, bone marrow suppression and leucopenia have been reported when the thiopurine 6-mercaptopurine or it's prodrug, azathioprine, and oral salazopyrin were used concomitantly.

Coadministration of oral sulfasalazine and methotrexate to rheumatoid arthritis patients did not alter the pharmacokinetic disposition of the drugs. However, an increased incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events, especially nausea, was reported.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

Pregnancy

Reproduction studies in rats and rabbits have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus. Published data regarding use of sulfasalazine in pregnant women have revealed no evidence of teratogenic hazards. If sulfasalazine is used during pregnancy, the possibility of fetal harm appears remote. Oral sulfasalazine inhibits the absorption and metabolism of folic acid and may cause folic acid deficiency. Because the possibility of harm cannot be completely ruled out, sulfasalazine should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed.

Lactation

Sulfasalazine and sulfapyridine are found in low levels in breast milk. Caution should be used, particularly if breastfeeding premature infants or those deficient in G-6-PD.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

No specific effects.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

The following have been reported to sulfasalazine given orally or rectally. The drug rectally is well tolerated. Overall, about 75% of adverse drug reactions occur within three months of starting therapy and over 90% by six months. Some undesirable effects are dose-dependent and symptoms can often be alleviated by reduction of the dose.

General

Sulfasalazine is split by intestinal bacteria to sulfapyridine and 5-amino salicylate so adverse drugs reactions to either sulfonamide or salicylate are possible. Patients with slow acetylator status are more likely to experience adverse drug reactions related to sulfapyridine. The most commonly encountered adverse drugs reactions are nausea, headache, rash, loss of appetite and raised temperature.

Specific

The adverse reactions observed during clinical studies conducted with Sulfasalazine have been provided in a single list below by class and frequency (very common (

Additional reactions reported from post-marketing experience are included as frequency Not known (cannot be estimated from the available data) in the list below.

Body System

Adverse drug reactions

Infections and infestations

 

Not known

Pseudomembranous colitis

Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders

 

Common

Leukopenia

Uncommon

Thrombocytopenia*

Not known

Agranulocytosis, aplastic anemia, haemolytic anemia, Heinz body anaemia, hypoprothrombinaemia, lymphadenopathy, macrocytosis, megaloblastic anemia, methaemoglobinaemina, neutropenia, pancytopenia

Immune System Disorders:

 

Not known

Anaphylaxis, polyarteritis nodosa, serum sickness

Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders:

 

Not known

Loss of appetite

Psychiatric Disorders:

 

Common

Insomnia

Uncommon

Depression

Not known

Hallucinations

Nervous System Disorders:

 

Common

Dizziness, headache, taste disorders

Uncommon

Convulsions

Not known

Aseptic meningitis, ataxia, encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy, smell disorders

Ear and Labyrinth Disorders:

 

Common

Tinnitus

Uncommo

Vertigo

Eye Disorders:

 

Common

Conjuctivial and scleral injection

Cardiac Disorders:

 

Not known

Allergic myocarditis, cyanosis, pericarditis

vascular Disorders:

 

Uncommon

Vasculitis

Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders:

 

Common

Cough

Uncommon

Dyspnoea

Not known

Fibrosing alveolitis, eosinophilic infiltration, interstitial lung disease

Gastrointestinal Disorders:

 

Very Common

Gastric distress, nausea

Common

Abdominal pain, diarrhoea, vomiting, stomatitis

Not known

Aggravation of ulcerative colitis, pancreatitis, parotitis

Hepato-biliary Disorders:

 

Not known

Hepatic failure, fulminant hepatitis, hepatitis*

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders:

 

Common

Pruritus

Uncommon

Alopecia, urticaria

Not known

Epidermal necrolysis (Lyell's syndrome), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), toxic pustuloderma, erythema, exanthema, exfoliative dermatitis, periorbital oedema, lichen planus, photosensitivity

Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders:

 

Common

Arthralgia

Not known

Systemic lupus erythematosus

Renal and Urinary Disorders:

 

Common

Proteinuria

Not known

Nephrotic syndrome, interstitial nephritis, crystalluria*, haematuria

Reproductive System and Breast Disorders:

 

Not known

Reversible oligospermia*

General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions:

 

Common

Fever

Uncommon

Facial oedema

Not known

Yellow discoloration of skin and body fluids

Investigations:

 

Uncommon

Elevation of liver enzymes

Not known

Induction of autoantibodies

* See Section 4.4 for further information

4.9 Overdose

Overdose with suppositories is unlikely. In the event, evacuate the bowel and treat supportively. The toxicity of sulphasalazine is low in acute dosage. There is no specific antidote.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Therapeutic benefit of sulfasalazine in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease appears to be due to a local action of the sulfasalazine and its split product 5-aminosalicylic acid on the mucous membrane and deeper colonic structures. Pharmacological actions noted for these compounds include inhibition of neutrophil activation, free radical scavenging, inhibition of superoxide production, inhibition of bacterial growth. Sulfasalazine inhibits 15-Prostaglandin dehydrogenase and slows prostaglandin metabolism. Lipoxygenase release in inflammatory cells is also depressed. NK cells and T cell proliferation are inhibited.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

There are considerable individual differences in the retention time of suppositories in volunteer studies. Consequently uptake values vary widely also. Given that the effect of the drug is almost certainly due to a local effect pharmacokinetics becomes less relevant to therapeutic action than to possible adverse effects related to systemic levels.

A study of five volunteers over three days following insertion of 2 x 0.5 g suppositories gave the following results:

Retention time: mean 8.9 hours (s.d. 5.2), serum concentration at 10 hours: sulfasalazine 1.7 mcg/ml (s.d. 0.46), sulfapyridine less than 1 mcg/ml. Percentage renal excretion: 10.2 (s.d. 4.3). Uptake as reflected by excretion is much below that of the oral rate and may explain the good tolerance of the dose form.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

In two-year carcinogenicity studies in rats and mice, sulfasalazine showed some evidence of carcinogenicity. In rats, there was a small increase in the incidence of transitional cell papillomas in the urinary bladder and kidney. The tumours were judged to be induced mechanically by calculi formed in the urine rather than through a direct genotoxic mechanism. In the mouse study, there was a significant increase in the incidence of hepatocellular adenoma or carcinoma. The mechanism of induction of hepatocellular neoplasia has been investigated and attributed to species-specific effects of sulfasalazine that are not relevant to humans.

Sulfasalazine did not show mutagenicity in the bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test) or in the L51784 mouse lymphoma cell assay at the HGPRT gene. It did not induce sister chromatid exchanges or chromosomal aberrations in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, and in vivo mouse bone marrow chromosomal aberration tests were negative. However, sulfasalazine showed positive or equivocal mutagenic responses in rat and mouse micronucleus assays, and in human lymphocyte sister chromatid exchange, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus assays. The ability of sulfasalazine to induce chromosome damage has been attributed to perturbation of folic acid levels rather than to a direct genotoxic mechanism.

Based on information from non-clinical studies, sulfasalazine is judged to pose no carcinogenic risk to humans. Sulfasalazine use has not been associated with the development of neoplasia in human epidemiology studies.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Povidone

Adepa Solidus

6.2 Incompatibilities

Certain types of extended wear soft contact lenses may be permanently stained during therapy.

6.3 Shelf Life

Five years

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Do not store above 25°C.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

PVC/Polyethylene laminate moulds

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

As the suppositories melt at body temperature they should be kept below 25°C and handled as little as possible before insertion so that they are firm.

Sulfasalazine is an orange dye, and care should thus be taken with clothing, bedding etc with regard to seepage or spillage.

Insertion

Empty the bowel if possible. Push the suppository through the anus with a finger, as far as possible. The urge to expel them will pass in a few minutes, once they have melted.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Pfizer Limited

Ramsgate Road

Sandwich

Kent, CT13 9NJ

United Kingdom

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 00057/1042

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

12 August 2010

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

12 August 2010

11. LEGAL CATEGORY

POM.

Ref: SZ 6_0 Supp UK


Dr. Reddy's Laboratories Inc.
Address Dr. Reddy's Laboratories Inc., 200 Somerset Corporate Boulevard, 7th Floor,


Diazepam 5mg / 5ml Forte Syrup (Sandoz Limited)
1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Diazepam Forte Syrup 5mg/5ml

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Each 5ml contains 5mg of Diazepam B.P.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Oral Solution

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Diazepam has anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, sedative, muscle relaxant and amnesic properties.

Diazepam Forte Syrup 5mg/5ml is indicated for

Adults

i) For the short-term relief (2-4 weeks only) of anxiety that is severe, disabling or subjecting the individual to unacceptable distress, occurring alone or in association with insomnia or short-term psychosomatic, organic or psychotic illness;

ii) As a sedative and premedicant;

iii) As an anticonvulsant in the management of status epilepticus, febrile convulsions and poisoning;

iv) In the control of muscle spasms as in tetanus;

v) In the management of alcohol withdrawal symptoms;

vi) In selected cases it may be useful in the management of cerebral spasticity;

Children

i) Night terrors and somnambulism;

ii) Premedication;

iii) In the control of muscle spasms as in tetanus;

iv) In selected cases, it may be useful in controlling tension and irritability in cerebral spasticity;

The use of diazepam to treat short term anxiety is inappropriate and unsuitable. Diazepam should be used to treat insomnia only when it is severe, disabling or subjecting the individual to extreme stress.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Adults:

Anxiety States: 2mg three times daily up to 30mg daily in divided doses.

Insomnia associated with Anxiety: 5mg to 15mg before retiring.

Muscle Spasms: 2mg to 15mg daily in divided doses up to 60mg in severe spastic disorders such as cerebral spasticity, epilepsy and muscle spasms associated with upper-motor neurone disease.

In the control of muscle spasms as in tetanus: 3mg to 10mg/kg bodyweight daily.

Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms: 5mg to 20mg repeated within 2 to 4 hours if necessary.

Premedication in Dental Patients: 5mg the night before, 5mg on waking and another 5mg 2 hours before the appointment.

Elderly or Debilitated patients: The dosage should be half that recommended in adults.

Children:

Night Terrors and Somnambulism: 1mg to 5mg daily before retiring.

Premedication: 2mg to 10mg.

Management of Cerebral Spasticity: 2mg to 40mg daily in divided doses.

In the control of Muscle spasms as in Tetanus: 3mg to 10mg/kg bodyweight daily.

Doses should be repeated only on medical advice. Long-term chronic use is not recommended and treatment should always be tapered off gradually. When a benzodiazepine is used as a hypnotic, treatment should, if possible, be intermittent.

Route of administration

Oral.

4.3 Contraindications

Patients with a known sensitivity to benzodiazepines, acute pulmonary insufficiency; respiratory depression.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

The lowest dose that can control the symptoms should be used and treatment should not be continued beyond 4 weeks. The risk of dependence increases when high dosages are attained, especially when given over long periods. This is particularly so in patients with a history of alcoholism, drug abuse or in patients with marked personality disorders.

Treatment should always be tapered off gradually. Sudden cessation of treatment can result in symptoms such as depression, nervousness, rebound insomnia, irritability, sweating and diarrhoea even in patients receiving normal therapeutic doses for short periods of time. Abrupt withdrawal following high dosage may produce confusion, toxic psychosis, convulsions or a condition resembling delirium tremens.

Diazepam should not be used to treat chronic psychoses or phobic or obsessional states. Because diazepam-induced disinhibition may precipitate suicidal or aggressive behaviour, it should not be used alone to treat depression or anxiety related depression. Caution must be exercised when treating patients with personality disorders.

Elderly or debilitated patients may be more prone to adverse effects and care must be taken in patients with impaired liver or kidney function. Care is also required in patients with organic brain disease (particularly arteriosclerosis).

Diazepam should be avoided in cases of loss or bereavement as psychological adjustment may be inhibited by benzodiazepines.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Sedation, or respiratory or cardiovascular depression may be enhanced if diazepam is combined with centrally acting drugs such as alcohol, anaesthetics, analgesics, antidepressants, hypnotics, neuroleptics and tranquillisers. Concomitant intake with alcohol is not recommended since the sedative effect is increased. Diazepam is primarily metabolised by hepatic microsomal oxidation and drugs which affect liver enzymes, such as cimetidine and phenobarbitone, may alter its pharmacokinetics. Diazepam has been reported to be displaced from protein-binding sites by sodium valproate.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

If the product is prescribed to a woman of childbearing potential, she should be warned to contact her physician regarding discontinuance of the product if she intends to become or suspects that she is pregnant.

If, for compelling medical reasons, the product is administered during the late phase of pregnancy or during labour at high doses, effects on the neonate such as hypothermia, hypotonia and moderate respiratory depression can be expected owing to the pharmacological action of the compound.

Infants born to mothers who took benzodiazepines chronically during the latter stages of pregnancy may have developed physical dependence and may be at some risk for developing withdrawal symptoms in the postnatal period.

Since benzodiazepines are found in the breast milk, benzodiazepines should not be given to breast feeding mothers.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

The side-effects of diazepam, such as sedation and impaired muscle function, may adversely affect the ability to drive or use machines. Insufficient sleep may also increase the likelihood of impaired alertness. (see also interactions, Section 4.5)

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Diazepam may cause drowsiness, sedation, blurring of vision, unsteadiness and ataxia. These may occur after single as well as repeated doses and persist to the following day. Less common effects include vertigo, headache, confusion, slurred speech, visual disturbance, tremor, change in libido, skin rashes and gastro-intestinal upset. Jaundice or blood dyscrasias have been reported rarely. High doses may be associated with respiratory depression or hypotension.

Abnormal psychological reactions to benzodiazepines have been reported. Rare behavioural adverse effects including paradoxical aggressive outbursts, excitement, confusion and the uncovering of depression with suicidal tendencies.

4.9 Overdose

Symptoms

Benzodiazepines commonly cause drowsiness, ataxia, dysarthria and nystagmus. Coma, hypotension and respiratory depression occasionally occur but are seldom serious if these drugs are taken alone. Coma usually lasts only a few hours but in elderly people it may be more protracted and cyclical. Benzodiazepine respiratory depressant effects are more serious in patients with severe chronic respiratory disease.

Benzodiazepines potentiate the effects of other central nervous system depressants, including alcohol.

Management

Consider activated charcoal in adults or children who have taken more than 1 mg/kg within 1 hour, provided they are not too drowsy. Gastric lavage is unnecessary if these drugs have been taken alone. Patients who are asymptomatic at four hours are unlikely to develop symptoms. Institute supportive measures as indicated by the patient's clinical state.

If CNS depression is severe consider the use of flumazenil (Anexate), a benzodiazepine antagonist. This should rarely be required. It has a short half-life (about an hour) and should NOT TO BE USED IN MIXED OVERDOSE OR AS A "DIAGNOSTIC" TEST. It is contraindicated in the presence of drugs that reduce seizure threshold (e.g. tricyclic antidepressants).

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Diazepam has potent anxiolytic anti-convulsant and central muscle relaxant properties, these effects are probably mediated through special areas of the CNS. Diazepam has little autonomic activity.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

The following results were obtained following a pharmacokinetic study with healthy volunteers

 

 

Diazepam 5mg/5ml Syrup (Lagap)

cmax (mean ± S.D.)

275 ± 73

tmax (mean)

1 hour

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

None stated

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Glycerin, sucrose, microcrystalline cellulose, methyl hydroxybenzoate, propyl hydroxybenzoate, alcohol (96%), sodium carboxymethylcellulose, Flavouring Agent (Framboise/raspberry 50969A), Ponceau 4R (E124), potassium sorbate and purified water.

6.2 Incompatibilities

None Known.

6.3 Shelf Life

24 months.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Store below 25?C. Protect from light.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Amber glass bottles with screw caps and plastic inserts.

Pack sizes: 50ml, 100ml, 150ml, 200ml, 250ml, 300ml and 500ml

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

Shake well before use.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Sandoz Ltd

Woolmer Way

Bordon

Hampshire

GU35 9QE

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 4416/0067

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

16th April 1984 / 30th January 1995

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

6 July 2005


Calan SR

Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AP a mil) Brand Names: Calan, Calan SR, Covera-HS, Isoptin SR, Verelan, Verelan PM

What is verapamil?

Verapamil is in a group of drugs called calcium channel blockers. It works by relaxing the muscles of your heart and blood vessels.

Verapamil is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), angina (chest pain), and certain heart rhythm disorders.

Verapamil may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about verapamil? You should not use verapamil if you are allergic to it, or if you have certain serious heart conditions such as "sick sinus syndrome" or "AV block" (unless you have a pacemaker), low blood pressure, or if you have recently had a heart attack.

Before taking verapamil, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have kidney disease, liver disease, congestive heart failure, or a nerve-muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis or muscular dystrophy.

There are many other drugs that can interact with verapamil. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you. Verapamil may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking verapamil suddenly, your condition may become worse.

Verapamil may be only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking verapamil? You should not use verapamil if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

certain serious heart conditions, especially "sick sinus syndrome" or "AV block" (unless you have a pacemaker);

low blood pressure; or

if you have recently had a heart attack.

To make sure you can safely take verapamil, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney disease; liver disease;

congestive heart failure; or

a nerve-muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis or muscular dystrophy.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether verapamil will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Verapamil can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take verapamil?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. Swallow it whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

If you have trouble swallowing a verapamil capsule whole, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce to make swallowing easier. Swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Discard the empty capsule.

Use verapamil regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking verapamil suddenly, your condition may become worse.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms.

Verapamil may be only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using verapamil. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of verapamil can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include slow heartbeat and fainting.

What should I avoid while taking verapamil? Verapamil may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of verapamil.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with verapamil and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor.

Verapamil side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fast or slow heartbeats;

feeling like you might pass out;

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;

restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling, rapid weight gain; or

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

constipation, nausea;

skin rash or itching;

dizziness, headache, tired feeling; or

warmth, itching, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect verapamil?

Many drugs can interact with verapamil. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

buspirone (BuSpar);

cimetidine (Tagamet);

clonidine (Catapres, Clorpres, Kapvay, Nexiclon) or any other blood pressure medications;

cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);

digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);

lithium (Eskalith, LithoBid);

lovastatin (Mevacor, Advicor) or simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin);

theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Uniphyl);

an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, Pediazole), rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, Rifater), or telithromycin (Ketek);

an antifungal medication such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), or voriconazole (Vfend);

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta, Ziac), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), timolol (Blocadren), and others;

cancer medicine such as cisplatin (Platinol), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar), doxorubicin (Adriamycin), paclitaxel (Taxol), procarbazine (Matulane), vincristine (Oncovin), or vinorelbine (Navelbine);

cholesterol-lowering drugs such as atorvastatin (Lipitor, Caduet), lovastatin (Mevacor, Altoprev, Advicor), or simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin, Juvisync);

a heart rhythm medication such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), flecainide (Tambocor), or quinidine (Quin-G);

HIV/AIDS medicine such as atazanavir (Reyataz), delavirdine (Rescriptor), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), or ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra);

a sedative such as midazolam (Versed) or triazolam (Halcion); or

seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol) or phenobarbital (Solfoton).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with verapamil. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Calan SR resources Calan SR Side Effects (in more detail)Calan SR Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesCalan SR Drug InteractionsCalan SR Support Group5 Reviews for Calan SR - Add your own review/rating Calan SR Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Calan SR Controlled-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Calan SR Prescribing Information (FDA) Verapamil Prescribing Information (FDA) Calan Prescribing Information (FDA) Calan MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Covera-HS Sustained-Release Tablets (Controlled Onset) MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Covera-HS Prescribing Information (FDA) Isoptin SR Prescribing Information (FDA) Verapamil Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Verelan Prescribing Information (FDA) Verelan Sustained-Release Pellet-Filled Capsules MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Verelan PM Prescribing Information (FDA) Verelan PM Sustained-Release Capsules Controlled Onset MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Calan SR with other medications AnginaArrhythmiaBipolar DisorderCluster HeadachesHigh Blood PressureIdiopathic Hypertrophic Subaortic StenosisMigraine PreventionNocturnal Leg CrampsSupraventricular Tachycardia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about verapamil.

See also: Calan SR side effects (in more detail)


Allergy Itch Ease
Generic Name: arisaema triphyllum root, viola tricolor, comocladia dentata bark/leaf, chamomile and artemisia cina flower granule Dosage Form: FOR ANIMAL USE ONLYAllergy Itch Ease

Relieves skin itch

Indications: Homeopathic remedy for the relief of itchy skin in pets.

Dosage: Sprinkle granules directly into the mouth and hold closed briefly.Initial dose: every 30 minutes for up to 10 doses. Thereafter, 3 times daily. Cats and dogs under 20 lbs: 1 large pinch. Dogs 20-50 lbs: 2 pinches. Dogs over 50 lbs: 1/4 cap granules. May be used with Skin and Coat Tonic™ .

Caution: Consult your vet if symptoms persist or worsen. Keep this and all medicines from the reach of children.

Ingredients: Each dose contains equal parts of Arum triph (6C) (HPUS), Viola tri. (6C) (HPUS), Comocladia (6C) (HPUS), Chamomilla (12C) (HPUS), Cina (6C) (HPUS)

Sucrose (inactive ingredient)

Enter section text here

Contains no gluten, artificial flavors, colors or preservatives.

All Native Remedies health products are especially formulated by experts in the field of natural health and are manufactured according to the highest pharmaceutical standards for maximum safety and effectiveness. For more information, visit us at www.nativeremedies.com

Distributed by

Native Remedies, LLC

6531 Park of Commerce Blvd.

Suite 160

Boca Raton, FL 33487

Phone: 1.877.289.1235

International: + 1.561.999.8857

The letters HPUS indicate that the component(s) in this product is (are) officially monographed in the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States.


isosulfan blue Subcutaneous

eye-soe-SUL-fan BLOO

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Lymphazurin

In Canada

Lymphazurin 1%

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution

Therapeutic Class: Diagnostic Agent, Lymphatic Visualization

Uses For isosulfan blue

Isosulfan blue injection is used as an aid in a procedure called lymphography (medical imaging procedure) to test how well your lymphatic system is working in certain parts of your body. It is a blue dye that works by staining the lymph nodes and lymph vessels. This creates a contrast between the lymph nodes and vessels and helps your doctor check for serious medical problems such as lymphedema, chyluria (lymph in the urine), chylous ascites (lymph in the stomach), chylothorax (lymph in the chest), cancer of the lymph nodes, or other problems of the lymphatic system.

isosulfan blue is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using isosulfan blue

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For isosulfan blue, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to isosulfan blue or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of isosulfan blue injection in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

No information is available on the relationship of age to the effects of isosulfan blue injection in geriatric patients.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of isosulfan blue. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Asthma, history of—Use with caution. May be more likely to experience side effects. Proper Use of isosulfan blue

A doctor will give you isosulfan blue in a hospital. isosulfan blue is given as a shot under your skin.

Precautions While Using isosulfan blue

It is very important that your doctor check your progress closely while you are receiving isosulfan blue. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to receive it.

isosulfan blue may cause a serious type of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Tell your doctor or nurse right away if you have cold clammy skin; confusion; dizziness; lightheadedness; a skin rash; itching; shortness of breath; sweating; swelling of the face, tongue, and throat; or trouble with breathing after you get the injection.

Make sure your doctor knows if you have had an allergic reaction to any dye or medicine given during a test or procedure.

Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using isosulfan blue. isosulfan blue may affect the results of certain medical tests.

isosulfan blue may cause your urine to turn blue for up to 24 hours after you receive isosulfan blue. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions.

isosulfan blue Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common Cold, clammy skin confusion cough difficulty with swallowing dizziness fast heartbeat fast, weak pulse hives or welts itching large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs lightheadedness puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue redness of the skin shortness of breath skin rash sweating tightness in the chest troubled breathing unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known Blue discoloration of the skin

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: isosulfan blue Subcutaneous side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More isosulfan blue Subcutaneous resources Isosulfan blue Subcutaneous Side Effects (in more detail)Isosulfan blue Subcutaneous Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingIsosulfan blue Subcutaneous Support Group0 Reviews for Isosulfan blue Subcutaneous - Add your own review/rating Compare isosulfan blue Subcutaneous with other medications Diagnosis and Investigation


calcium supplement Oral, Parenteral

Class Name: calcium supplement (Oral route, Parenteral route)

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Ascocid Cal-C-Caps Cal-G Cal-Lac Citracal PhosLo Posture Prelief Rolaids

In Canada

Calcium Stanley

Available Dosage Forms:

Tablet, Chewable Tablet Powder for Suspension Capsule Capsule, Liquid Filled Syrup Wafer Powder Tablet, Effervescent Suspension Tablet, Extended Release Granule Uses For This Medicine

Calcium supplements are taken by individuals who are unable to get enough calcium in their regular diet or who have a need for more calcium. They are used to prevent or treat several conditions that may cause hypocalcemia (not enough calcium in the blood). The body needs calcium to make strong bones. Calcium is also needed for the heart, muscles, and nervous system to work properly.

The bones serve as a storage site for the body's calcium. They are continuously giving up calcium to the bloodstream and then replacing it as the body's need for calcium changes from day to day. When there is not enough calcium in the blood to be used by the heart and other organs, your body will take the needed calcium from the bones. When you eat foods rich in calcium, the calcium will be restored to the bones and the balance between your blood and bones will be maintained.

Pregnant women, nursing mothers, children, and adolescents may need more calcium than they normally get from eating calcium-rich foods. Adult women may take calcium supplements to help prevent a bone disease called osteoporosis. Osteoporosis, which causes thin, porous, easily broken bones, may occur in women after menopause, but may sometimes occur in elderly men also. Osteoporosis in women past menopause is thought to be caused by a reduced amount of ovarian estrogen (a female hormone). However, a diet low in calcium for many years, especially in the younger adult years, may add to the risk of developing it. Other bone diseases in children and adults are also treated with calcium supplements.

Calcium supplements may also be used for other conditions as determined by your health care professional.

A calcium "salt" contains calcium along with another substance, such as carbonate or gluconate. Some calcium salts have more calcium (elemental calcium) than others. For example, the amount of calcium in calcium carbonate is greater than that in calcium gluconate. To give you an idea of how different calcium supplements vary in calcium content, the following chart explains how many tablets of each type of supplement will provide 1000 milligrams of elemental calcium. When you look for a calcium supplement, be sure the number of milligrams on the label refers to the amount of elemental calcium, and not to the strength of each tablet.

Calcium supplement Strength of each tablet (in milligrams [mg]) Amount of elemental calcium per tablet (in milligrams) Number of tablets to provide 1000 milligrams of calcium Calcium carbonate 625 650 750


Adrenalin Injection

Generic Name: epinephrine (Injection route)

ep-i-NEF-rin

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Adrenaclick Adrenalin Adrenalin Chloride Epipen Epipen Jr Twinject

Available Dosage Forms:

Injectable Solution

Therapeutic Class: Anaphylaxis Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Adrenergic

Chemical Class: Alkylarylamine

Uses For Adrenalin

Epinephrine injection is used for emergency treatment of severe allergic reactions (including anaphylaxis) to insect bites or stings, medicines, foods, or other substances. It is also used to treat anaphylaxis caused by unknown substances or triggered by exercise.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Adrenalin

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

No information is available on the relationship of age to the effects of epinephrine injection in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

No information is available on the relationship of age to the effects of epinephrine injection in geriatric patients. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related heart disease which may require caution in patients receiving epinephrine injection.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Dihydroergotamine Isocarboxazid Linezolid Phenelzine Tranylcypromine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Amitriptyline Amoxapine Bucindolol Carteolol Carvedilol Clomipramine Desipramine Dilevalol Dothiepin Doxepin Entacapone Halothane Imipramine Levobunolol Lofepramine Metipranolol Nadolol Nortriptyline Opipramol Oxprenolol Penbutolol Pindolol Propranolol Protriptyline Rasagiline Sotalol Tertatolol Timolol Trimipramine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Labetalol Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Angina pectoris (severe chest pain) or Blood vessel problems or Diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes) or Heart attack or Heart disease or Heart rhythm problems or Hypertension (high blood pressure) or Overactive thyroid or Parkinson's disease—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of epinephrine

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain epinephrine. It may not be specific to Adrenalin. Please read with care.

Use this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

If you are using this medicine at home, make sure you or any of your family members understand exactly how to give them. Also, tell your doctor if you or your caregiver has severe arthritis of the hands. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

This medicine is injected under your skin or into the muscle of your outer thigh only. Do not inject this medicine into a vein or into the muscle of your buttocks. To do so, may increase the chance of having serious side effects.

This medicine comes with patient instructions. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

This medicine comes in an auto-injector syringe and needle kit that contains the correct dose of medicine your doctor has prescribed.

You may need to use more than one injection if your allergic reaction does not get better after the first shot.

Carry this medicine with you at all times for emergency use in case you have a severe allergic reaction.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form: For allergic reactions: Adults and children weighing above 30 kilograms (66 pounds)—0.3 milligram (mg) injected under the skin or into the muscle of your thigh. Adults and children weighing 15 to 30 kilograms (33 to 66 pounds)—0.15 milligram (mg) injected under the skin or into the muscle of your thigh. Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Store the injection kits at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Do not store the medicine in the refrigerator or freezer. Keep the auto-injector in its case or tube.

Check the injection kits regularly to make sure that the liquid has not changed its color. Do not use this medicine if the liquid has changed its color, or if there are solids in the liquid.

Do not reuse the remaining portion of the medicine that is left in the auto-injector. Throw away the auto-injector after you have used it.

Precautions While Using Adrenalin

If your symptoms do not improve within a few days or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening reaction and requires immediate medical attention. Check with your doctor right away, or go to an emergency room as soon as possible, even if you feel better after using this medicine.

This medicine may affect blood sugar levels. If you notice a change in the results of your blood or urine sugar tests or if you have any questions, check with your doctor.

Do not inject this medicine into your hands or feet. There is already less blood flow to the hands and feet, and epinephrine could make that worse and cause damage to these tissues. If you accidentally inject epinephrine into your hands or feet, check with your doctor or go to the hospital emergency room right away.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Adrenalin Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Incidence not known Abnormal or decreased touch sensation arm, back or jaw pain bleeding, blistering, burning, coldness, discoloration of the skin, feeling of pressure, hives, infection, inflammation, itching, lumps, numbness, pain, rash, redness, scarring, soreness, stinging, swelling, tenderness, tingling, ulceration, or warmth at the injection site blurred vision chest pain or discomfort chest tightness or heaviness dizziness fainting fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse fear or nervousness headache nausea or vomiting paleness of the skin pounding in the ears restlessness shakiness in the legs, arms, hands, or feet shortness of breath slow or fast heartbeat stroke sweating trembling or shaking of the hands or feet troubled breathing unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose Agitation coldness of the skin coma confusion decreased urine output depression drowsiness hostility irritability lethargy lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting muscle twitching pounding, slow heartbeat rapid weight gain rapid, deep breathing seizures stomach cramps stupor swelling of the face, ankles, or hands

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Adrenalin Injection side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Adrenalin Injection resources Adrenalin Injection Side Effects (in more detail)Adrenalin Injection Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingAdrenalin Injection Drug InteractionsAdrenalin Injection Support Group0 Reviews for Adrenalin Injection - Add your own review/rating Compare Adrenalin Injection with other medications Adams-Stokes SyndromeAllergic ReactionsAsthma, acuteAsystoleAV Heart BlockCOPD, AcuteElectromechanical DissociationShock


Cystospaz

Generic Name: hyoscyamine (hye oh SYE a meen) Brand Names: Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Ed Spaz, HyoMax, HyoMax DT, HyoMax FT, HyoMax SL, HyoMax SR, Hyospaz, Hyosyne, IB-Stat, Levbid, Levsin, Levsin SL, Levsinex SR, NuLev, Nulev, Symax Duotab, Symax FasTab, Symax SL, Symax SR

What is Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)?

Hyoscyamine produces many effects in the body, including relief from muscle spasms.

Hyoscyamine also reduces the fluid secretions of many organs and glands in the body, such as the stomach, pancreas, lungs, saliva glands, sweat glands, and nasal passages.

Hyoscyamine is used to treat many different stomach and intestinal disorders, including peptic ulcer and irritable bowel syndrome. It is also used to control muscle spasms in the bladder, kidneys, or digestive tract, and to reduce stomach acid. Hyoscyamine is sometimes used to reduce tremors and rigid muscles in people with symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

Hyoscyamine is also used as a drying agent to control excessive salivation, runny nose, or excessive sweating.

Hyoscyamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have kidney disease, a bladder or intestinal obstruction, severe ulcerative colitis, toxic megacolon, glaucoma, or myasthenia gravis.

Before taking hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have heart disease, congestive heart failure, a heart rhythm disorder, high blood pressure, overactive thyroid, or hiatal hernia with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)? Do not take hyoscyamine if you are allergic to it, or if you have: kidney disease;

an enlarged prostate or problems with urination;

intestinal blockage;

severe ulcerative colitis, or toxic megacolon;

glaucoma; or

myasthenia gravis.

To make sure you can safely take hyoscyamine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

heart disease, congestive heart failure;

a heart rhythm disorder;

high blood pressure;

overactive thyroid; or

hiatal hernia with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether hyoscyamine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Hyoscyamine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your medication may come with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Hyoscyamine is usually taken before a meal. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Do not crush, chew, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or crushing the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Your doctor may want you to break an extended-release tablet and take only half of it. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Measure the oral liquid form of hyoscyamine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

The sublingual tablet form of this medication must be placed under the tongue, where it will dissolve. Do not swallow the sublingual tablet whole or wash it down with water. You may drink water after the pill has completely dissolved in your mouth.

Before using hyoscyamine oral spray for the first time, you must prime the spray pump. To do this, spray 3 test sprays into the air and away from your face. Prime the spray pump at least 1 test spray any time you have not used the oral spray for longer than 2 days. Spray until a fine mist appears.

After using the oral spray, try not to swallow right away. Do not rinse your mouth or spit for 5 to 10 minutes after using the oral spray.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Do not use hyoscyamine oral spray for more than 30 sprays, even if there is medicine still left in the bottle.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include headache, dizziness, dry mouth, trouble swallowing, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, hot dry skin, and feeling restless or nervous.

What should I avoid while taking Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)?

Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take hyoscyamine. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb hyoscyamine. If you use an antacid, take it after you have taken hyoscyamine and eaten a meal.

Hyoscyamine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking hyoscyamine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Hyoscyamine can decrease sweating and you may be more prone to heat stroke.

Cystospaz (hyoscyamine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using hyoscyamine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

diarrhea;

confusion, hallucinations;

unusual thoughts or behavior;

fast, pounding, or uneven heart rate;

rash or flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling); or

eye pain.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, drowsiness, feeling nervous;

blurred vision, headache;

sleep problems (insomnia);

nausea, vomiting, bloating, heartburn, or constipation;

changes in taste;

problems with urination;

decreased sweating;

dry mouth; or

impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Cystospaz (hyoscyamine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

amantadine (Symmetrel);

haloperidol (Haldol);

an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro), promethazine (Pentazine, Phenergan, Anergan, Antinaus), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine); or

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip), doxepin (Sinequan), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with hyoscyamine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Cystospaz resources Cystospaz Side Effects (in more detail)Cystospaz Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingDrug ImagesCystospaz Drug InteractionsCystospaz Support Group0 Reviews for Cystospaz - Add your own review/rating Hyoscyamine Monograph (AHFS DI) Hyoscyamine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Anaspaz MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) HyoMax Prescribing Information (FDA) Hyosyne Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Hyosyne Prescribing Information (FDA) IB-Stat Spray MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levbid Extended-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levsin Prescribing Information (FDA) NuLev Orally Disintegrating Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Symax Duotab Controlled-Release Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Cystospaz with other medications AnesthesiaCrohn's DiseaseEndoscopy or Radiology PremedicationIrritable Bowel SyndromeUrinary Incontinence Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about hyoscyamine.

See also: Cystospaz side effects (in more detail)


Amphetamine/Dextroamphetamine
Pronunciation: am-FET-a-meen/DEX-troe-am-FET-a-meenGeneric Name: Amphetamine/DextroamphetamineBrand Name: Adderall


Caldolor

Generic Name: ibuprofen (Intravenous route)

eye-bue-PROE-fen

Intravenous route(Solution)

NSAIDs increase the risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may be increased in patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Ibuprofen is contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. NSAIDs can also cause an increased risk of serious gastrointestinal adverse events especially in the elderly, including bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal .

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Caldolor Neoprofen

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution

Therapeutic Class: Analgesic

Pharmacologic Class: NSAID

Chemical Class: Propionic Acid (class)

Uses For Caldolor

Ibuprofen injection is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used alone or together with other medicines (e.g., opioid analgesics) to relieve mild to severe pain. It is also used to treat fever in adults.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Caldolor

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of ibuprofen injection in children and teenagers below 17 years of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of ibuprofen injection in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney, liver, heart, or stomach problems, which may require an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving ibuprofen injection.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation 1st Trimester C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. 2nd Trimester C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. 3rd Trimester D Studies in pregnant women have demonstrated a risk to the fetus. However, the benefits of therapy in a life threatening situation or a serious disease, may outweigh the potential risk. Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Ketorolac Pentoxifylline

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Abciximab Ardeparin Argatroban Beta Glucan Bivalirudin Certoparin Cilostazol Citalopram Clopidogrel Clovoxamine Dabigatran Etexilate Dalteparin Danaparoid Desirudin Dipyridamole Enoxaparin Escitalopram Femoxetine Flesinoxan Fluoxetine Fluvoxamine Fondaparinux Ginkgo Heparin Lepirudin Methotrexate Nadroparin Nefazodone Parnaparin Paroxetine Pemetrexed Protein C Reviparin Rivaroxaban Sertraline Sibutramine Tacrolimus Ticlopidine Tinzaparin Tirofiban Vilazodone Zimeldine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Acebutolol Acetohexamide Alacepril Alprenolol Amikacin Amiloride Arotinolol Aspirin Atenolol Azilsartan Medoxomil Azosemide Befunolol Bemetizide Benazepril Bendroflumethiazide Benzthiazide Betaxolol Bevantolol Bisoprolol Bopindolol Bucindolol Bumetanide Bupranolol Buthiazide Candesartan Cilexetil Canrenoate Captopril Carteolol Carvedilol Celiprolol Chlorothiazide Chlorpropamide Chlorthalidone Cilazapril Clopamide Cyclopenthiazide Cyclosporine Delapril Desipramine Desvenlafaxine Dilevalol Duloxetine Enalaprilat Enalapril Maleate Eprosartan Esmolol Ethacrynic Acid Fosinopril Furosemide Gliclazide Glimepiride Glipizide Gliquidone Glyburide Hydrochlorothiazide Hydroflumethiazide Imidapril Indapamide Irbesartan Labetalol Landiolol Levobetaxolol Levobunolol Lisinopril Lithium Losartan Mepindolol Methyclothiazide Metipranolol Metolazone Metoprolol Milnacipran Moexipril Nadolol Nebivolol Nipradilol Olmesartan Medoxomil Oxprenolol Penbutolol Pentopril Perindopril Phenytoin Pindolol Piretanide Polythiazide Propranolol Quinapril Ramipril Sotalol Spirapril Spironolactone Tacrine Talinolol Tasosartan Telmisartan Temocapril Tertatolol Timolol Tolazamide Tolbutamide Torsemide Trandolapril Triamterene Trichlormethiazide Valsartan Venlafaxine Voriconazole Xipamide Zofenopril Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Anemia or Bleeding problems or Congestive heart failure or Edema (fluid retention) or Heart attack, history of or Hypertension (high blood pressure) or Kidney disease or Liver disease or Stomach ulcers or bleeding, history of or Stroke, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Aspirin-sensitive asthma or Aspirin sensitivity, history of—Should not use in patients with these conditions. Heart surgery (e.g., coronary artery bypass graft [CABG])—Should not use for pain right before or after surgery in patients with this condition. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)—May cause side effects to become worse. Proper Use of ibuprofen

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain ibuprofen. It may not be specific to Caldolor. Please read with care.

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine in a hospital. This medicine is given through a needle placed in one of your veins.

Drink extra fluids so you will pass more urine while you are using this medicine. This will keep your kidneys working well and help prevent kidney problems.

Precautions While Using Caldolor

It is very important that your doctor check your progress while you receive this medicine. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to use it. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

This medicine may increase your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. This is more likely to occur in people who already have heart disease. People who use this medicine for a long time might also have a higher risk.

This medicine may cause bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This problem can happen without warning signs. This is more likely to occur if you have had a stomach ulcer in the past, if you smoke or drink alcohol regularly, are over 60 years of age, are in poor health, or are using certain other medicines (such as steroids or a blood thinner).

Liver problems may occur while you are using this medicine. Stop using this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you are having more than one of these symptoms: abdominal pain or tenderness; clay-colored stools; dark urine; decreased appetite; fever; headache; itching; loss of appetite; nausea and vomiting; skin rash; swelling of the feet or lower legs; unusual tiredness or weakness; or yellow eyes or skin.

This medicine may cause a serious type of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Call your doctor right away if you have a rash; itching; hoarseness; trouble breathing; trouble swallowing; or any swelling of your hands, face, or mouth after you get the injection.

Serious skin reactions can occur with this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you have blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin; red skin lesions; a severe skin rash or acne; sores or ulcers on the skin; or fever or chills while you are using this medicine.

Using this medicine while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. If you think you have become pregnant while using the medicine, tell your doctor right away.

Check with your doctor immediately if blurred vision, difficulty in reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after you receive this medicine. Your doctor may want you to have your eyes checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor).

Call your doctor right away if you have confusion, drowsiness, fever, a general feeling of illness, a headache, loss of appetite, nausea, stiff neck or back, or vomiting. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called meningitis.

Tell your doctor if you have unexplained weight gain or edema (fluid retention or body swelling) with this medicine.

Caldolor Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Abdominal or stomach pain black, tarry stools bleeding gums blurred vision chest pain confusion convulsions cough coughing up blood decreased urine diarrhea difficulty in breathing or swallowing dizziness dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly dry mouth fast heartbeat fat in the stool fever or chills headache increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding increased thirst irregular heartbeat irritability loss of appetite lower back or side pain mood changes muscle pain or cramps muscle twitching nausea or vomiting nervousness nosebleeds numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips pain, warmth, or burning in the fingers, toes, and legs painful or difficult urination pale skin paralysis pounding in the ears problems with vision or hearing prolonged bleeding from cuts rapid breathing red or black, tarry stools red or dark brown urine restlessness seizures shortness of breath slow or fast heartbeat sneezing sore throat sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth sweating swelling of the feet or lower legs swollen glands tightness in the chest troubled breathing with exertion unusual bleeding or bruising unusual tiredness or weakness weakness wheezing Less common Bloating or swelling of the face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet decrease in frequency of urination decrease in urine volume difficulty in passing urine (dribbling) rapid weight gain unusual weight gain or loss

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling passing gas Less common Abdominal or stomach discomfort acid or sour stomach belching heartburn indigestion stomach discomfort, upset, or pain

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Caldolor side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Caldolor resources Caldolor Side Effects (in more detail)Caldolor Use in Pregnancy & BreastfeedingCaldolor Drug InteractionsCaldolor Support Group0 Reviews for Caldolor - Add your own review/rating Caldolor Prescribing Information (FDA) Caldolor Injection MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Caldolor Consumer Overview Ibuprofen Monograph (AHFS DI) Ibuprofen Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Ibuprofen Prescribing Information (FDA) Advil Consumer Overview Advil MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Advil Prescribing Information (FDA) Advil Childrens Prescribing Information (FDA) Advil Migraine Prescribing Information (FDA) IBU MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ibutilide Fumarate Monograph (AHFS DI) Motrin Consumer Overview Motrin Prescribing Information (FDA) Motrin IB Prescribing Information (FDA) Motrin Junior Strength Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) NeoProfen Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Caldolor with other medications FeverPainSpondylolisthesis


Nimodipine
Pronunciation: nye-MOE-di-peenGeneric Name: NimodipineBrand Name: Generic only. No brands available.



1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 ... 248 Next →


Search


 

Best ED Pills

 

Erectile Dysfunction

 

RX Pharmacy Drugs List - Buy Pills Online

RSS | Site Map | Map | PageMap

Copyright © Online Pharmacy Drug Store. All rights reserved.